Biography, Cork history

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

The Peard family were substantial landlords in the area of north-east County Cork for near 300 years. There were numerous branches of the family who lived in a number of great houses. Yet today none remain and some of their former homes are in ruins or totally destroyed. The family does not appear in any genealogical publication of note and so this article is an attempt to reconstruct their lives from the pages of the past.

This article is in no way the final finished product but a working document in progress with changes expected as new information comes to hand.

Peard surname in Devon

The ancient records of Devonshire give reference to a number of people with the Peard surname. In 1332 Richard Peard of the parish of Hatherleigh paid 2s in the lay subsidy tax of that year. [Audrey M. Erskine (ed.), The Devonshire Lay Subsidy of 1332 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 14, 1969), p. 66]

Later records in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries make reference to people with the Peard surname. In 1701 Henry Peard, merchant and apprentice of Malachi Pyne, was made a freeman of Exeter. In 1722 another Henry Peard, hotpressman and apprentice of Samuel Wardell, was made a freeman. In 1754 Thomas Peard, fuller and apprentice of Henry Peard, was made a freeman. In 1757 Henry Peard, tailor, became a freeman in succession of his father, Henry Peard. In 1767 Abraham Peard, fuller and apprentice of Joseph Stephens, was made a freeman of Exeter. [Margery M. Rowe & Andrew M. Jackson (eds.), Exeter Freemen 1266-1967 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, Extra Series, No. 1, 1973), pp. 206, 232, 281, 282, 293]

In 1733 when Oliver Peard of Tiverton was a clothier and merchant with insured property worth £1,900 (this increased to £6,100 by 1744). [Stanley D. Chapman (ed.), The Devon cloth industry in the Eighteenth Century (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 23, 1978), pp. 122, 138]

In about 1693 to 1707 Oliver Peard of Barnstaple was co-pastor of the United Brethren Assembly with John Hanmer. In 1698 and later years William Peard was a member of the United Brethren Assembly at Exeter. He was the son of Oliver Peard of Barnstaple and succeeded John Hanmer as moderator in 1707 at Barnstaple where he was not the most favoured of ministers. William Peard died in 1716. [Allan Brockett (ed.), The Exeter Assembly: The minutes of the Assemblies of the United Brethren of Devon and Cornwall, 1691-1717 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 6, 1963), pp. 14, 39, 60, 61, 140, 144]

Early Peard family of Cork in Devon

[101] George Peard (b. 1505, d. 1578)

He was the great grand father of Richard Peard [104] (the first of the family to come to Ireland). [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[102] John Peard (b. 1525, d. 1574)

He was Chamberlain of Barnstaple in Devon and father of John Peard [103] of Upcott, Devon. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[103] John Peard (b. 1559, d. 1632)

John was the father of Richard Peard [104] who came to Ireland. He has a monument in Burnum Church. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[104] Richard Peard (b. 1595; d. 1683)

Listed for Coole as a husbandman in the 1641 depositions – married a miss Cole and had three sons; Richard [105], Henry [106] and William [107].

Richard Peard is listed as one of 7 tituladoes for Castlelyons town [Seamus Pender (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin), p. 237].

In this tomb, erected at the charges of William [107] and Henry [106] Peard, it says here lieth the body of Ensign Richard Peard of Castlelyons, who departed this life February the 28 day anno Dom 1683 aged 88 years and (who) came from Upcott in the parish of Welcombe in Devonshire in England. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription]

It is interesting to note that in the parish register for Welcombe there is no person by the name of Peard at that time but there were a good number of people with the surname of Beard. The two surnames are very near each other – only a slip of the pen in the difference.

peard-tomb

Peard tomb at Kill-St-Anne

[105] Richard Peard (b. 1620, d. 1684)

Here lieth, also, the body of Richard Peard of Coole, gent, eldest son of Ensign Richard [104] Peard, who departed this life November the sixth 1684 aged 54 years. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription] His will was proved in 1689 and from Coole. [Guide to Genealogical Office, p. 241] He married and had one son, William [129] and three daughters. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[107] William Peard

He could be the William Peard of Castlelyons who married Miss Wrixon of Cork in October 1762 at Glinfield, the home of Henry Wrixon. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2544] William wrote a series of letters to Francis Price in Wales from 1739 to 1750 about various aspects of life in Castlelyons and across Cork. These are now in the Puleston Papers at the National Library of Wales MS 3577C and MS 3579D. [There are copies on Microfilm at the National Library of Ireland Mic. P. 3,262 and P. 3,263] William Peard is mentioned as a cousin of Redmond Barry of Rathcormac in the latter’s will which was proved on 22 November 1750. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 642]

William Peard had three sons; Henry [133], Richard [134] and Thomas [135].

[106] Henry Cole Peard of Coole (b. 1661; d. 1731)

Henry Cole Peard was a former army captain and in 1698 he lately held the abbey lands of Castlelyons with the impropriator of its rector. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore Papers, MS 6146]

Henry is mentioned as trustee and overseer to the will of his brother-in-law of Christopher Vowell of Ballyorane in 1724. John Harrison of Castlelyons is also mentioned for the same job and is also referred to as brother-in-law of Christopher. Both gentlemen were also to be executors of his will if his wife, Elizabeth, remarried. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 678]

His will was proved in 1738 and he is a gent from Coole. [Guide to genealogical office, p. 241] The will was made on 6 August 1729 with his wife and two sons as executors. He asked to be buried in Castlelyons. The will also mentions his two daughters; Dorcas and Priscilla along with his nephew, Thomas Peard. The guardians appointed by him were; his brothers-in-law, John and Henry Harrison of Castlelyons, Samuel Harrison of Carrigabrick, his cousin Daniel Keeffe of Ballinglinhane and his friend Andrew Crotty. The latter was for many years the Irish land agent for the earl of Cork and lived for sometime at Modeligo House. E. William Troke, Richard Thorne and John Bryan were witnesses to the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 677]

He married Priscilla Harrison in 1701 and had two sons; John [108] and Richard [109] along with a daughter Priscilla [110].

[108] John Peard (d. November 1780)

He lived at Ballyclogh House and his will is dated 1785. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] John was trustee with Rev. William Vowell to the lands of Shanakill and that part of Glenatore called Carrow Towreen by will of his brother in 1772. John was trustee, with Richard Moore (heir-at-law of Rev. Vowell), of the marriage of his nephew, John and Margaret Mitchell. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81] He died in 1780 without any issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[110] Priscilla Peard

She was a daughter of Henry Cole Peard [106] of Coole.

[109] Richard Peard (d. 1773)

He married Elizabeth, sister of Rev. William Vowell, vicar of Aghern in 1731. He had issue by her of; Henry [111], Christopher [112] John [113] and Peard Harrison [114] and another eight children. [Conna in History and Tradition, p.194; J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179 for order of sons] He lived at Carrigeen. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] His will was dated 10 May 1772 with his wife and his brother, John, as executors. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179]

In 1771, his daughter Ellen married Henry Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork and their daughter and co-heiress Mary Broderick married in June 1795 Grice Smyth of Ballinatray. She married secondly Captain John Irvine, the 7th son of Col William Irvine of Castle Irvine Co. Fermanagh (see Burke 1912). [Burke’s Irish Family records p. 1040] His other daughters were: Elizabeth married William Spread, Ballycannon in the liberties of Cork, at Mogeely church in May 1763 with a dowry of £2,000; [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2550] Dorcas, wife of Westropp Watkins, late of Old Court, Co. Cork and Priscilla who married Charles Widenham, esq., and attorney-at-law on 20 April 1776 at Carrigeen. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29] see also [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[111] Henry Peard of Coole (d. 1797)

Henry was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Mary Gumbleton in 1764 at Lismore. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559 and Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 15/9/1764]

He built Coole Abbey with David Duckert around 1765 – he planted 10,000 trees at Coole in 1794. Henry died before 1773. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He left six children including; Richard [115] and John [116] [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

Henry had a daughter, Charlotte, who in 1807 married Rev. John Lord. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 919]

[115] Richard Peard of Coole Abbey (d. 1830)

Richard Peard is mentioned with reminder to Carrigeen and part of Glenatore from his grandfather in a legal petition of his aunt-in-law in 1791. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179] He attended the John Anderson creditors meeting on 19 June 1816. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 51] In 1801 he married Elizabeth Hart and had a son; Henry Hawke Peard [117] and a daughter, Henrietta Maria Peard [118]. Richard had two other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[118] Henrietta Maria Peard

She married on 2 September 1837, Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park as his second wife. They had five sons and two daughters. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

[117] Henry Hawke Peard (b. 1804; d. 1858)

He married Elizabeth Cathrow in 1826 and had a son; Richard [119]. Henry Peard had eleven other children included Francis [120]. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

dsc03300

Coole Abbey

In 1836 Henry H. Peard reported to the Poor Law enquiry that no more than a dozen labourers left the Coole area for the U.S.A. he went on to say that ‘fifty-nine labourers [who] reside in this parish (Coole), all in constant work, besides many more from adjoining parishes’. Henry Peard said that the ordinary diet of the people was ‘potatoes with milk in summer, which is very cheap and in winter those that can afford it, the addition of bacon, salt fish etc., while the article of clothing is beyond belief improved’. Henry Peard further said that since 1815 the ‘condition of the poor is much improved in clothing particularly, you now never see a person without shoes and stockings, which used to be the case, clothing is much cheaper, they are also improved in cleanliness of the house, diet perhaps also improved. The population is about the same’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 66, 68, 71]

As for the wages of the labouring class in Coole, Henry Peard said that ‘including the sale of a couple of fat pigs, fowl, etc., together with constant work, a man can earn about £15 per year’. But the devoutness of many Catholic labourers prevents them from earning more money as they observe too many church holidays and ‘attending stations to confess, [which] take a good deal from what a labourer could earn, there are 11 holidays kept’. Henry Peard estimated that the cost of living ‘as the labourer does, he can procure a full supply of potatoes and milk for about £7 per year, many live on £5’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 69]

Henry Peard went on to tell the Poor Law enquiry that “the number employed on roads is very difficult to determine, they being almost in every case, belonging to other parishes, the resident labourers, as I before stated, having constant work. I know they are paid in money”. [Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 82 – 83]

On the houses of the Coole labourers Henry Hawke Peard said that those who owned cabins ‘with the exception of a few tradesmen such as carpenters, blacksmiths etc., they are the labourers of the different farmers in the parish’. The usual rent was ‘with a small patch of garden … from £1 10s to £2’. The conditions of the cabins were better than those at Aghern and were mostly ‘composed of mud walls, thatched [and] in almost all you will find good bed and bedding’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 71]

in 1837 Henry Hawke Peard was a subscriber to the large folio volumes of Samuel Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland.

In September 1845 Henry Hawke Peard backed a proposal for a railway between Cork and Fermoy at a meeting in Fermoy courthouse which was attended by many of the great and the good of the district. The proposed Cork and Fermoy Direct Railway Company was to have a share capital of £250,000 in 12,500 shares of £20 each. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 3]

On 16th March 1846 Henry Peard attended a meeting at Fermoy Courthouse, under the chairman of the Earl of Mountcashell, to appoint a relief committee for the Fermoy Poor Law Union. The potato blight which started in 1845 to rot the crops was now causing much distress in the area.

Henry Peard proposed that an estimate of the funds needed until 10th August be made and that the landlords would pay a rational proportion according to the value of their estates. Michael Mackey of Ballyroberts seconded the motion but the Earl of Mountcashel would not put it to a vote. Father Fitzpatrick then proposed a motion of a levy of one shilling in the pound according to the Poor Law Valuation (Griffith’s Valuation) of each rate payer and the money be deducted from the rent.

Both motions caused division, uproar and laughter and the Earl of Mountcashell stood down as chair with Hon. Gen Annesley of Annesgrove taking it. Subsequently both motions were denied a vote. Instead the meeting divided the area into 11 relief districts and left the issue of funding undecided. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 29]

At relief committee was established in Castlelyons at the end of March 1846 but no names of those attending were published. On 1st April 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the weekly meeting of the Fermoy Board of Guardian. There were 739 people in the workhouse and the Board had £705 5s 7d in the bank. The Board unanimously resolved to assist everyone within the Poor Law Union. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

On 28th August 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the presentment session for the Barony of Barrymore at Watergrasshill. The meeting resolved to employ labourers on the proposed Cork to Waterford railway which would pass through two parts of the Barony. They would further employ people on road maintenance and improvement after a new Government Act was passed to allow for such employment. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 52]

On 26th December 1846 R.G. Campion of Bushy Park attended the Kinnatalloon presentment session at Aghern schoolhouse as agent for Henry Hawke Peard. Mr. Campion reported that the tenants at Coole had their land at a fair rent from Henry Peard and there were no small tenants. Eugene Byrne contradicted this claim by saying that when Henry Peard was at home up to 40 people were employed but when he was away there was much unemployment and that the rent was too dear.

Mr. Campion said the rent was cheap while Byrne replied that the tenants were leaving fast. Campion responded with denial and the meeting fell into confusion and disorder. After order was restored Mr. Campion got £180 to drain 35 acres at Coole. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 69]

On 27th March 1851 Henry’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth married Francis Drew Campion, second son of Robert (or Richard) Gifford Campion of Bushy Park, Co. Cork, at Castlelyons. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

In 1850 Henry Hawke Peard rented Coole Upper and Coole Lower from James H. Smith Barry. Henry farmed 157 acres directly in Coole Lower of a total of 606 acres and rented out the remained. At Coole Upper, where Coole Abbey was situated (total buildings worth £36) Henry farmed directly 449 acres of a total of 545 acres. [Griffith’s Valuation, Coole, parish Coole, barony of Barrymore]

[119] Richard McCulloch Peard (b. 1829; d. 22 March 1880)

He lived at Coole Abbey. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 135] He married Ann Corban in 1858 and had a son Henry William [121] [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 78] There was also another unnamed child. Richard died in 1880 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

It is unclear if this was the Richard Peard who was in 1850 landlord of the townland of Kilmagner (637 acres of 765 acres – remained held by Michael Cagney in perpetuity).  [Griffith’s Valuation, Kilmagner, parish Castlelyons, barony of Condons and Clangibbon]

[121] Henry William Peard (b. 1860 – d. 1936)

He lived in Buenos Aires and married Flora Agusta Sewell in 1893 and she died in 1960 aged 86. Henry was a physician and surgeon. Before 1901 he sold Coole Abbey to Orr McCausland. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), pp. 78, 126]

[120] Francis Peard (d. 31 January 1864)

This Francis Peard died in 1864 at 84 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[116] John Peard (b. 1775, d. 1847)

John Peard lived at Towermore. He married Bridget Woodley in 1810 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and had two sons; Henry [122] and John [123] and one daughter Elizabeth [124].

In 1863 John’s widow, Bridget Peard otherwise Woodley late of Rathcormac died. Letters of administration of her estate (valued under £100) were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, widow and the administratrix of the son of the deceased [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 897]

towermore-house

Towermore house as seen from gate lodge

This John Peard of Towermore was possibly the same John Peard of Castlelyons who in 1847 was a member of the Fermoy Board of Guardians. In that year John complained to the rector about the cost of graves at 18d each at Beechfield. Plans were then in place for a new cemetery beside the workhouse. John Peard proposed an extra story to the fever hospital then under construction to accommodate 30 more patients and this was accepted. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 101] John Peard died in 1847 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

In 1850 Maria Oliver was the immediate landlord of the two townlands of Towermore Upper (Frederick C. Hayes was chief tenant) and Towermore Lower (John Fouhy was chief tenant). [Griffith’s Valuation, Towermore, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

In 1911 associates of John Peard lived at Knocknahorgan in Rathcooney, Co. Cork. They were John Richard Peard (28, bank official) and his brother Francis Woodley Peard (24, bank official) and their two sisters, Ethel Woodley Peard (34 years) and Maud Josephine Peard (29 years) – all unmarried. [http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001913770/]

[122] Henry Harrison Peard (b. 1810; d. 1918)

He lived at Towermore and died in 1918. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[123] John Peard (d. 1876)

It is unclear if this John Peard was the John Peard of Coole mentioned in 1850 as a member of the Board of Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 105], or is there confusion with John Peard [116] above.

In 1850 John Peard was the immediate landlord of Ballyrobert (169 acres), parish of Castlelyons with Michael Mackey as sole tenant. [Griffith’s Valuation, Ballyrobert, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

John Peard left a will under £3,000 at his death on 11th January 1876. On 21st March 1876 letters of administration per estate of John Peard, late of Brideville, Rathcormac, esq., deceased, was granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard also of Brideville, the widow of the said deceased. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 898]

[124] Elizabeth Peard (d. 1867)

Elizabeth Peard died on 23rd June 1867, late of Rathcormac, spinster leaving an estate valued at under £300. On 1st May 1867 letters of administration of per estate were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, Rathcormac, widow and the administratrix  of John Peard, brother of the deceased [Upper Blackwater, vol 14, p. 897]

[111] Christopher Peard (d. 1775)

Christopher was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Ann Cooke of Tallow and lived at Glantore where his house is marked on the Taylor and Skinner map and where he was a J.P. Christopher died intestate in 1775. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He had two sons and one daughter; William [125], Richard [126] and Mary [127].

Anne Peard filed two draft briefs in 1791 concerning her right to a legacy on various lands at Barranstown, Tallow and Curryglass. [Cork Archive Institute, U290; see J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81 for info on this petition]

[125] William Peard

He lived at Peardmount and is listed in the 1804 tithe books. Mary Boles of Killbree married William Peard of Peardmount. She was the daughter of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles of Ballinacurra and the latter was born in 1646 [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland 1899, p. 44 Bowles of Aghern]

He was possibly the William Peard, who transmitted a letter from Jane ____ to Mrs Henrietta Smyth in November 1827 from Dublin to Ballinatray. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 1, folder (7), 1827-8, Bill Fitzgerald to Mrs Henrietta Smyth, 21 November 1827]

On 7th August 1809 Walter Croker Poole of Ballyanchor, Co. Waterford made his will and it was witnessed by William Peard and Richard Peard. A cordicil made on 4th January 1810 was witnessed by Ann Peard and William Peard. It is unclear if the William Peard of the Poole will was the William Peard of Peardmount. [Eilish Ellis & P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds Dublin, Abstract of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 502]

In 1814 William Peard was still living at Peardmount, Co. Cork with Tallow, Co. Waterford as the postal town. [Ambrose Leet, Directory of market towns, villages and gentleman’s seats (Dublin, 1814), p. 318] In 1815 Peardmount was mentioned as a seat of the Peard family in the Barony of Kinnatalloon along with Carrigeen and Coole. [Horace Towsend, Statistical survey of County Cork (1815), p. 73]

[126] Richard Peard

It is unclear if this is the Richard Peard of Peardmount mention about 1799 as one of the many commissioners for building a road between Cork city and the bounds of County Tipperary north of Kilworth. [Anon, Statutes passed in the Parlaiments held in Ireland 1799-1800 (Dublin, 1801), p. 46]

[127] Mary Peard

[113] John Peard (d. June 1784)

John Peard married Margaret Mitchell in July 1776 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and lived at Peardmount. Margaret was the daughter and only child of Henry Mitchell and Mary Shears of Mitchellsfort. She remarried in September 1784 to Odell Spread. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29; J.C.H.A.S. vol 52 (1947), p. 180; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] By deed made on 10 July 1776, previous to her marriage with John Peard, Margaret became entitled to the charge of £1,500 on Barranstown and other lands of her father. By the will of his father, Richard Peard, John vested a charge of £80 on Glenatore and Shanakill as a jointure for Margaret.

John was obliged, by his father’s will, to pay his brother, Christopher £200 but though he possessed property valued at £300, John was in a poor financial state and despite repeated promises, never paid the amount. John died intestate in 1784 leaving his widow Margaret and very little else as P.H. Peard sold his effects for £130. Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[114] Peard Harrison Peard (d. 1798)

In 23 October 1784, he married Arabella Drew, daughter of Francis Drew of Mocollop by his wife, Arabella Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 159] In the same year, his brother, John died and Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He was the Captain Commandant of the Curryglass Volunteers infantry unit in April 1779. His lieutenant was Stephen Rollston with James Graham as secretary. [Robert Day, ‘Reprint of the Munster Volunteer Registry, 1782’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. III (1894), p. 326] Vicar’s index of wills gives his death for 1799 and an esq. from Carrigeen. [Vicar’s index, p. 370] He had two sons; Henry [128] and Richard Frederick [129] and two daughters along with two other unnamed children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[128] Henry Peard (b. 1791; d. 1832)

He lived at Carrigeen Hall and married Charity Jane Greene (she died 26 March 1841 at 41 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann), and had a son; Henry [130] along with three other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

carrigeen-hall

Entrance to Carrigeen Hall – old house no longer standing

In a court case at Carlow, Henry Peard was “disguised beyond redemption by his exposure of his attempts to deprive his poor dependent younger brother of the ___ of renewal of a small farm”. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

Henry Peard died in September of 1832 and letters of administration were written on 28 March 1833 at under £300. His wife as executrix of his will should have received the letter but she didn’t. Instead his son Henry got the letter of administration. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[130] Henry Peard (d. pre 1854)

Henry Peard was living at George Street in Cork city in 1833/34. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He lived at Carrigeen and farm 147 acres there in 1850

In December 1845 Henry Peard gave notice that his farm at Carrigeen Hall was for lease from 1st May 1846. The house, offices and land of 180 acres had a coach house, stables, and walled gardens and was well stocked. The gate keeper at the lower lodge was available to allow people see the property. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 17]

In February 1847 Henry Peard of Carrigeen was named as one of the local landed gentry who did not contribute money to the Kinnatalloon relief fund. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 78]

Henry Peard is said to have married in 1849 to Jane Roch of Woodbine Hill, Waterford, and daughter of George Butler Roch. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 392] Yet as daughter was said to marry in 1854 there may have been an earlier marriage or confusion between the different Henry Peards. His second daughter, Arabella, married at Kinsalebeg in 1854, Rev Mellanus Spread Campion, the second son of Rev Thomas Spread Campion of Knockmourne. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

In 1850 Henry Peard was landlord in fee of Carrigeen East (320 acres) and of 30 acres at Carrigeen Hill where he rented out the remaining 320 acres. Henry Peard was also landlord of Castleview where Richard Gumbleton was the chief tenant. Henry Peard was also landlord of Glantore Lower (139 acres) and Glantore Upper (173 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Carrigeen, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Henry Peard was landlord of Shanakill Lower (244 acres) and Shanakill Upper (244 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

For more on Shankill townland see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/shanakill-townland-in-the-barony-of-kinnatalloon-county-cork-2/

[129] Richard Frederick Peard

Richard Frederick Peard lived at Belvedere House and died in the 1840s. He planted 31,640 trees between 1815 and 1817. In various land deeds, Richard is mentioned as an attorney and solicitor, while one of the deeds was registered by a Francis Peard. [See appendix I, no. (I), (III) and (IV) for land deeds involving Richard Peard in 1828, 1833 and 1842] Richard Peard handled the Heathcote land sale of 1826 with his first cousin, Charles Maunsell, solicitor of Dublin. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth papers, PC 904, box 2, folder (6), 1826, letters to Richard Smyth]

belverdere-house-from-mogeely-bridge

Belverdere house from Mogeely Bridge

In 1831, he went to court in Carlow because his brother Henry Peard would not renew a lease on a small farm and Richard Peard was dependent on Henry for his livelihood. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

He married Maria Maunsell, the daughter of Charles Maunsell of Roseville, Tallow by Grace, daughter of John Green. Charles was great, great, great, grandson of Thomas Maunsell of Berkshire and later of Derryville, Co. Cork, who’s first son was Colonel Thomas Maunsell of Mocollop, who defended it against Cromwell’s forces in 1649. [Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 800-801, 803] The couple were married before 1822 and had two children, a son; John Maunsell [130] and a daughter; Grace. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), p. 78]

In 1850 Mrs. Maria Peard held Belvidere (171 acres) from Henry Peard of Carrigeen. She farmed 74 acres where the buildings were worth £15 12s and rented out the remainder. Maria Peard also had 5 acres at Castleview which was rented by Richard Gumbleton. At Glantore Lower Maria Peard rented the townland from Henry Peard and in turn rented the land out to other tenants. At Glantore Upper Maria Peard rented 19 acres from Richard Gumbleton and rented the remaining land (154 acres) from Henry Peard. This land she in turn rented out to others. [Griffith’s Valuation, Belvidere, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Maria Peard was the immediate landlord of Blackpool townland (38 acres) where the representatives of Lord Lisle appear to be the senior landlord. Maris Peard was also landlord of about 15 houses in Rosybower and a garden which she rented from the representatives of Lord Lisle. [Griffith’s Valuation, Blackpool, Rosybower, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

See appendix one below for some lands deeds involving Richard Frederick Peard.

[130] John Maunsell Peard

He lived at Belvedere House. He occupied Vinepark House near Curriglass in 1855. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 356] On 27 November 1855 his wife had a son at Vinepark. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29 – Faulkner’s Journal] But the child didn’t live to adulthood as John Peard died without issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[132] William Peard

He was the son of Richard Peard [105] and did not marry. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[133] Henry Peard (d. 19 July 1797)

He was the son of William Peard of Castlelyons and is mentioned as one of the three lives in a lease deed of 1750 between James, earl of Barrymore and John Nason of Newtown for property about Castlelyons. Henry Peard was still alive in 1777, but in poor health by 1791 and died 19 July 1797. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 183-4]

[134] Richard Peard (d. pre 1729)

He was the son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons. In the will of his uncle, Henry Peard [106] of Coole, dated 1729, it is mentioned that Richard was deceased. He may be that Richard Peard who made land deeds with a Mr. Croker between 1709 and 1729. [Registry of deeds = 0522803 2 320 481]

Richard Peard married Diana Mitchell in 1709. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101] There is a will dated 1716 for a Richard Peard of Castlelyons and this could be the same person. [Guide to Genealogical office, p. 241; Vicar’s index, p. 370]

[135] Thomas Peard

He was the second son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons and was mentioned in the will of his uncle, Henry Peard of Coole in 1729.

Twenty-first century Peard members

Darrell W. Peard

He restored the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann in September-December 2002 at a cost of €9,000. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 5]

Delphine Adele Peard

She died on 5 July 1909 at 75 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann.

[Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

029

Peard mausoleum

Eric W.E. Peard

Eric Peard and his brother-in-law Eric Balt entered the Peard mausoleum in 1985 following damaged by a falling tree. There they saw about 15 to 20 broken coffins with of the name plates having rusted away. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Francis Peard

He lived in South Africa where his daughter Gitta Brill passed on the family coat-of-arms to Noel Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Frank W. Peard

He wrote a short history on the Peard family in Ireland entitled Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003).

Noel P. Peard

Noel inherited a plaque with the Peard coat-of-arms from Gitta Brill, daughter of Francis Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

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Apart from the Peard family of north-east Cork outlined above, there were other people by the name of Peard living in north Cork in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. These people maybe cousins of the Peard family above but no clear line of connection has been made yet. Information on these, as yet, unconnected Peard people is recorded below.

Peard of Allworth

John Peard of Allworth

John Peard was married to Ellen and they had a son, William Peard who was baptised 4 December 1836. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Joseph Peard of Allworth

On 16th February 1839 Joseph Peard and his wife Ellen had a son, Matthew Peard baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Thomas Peard of Allworth

Denis son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, baptised 28 July 1812 and died on 12th November 1812. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 319]

On 24th April 1813 —– Peard daughter of Thomas Peard of Allworth, died and on 4th October 1813 Henry Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 29th November 1818 Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised while on 15th April 1821 their son Matthew Peard was baptised. On 21st January 1827 Richard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 4th April 1828 —- Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 319, 298, 299, 300, 303, 319, 322]

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Peard family of Glountane

[PG110] Henry Peard of Glountane

On 11th October 1838 Thomas Peard [PG111], son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane was baptised. On 12th April 1842 Thomas Peard, son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 306, 325]

On 17th February 1840 Robert Peard [PG112], son of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 307]

On 1st April 1842 Frances Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 26th July 1846 Elizabeth Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 5th April 1846 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

On 11th March 1848 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to George Dormer in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

John Peard of Glountane

On 7th August 1845 John Peard lived at Glountane and married Mary Phillpott of Newmarket by licence. John Peard was 25 years old and a farmer. He was son of Thomas Peard who was also a farmer. Mary was 28 in 1845 and daughter of Robert Philpot of Glantane (farmer). The witnesses were Thomas Peard and Robert Philpot with M. Becker as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, pp. 20, 340]

Thomas Peard of Glantane

On 4th November 1832 Robert Peard, son of Thomas and Frances of Glountane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304]

John Peard, the son of Thomas Peard, got married on 7 August 1845. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20 and see above under John of Glantane]

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Peard family of Knockanesweeny

[PK108] Thomas Peard of Knockanesweeny

He married Katherine Callaghan and they had a daughter Katherine baptised on 28 November 1761. Thomas Peard died on 27 August 1786. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1728; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 316]

[PK110] Henry Peard of Knockanesweeny

He and his wife Catherine had a daughter Jane baptised on 27 December 1789. On 4th December 1791 they had a son Thomas Peard [AK111] baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1736]

Henry Peard died on 6 September 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 317]

Richard Peard of Knockanesweeny

On 23rd October 1810 Richard Peard and his wife Mary had a daughter baptised. On 27th December 1812 their son, Denis Peard was baptised and in December 1815 another son called Thomas Peard was baptised. On 12th April 1818 a third son, Richard Peard was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 298, 299]

Matthew Peard

He lived at Knockanesweeny and died 13 January 1839 at 68 years. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 324]

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Peard family of Knocknemony

[AKP110] Henry Peard of Knocknemony

He and his wife Katherine had a daughter Elizabeth baptised on 22 June 1794. They had a son John Peard [AKP111] baptised on 2 April 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1737, 1738]

[AKP111] John Peard of Knocknamoney

His wife Ellen had a daughter Elizabeth Peard who was baptised on 6 March 1835. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 305]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamony

On 25th October 1778 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter, Jane, baptised and on 8th October 1779 they had a son Thomas Peard baptised on 8 October 1779. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1732, 1733]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamoney

Thomas was a shoemaker in Knocknamonee. His daughter, Elizabeth (spinster) was a servant and married in Kilshannig parish on 14 February 1854 to Isaac Jones (servant) of Rockforest and son of Thomas Jones (steward). Thomas Peard and Thomas Peard junior were the two witnesses and H. Swanson was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 25]

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Peard family of Lombardstown

Catherine Peard of Lombardstown

She lived at Lombardstown and died a widow on 21 October 1836 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 323]

[PL110] John Peard of Lombardstown

On 2nd November 1825 John Peard and his wife Ellen had a daughter, Catherine Peard baptised. On 6th April 1828 they had a son, Henry Peard [PL111] baptised. On 7th September 1830 they had a daughter, Ellen baptised and on 29th July 1832 another daughter, Jane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 302, 303, 304]

John Peard was a yeoman and his son Denis Peard [PL112] got married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

[PL112] Denis Peard of Lombardstown

Denis Peard was the son of John Peard of Lombardstown. He was a wood-ranger and married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish to Bridget Boyle (spinster) of Duclayne and daughter of James Boyle (yeoman). The witnesses were James Berry and Richard Berry with H. Swanson as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

Denis Peard and his wife Bridget had a son called Henry Peard baptised 28 September 1851. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 310]

Thomas Peard of Lombardstown

In February 1820 Thomas Peard and his wife, Elizabeth had a son, Henry Peard baptised. On 11th January 1822 they had a daughter, Catherine baptised in Kilshannig church. On 14th May 1826 Thomas and Elizabeth Peard had a son, Denis Peard baptised and on 23rd November 1828 another son, Thomas Peard was baptised. On 23rd October 1831 their daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 300, 302, 303, 304]

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Peard family of Scarragh

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a son John baptised on 20 November 1763 (he died on 18th December 1763) and a daughter Mary was baptised on 25th August 1773. They had a daughter Mary baptised on 25 August 1773. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1728, 1731; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 314]

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

On 19th August 1824 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a daughter, Celia baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 301]

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Unassigned Peards

In additional to the above a number of people with the Peard surname have appeared for which it is as yet not possible to connect them with any of the Peard families above.

Alice Peard

She married Hercules Jones in 1814. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anna Maria Peard

She married Joseph Busteed in 1820. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anne Peard

She married Thomas Williamson in 1811. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Annie Peard

Mrs Annie Peard lived at 4 College View Terrace, Western Road, Cork in 1881. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78] She was a widow in 1897 and got letters of administration to the estate of her sister, Sarah Land who died 19 December 1897. Both lived at Woodview, Glanmire. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2105]

Catherine Peard

She lived in Fermoy and married, in 1832, Rev. Robert Spread Nash. Rev. Nash was a grandson of Rev. William Nash and died in November 1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 922]

Diana Peard

Diana Peard married John Mowbay in 1717. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Elinor Jane Peard

She married 24 October 1854 her second cousin, Richard Gifford Campion son of Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park by his wife, Lucinda Catherine Drew. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard was a witness to a marriage in Kilshannig parish on 7 July 1796 and also a witness to another marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Thomas Peard. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 334, 335]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard married Thomas O’Grady of Aghamarta castle and had four sons and one daughter – Louise who in 1891 married George Foott of Carrigacunna castle, Co. Cork. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 345]

Frances Peard

She left a will under £1,500 after her death on 31 January 1864 at Fermoy, Co. Cork. She died a spinster and John Thomas Sherlock, solicitor, Fermoy proved the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1517]

Francis Peard

See under Richard Frederick Peard – also Ellen Peard, full age spinster from Curryglass, daughter of Francis Peard, married 9 December 1847, James Wynne, full age bachelor of Curryglass and land steward (son of Richard Wynne, steward) in Mogeely Church by Rev. M.S. Campion. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2669]

Henry Peard (d. 1773)

From near Castlelyons [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

Henry Pearde

He married Hannah Dickenson in 1837. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] She died on 16 October 1868 at Dunkerreen, Bandon, Co. Cork. Letters of administration were granted to her husband and only next of kin. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1626]

Henry Peard of Kilshannig

His daughter Mary died 22 January 1847. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 326]

Henry Peard

He lived a Millview, Fermoy Co. Cork and was party to a number of deeds with the Nash family around 1843 to 1853 and with Catherine Peard, a possible daughter who was wife of Robert Spread Nash of Fermoy, Co. Cork. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2179]

Henry Peard

He was a witness to the will of Jonathan Tanner of Bandon, which was proved on 17 May 1776. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 703]

Henry Peard of Mountpleasant

His will is dated 1805 at Mountpleasant. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Jane Peard

She married William Berry in 1834. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard

She married James Crothers in 1807. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 11th October 1814 Jane Peard married John Farmer of Kilshannig parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, p. 335]

Jane Peard of Youghal

She lived at number 14 Knockaverry, Youghal in the 1901 census with Margaret O’Reilly. [Youghal family roots, p. 7]

John Peard

In 1698, John Peard along with Henry Ellin lately held Coole with its two ploughlands. He shared a fine of £2,000 with Ellin from Charles, earl of Burlington in consideration of their interest there on 4 August 1698 because Charles wished to sell the property to financiers. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore papers, MS 6146]

John Peard

John married Mary Seward in 1732. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

John Holmer Harrison Peard

He lived on Western Road, Cork in 1881 and had a veterinary practice at 28½ Princess Street. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78]

On 25th June 1922 Henry Holmer Peard, son of John Holmer Harrison Peard of Ashtown House, Castleknock, Co. Dublin, married Fanny McClintock (born 8th May 1902), third daughter of Frederick Foster McClintock of Termonfeckin, Co. Louth. Henry Holmer Peard died on 12th September 1950. [Burke’s Irish Family Record, 1976, p. 753]

John Peard of St. Finbarry

He left a will dated 1782 with an address in St. Finbarry. [‘Index testamentorum olim in Registro Corcagle’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 390]

Mary Peard

In 1774 Mary Peard married John Bennet. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Mary Peard

In 1787 Mary Peard married William Dobbyn. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

He married Catherine Ring in 1810. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

Witness the marriage of Elizabeth Peard of Brittas to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas at Kilshannig in April 1846. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

Nicholas Peard

He was a witness to the will of John Williams of Cork which was proved on 22 January 1662. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1452]

Rebecca Peard

Rebecca married Thomas Connaway in 1704. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Richard Peard of Kilshannig

On 25th February 1810 Richard Peard married Mary Lynch. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 335]

Richard Peard of Mallow

His son Richard Peard died 30th July 1820 and on 19th June 1828 his son Matthew Peard died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 321, 322]

Richard Peard (living c.1846)

In March 1846 Richard Peard reported on the state of the poor and the condition of the potato crop in the area of Ballyclough, Kilmagner and Knockdromaclough to the Fermoy Relief Committee. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

Richard William Peard

He lived at Butlerstown, barony of Barrymore, Co. Cork and Elizabeth Phair was his wife. He was party to a Phair family deed of 13/8/1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2170]

Robert Peard of Roscommon

His will is dated 1794 at the Cottage, Roscommon and a gent. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Rosanna Peard

In 1772 Rosanna Peard married George Ward. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Sarah Peard

In 1764 Sarah Peard married George Pearse. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Thomas Peard of Brittas

In April 1846 Thomas Peard of Brittas, farmer, saw his daughter Elizabeth marry at Kilshannig to Laurence O’Connor, a smither of Brittas. Elizabeth was twenty five years old at the time. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

In 1848 Thomas Peard was a farmer and his daughter Elizabeth O’Connor (a widow) married in Kilshannig parish on 11 March 1848 to George Dormer (constable), the son of Richard Dormer (weaver). Henry Peard and John Vanston were the witnesses and F. Brady was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

Thomas Peard of Dromore

William Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Dromore was baptised on 6 March 1831.

Later in 1835 Thomas Peard was witness to Murphy/Buckley land deed of 16/3/1835 in the barony of Duhallow. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304; Ibid, vol. 15, p. 2202]

Thomas Peard of Keal

On 21st January 1765 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter Elizabeth baptised. They had a son Henry Peard baptised on 28 June 1767. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1729, 1730]

Thomas Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 24th August 1783 Thomas Peard and his wife June had a son Richard Peard baptised. He was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Elizabeth Peard and also on 14 November 1804. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1734; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 335]

On 20th February 1810 Thomas Peard married Frances Lynch of Kilshannig parish by licence. On 23rd November 1810 Thomas Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 296, 335]

On 1st September 1815 Thomas Peard of Kilshannig married Elizabeth Lynch of same parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

On 7th January 1823 Thomas Peard was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

In April 1850 Thomas Peard was a witness to a marriage at Mourne Abbey church. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2495]

Robert Henry Peard was baptised on 2 September 1855 to Thomas and Elizabeth Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 311]

Thomas Peard of Newberry

On 22nd September 1816 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a son, John Peard, baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 299]

William Peard

He was brother-in-law of John Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork who died 16th March 1755 and had his will proved on 2nd April 1755 and executor to the will. Among the witnesses were Thomas Browne, John Barry and Henry Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 729]

William Harrison Peard (b. 9 May 1822)

He was born at St. Helier in Jersey and married in 1875 Maude Anna King Palmer. She was born about 1851 and died in 1891. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003)]

The will of Maude Palmer Peard was proved on 27th October 1892 with an address of Riverstown, Co. Cork. The registrar of the will stated that she died 19 September 1891 at the same place. Letters of administration for her will was granted at Cork to William Harrison Peard of same place, gent, and described as farmer and the husband. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1797]

William Love Peard

Major William L. Peard of Rathbarry sent 29 letters, via his solicitor, G.W. Shannon, to Henry Dennehy, agent of Villiers Stuart, about the lease of a field near Youghal in 1844-48. A legal case resulted which was entitled Peard v Lord Stuart. [P.R.O.N.I. Villiers Stuart papers, T. 3131/G/16/1-29]

Major William Love Peard was chief tenant of Rathbarry (47 acres) which he rented from Rev. R. Gumbleton. [Griffith’s Valuation, Rathbarry, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

W. Peard

In 1881 W. Peard lived at Richmond Lodge, Riverstown. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

W. Peard

He wrote a book entitled “A Year of Liberty-Salmon Angling in Ireland, 1867”. [Hamilton Osbourne King, House sale at Ileclash House, Fermoy, Co. Cork, 26 May 1998, lot 389]

William Peard

In 1881 William Peard lived at Skahabeg on the Old Douglas Road. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

William Peard

His will was proved in Cork by John Harris, solicitor, Sullivan’s Quay as one of his executors. William died 14 August 1885 at Duhallow, gent. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1568]

William Pearde

Ellen Pearde … effects £2,340 … July 7 … letters of admin … will annexed … per est … late of Kilbrogan Hill, Bandon and wife of William Pearde, died 9 October 1889 at same place and left unadmin by Frances Anne Beamish, sole executor, were granted at Cork to Ellen W. Beamish of Neelin House, Bandon, spinster, attorney of one of the resident legatees [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1844]

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Appendix I

Some land deeds involving members of the Peard family

(I)        CROKER/HANNA (869/432/578432); barony of east Muskerry; 7/3/1828; indented deed – Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork, Francis Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, merchant;

Walter Croker made over to Francis Hanna the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; Witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard and John O’Brien, writing clerk; sworn 19/5/1828; registered by Francis Peard. [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 1752]

(II)       PEARD/WESTROPP (866/56/576556) Barony west Muskerry 27/5/1830 – indented deed – Richard Peard. Coole, Co. Cork (eldest son & exec, of last will and testament of Henry Peard), Edward Morgan, Birdstown, co. Cork, Maria Morgan (nee Spread) his wife, Eliza Albina Spread, Ballincollig Co. Cork (spinster – exec of last will & testament of Rev Thomas Westropp, Richard Spread, Ballincollig, Co. Cork, Mountiford Westropp, Westmount, Co. Cork.

In consideration of the marriage of Wm Spread & Elizabeth Peard; Richard Peard, Ed Morgan, Maria his wife & Eliza A. Spread made over to Mountiford Westropp, in trust for Richard Spread, the lands at Ballycannon & Kilbeg – Barony Barretts – Upper and Lower Coolnageragh – Barony Muskerry lands of Behina, Knockaroghery, Lansvaghy, and Carrigatow & £142/17 part of a trust of £1,000. Witnesses; John Lysaght, Richard Pope Hackett (gent); sworn 24/11/1830; reg. Richard Foot [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2160]

(III)     HANNA/CROKER (1833/15/1911); barony of east Muskerry – 28/5/1833 – indented deed of reassignment by William Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, (?) and Elizabeth O’Hea (widow), Co. Waterford (both administrators and executors of the will of Francis Hanna, deceased merchant) to Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork

William Hanna and Elizabeth O’Hea reassigned and made over to Walter Croker the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard (attorney) and John O’Brien (writing clerk); sworn; 8/10/1833 and registered by Francis Peard

(IV)     BOWLES/WOODLEY (1842/21/282); barony of East Muskerry – 7/10/1842 – indenture of removal; Catherine Jones Bowles, Mount Prospect, Co. Cork, widow and administrator of George Bowles; Ellen Harman Woodley, Tallow, Co. Waterford, widow and devises of Joseph Woodley and Francis George Woodley, Leads, Co. Cork. Catherine Bowles and Ellen Woodley demised and let unto Francis Woodley, in his actual possession, the lands of Leads East (401 acres), Leads West (354 acres) and Ballyvougane (877 acres) in the barony of Muskerry for life at yearly rent of £110 0s 5d together with 11d per (hereceives) fees, also 1 fat hog at Christmas. Witnessed by William Woodley and Richard Frederick Peard, solicitor; sworn 12/10/1842 and registered by John Cranitch

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Cork history

Shanakill townland in the Barony of Kinnatalloon, County Cork

Shanakill townland in the Barony of Kinnatalloon, County Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On the first Sunday of February Tallow point-to-point races are held at a place called Shanakill Cross between Curraglass and Conna, by the banks of the River Bride, in County Cork. This article provides a few historical notices relating to the townland of Shanakill.

The name of Shanakill is usually translated as “old church” but the “kill” element of the name could also be from the Irish “coil” or wood and so the townland name could be translated as “old wood”. Local tradition calls Shanakill as “Seana Chill” which means “old church” and local tradition is usually a good clue to fact – most of the time anyway.[1]

Tallow races

Early Christian times

So far no archaeological discovery of any site which could be called an “old church” has been made in Shanakill. Instead Shanakill Upper is dominated by a ringfort on the land of Edward and Catherine Casey, beside the Shanakill River. This ringfort is 35 meters in diameter and surrounded by a 2 meter high bank topped with large stones. The intervening fosse is well preserved. Within the interior is a possible souterrain showing a semi-circular depression and several flat sandstone blocks resembling capstones.[2]

The majority of ringforts were enclosed farmstead. Yet some excavated ringforts have shown industrial activity of iron working and such like. It also has to be said that the ringforts we see today, sitting quietly in green fields, are but the remains of a much more complex landscape. Just as many of the medieval tower houses stand isolated in green fields with their bawn wall and secondary buildings removed over time, ringforts were possibly once surrounded by other buildings outside with banks, ditches and fences.

Shanakill Lower also has possible Early Christian remains but as this part of the townland contains the better land for tillage purposes much of the remains have been ploughed out over the centuries. Still the 1842 Ordnance Survey map shows a circular enclosure, a possible ringfort, while an aerial photograph shows the crop mark of a large univallate circular enclosure of up to 100 meters in diameter.[3]

Shanakill c.1660

The earliest record for the townland so far discovered in documents is from the so-called “census of Ireland” taken in 1659-60. The census is actually a poll tax return for the country. This record shows Shanakill as part of the parish of Mogeely in the Barony of Kinnatalloon. John Russel was the tituladoe name (chief person) of the townland which had 2 English taxpayers and 17 Irish taxpayers. Shanakill was fifth out of 15 townlands in Mogeely parish in the number of its taxpayers (Lisnabrinn had 62 taxpayers).[4]

Eighteenth century

The eighteen century is presently a “dark age” period for the armchair historian as very few of the surviving manuscripts from that century are online or in printed books. The best source of information in the research of a townland is to be had from the Registry of Deeds in Dublin. Sadly work commitments prevent me from travelling to Dublin and spend a few days at the Registry. The information there is mainly deeds relating to land – a lease agreement – land appropriated as part of a marriage settlement or land secured against a mortgage. The landowner, associated people, tenants or people with a financial interest in the property appear in the various deeds. The deeds therefore provide information towards a history of a townland and also genealogy information.

Tithe Applotment 1830

In 1830 a number people held land in Shanakill for the purposes of paying tithe to the Church of Ireland. These were Henry Peard (48 acres 1 root 9 perches & 43a 3r 17p = £11 1s 4½d in tithe payment), John Gallagher (59a 1r 2p & 20a = £14 6s 3d), Patrick and William Gallagher (104a 2r 36p & 20a = £24 13s 4d), James Halpin (5a 2r = 8s 9½d), Richard Neville (38a 1r 12p & 18a = £6 8s 1d), Martin Brien (29a 0r 17p = £2 9s 2d), Thomas Wall (8a = 11s 2d), William Buckley (3a 2r 28p = 5s 2d), Widow Higgins (61a 2r 17p = £8 13s 2½d), Widow Kenefick (3a 0r 22p = 2s 7½d ), Widow Quirke (10a 2r 32p = 14s 11d), Widow Hillgrove (8a 1r 39p = 16s 10d). This gives a total acreage of 487 acres 2 roots and 31 perches.[5]

It would seem from the amount of tithe paid by the various people in Shanakill in 1830 that the townland was mostly under pasture land as pasture land was exempt from paying tithes.

Census 1841

In the census of 1841 there were 65 people living in Shanakill Lower in 9 houses and 65 people living in Shankill Upper in 10 houses.[6]

Shanakill Lower c.1853

In Griffith’s Valuation the townland of Shanakill Lower was measured as 244 acres no roots and 25 perches of land which was worth £285 16s. Land worth above one pound per acre was considered good agricultural land as Shanakill Lower was and still is. The buildings in the townland were worth £10 5s. The townland was owned by Henry Peard of Carrigeen Hall (townland north of the River Bride and across from Shanakill Lower) and was divided into seven individual plots. Carrigeen Hall was part of the Peard estate since the first half of the seventeenth century and possibly Shanakill was owned by the family from that time. Henry Peard held plot 1 comprising of 47 acres 35 perches (£73 14s).[7]

Patrick Gallagher rented plot 2a of house, offices and land (125 acres 27 perches, worth £137) from Henry Peard. The buildings were worth £4 5s. Patrick Gallagher had two vacant plots of a house and garden; plot 2b (14 perches, worth 4s, house worth 5s) and 2c (11 perches, worth 3s, house worth 4s).[8]

John Gallagher rented plot 3a (house, offices and land) from Henry Peard. The land was 66 acres 2 roots and 15 perches worth £72 12s and buildings worth £3 16s. In turn Henry Grey rented plot 3b, a house (worth 13s), from John Gallagher.[9] On 23rd July 1878 James Gallagher, farmer of Shanakill (aged 75), died.[10] His relationship with Patrick and John Gallagher is as yet unknown. On 28th April 1883 Mary Gallagher, farmer’s widow (aged 75) died.[11]

Plot 4 was house, offices and land rented by James Halpin from Henry Peard. The 2 acres 1 root and 3 perches were worth £2 3s and the buildings were worth £1 2s. In addition to the above there was 2 acres 3 roots of water and waste, worth nothing, in Shanakill Lower.[12]

Shanakill Upper c.1853

The townland of Shanakill Upper was slightly bigger than its lower counterpart at 244 acres 1 root and 35 perches. But the land was of poorer quality and only worth £125 18s. The buildings in the townland were worth £7 19s, less than the buildings in Shanakill Lower even though there were more buildings in Shanakill Upper.

The townland of Shanakill Upper was owned by the same Henry Peard and was divided into fourteen individual plots with Henry Peard holding plot 7, land (49a 1r 6p worth £9 10s), for his own use. Plot 1 was 2 acres 3 roots of land (worth £2 9s) rented by James Halpin from Henry Peard. Plot 2 was 12 acres 9 perches of land (worth £8 18s) rented by John Gallagher from Henry Peard.[13]

Plot 3a in Shanakill Upper comprised of a house, offices (buildings worth £2) and land (54 acres 1 root 34 perches, worth £28) rented by Richard Neville from Henry Peard. In turn Mary McGrath rented plot 3b, house (4s) and garden (14 perches worth 4s), from Richard Neville while Michael O’Keeffe rented plot 3c, house (3s) and garden (25 perches worth 6s), from Richard Neville. Mary Heffernan rented plot 3d from the same Richard Neville, house, office (buildings worth 7s) and land (11 perches worth 3s).[14] On 4th March 1871 Richard Neville (aged 73) died. His wife, Mary Neville, died on 14th January 1878.[15]

Patrick Gallagher rented plot 4, house (10s) and land (30a 2r 33p, worth £18 5s), from Henry Peard while Joshua Donnell rented plot 5 from Henry Peard, house (9s) and land (12a 1r 11p worth £5 15s).[16]

Robert Hillgrove rented plot 6a at Shanakill Upper townland from Henry Peard, comprising of house, office (buildings worth 13s) and land (8a 2s 38p, worth £4 9s). In turn Hugh Cleary rented plot 6b, a house (worth 3s) from Robert Hillgrove.[17] The Hillgrove family lived in the area of Mogeely parish since at least 1755 and possibly for some time before that. In Mogeely graveyard there is a headstone for Mary Hillgrove who died in 1755. On 5th March 1871 Susan Hillgrove, farmer’s wife (aged 58), died. She was the wife of Robert Hillgrove. On 24th March 1877 Robert Hillgrove, widower (aged 73), died. On 22nd May 1884 their son, William Hillgrove, married farmer (aged 32), died. On 8th April 1874 William’s son, Robert Hillgrove, died aged just 4 weeks.[18] The Hillgrove family continued to live and farm at Shanakill into the twentieth century. On 30th January 1965 John Hillgrove, a widower and retired farmer (aged 84), died.[19]

Thomas Quirke rented plot 8 from Henry Peard comprising of house, offices (buildings worth 14s) and land (10a 2r 24p worth £5 14s). On 5th April 1884 Thomas Quirke died as a bachelor small farmer (aged 56).[20]

Timothy Higgins rented plots 9AaB from Henry Peard of house, offices (buildings worth £2 4s) and land (62a 3r 20p worth £42). In turn John Murray rented plot 9b, house (12s) and garden (18 perches worth 5s), from Timothy Higgins.[21] Sometime after 1850 Timothy Higgins was succeeded by Edmond Higgins. On 21st October 1865 Edmond Higgins, bachelor farmer, died.[22]

IMG

Map of Shanakill townland

Census 1851

In the 1851 census there were 62 people living in Shanakill Lower in 9 houses and 36 people in Shanakill Upper in 6 houses. Shanakill Lower had only a slight fall from 1841 but Shanakill Upper was down from 65 people in 1841 and lost 4 houses. The Poor Law valuation was £240 6s (£296 1s in Griffith’s) for Shanakill Lower and £97 4s (£133 17s in Griffith’s) for Shanakill Upper.[23]

Census 1861

In the 1861 census there were 29 people (15 male & 14 female) living in Shanakill Lower in 4 houses and 31 people (14 male & 17 female) in Shanakill Upper in 8 houses. Shanakill Lower had lost 36 people from 1851 and lost 2 houses while Shanakill Upper was down 5 people from 1851 but gained 2 houses. The Poor Law valuation was £278 15s (up £38 on 1851) for Shanakill Lower and £109 10s (up £11 on 1851) for Shanakill Upper.[24] The story of Ireland after the Great Famine is one of decline but down at the level of individual townlands the story is of fall and rise as circumstances change.

Shanakill residents after 1861

After 1860 different people to those recorded in Griffith’s Valuation came to live at Shanakill and are noticed in various manuscripts. On 15th December 1864, Bartholomew Daly of Shanakill, a married pensioner (aged 60), died. On 28th October 1869 Margaret Callaghan, labourer’s widow (aged 72), died. On 1st January 1873 Julia Walsh of Shanakill, servant’s daughter (aged 13), died.[25]

In the 1870s the Fitzgerald family of Shanakill suffered a number of tragedies. On 28th January 1871 Johanna Fitzgerald, labourer’s daughter (aged 8 months), died. Two days later, on 30th January 1871, William Fitzgerald, a labourer’s son (aged 7 months), died. Five years later the Fitzgerald family had another son, also named William Fitzgerald. This child lived one year before dying on 1st May 1877.[26]

The Brien family of Shanakill also suffered a double loss. On 14th February 1878 James Brien, bachelor of Shanakill (aged 19), died. A few days later, on 25th February 1878, Julia Brien, service of Shanakill (aged 15), died.[27]

On 30th November 1875 John Higgins, a married labourer (aged 43), died. On 30th September 1880 Ida Daniels, widow of Shanakill (aged 74), died.[28]

The Healy labouring family of Shanakill also suffered a number of tragedies. On 23rd September 1887 an unnamed Healy child, a son, died after only 5 minutes of life. On 18th October 1889, two daughters, Mary and Bridget, both aged 4 months, died.[29]

On 19th June 1890 Bridget Gallagher, a farmer’s wife of Shanakill Lower (aged 36), died. On 27th December 1893, Ellen Gallagher, a spinster farmer’s daughter (aged 28), died.[30]

People who lived the religious life

The surviving records are not all about recording the deaths of Shanakill residents. Other records add something more to the passing of a life. Sister Thadeus Gallagher (died 1965) joined the Presentation Order in Cork while her sister, Sister Phillip Gallagher joined the Good Shepherd Order in Waterford and died in 1966.[31]

Shanakill lower

Shanakill Lower on race day

Census 1901

In 1901 there were 25 people living in Shanakill Upper and 13 people living in Shanakill Lower. There were five dwelling houses in Shanakill Upper, viz, Edmund Casey (3 people), Patrick O’Brien (10), Sarah Hillgrove (2), Patrick Geary (7) and Mary O’Brien (3).[32] Shanakill lower had two dwelling houses, namely, John Gallagher (5) and Michael Gallagher (8).[33]

The earlier Griffith’s Valuation (1853) often described a holding as “house, offices and land” but gave few clues as to what those offices were. The surviving census returns for 1901 and 1911 give us a view into those “offices”. In 1901 Edmond Casey has two stables and one each of a cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery, foul house, boiling house, barn and potato house. Patrick O’Brien had a stable, cow house and piggery. Sarah Hillgrove had a stable, cow house, piggery, foul house and barn while Patrick Geary had a piggery and foul house. Mary O’Brien had no out houses.[34]

At Shanakill Lower John Gallagher had a stable, cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery, foul house, boiling house, barn and a shed while Michael Gallagher had the same as John Gallagher but no boiling house.[35]

Census 1911

In the 1911 census 32 people lived in Shanakill Upper.[36] Patrick O’Brien, farmer, had six daughters and three sons living in his house along with his wife, Kate O’Brien.[37] John Scannell, labourer, lived with his wife, Kate, and one son and two daughters.[38] Sarah Hillgrove, widow and farmer, lived with her two sons and two daughters.[39] Edmond Casey, farmer, lived with his wife, Ellen and their son, James along with two servants.[40] Patrick Geary, farm labourer, lived with his wife, Nora and their son, two daughters and one grandson.[41]

There were 8 people living In Shanakill Lower. Michael Gallagher, farmer, lived with his daughter and two sons.[42] In another house John Gallagher lived with his wife Katie and two servants.[43]

Shanakill in 1945

Guy’s Postal Directory for 1945 named the principal residents of Shanakill as Mrs. Casey, farmer, Mrs. J. Gallagher, farmer, and John Lane.[44]

Conclusion

It is possible to find extra historical information on Shanakill townland on the internet, in newspapers and in manuscripts in libraries to mention a few places.

 

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[1] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 398

[2] Denis Power (ed.), Archaeological inventory of County Cork, Vol. II – East & South Cork (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1994), nos. 4636, 5145; Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, p. 368

[3] Denis Power (ed.), Archaeological inventory of County Cork, Vol. II – East & South Cork, nos. 5010, 5472

[4] Seamus Pender (ed.), A census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2002), p. 234

[5] http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/reels/tab//004239504/004239504_00160.pdf

[6] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[7] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork; Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 270, 271

[8] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[9] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[10] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 250

[11] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 255

[12] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[13] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[15] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 249

[16] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[17] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[18] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 248, 256, 275

[19] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 303

[20] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork ; Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 256

[21] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[22] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 236

[23] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[24] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[25] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 235, 241, 275

[26] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 248

[27] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 249

[28] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 252, 276

[29] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 260, 262

[30] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 263

[31] Anon, St. Catherine’s Parish: Conna, Ballynoe, Glengoura, a Christian heritage (Conna Community Council, 2000), pp. 74, 75

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572163/

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572158/

[34] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572164/

[35] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572159/

[36] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1911 County Cork, ded Curraglass, townland Shanakill Upper

[37] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411843/

[38] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411841/

[39] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411842/

[40] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411844/

[41] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411840/

[42] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Lower/411839/

[43] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Lower/411838/

[44] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, p. 393

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