Cork history

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons: A Great War casualty

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons:

A Great War casualty

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Among the dead of the Great War, otherwise known as World War One, was Brevet Colonel Henry Hendley Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. He died in a Dublin hospital on 10th November 1919 and even though his death was after the end of the Great War he is included among the dead of that War. He was buried at Kill St. Anne cemetery beside his home at Castlelyons and his name is inscribed on a memorial within the Church of Ireland church in Fermoy. This article sets out some information on the life and times of this soldier of the Royal Artillery.

Henry Bond

Henry Hendley Bond was the son of Major General Henry Bond and Mary Earbery Hendley Bond. Henry Bond senior was born in County Longford in about 1837. Shortly after leaving school he joined the Royal Artillery to see the world and find employment. On 7th April 1856 Henry Bond was made a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.[1] Thereafter he made a steady rise up the ranks. On 1st August 1866 he was made a Captain.[2] It was at this stage of his life that Captain Henry Bond met Mary Earbery Hendley of Mountrivers near Fermoy, Co. Cork. In 1868 they got married.

Mary Earbery Hendley and family

Mary Earbery Hendley was the daughter of Matthias Christopher Hendley of Mountrivers by his wife, Clementina (d 29th July 1867). Matthias and Clementina had one son, Matthias Christopher Hendley (d 22nd March 1885) and six daughters. One of these daughters, Mary Earbery Hendley (d 24th April 1931) it was who married Henry Bond.[3]

Matthias Christopher Hendley was the son of Matthias Hendley (1771-1847) of Mountrivers near Fermoy who was agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby. Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, had purchased the Fermoy estate in 1835 for £70,000. It was said that Abercromby was owed £10,000 from the Anderson family, the previous owners of Fermoy.[4] Matthias Hendley left at least two sons; Matthias Christopher Hendley (1813-1901) and John Leslie Hendley. John Leslie Hendley married, 15th August 1847, Marianne Ryder, daughter of Archdeacon William Ryder and left at least one son, John Leslie Hendley who went to live in New Zealand. John Leslie Hendley, senior, was killed while hunting in India.[5]

Henry Bond in the Royal Artillery

After his marriage Captain Henry Bond continued his career in the Roya Artillery. On 16th January 1875 he was promoted to Major. On 16th January 1882 Henry Bond was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and on 16th January 1886 was made a full Colonel in the Royal Artillery. On 1st November 1887 he was promoted to the rank of Major General.[6]

The Bond family in 1893

After many postings in India (1872), Ireland (1873), the East Indies and England (1880-85) Major General Henry Bond returned to Ireland to settle down. In 1893 Major General Henry Bond was living at the Manor, Castlelyons with his family.[7]

The Bond family in 1901

In 1901 Henry Bond (aged 64, born Co. Longford) lived at the Manor, Kill St Ann, near Castlelyons. By 1901 Henry Bond was a retired from the Royal Artillery. With him at the Manor was his wife, Mary Earbery Bond (aged 53, born Co. Cork) and their three daughters. The daughters were Edith Frances Bond (aged 29, born in India), Mary Kathleen Bond (aged 25, born in England) and Charlotte Emily Bond (aged 21, born in England), all single. The family was attended by two servants, Bridget Casey (aged 29, born Co. Cork, cook) and Mary Sullivan (aged 23, born Co. Cork, housemaid).[8]

In 1901 the Manor was classified as a first class house with 19 rooms, 7 windows at the front of the house and 7 outbuildings in the grounds.[9] These outbuildings consisted of two stables, one coach house, one harness room, two fowl houses and one shed.[10]

Also in the grounds of the Manor was situated another house held by Henry Bond. This house was lived in by Patrick Allen.[11] Patrick Allen (aged 25, born Co. Tipperary) worked as a coachman for the Bond family while his wife, Kate Allen (aged 24, born Co. Cork) worked as a house keeper. They had two sons, William aged two and John aged one.[12]

 

Phone photos February 2017 102

Entrance to the Manor, Castlelyons

The Bond family in 1911

Major General Henry Bond died sometime between 1901 and 1911. His widow, Mary Earbury Bond was head of the household at the Manor in the 1911 census. With her on the census night were her three daughters, all single, and her son, Henry Hendly Bond along with two servants; Annie Frances Stuart (aged 23, born Co. Cork, parlour maid, Church of Ireland), and Margaret Mahony (aged 19, born Co. Cork, cook, Roman Catholic).[13]

In 1911 the Manor had 16 rooms and 6 outbuildings while Patrick Allen and family still lived in the second house.[14] Henry Hendley Bond was aged 37 in 1911 and was born in Co. Longford. In 1911 he was a Major in the Royal Field Artillery and was on the active service list.[15]

Henry Hendley Bond

Henry Hendley Bond He was born at Ballymahon, Co. Longford on 13th June 1873 although some sources say it was at Ahmedabad in Gujarat in India. In the 1911 census Henry Hendley Bond said he was born in Co. Longford.[16]

Like any army family, the Bond family moved around a lot. They lived initially in Moigh, Ballymahon, before moving to the East Indies and later England (Solihull), before settling at the Manor, near Castlelyons, Co. Cork.[17]

Henry Hendley Bond attended Wellington College and as a teenager joined the Royal Horse Artillery and Field Artillery at Woolwich.[18] On 22nd July 1892 Henry Hendley Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. On 22nd July 1895 he was promoted to lieutenant and 6th April 1900 was made a Captain.[19]

In 1898-1900 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was posted to India. While there he became a noted cricket player. Between August 1898 and September 1900 he played five matches for the Europeans against the Indians.[20]

By 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 136 Battery at Woolwich under the command of Major Elton.[21] In that same year of 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond served in the closing stages of the South African War.[22]

By 1908 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 15th Battery at Dundalk.[23] At that time he was attached to the Sierra Leone Battalion.[24] In 1911 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was at home at Castlelyons for the census of that year.

After World War One started Captain Henry Hendley Bond saw action in a number of places including at Salonika.[25] On 4th June 1917 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).[26]

So after this occasion the health of Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond began to deteriorate. For the next eighteen months he suffered from degenerative neurological disease. On 10th November 1919 Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond died aged 46 years with the rank of Brevet Colonel and temporary title of Brigadier General.[27] He died at Hampstead, Glasnevin in north Dublin.[28] Henry Hendley Bond was buried in the graveyard at Kill-St-Ann, Castlelyons, near his old home.

The Bond family after 1919

After the death of Henry Hendley Bond in 1919 his family continued to live at the Manor near Castlelyons. In April 1931 his mother, Mary Earbery Hendley Bond, died. On 10th September 1945 Charlotte Emily (died 16th April 1960), daughter of Major General Henry Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons married Venerable Samuel Hobart Dorman, Rector of Knockmourne Union and Archdeacon of Cloyne, sixth son of Rev. Thomas Dorman of Richmond House, Cork.[29]

Other members of the Bond family of Castlelyons included Edward Leslie Bond and Charles Earbery Bond, both of whom joined the army.

Edward Leslie Bond

Edward Leslie Bond joined the Royal Garrison Artillery to keep the gunning tradition in the family. On 4th March 1899 Edward Leslie Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and on 16th February 1901 was promoted to lieutenant. In 1902 he was serving with the Native Mountain Artillery in India.[30] On 1st February 1906 Edward Leslie Bond was made a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery.[31] In 1908 Captain Edward Leslie Bond was with the 21st Kohat Mountain Battery in India.[32]

On 26th April 1969 Major Leslie Crawford Bond of Pewsey, Wiltshire, son of Colonel Edward Leslie Bond of Castlelyons, married Penelope Margaret Alexander, daughter of Edward Currie Alexander by his wife Isabella, daughter of Major George Stoney. They had one daughter, Kristin, born in 1971.[33]

Charles Earbery Bond

Meanwhile Charles Earbery Bond left the family tradition of the artillery and instead joined the Royal Sussex Regiment. Charles Bond was born on 14th October 1877 and attended school at Wellington College.[34]

On 4th May 1898 Charles Earbery Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment and on 2nd April 1899 was promoted to lieutenant.[35] Lieutenant Charles Bond served in the South African war in 1899- 1900 with the 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria, including the engagements at Welkom Farm, Zand River, and Doorukop, the occupation of Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the engagement at Diamond Hill. He was also present in the subsequent advance into the Orange River Colony, including the operations round Bethlehem and in the Caledon Valley, the engagement at Relief’s Nek, and the surrender of the Boer forces on 1st August 1900 at Golden Gate. Lieutenant Bond was also involved in operations round Thabanchu, Winburg, and Lindley.[36]

In October 1902 Lieutenant Charles Bond was awarded the Distinguish Service Order (DSO) medal for his services in the South African War.[37] On 2nd February 1907 Charles Earbery Bond was made a Captain in the Royal Sussex Regiment.[38]

 

Charles Earbery Bond

Charles Bond and others at cricket in India, c.1910

Captain Charles Bond served in the Great War (1914-18). In September 1915 he was promoted to Major and from 24th November 1915 to 31st May 1917 was Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, first with the Worcestershire Regt., and from Dec. 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. In 1916 he was awarded the honour of C.M.G.

From June 1917 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the 51st Infantry Brigade in France until 30th May, 1918. From July 1918 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. In the War Charles Bond was five times mentioned in Despatches and acquired the Mons Medal.[39]

 

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[1] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1862), p. 171; Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1871), p. 169

[2] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1902), p. 600

[3] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 81; memorial brass plates in Church of Ireland, Fermoy; http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2890 accessed on 5th August 2017

[4] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 52

[5] Edward Garner, Massacre at Rathcormac (n.d.), p. 62

[6] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 600

[7] Francis Guy, Directory of the Province of Munster, 1893, Cork, p. 81

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572885/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572877/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572884/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927069/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[16] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462 ; http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[17] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[18] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[19] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[20] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 516

[21] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[22] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 203c

[23] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 189a

[24] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 171

[25] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[26] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[27] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31560/supplement/11749/data.pdf accessed on 5th August 2017

[28] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 376, 377

[30] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 184

[31] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 183

[32] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 503

[33] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 11

[34] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[35] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 288

[36] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 289a

[37] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[38] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), pp. 288, 289a

[39] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

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