Biography, Cork history

Roger Brettridge of Duhallow and his descendants

Roger Brettridge of Duhallow and his descendants

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Roger Brettridge came from the West Country in England and at first settled on the Brook estate in Co. Donegal in the early 1650s. Towards the end of the 1650s he became involved with the Munster army and in the 1660s received lands in the Barony of Duhallow in North West County Cork. These lands were centred on the manor of Castle Magner which Roger renamed as Castle Brettridge. Roger’s brother Samuel Brettridge received a smaller estate in Duhallow which he gave to Roger. In his will of 1683 Roger Brettridge left the townland of East Drumcummer (now called Drumcummer More), to found an alms house for ex-soldiers in the Shandon area of Cork City. In the parish re[1]gister of Whaddon, Gloucester, it is recorded that Roger Brettridge, gent, was buried there on 4th October 1683 having died at Tuffley.[2]

Roger Brettridge was the son of Francis Brettridge. Roger Brettridge married Joan Brettridge (maiden name Hawnby) and sister of William Hawnby of Rasheen. John Hall, rector of Ardstragh, Co. Tyrone was a nephew of William Hawnby. The said William Hawnby had two daughters, Mary (mother of Robert Longfield) and Elizabeth (mother of Bartholomew Purdon).[3] Roger and Joan had three daughters; Mary (wife of Francis Hartstonge), Elizabeth (wife of Robert Deane) and Jane (wife of Thomas Badham). In 1683 Roger’s estate consisted of Castle Brettridge, Cappabrack, Cappagh, Killebraher, Knocknesheling, Knockneineater, East Drumcummer, Rathmahiry, Rossendry, Knockballymartin, Ardagh, Ballyheene, Killballyheen, Clashbale, Kilrush (also called Kilbrash), West Drumcummer and Horse Island, plus a house in Millstreet town.

Roger Brettridge gave some property to his nephew Roger Brettridge, namely West Drumcummer and Horse Island which he had previously received from Samuel Brettridge. Roger Brettridge, the nephew, had a son also called Roger Brettridge the third.[4] In 1758 Roger Brettridge the third married Abigall Sandys.[5] But the couple had no children and his property reverted to Elizabeth Badham Deane.

The castle of Castlemagner = photographer unknown

Mary Brettridge Hartstonge

Mary Brettridge, the eldest daughter, received the lands of Castle Brettridge, with its manorial rights, along with Cappabrack. But these lands were first entrusted to Joan Brettridge for life. A third townland, Cappagh, was granted to Mary’s son, Arthur Hartstonge.[6] Mary married Francis Hartstonge and was the mother of Arthur and Standish. Arthur Hartstonge had no children and Cappagh passed to Price Hartstonge, son of Standish. Price Hartstonge had a son called Henry Hartstonge. In 1751, Henry Hartstonge married Lucy, daughter of Rev Stackpole Pery. She was a sister of Edmond Sexton Pery, speaker of the Irish House of Commons. The couple had no children and much of the Hartstonge estate including Castle Magner and Cappagh passed to the speaker’s son, Edmond Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick. The 1st Earl had married in January 1793 Mary Alice, only daughter and heir of Henry Ormsby by Mary, sister and heir of Sir Henry Hartstone.[7] His grandson, William Henry, 2nd Earl was the owner at Griffith’s Valuation (circa 1850) by which time Cappagh had become Kippagh and was divided into three parts. The 2nd Earl of Limerick died in 1866 and the property was sold to Sir Henry Wrixon-Beecher of Ballygiblin. The present (2021) holder of the title as 7th Earl of Limerick is Edmund Christopher Pery.

Jane Brettridge Badham

Jane Brettridge, the second daughter received as her inheritance the lands of Ballyheene, Killballyheen, Clashbale and Kilbrash. In addition Jane Brettridge also got the lands of Killebraher, Knocknesheling, Knockneineater and Rathmahiry with its mill which property had been grant to her mother Joan for life.[8] Joan married Thomas Badham and had two sons, one of whom was called Brettridge Badham, M.P. for Rathcormac. In 1744 Brettridge Badham was living at Rockfield, Co. Cork at the time of his death.[9] Rockfield was formerly known as Ballyheene and came from the Roger Brettridge inheritance. Brettridge Badham married Sophia, daughter of John King, 3rd Lord Kingston, and had two sons who died young and two daughters Sophia, born in 1720 and, Martha. Sophia Badham inherited Rockfield and her Brettridge lands which she passed to the family of her first husband.

Sophia Badham married Richard Thornhill (1707-1747), M.P., son of Edward Thornhill by Ann, daughter of Rev. Francis Quayle of Brigown, and grandson of William Thornhill (husband of Elizabeth Newenham), and great grandson of William Thornhill from Derbyshire who acquired Castle Kevin and other Irish property as reward for his service in the Parliamentary army of the 1640s civil war. Richard Thornhill took his wife’s surname for his children and the family became known as Badham-Thornhill. Sophia Badham-Thornhill had a number of children including Anne (died unmarried 1790), Sophia (wife of Major-General John Stratton), Major James Badham-Thornhill who died in 1796. Major James married Elizabeth and was the father of Anne (second wife of Richard Tonson-Rye of Rye Court) and Sophia (wife of Samuel Godsell, possible relation of Amos Godsell of Moorestown, Co. Limerick, whose will was, dated 1714).[10] Richard Tonson-Rye and Anne Badham-Thornhill were the parents of John Tonson-Rye (born 1797) who in 1818 married his cousin Mary Godsell, daughter of Samuel Godsell. John Tonson-Rye left one son and five daughters with many descendants as documented in Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), page 1004.

The eldest son of Sophia Badham and Richard Thornhill was Edward Badham-Thornhill (1730-1798) who married Mary Marsh, daughter of Henry Marsh of Moyally, King’s County (Offaly), by his wife Barbarra, daughter of Jonathan Gerard of Dublin and Mary Mason. Edward Badham-Thornhill had three sons (Henry, Gerrard and Richard) and seven daughters (Mary, Charolette, Harriot, Barbarra, Alicia, Louisa and Juliet). Henry Badham-Thornhill (1771-1821) married Catherine Odell as her first husband (she later married Francis Roche and had a son), daughter of Thomas Odell and Sarah Westropp. Henry Badham-Thornhill had three daughters; Sarah, wife of William Beamish Ware; Mary who in 1820 married Rev. Benjamin Burton Johnson and they had three children with many descendants in Australia and Canada; and Catherine who married William Maitland. Henry Badham-Thornhill had five sons (Edward, John Thomas, John, James and Henry R.I.C. officer). The eldest son, Edward Badham-Thornhill (1808-1889) sold Castle Kevin in 1851 to Dorothea Reeves because of debts accrued during the Great Famine. Edward Badham-Thornhill married Elizabeth, daughter of Lawrence O’Donovan of Dublin and had two sons, Henry and Lawrence.[11]

Sophia Badham married secondly, on 2nd September 1752, to John Cuffe, 2nd Lord Desart. John Cuufe was the third but first surviving son of John Cuffe, 1st Baron of Desart by his second wife Dorothea Gorges, daughter of Lt. Gen. Richard Gorges of Kilbrew, Co. Meath. John Cuffe died on 25th November 1767 without any children when the barony passed to his brother Otway Cuffe, 3rd Lord Desart, who left issue. Sophia Badham died on 2nd August 1768 at Merrion Street in Dublin.[12]  

Martha Badham, second daughter of Brettridge Badham and Sophia King, married Rev. Thomas Ryder, rector of Brigown and great grandson of John Ryder, bishop of Killaloe. Some records say that Martha was the sister of Brettridge Badham.[13] I think she was the daughter of Brettridge. Thomas and Martha Ryder were the parents of four sons (Henry, Badham, St. George, and John) and one daughter Jane (wife of Rev. James Graves and grandparents of Rev. Richard Hastings Graves, rector of Brigown). Badham and John Ryder appear to have left no descendants. Henry Ryder was the father of Abraham St. George Ryder who married (1777) Frances, daughter of William Harrington. Abraham had a number of children including Captain William Ryder of Riverstown House, Co. Kildare (husband of Anne Dickson) who was the father of William Ryder, genealogist. Local folklore said the Ryder family tried to block up the nearby St. Brigid’s Holy Well but the well fought back and won. In the 20th century Riverstown House had a number of owners, and after empty for a number of years, it was sold again in 2016.

The other sons of Abraham Ryder were Harrington Ryder (husband of Elizabeth Gore, daughter of Arthur Gore) and St. George Ryder (husband of Annabella Pennicuick). Abraham Ryder was the father of Emma, wife of James Cassidy of Bray. Harrington Ryder of the Abbey, Co. Tipperary, was the father of Rev. Arthur Gore Ryder who was the headmaster of Carrickmacross School and later rector of Donnybrook, Co. Dublin. Rev. Arthur married twice (1st to Anne Gore (d.1863), daughter of William Gore of Tramore, and 2nd to Nina MacMahon, daughter of Sir Beresford MacMahon). His eldest son, Harrington Dudley Ryder died in 1858 and his second son, St. George Ryder died in 1859 and Arthur Gore Ryder of Riverstown House (husband of Caroline Grogan) died 1906 by his first marriage. The second marriage produced Nina Beryll Ryder, Ralph Ryder and Beresford Burton MacMahon Ryder (husband of Eleanor Curle).[14]  

Meanwhile St. George Ryder of Mitchelstown, Co. Cork, married Margaret, daughter of William Murphy of Mitchelstown, and was the father of Martha Ryder (d.1846 and wife of Charles Venters), St. George Ryder, barrister (husband of Abigail Rothwell) and John Ryder (d.1819 and chancellor of Cloyne). John Ryder married Margaret, daughter of Rev. Joshua Brown (husband of Margaret, daughter of Llewellyn Nash), and was the father of three sons (St. George, Rev. Joshua and Rev. William) and two daughters (Dorothy and Margaret). St. George Ryder left no issue while Rev. Joshua Ryder married his cousin Lucinda Wood, daughter of Michael Wood, merchant of Cork, by his wife Margaret, daughter of Rev. William Nash, son of Llewellyn Nash. Rev. Joshua Ryder, rector of Castlelyons, was the father of Michael wood Ryder (d.1847) and Lucinda Ryder (d.1875). Rev. William Ryder, archdeacon of Cloyne, married Ann, daughter of Rev. John Ross. Rev. William Ryder (d.1862) was the father of John Ross Ryder and William Ryder (1856). Rev. William Ryder was the father of a number of daughters including Margaret (wife of George Browne), Marianne (wife of John Hendley and later James Murray, leaving descendants presently living by Hendley), Eleanor (wife of Walter Fitzsimon), Isabella and Annie (wife of Walter Browne).

Elizabeth Brettridge Deane

Elizabeth Brettridge, the third daughter, received the lands of Rossanarny (owned by Pierce Purcell of Altamira by the 1840’s), Ardagh and Knockballymartin. After the death of her mother, Elizabeth also got a house in Millstreet.[15] Elizabeth married c.1679 to Robert Deane (d.1714) of Springfield Castle, Co. Limerick, 2nd Baronet, and son of Sir Matthew Deane created 1st Baronet in 1709 and died in 1710.[16] They were the parents of Sir Matthew Deane (c.1680-1747), 3rd Baronet and M.P. for Charleville and later for Co. Cork in the Irish parliament. Sir Mathew Deane married Jane Sharpe, only daughter of Rev. William Sharpe, and was the father of three sons and three daughters. In 1781 Sir Robert Deane, the 6th Baronet, was raised in the peerage to Baron Muskerry. The present (2021) 9th Baron Muskerry lives in South Africa. The Deane family did continue the Brettridge blood line but little of the estate as in 1883 the family held only 28 acres in Co. Cork.[17]

Conclusion

In 1683 Roger Brettridge, army officer and grantee of forfeited estates in north-west County Cork, died in Gloucestershire without any male heirs to continue his name. Yet his three daughters, Mary, Jane and Elizabeth, have continued his blood line over the next 250 years to the present-day.     

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[1] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 650

[2] Extracted from web site – www.glosgen.co.uk/whadreg.htm, in November 2005

[3] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 650

[4] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 14

[5] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 5, p. 112

[6] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[7] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. VII, p. 663

[8] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[9] P. Beryl Eustace, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 97

[10] P. Beryl Eustace, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 186

[11] Jane Hills, ‘’, in the Mallow Field Club Journal, No. 20 (2002), pp. 144-153

[12] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. IV, p. 228

[13] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 641

[14] Alison-Stewart blogspot entitled DubStewartMania with the article title of ‘Rev. John Grogan and Lizzie Bourne, Balrothery and Clyde Road’, posted on 16th August 2013

[15] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[16] Debrett’s Illustrated Peerage, 1901, p. 590

[17] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. IX, p. 443

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