Cork history

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

For much of the eighteenth century the Forward family owned the site of the modern town of Fermoy, Co. Cork and the surrounding countryside. But in the history of Fermoy the family are passed over with only a few brief references as historians concentrate on the history of Fermoy after it was totally rebuilt by John Anderson. This article aims to add some more facts and flesh to the Forward family.

Christopher Forward senior

The earliest member of the family was Christopher Forward senior who was a merchant in Cork city around 1700. Many years before that, in 1682, Christopher Forward was assigned seat number 47 along with John Potts.[1] On 24th July 1705 Christopher Forward acquired an interest in the Fermoy estate, its lands and mills by indenture. These lands were got in trust for William Cockerell, merchant of Cork, for 1,000 years.[2] In 1690 William Cockerell had married Barbara Forward, sister of Christopher Forward.[3] Yet other sources say it was Henry Luther who purchased Fermoy on behalf of William Cockerill.[4]

The Fermoy estate was previously owned the Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, as part of his great estate across Counties Cork and Waterford. Fermoy was given to one of his sons, Robert Boyle, the famous scientist. When Robert Boyle died in 1698 the Fermoy estate was taken over by trustees on behalf of the 3rd Earl of Cork and sold in 1705 to William Cockerell.[5] But as we saw previously Christopher Forward was as much involved in the Fermoy estate as his brother-in-law, William Cockerell. Perhaps Christopher Forward provided some of the purchase money.

 

fermoy_king_street_vcbq

King Street (MacCurtain Street), Fermoy

The Cockerell family were prominent in Cork city politics at the turn of the eighteenth century. In 1700 Francis Cockerell was sheriff of Cork city and in 1705 he was mayor. In the same year of 1705 William Cockerell was city sheriff. In 1717 Charles Cockerell was the city sheriff.[6] In 1704 William Cockerill was one of the vestrymen of the church of St. Maria at Shandon.[7] Christopher Forward was also involved in the same church. In April 1711 Christopher Forward was church warden of the parish church of St. Maria of Shandon with Francis Gray. In that year £20 was laid out on the fabric of the church.[8] Elsewhere about the year 1709 Christopher Forward was a witness to a number of property deeds in and around Cork city with Samuel Hodder.[9]

Sadly William Cockerell didn’t enjoy his new estate at Fermoy for long as he died in 1707 and Fermoy was inherited by his wife.[10] His widow, Barbara Cockerill, later remarried to Thomas Hodder.[11]

Christopher Forward junior

It is not clear if the Christopher Forward who was brother-in-law of William Cockerill was known as Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior. Just five years after the purchase of Fermoy a merchant named Christopher Forward junior was very much part of the business world of the early eighteenth century.

By 1710 Joshua Savery, merchant of Mallow, was indebted to Christopher Forward junior, merchant of Cork, to the amount of £375. To help pay the debt on 13th July 1710 Joshua Savery gave Christopher Forward three leases he had on lands around Mallow (Killetra) and other property in the Baronies of Duhallow (Gortnagross) and Fermoy. Christopher Forward was allowed to hold these lands until redeemed by Joshua Savery.[12]

On 31st March 1727 Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Richard Lloyd (rector of Rathcormac 1742 to his death April 1775). They had four sons and two daughters of which the eldest was Richard Lloyd of Tullygreen House who married Jane, daughter of Thomas Austen and left issue. Christopher the second son married Elizabeth Bateman and left issue. William the third son died in 1736 aged two while the fourth son, Samuel married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Austen. The two daughters of Elizabeth Forward were; Elizabeth (died 1734 aged one year) and Barbara who married Lt. Stephen Sandys, Royal Navy. Elizabeth Forward died on 26th November 1778.[13]

In 1728 Barbara Forward married Richard Gaggin.[14] It is not known if she was a daughter of Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior.

In 1708 Christopher Forward married Elizabeth Austen.[15] Christopher Forward died sometime between 1727 and 1758. In early January 1758, Elizabeth Forward, the widow of Christopher Forward, died at Fermoy.[16] This was possibly Christopher Forward junior

William Forward

By her will, dated 20th February 1724 Barbara Cockerill gave the Fermoy estate to her nephew William Forward.[17]

At some date William Forward married Margaret Hely, daughter of Francis Hely of Gortroe, Co. Cork and his wife, Prudence Earbery (married 1719), daughter of Matthias Earbery of Ballincollig (son of Nicholas Earbery) and his wife Margaret Vowell.[18] It appears that the early members of the Earbery family in Ireland were Quakers. In July 1687 Elizabeth Earbery, a widow of Cork city, wished to be buried in the Quaker burial ground.[19] The Earbery family married into the Hendley family of Araglin and later of Mount Rivers, near Fermoy. In February 1760 Mrs. Hendley, widow of Roger Hendley, and sister of Christopher Earbery of Shandangan, died at Araglin near Kilworth.[20] William Forward’s sister Frances would later married James Hendley of Fermoy. Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers in the 1840s no doubt took his first name from his ancestor, Matthias Earbery.

Francis Hely had two other daughters, Prudence who married Thomas Spraight and another daughter who married Mr. Duquery, along with a son, John Hely. In 1751 John Hely married Christiana, daughter of Lorenzo Nixon of Co. Wicklow and niece and heir of Richard Hutchinson of Knocklofty, Co. Tipperary and took the name of John Hely Hutchinson. In 1783 Christiana was made Baroness Donoughmore (Matthias Earbery held land at Donoughmore in the barony of Muskerry, Co. Cork in early 18th century) and in 1800 her son Richard was made Earl of Donoughmore. In 1761 John Hely Hutchinson was elected M.P. for Cork city which he represented until his death in 1795.[21]

Fermoy in the Eighteenth century has often been described as a poor place of little activity, yet the records show some activity in the area. In 1755 William Crow operated an inn in Fermoy. In 1757 Owen Keeffe of Fermoy advertised that he had 1,000 apple trees for sale.[22]

The election of his brother-in-law in 1761 must have given William Forward bright hopes for the future but within four years a series of deaths would change everything. In the 1764 will of William Forward, he named his wife, Margaret, and eldest daughter, Barbara. Yet this must be the eldest surviving daughter as in May 1761 William Forward’s eldest daughter died at Mallow.[23] This sorrowful death was followed in 1762 by a more significant death. On Tuesday, 21st December 1762 at Fermoy, Francis Forward, the only son of William Forward, died.[24]

In the face of these deaths William Forward prepared for his own death by making his will. On 26th August 1764 William Forward of Fermoy made his will in which he made his wife Margaret and brother-in-law John Hely Hutchinson as his executors. He only made his will just in time as he died in the last week of September 1764 at Fermoy.[25] The will was proved on 5th January 1765. The witnesses to the will were James Hendley, Richard Page and Mathew Hendley.[26]

Also mentioned in William’s will was his niece Elizabeth Hendley and nephews James Hendley and William Hendley. These were the children of Francis Forward, William’s sister and her husband James Hendley of Fermoy.[27] This Hendley family could possibly be connected with that of Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers who between 1836 and 1847 was the agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Birkenbog, Scotland.[28]

It is said that it was John Anderson was the first to build Fermoy house on the north bank of the River Blackwater about 1800. The central block was a two storey five bay house with a three bay wing on each side terminated by a high pitched one bay end. The house was still standing in the 1960s but has since been demolished.[29] Yet with so many members of the Forward family dying at Fermoy it is unlikely that they lived in a mud house or a room in the ‘Carman’s Inn’. Somewhere under the modern town or in the grounds of the present Fermoy house must have been a house built by the Forward family as their residence.

 

fermoy house main section

Fermoy house as built by John Anderson

William Forward left six daughters (Barbara, Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca, Margaret and Christina) who each got an equal share of the Fermoy estate.[30] But it is uncertain if the estate was indeed divide into six parts as the eldest daughter had died in 1761 and so there was only five daughters living by the time William Forward died. The estate should then have only being divided into five parts and not six – clearly there is some work to do to solve that issue. In 1774 the heirs of William Forward were the impropriators of the extra parochial parish of Fermoy. Later in 1774 they sold the right of impropriator to John Nason. The right of impropriator was later acquired by John Anderson.[31]

By 1791 two of the daughters (Christina and Elizabeth – see below) of William Forward had married and acquired their sixth shares.[32] A third daughter, Rebecca, had also got married but seems not to have secure her sixth share or fifth share depending on how many heirs there truly were (see below).

In September 1765 Joshua Poultney died at Fermoy. He was a member of the King’s Bench and one of the oldest freemen of Cork city.[33]

Fermoy at the end of the eighteenth century was described as a small village of poor cabins surrounding the ruins of the medieval abbey. The one substantial building was a two story house described as a ‘carman’s inn’. The village did have three fair days; on 21st June, 20th August and 7th November, which provided some commercial benefits. The biggest asset of the town was thirteen arch stone bridge across the River Blackwater which was built in 1687 at a cost of £7,500.[34]

 

hodges_fermoybridge

Fermoy bridge in olden days 

Purchase of Fermoy by John Anderson

In 1791, John Anderson, a merchant and mail coach operator, purchased four parts of the Fermoy estate for £40,000 along with the associated tithes. By 1791 one unmarried daughter of William Forward was owner of four sixths of Fermoy but was interested in selling and John Anderson purchased the estate from her through the Court of Chancery.[35]

As the Fermoy historian J.R. O’Flanagan wrote ‘Learning Miss Forward was willing to dispose of her property at Fermoy, Anderson resolved to buy it and deal with the government. Not being possessed of sufficient means, he made tempting offers which enabled him to procure a loan of £40,000 from the Douglas family and become the proprietor of Fermoy’.[36]

The purchase of Fermoy has always being assumed to be the four parts held by four of the six daughters of William Forward. Yet other sources say that John Anderson purchased Fermoy for £50,000 in 1797 from William Forward, M.P. and Privy Councillor.[37]

John Anderson was originally from Scotland and founded a merchant business in Cork city. In 1789 John Anderson established Ireland’s first mail coach business with routes across Ireland. John Anderson borrowed the money from Sir William Douglas of Carlingwark, near Anderson’s home place in Scotland. Some this loan was still unpaid in 1830 when Sir William died.[38]

John Anderson had previous knowledge of Fermoy as he had established a coach-building and repair yard there as part of his mail coach business. The medieval Cistercian abbey ruins were still there in 1792 where the attached graveyard was frequented by pigs and other farm animals. Almost immediately after purchasing the estate, John Anderson demolished the abbey ruins and the hamlet around it and within a few years had built a totally new town with fine squares and straight streets.[39]

Mary Forward and Margaret Forward

Mary and Margaret Forward were two of the six daughters of William Forward of Fermoy. It would seem that one of them was possibly the eldest daughter of William Forward that died at Mallow in 1761.[40] The surviving sister or possibly Barbara was the unmarried heiress who by 1797 held fourth sixths of the Fermoy estate which was purchased by John Anderson.

Barbara Forward

Barbara was alive in 1764 when she was mentioned in her father’s will as the eldest daughter.[41] Yet this must be the eldest ‘surviving’ daughter as the eldest daughter was said to have died at Mallow in 1761.[42]

Rebecca Forward

Rebecca Forward was born about 1740. In 1778 (marriage licence 10th August) Rebecca Forward, daughter of William Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Wensley Bond, son of Rev. James Bond of Carbery, Co. Longford.[43] Rev. Wensley Bond was Dean of Ross (1773-1813), Treasurer of Ferns (1776-1820) and Rector of St. John’s, Sligo (1775-1820). They had two sons and four daughters.[44] One of the sons, Rev. James forward Bond married (21st May 1825) his cousin Christiana, daughter of Rev. Lorenzo Hely-Hutchinson.[45] It is not clear why Rebecca Forward did not get any share of the Fermoy estate when her two other married sisters did secure a sixth of the property each.

Elizabeth Forward

Elizabeth Forward married Garret Atty Nagle of Knockanevin. But this was no ordinary marriage as it is said that Garret Nagle abducted Elizabeth Forward and then married her. Elizabeth Forward received a sixth share of the Fermoy estate from her father and this share was centred on Grange West. In 1772 their son Garrett Nagle was born. In 1784 Garret Atty Nagle died. Elizabeth Forward died on the 9th November 1817 aged 75 years (born c.1742).[46]

On 16th March 1786 blackwater 7/1409

Garret Nagle fell into bad company without his father. He began drinking heavily and was involved in robberies. In 1798 Garret Nagle was a co-accused at the trail on Mon Roche. When Garret Nagle married Ellen Croker it was hoped that he would improve but instead Garret Nagle got the name of being a bad husband.

Christina Forward

Christina Forward got Grange East as her sixth part share of the Fermoy estate from her father. In 1788 Christina Forward was living in St. Ann’s Parish, Dublin, when she married William Tynte Austin of Dublin.[47] In 1837 their son, William Forward Austin of Grange Hill was mentioned as one of the principal gentlemen in the Fermoy area.[48] In 1839 William Forward Austin was elected among the first Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union. But his election was a close run affair. Matthias Hendley, agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, wrote to his boss that:

“The priests made very exertion to return a member of their own creed instead of Mr. Austin, who only succeeded by a majority of 221-220; but in the other Districts with the exception of 2, nominees of the priests were returned. We could not have a better Guardian than Mr. Austin; he owns a sixth of what was originally the Fermoy estate; and will I am convinced be an active member of the Board”.[49]

William Forward Austin was often mentioned in the newspapers during the Great Famine (1845-1850). In 1850 William Forward Austin was appointed one of the ex-officio members of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[50]

Conclusion

The grandchildren of William Forward of Fermoy are of a different generation and form a different to the Forward family in eighteenth century Fermoy. This article is no definite history of the family. As noted in many places above the source evidence for various events and people are conflicting. What this article does do is bring the family out of the shadows of the dark eighteenth century and put some fresh and blood behind the names. It is hoped in a future time to sort out the conflicting evidence and maybe add some new details – a task for another day.

 

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[1] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 267

[2] Tenison, C.M., ‘Barrymore archives’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 5 (1896), pp. 178-9

[3] Index of the Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[4] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[5] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 26

[6] Charles Smith, ‘The ancient and present state of the County and City of Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. II (1893), pp. 403, 404

[7] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at p. 268

[8] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 269

[9] Some Cork Lawyers from 1199

[10] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[11] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[12] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 1995

[13] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 412; Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 872

[14] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[15] Index to Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[16] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2606, quoting the Cork Evening Post of 19th January 1758

[17] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[18] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969; Mosley, C. (ed.), Burke’s Peerage, Baronage and Knightage (3 vols. Wilmington, 2003), Vol. 1, p. 1162; https://www.myheritage.com/names/prudence_earbery accessed on 16th August 2017

[19] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 744

[20] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2526

[21] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969

[22] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, pp. 2593, 2604

[23] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[24] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2546

[25] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559, quoting Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 6th October 1764

[26] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[27] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[28] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 67

[29] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 14, 21, 33

[30] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[31] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 834

[32] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[33] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2563

[34] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 8, 10

[35] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[36] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[37] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[38] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), pp. 44, 350

[39] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44

[40] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[41] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[42] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[43] Brady, W.M., Clerical and Parochial Records of Cork, Cloyne and Ross (Dublin, 1863), Vol. II, p. 430

[44] Rev. James B. Leslie, Ferns Clergy and Parishes (author, 1936), p. 47

[45] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/ireland/81186/ accessed on 18th August 2017

[46] Freeman’s Journal, 18th November 1817

[47] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Dublin

[48] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 66

[49] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 72

[50] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

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Cork history

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons: A Great War casualty

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons:

A Great War casualty

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Among the dead of the Great War, otherwise known as World War One, was Brevet Colonel Henry Hendley Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. He died in a Dublin hospital on 10th November 1919 and even though his death was after the end of the Great War he is included among the dead of that War. He was buried at Kill St. Anne cemetery beside his home at Castlelyons and his name is inscribed on a memorial within the Church of Ireland church in Fermoy. This article sets out some information on the life and times of this soldier of the Royal Artillery.

Henry Bond

Henry Hendley Bond was the son of Major General Henry Bond and Mary Earbery Hendley Bond. Henry Bond senior was born in County Longford in about 1837. Shortly after leaving school he joined the Royal Artillery to see the world and find employment. On 7th April 1856 Henry Bond was made a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.[1] Thereafter he made a steady rise up the ranks. On 1st August 1866 he was made a Captain.[2] It was at this stage of his life that Captain Henry Bond met Mary Earbery Hendley of Mountrivers near Fermoy, Co. Cork. In 1868 they got married.

Mary Earbery Hendley and family

Mary Earbery Hendley was the daughter of Matthias Christopher Hendley of Mountrivers by his wife, Clementina (d 29th July 1867). Matthias and Clementina had one son, Matthias Christopher Hendley (d 22nd March 1885) and six daughters. One of these daughters, Mary Earbery Hendley (d 24th April 1931) it was who married Henry Bond.[3]

Matthias Christopher Hendley was the son of Matthias Hendley (1771-1847) of Mountrivers near Fermoy who was agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby. Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, had purchased the Fermoy estate in 1835 for £70,000. It was said that Abercromby was owed £10,000 from the Anderson family, the previous owners of Fermoy.[4] Matthias Hendley left at least two sons; Matthias Christopher Hendley (1813-1901) and John Leslie Hendley. John Leslie Hendley married, 15th August 1847, Marianne Ryder, daughter of Archdeacon William Ryder and left at least one son, John Leslie Hendley who went to live in New Zealand. John Leslie Hendley, senior, was killed while hunting in India.[5]

Henry Bond in the Royal Artillery

After his marriage Captain Henry Bond continued his career in the Roya Artillery. On 16th January 1875 he was promoted to Major. On 16th January 1882 Henry Bond was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and on 16th January 1886 was made a full Colonel in the Royal Artillery. On 1st November 1887 he was promoted to the rank of Major General.[6]

The Bond family in 1893

After many postings in India (1872), Ireland (1873), the East Indies and England (1880-85) Major General Henry Bond returned to Ireland to settle down. In 1893 Major General Henry Bond was living at the Manor, Castlelyons with his family.[7]

The Bond family in 1901

In 1901 Henry Bond (aged 64, born Co. Longford) lived at the Manor, Kill St Ann, near Castlelyons. By 1901 Henry Bond was a retired from the Royal Artillery. With him at the Manor was his wife, Mary Earbery Bond (aged 53, born Co. Cork) and their three daughters. The daughters were Edith Frances Bond (aged 29, born in India), Mary Kathleen Bond (aged 25, born in England) and Charlotte Emily Bond (aged 21, born in England), all single. The family was attended by two servants, Bridget Casey (aged 29, born Co. Cork, cook) and Mary Sullivan (aged 23, born Co. Cork, housemaid).[8]

In 1901 the Manor was classified as a first class house with 19 rooms, 7 windows at the front of the house and 7 outbuildings in the grounds.[9] These outbuildings consisted of two stables, one coach house, one harness room, two fowl houses and one shed.[10]

Also in the grounds of the Manor was situated another house held by Henry Bond. This house was lived in by Patrick Allen.[11] Patrick Allen (aged 25, born Co. Tipperary) worked as a coachman for the Bond family while his wife, Kate Allen (aged 24, born Co. Cork) worked as a house keeper. They had two sons, William aged two and John aged one.[12]

 

Phone photos February 2017 102

Entrance to the Manor, Castlelyons

The Bond family in 1911

Major General Henry Bond died sometime between 1901 and 1911. His widow, Mary Earbury Bond was head of the household at the Manor in the 1911 census. With her on the census night were her three daughters, all single, and her son, Henry Hendly Bond along with two servants; Annie Frances Stuart (aged 23, born Co. Cork, parlour maid, Church of Ireland), and Margaret Mahony (aged 19, born Co. Cork, cook, Roman Catholic).[13]

In 1911 the Manor had 16 rooms and 6 outbuildings while Patrick Allen and family still lived in the second house.[14] Henry Hendley Bond was aged 37 in 1911 and was born in Co. Longford. In 1911 he was a Major in the Royal Field Artillery and was on the active service list.[15]

Henry Hendley Bond

Henry Hendley Bond He was born at Ballymahon, Co. Longford on 13th June 1873 although some sources say it was at Ahmedabad in Gujarat in India. In the 1911 census Henry Hendley Bond said he was born in Co. Longford.[16]

Like any army family, the Bond family moved around a lot. They lived initially in Moigh, Ballymahon, before moving to the East Indies and later England (Solihull), before settling at the Manor, near Castlelyons, Co. Cork.[17]

Henry Hendley Bond attended Wellington College and as a teenager joined the Royal Horse Artillery and Field Artillery at Woolwich.[18] On 22nd July 1892 Henry Hendley Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. On 22nd July 1895 he was promoted to lieutenant and 6th April 1900 was made a Captain.[19]

In 1898-1900 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was posted to India. While there he became a noted cricket player. Between August 1898 and September 1900 he played five matches for the Europeans against the Indians.[20]

By 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 136 Battery at Woolwich under the command of Major Elton.[21] In that same year of 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond served in the closing stages of the South African War.[22]

By 1908 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 15th Battery at Dundalk.[23] At that time he was attached to the Sierra Leone Battalion.[24] In 1911 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was at home at Castlelyons for the census of that year.

After World War One started Captain Henry Hendley Bond saw action in a number of places including at Salonika.[25] On 4th June 1917 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).[26]

So after this occasion the health of Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond began to deteriorate. For the next eighteen months he suffered from degenerative neurological disease. On 10th November 1919 Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond died aged 46 years with the rank of Brevet Colonel and temporary title of Brigadier General.[27] He died at Hampstead, Glasnevin in north Dublin.[28] Henry Hendley Bond was buried in the graveyard at Kill-St-Ann, Castlelyons, near his old home.

The Bond family after 1919

After the death of Henry Hendley Bond in 1919 his family continued to live at the Manor near Castlelyons. In April 1931 his mother, Mary Earbery Hendley Bond, died. On 10th September 1945 Charlotte Emily (died 16th April 1960), daughter of Major General Henry Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons married Venerable Samuel Hobart Dorman, Rector of Knockmourne Union and Archdeacon of Cloyne, sixth son of Rev. Thomas Dorman of Richmond House, Cork.[29]

Other members of the Bond family of Castlelyons included Edward Leslie Bond and Charles Earbery Bond, both of whom joined the army.

Edward Leslie Bond

Edward Leslie Bond joined the Royal Garrison Artillery to keep the gunning tradition in the family. On 4th March 1899 Edward Leslie Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and on 16th February 1901 was promoted to lieutenant. In 1902 he was serving with the Native Mountain Artillery in India.[30] On 1st February 1906 Edward Leslie Bond was made a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery.[31] In 1908 Captain Edward Leslie Bond was with the 21st Kohat Mountain Battery in India.[32]

On 26th April 1969 Major Leslie Crawford Bond of Pewsey, Wiltshire, son of Colonel Edward Leslie Bond of Castlelyons, married Penelope Margaret Alexander, daughter of Edward Currie Alexander by his wife Isabella, daughter of Major George Stoney. They had one daughter, Kristin, born in 1971.[33]

Charles Earbery Bond

Meanwhile Charles Earbery Bond left the family tradition of the artillery and instead joined the Royal Sussex Regiment. Charles Bond was born on 14th October 1877 and attended school at Wellington College.[34]

On 4th May 1898 Charles Earbery Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment and on 2nd April 1899 was promoted to lieutenant.[35] Lieutenant Charles Bond served in the South African war in 1899- 1900 with the 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria, including the engagements at Welkom Farm, Zand River, and Doorukop, the occupation of Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the engagement at Diamond Hill. He was also present in the subsequent advance into the Orange River Colony, including the operations round Bethlehem and in the Caledon Valley, the engagement at Relief’s Nek, and the surrender of the Boer forces on 1st August 1900 at Golden Gate. Lieutenant Bond was also involved in operations round Thabanchu, Winburg, and Lindley.[36]

In October 1902 Lieutenant Charles Bond was awarded the Distinguish Service Order (DSO) medal for his services in the South African War.[37] On 2nd February 1907 Charles Earbery Bond was made a Captain in the Royal Sussex Regiment.[38]

 

Charles Earbery Bond

Charles Bond and others at cricket in India, c.1910

Captain Charles Bond served in the Great War (1914-18). In September 1915 he was promoted to Major and from 24th November 1915 to 31st May 1917 was Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, first with the Worcestershire Regt., and from Dec. 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. In 1916 he was awarded the honour of C.M.G.

From June 1917 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the 51st Infantry Brigade in France until 30th May, 1918. From July 1918 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. In the War Charles Bond was five times mentioned in Despatches and acquired the Mons Medal.[39]

 

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[1] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1862), p. 171; Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1871), p. 169

[2] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1902), p. 600

[3] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 81; memorial brass plates in Church of Ireland, Fermoy; http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2890 accessed on 5th August 2017

[4] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 52

[5] Edward Garner, Massacre at Rathcormac (n.d.), p. 62

[6] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 600

[7] Francis Guy, Directory of the Province of Munster, 1893, Cork, p. 81

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572885/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572877/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572884/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927069/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[16] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462 ; http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[17] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[18] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[19] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[20] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 516

[21] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[22] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 203c

[23] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 189a

[24] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 171

[25] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[26] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[27] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31560/supplement/11749/data.pdf accessed on 5th August 2017

[28] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 376, 377

[30] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 184

[31] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 183

[32] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 503

[33] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 11

[34] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[35] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 288

[36] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 289a

[37] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[38] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), pp. 288, 289a

[39] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

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