General History, Kildare History

The Archbold family of Davidstown, County Kildare

The Archbold family of Davidstown, County Kildare

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

 

In 1518 the Earl of Kildare was subject to royal service for his property at Davidstown in County Kildare. At Davidstown (which was part of the manor of Castledermot) the Earl had a number of messuages and 115 arable acres but the Earl gained no income from the place as it was unoccupied and the land uncultivated.[1]

William Archbold

In 1663 William Archbold of Timolin claimed that his grandfather, William Archbold, was seized of all the family property in October 1641 at the start of the Rebellion.[2] The Civil Survey gave title to Christopher Archbold, son of the latter and father of the former. During the 1640s William Archbold was sheriff of Kildare and signed indentures for electing burgesses from Athy and Naas to serve on the Supreme Council of the Confederate government. For this and the activities of his son Christopher, the family lands were declared forfeit after the war.[3]

As well as a son Christopher, William Archbold was the father of Margaret Donnell, wife of James Donnell of Tenekilly in Queen’s County, son of Captain Fergus Donnelly. In 1628 Captain Donnell mortgaged some of his property to Edward Jacob for £235. Later William Archbold took the mortgage and demised the property to Margaret’s second son, William Donnell (died March 1650). After William Donnell died Margaret Archbold as administrator entered the property. But James Donnell (who died in London in 1661) and William Archbold were both indicted and outlawed for taking the Irish side in the Rebellion and lost all their property.[4]

In June 1619 Peter Walsh of Kilgobban, Co. Dublin, gave William Archbold of Crookstown, Co. Kildare, three messuages and 75 acres at Jamestown, Co. Dublin, for 1,000 years with a clause of redemption.[5] In the Civil Survey Sir Adam Loftus was proprietor of Jamestown.[6]

Christopher Archbold

Christopher Archbold married Jane Dungan, daughter and heir of the late Edward Dungan. As part of the marriage articles William Archbold entered into the family property and held it for his natural life after which it would pass to Christopher and in turn to the first and second sons of Christopher.[7] During the 1640s Christopher Archbold was said to have arrange voters to elect representatives to the Supreme Council from the counties of Dublin, Wicklow and Kildare.[8]

Davidstown in the Civil Survey 1640

In the Civil Survey of 1640 (made in 1654-6) George Fitzgerald, Earl of Kildare held Davidstown (then known as Ballydavid) as part of the manor of Castledermot. The manor, containing 1,000 acres, comprised the townlands of Castledermot with Davidstown, Finoge and Knockneiry. In the notes to the Civil Survey it was reported that Christopher Archbold of Timolin, Irish papist, had a stone house on the lands of Castledermot.[9] This stone house could have been at Davidstown which in later times was the residence of the Archbold family.

Elsewhere in the Civil Survey it was reported that Christopher Archbold held the townlands of Collins, Davidstown, Hughstown, Killelan, Comminstown, Knockbrath and Bonack in the parish of Killelan in the Barony of Kilkae and Moone. The total of these lands measured 925 acres (worth £120) and was divided into arable (445 acres), meadow (20 acres) and pasture (460 acres). Christopher Archbold also held the townland of Graingefore in Killelan parish. This measured 72 acres (worth £15) of which 60 acres was arable and 12 acres in meadow.[10]

Other lands of Christopher Archbold

In 1640 Christopher Archbold held two townlands (Timolin and Porterseize) in the parish of Timolin in the Barony of Narragh and Reban in Kildare. The parish of Timloin bordered the parish of Castledermot on the north. In Timolin townland Christopher held 519 acres, worth £120 in which was situated a castle and two mills and a stone quarry. This castle was the main residence of Christopher Archbold. The land was divided into arable (400 acres), meadow (31 acres), pasture (80 acres) and bog (8 acres). The townland of Porterseize contained 178 acres (worth £10) made up of arable (130 acres), meadow (8 acres), pasture (30 acres), and bog (10 acres).[11]

Elsewhere Christopher Archbold held the townlands of Moyle Abbey and Sprostown in the parish of Narraghmore. These townlands measured 336 acres (worth £37) made up of arable (111 acres), meadow (20 acres), pasture (205 acres). Christopher Archbold also held half of the townland of Crookestown in the same parish. This measured 140 acres (worth £20) and was divided into arable (110 acres), meadow (10 acres), pasture (15 acres) and bog (5 acres). The value of these lands may have declined by the 1650s as the surveyor’s reported that many inhabitants of the parish died in the Confederate War or were transplanted to Connacht.[12]

In 1640 Christopher Archbold held the townlands of St. John and Skeyghnegone in the parish of Castledermot in the Barony of Kilkae and Moone. These townlands measured 282 acres (worth £40) made up of 200 acres arable, 12 acres meadow and 70 acres of common pasture. There was a castle on the lands of St. Johns worth five pounds. Christopher Archbold also held Gurtin Vacon in the same parish with a ruined castle. Gurtin Vacon measured 73 acres of which 60 acres was arable, 3 acres in meadow and 10 acres in pasture.[13] Christopher Archbold also held 25 acres of arable land (worth £6 5s) in the parish of Moone in the Barony of Kilkae and Moone.[14]

William Archbold

In 1663 William Archbold claimed the lands of his father which he said included the above and other property like at Kilrush and Tyredoyne, a tenement in Castledermot, a mill at Johnstown with the lands of Corristown, Spinant and Rathcool in Wicklow along with a mortgage on the town of Clonfert in King’s County and a lease on Ardery in Kildare.[15]

 

Davidstown House001

Davidstown House [photographer unknown]

Davidstown in 1660

In the census of Ireland dated 1659 but with a more correct year of 1660 mentions Davidstown. In that year there were eight Irish taxpayers in the townland.[16] Captain William Archbold fought for King James in 1690 and had his estate confiscated.[17]

Robert Archbold

Even with all the upheaval of the seventeenth century, the Archbold family managed to hold onto to their property at Davidstown. It is not known when William’s son Robert Archbold recovered Davidstown but he was there in the 1720s. Robert Archbold of Davidstown had at least two sons called William and Thomas Archbold. In 1727 Robert Archbold was made a tenant for life at Davidstown by his son William Archbold on the latter’s conversion to the Protestant faith.[18]

William Archbold

William Archbold of Davidstown was the eldest son of Robert Archbold. On 7th October 1727 William Archbold converted to the Protestant faith and was enrolled on 12th October 1727. After his conversion William Archbold made his father Robert Archbold a tenant for life at Davidstown. William Archbold made his will on 9th October 1752 (proved 17th August 1753) and named is wife Anne as executor. Also mentioned in the will was his brother Thomas Archbold.[19]

Thomas Archbold

Thomas Archbold of Davidstown was a younger brother of Robert Archbold.[20]

James Archbold

In the early nineteenth century James Archbold lived at Davidstown house. James Archbold married Miss Copeland (she died 1842).[21] Other sources say he married Eleanor; daughter of T. Kavanagh.[22] James Archbold had at least two sons called Robert and James Archbold.[23]

Robert Archbold

Robert Archbold of Davidstown house was a magistrate and Deputy Lieutenant for County Kildare. In 1837 Robert Archbold was elected one M.P. for County Kildare and served until 1847.[24] In the 1837 poll Richard More O’Ferrall (Liberal) got 762 votes and Robert Archbold (Liberal) got 728 votes. Both candidates were elected and were re-elected unopposed in the 1841 general election.[25] In 1855 Robert Archbold died and was succeeded by his brother James Archbold.[26]

James Archbold

In 1855 James Archbold succeeded his brother Robert Archbold to the estate at Davidstown house. By 1860 James Archbold was the eldest surviving son of James Archbold of Davidstown house. James Archbold was born in the 1780s. In 1842 he married Mary, daughter of Nicholas Mahon Power of Faithlegg, Co. Waterford.[27]

Robert Archbold

James Archbold was succeeded by Robert Archbold, a child of twelve. On 9th December 1876 Robert Archbold of Davidstown house died. He left effects valued at under £5,000 and on 2nd August 1877 administration was given to his sister, Eleanor Frances Archbold.[28]

Eleanor Archbold

In 1901 Eleanor Frances Archbold was the landlady of Davidstown. She was 48 years old, single and a Roman Catholic. On census night she was living in Davidstown house with five servants.[29] In 1901 Davidstown house had 27 rooms with 14 windows in the front elevation and 24 outbuildings.[30] In 1911 Eleanor Archbold was still the landlady of Davidstown. She was 54 years old and single and a Roman Catholic. On census night she was living in Davidstown house with five servants.[31] In 1911 Davidstown house had 28 rooms and 15 windows at the front elevation. There were 13 outbuildings near the house.[32] This was nearly half the number of outbuildings that were there just ten years before.

Over the years Eleanor Archbold sold much of the estate under the various land acts. Eleanor Archbold died in 1927 and the Land Commission took over the estate and sold the house.[33] So ended many centuries of association between the Archbold family and Davidstown.

 

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[1] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), Crown Surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare rental begun in 1518 (Dublin, 1992), p. 286

[2] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 897

[3] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 897

[4] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 395

[5] Griffith, M. (ed.), Calendar of inquisitions formerly in the Office of the Chief Remembrancer of the Exchequer prepared from the MSS of the Irish Record Commission (Dublin, 1991), no. JI 146

[6] Simington, R. (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VII County of Dublin (Dublin, 1945), p. 274

[7] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 897

[8] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 897

[9] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 106

[10] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 115

[11] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 96

[12] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 95

[13] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 107

[14] Robert C. Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 Vol. VIII County of Kildare (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1952), p. 117

[15] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence, 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 897

[16][16] Seamus Pender (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2002), p. 404

[17] http://landedfamilies.blogspot.com/2015/04/163-archbold-of-davidstown-house.html [accessed on 5th September 2019]

[18] Eileen O’Byrne (ed.) with additional material edited by Anne Chamney, The Convert Rolls (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2005), p. 290

[19] Eileen O’Byrne (ed.), The Convert Rolls, pp. 2, 290

[20] Eileen O’Byrne (ed.), The Convert Rolls, p. 290

[21] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 15

[22] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 717

[23] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 15

[24] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 15

[25] B.M. Walker, Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801-1922 (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, 1978), pp. 65, 70

[26] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), pp. 717, 849

[27] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 717

[28] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014893/005014893_00017.pdf [accessed on 26th April 2016]

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000901487/ [26th April 2016]

[30] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000901485/ [accessed on 26th April 2016]

[31] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002560760/ [23rd April 2016]

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002560756/ [23rd April 2016]

[33] http://landedfamilies.blogspot.com/2015/04/163-archbold-of-davidstown-house.html [accessed on 5th September 2019]

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