Biography, Cork history

Nason of Mellefontstown

Nason of Mellefontstown

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Mellefontstown is a townland in the parish of Gortroe, Co. Cork. It is a Latin place-name meaning homestead of the fountain of honey. In 1641 the townland of 176 acres 2 roots and 16 perches was held by Teige and Katherine Cartaine. As Irish Catholics their property was seized by the government. On 22nd May 1667 it was granted, with neighbouring townlands to James Stuart, the Duke of York.[1] In the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century it was held by Robert Rogers of Luctamore (Lotamore). Robert was the son of Francis Rogers a merchant of Cork City in the 1650s/1660s and brother of George Rogers of Ashgrove. Robert Rogers married Elizabeth Dunscombe of Mount Desart and had four sons and one daughter. Robert Rogers made his will in March 1717.[2] Robert’s will was proved in 1718.[3] It was possibly Francis Rogers who first purchased Mellefontstown.

The road by Mellefontstown

William Nason: this William Nason was born circa 1681 and died on 3rd February 1726. He was buried at Gortroe cemetery.

Richard Nason of Mellefontstown: in 1686 Richard Nason married Catherine Woodley.[4] Around this time Richard Nason leased Mellefontstown from Robert Rogers and it became the home of his descendants for several generations.On 23rd July 1706 Richard made his will in which he named his three sons (William, Andrew and John) and his daughter, Catherine. The witnesses were; John Enness, Michael Bourke and Thomas Dougan.[5] In February 1724 Richard Nason and his son, William, were among the witnesses to the last will of Barbara Hodder of Ballinterry.[6] Richard Nason died on 24th April 1727 and was buried at Gortroe, leaving a son, John Nason. Richard’s will was proved on 12th September 1727 in which he appointed his son as executor.[7]

  1. John Nason of Mellefontstown: John Nason inherited Mellefontstown from his father in 1727. He married Sarah, daughter of William Lapp of Bandon. Together they had a number of children.[8] In 1731 John was a witness to the lease between George Rogers of Ashgrove and John Nason of Rahenity of the lands of Rahenity which John Nason gave to his son William Nason and to William Nason, merchant of Cork, for their lives.[9] In 1740 John Nason was named as executor to the will of his brother, William Nason.[10] John Nason died in 1743 but Sarah lived on at Mellfontstown until her death in 1780.[11] On 6th February 1780 Sarah Nason made her will which was witnessed by Dennis Keeffe, John Keating and Stephen Scannell. In the will she named her three sons, Richard, John and Lancaster and appointed Lancaster as executor.[12]
    1. Richard Nason of Mellefontstown: in 1743 Richard Nason inherited Mellefontstown from his father, John Nason. In 1754 Richard married Dorcas Bengers and had a number of children by her. In 1759 Richard Nason received land in Ballynoe from Arthur Chapman of Ballynoe to be held with his sister, Mary Nason.[13]
      1. Elder Nason of Mellefontstown:
      2. Richard Nason of Bettyville: Richard Nason was the second son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown. As his elder brother inherited Mellefontstown, Richard junior had to find a new home and settled at Bettyville, near Clondulane, a few miles east of Fermoy. In 1787 Richard Nason married Catherine Sherlock and had seven daughters.[14] On 10th June 1809 Richard Nason was a witness to the lease of land at Ballynafana between the Carey family of Careysville and Thomas Dennehy of Bellview with Mathew Glissan of Brook Lodge.[15] On 19th June 1816 Richard Nason attended the creditors meeting in Fermoy that followed the bankruptcy of John Anderson.
        1. Elizabeth Nason of Bettyville: Elizabeth inherited Bettyville from her father as his eldest daughter. In 1808 she married her kinsman, John Nason of Newtown, Ballynoe, Co. Cork. Together they had two sons; Rev. William Henry Nason and Richard Nason, along with a daughter, Katheine Nason (wife of John Bellis).[16]
        2. Dorcas Nason: in 1818 Dorcas Nason married John Gaggin from Midleton, Co. Cork, and had a number of children by him. One of their daughters, Catherine Elizabeth, married in 1840, her first cousin, Rev. William Henry Nason, as his first wife. They had four sons (John, William, Charles and George) and three daughters (Elizabeth, Dorcas and Mary).[17] Dorcas Nason Gaggin died in 1867.
        3. Alicia Nason: Alicia Nason was born in 1795 and died in 1867. In 1824 she married Christopher Crofts (died 17th March 1861) of Ballyhoura Lodge, near Buttevant, Co. Cork. They had two sons (Christopher, 1826-1913 and Richard Nason, 1834-1905) and one daughter (Catherine, 1825-1904). On 22nd October 1868 Richard Nason Crofts married his cousin, Elizabeth Nason, daughter of Rev. William Henry Nason. They had two sons (Christopher Nason Crofts of Ballyhoura Lodge, 1877-1947, left a daughter, and Richard Nason Crofts, 1882-1924, died unmarried) and twounmarried daughters (Alicia Nason Crofts, 1870-1925 and Maud Nason Crofts, 1879-1943).[18]
        4. Ann Nason: in 1826 Ann Nason married John Sherlock of Sandbrook who was a son of Richard Sherlock of Woodville, near Buttevant, Co. Cork.[19]
        5. Catherine Nason:
        6. Margaret Nason:
        7. Mary Nason: in 1842 Mary Nason married Nelson Kearney Cotter (1806-1869), MD, fourth son of Sir James Laurence Cotter, 2nd Baronet, and had three daughters by him including Isabella Mary Cotter (died 30th June 1925). Nelson Cotter died on 18th July 1869.[20]
      3. Mary Nason: in 1759 Mary Nason was named as the sister of Richard Nason of Mellfontstown.[21]
    2. John Nason: in 1780 John Nason was mentioned in the will of his mother, Sarah Nason of Mellefontstown.[22]
    3. Lancaster Nason: in 1780 Lancaster Nason was mentioned in the will of his mother, Sarah Nason of Mellefontstown. Lancaster was appointed as executor of the will which was made in February 1780.[23] In 1774 Lancaster Nason was living at Coolconan, Co. Cork when the land became subject to a marriage settlement between John Croker of Cahergal and Jane Andrews of Cahergal, daughter of John Andrews of Cork City.[24]
    4. William Henry Nason: another son of John and Sarah Nason is said to be William Henry Nason who died in 1820.
  2. Andrew Nason of Whitewell (Whitehall): Andrew Nason, the second son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, settled at Whitewell (Whitehall) where he got married and had children.[25]
  3. William Nason of Cork: William Nason, the third son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, became a merchant in Cork City. In 1724 William Nason and his father, Richard, were witnesses to the last will of Barbara Hodder of Ballinterry.[26] In 1727 he married Huldah Claver and had children by her.[27] In 1735 William Nason was living in the North Suburbs of Cork when he was named as executor to the will of his cousin, William Nason of Rahinity, Barony of Barrymore, husband of Jane Nason, and son of John Nason (then living). The will was proved on 11th June 1736. The witnesses were Joe Deyos and Richard Kinefick.[28] William Nason made his own will on 31st March 1740 and this was proved on 30th June 1740. The witnesses were Joe Deyos, Richard Kinefick and William Cumins. William named his wife, Huldah, and his brother, John Nason, as executors.[29] William Cummins was a cooper in Cork City while Richard Kinetick was a merchant of the city.[30]
    1. William Nason:William Nason of Cork was the son of William Nason the merchant.[31]
  4. Catherine Nason: in 1720, Catherine Nason, daughter of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, married Thomas Carey.[32]

It would appear that the Nason family ceased to hold Mellefontstown by the early nineteenth century. In 1837 Pierce Cotter took out a lease on Mellefontstown house and 210 acres for 200 years from Thomas Wise at a rent of 19 shillings 5 pence per acre on 182 acres and 20s 10d on 28 acres.[33] A number of other tenants of Thomas Wise held leases of 31 to 50 years. In June 1846 Pierce Cotter held Mellefontstown house (worth £10) which measured 58.6 feet long by 21 feet wide by 21 feet high with an extension measuring 38 feet by 21 feet by 21 feet. His outbuildings included a boiler house, fowl house, coach house, stable, two car houses, dairy, two cider houses (one derelict), a barn and a cow house,[34] In about 1850 Pierce Cotter held Mellefontstown house (worth £19 including outbuildings) along with 197 acres of land (169 acres around the house and another 28 acres in the townland). The landlord of the whole townland (containing 566 acres) was Thomas Wise.[35] Thomas Wise held some of the townland in fee while other parts were by a lease for lives renewable forever. Thomas Wise of North Mall, Cork, died on 7th September 1852 leaving effects worth £404 the administration of which was granted to Joseph Gubbins.[36] In the 1860s John Cotter was proprietor and a well-known local athlete. By 1871 the property passed to John Barry who was the owner of 242 acres 2 root and 10 perches at Mellefontstown.[37] In the early twentieth century it passed to a different Barry family. The house was destroyed by fire in the early 1990s and demolished.[38]

Old wall beside Mellefontstown

In the 1901 census Richard and Ellen Nason lived in house number 3 in Melfontstown townland. Richard was 69 years old, a Roman Catholic, born in Co. Cork. He was a farmer who could speak Irish and English but couldn’t read. Ellen Nason was 52 years old, a Roman Catholic from Co. Cork and she could read as well as speak both languages. They rented the one room cottage from Hanora Scannell.[39] After 1901 Richard and Ellen Nason moved to Ballinure near Bartlemy. On 11th May 1908 Richard Nason died leaving effects worth £60. His will was proved at Dublin on 10th June 1908.[40] By 1911 Ellen Nason was living on her own, at a house in Bride’s Bridge near Castlelyons, now aged 76 years to qualify for the newly introduced state pension.[41] In 1901 John Barry lived in Mellefontstown house with its eleven rooms and thirteen windows in the front elevation along with eleven outbuildings. John Barry held two other cottages; one occupied by Cornelius Cashman and the other unoccupied. John Barry was 46 years old, a Roman Catholic and a farmer who could only speak English. He could read and write as could his wife and eldest daughter. Margaret Barry was 44 years old and also from Co. Cork. They had two daughters (Margaret, aged 9 and Bridget, aged 7) and three sons (Thomas, aged 6, James, aged 5 and William, aged 4). They had two servants, James and Bridget Condon, both unmarried.[42] By 1911 Mellefontstown house was still owned by John Barry but unoccupied as the family had moved to Kill St. Anne townland in the parish of Castlelyons with James and Bridget Condon as their servants.[43]

======================

End of post

======================


[1]Waters, A. ‘A Distribution of Forfeited Land in the County of Cork, Returned by the Downe Survey’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XXXVII (1932), pp. 83-89, at p. 84

[2]Ffolliott, R., ‘Rogers of Lota and Ashgrove’, in theJournal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXII (1967), pp. 75-80, at p. 75

[3] Eustace, P. Beryl, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 252

[4]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[5]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[6]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 44, Page 352, Memorial 29738, dated 20th February 1724

[7]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[8]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[9]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 73, Page 54, Memorial 49717, dated 13th January 1731

[10]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[11]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[12]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[13]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 248, Page 103, Memorial 159056, dated 7th September 1759

[14]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[15]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 615, Page 117, Memorial 419629

[16]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[17]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 294, 295

[18]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[19]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[20]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[21]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 248, Page 103, Memorial 159056, dated 7th September 1759

[22]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[23]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[24]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 306, Page 58, Memorial 202478, dated 12th July 1774

[25]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[26]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 44, Page 352, Memorial 29738, dated 20th February 1724

[27]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[28]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[29]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[30]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 73, Page 54, Memorial 49717, dated 13th January 1731

[31]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[32]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[33]Tenure Valuation Books, 1848, Valuation Office of Ireland, now in National Archives of Ireland

[34]House Valuation Books, 1846, Valuation Office of Ireland, now in National Archives of Ireland

[35]Griffith’s Valuation, Mellefontstown, Gortroe Parish, Barrymore Barony, Co. Cork

[36]National Archives of Ireland, Wills and Administration, Wise

[37]Owners of one acre and upwards, 1871, province of Munster, County Cork, p. 117

[38]Hajba, Anna-Maria, Historical, Genealogical, Architectural notes on some Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 261

[39]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1901 returns, Melfontstown

[40]National Archives of Ireland, Wills and Administration, Nason

[41]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1911 returns, Bridebridge

[42]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1901 returns, Melfontstown

[43]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1911 returns, Kill St. Anne

Standard
Cork history

Clondulane flour mill

Clondulane flour mill

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the townland of Clondulane North, by the south bank of the River Blackwater, in the civil parish of Clondulane, lie the large ruins of a nineteenth century flour mill. The mill is sometimes referred to as Glandalane mill. The extensive Clondulane flour mill was said to have been built by Stephen Moore, 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell (b.1770, s.1790, d.1822). The Earl also built a weir at Poulshane on the River Blackwater with a mill race to provide power for the mill.[1]

The growth in tillage

From the 1760s onwards there was a change in the nature of Munster agriculture. Cereal prices began to increase and tillage farming expanded after years of stagnation. The Dublin trade was the first point of sale for these grain crops but soon demand for oats and wheat came from England. In the north Cork area after 1780 wheat cultivation began to change the landscape. Many landlords invested in the construction of large flour mills and by the 1820s Fermoy (the new town of John Anderson) was regarded as the largest inland market in south Munster for wheat and oats.[2] The Clondulane mill was part of this expansion of tillage production and an important part of the local wheat and flour trade.

The mill building

The mill race is about 200 meters long and the mill building varies from six to seven stories. The window openings were arched with stone and later repaired with brick arches. By the 1980s the interior of the mill building was empty except for some trees and ivy. Some of the gearing machines were still visible in the wheelhouse.[3]

In 1848 the dimensions of the mill building were given as 40 feet long by 26 feet wide and 58.6 feet high. The mill wheel at that time was made of iron and measured 20 feet in diameter by 12 feet in breath with an 8 foot fall of water into the wheel pit.[4]

 

800px-Stephen_Moore,_Vanity_Fair,_1883-09-08

Stephen Moore, 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell

Robert Briscoe & Clondulane mill

In 1837 the mill was managed by Robert Briscoe of Fermoy. At that time the mill employed about 30 people and was capable of producing annually about 20,000 bags of flour. Clondulane parish (4,738 acres) was described as chiefly in tillage with also considerable areas under meadow and pasture.[5]

Sometime before 1845 Stephen Moore, 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell (b.1792, s.1822, d.1883), is accredited with building a corn mill at Glandalane.[6] Slater’s Postal Directory for 1846 described the mill as ‘extensive’ and built by the late Earl. In about 1856 Edward Kiley Carey had a corn mill (worth £7) in the townland of Careysville.[7] Careysville townland is just immediately to the east of Clondulane North townland where the Mount Cashell flour mill was situated. In the 1840 Ordinance Survey map the flour mill is shown but no corn mill is marked.

In about 1848 Robert Briscoe was leasee of Clondulane flour mill, then worth £25 15s. In about 1856 Robert Briscoe still rented the Clondulane flour mill from the Earl of Mount Cashell. The mill was then worth £96. Robert Briscoe was then living in Glandalane house, immediately to the west of the flour mill.[8] The large increase in the valuation of the flour mill between 1848 and 1856 was a significant investment in the dark days of the Great Famine. The investment was no doubt a great help in providing local employment as construction workers and employment at the expanded mill.

After Robert Briscoe the Clondulane mill was leased and managed by Henry Smith. The wheel dimensions were maintained under Henry Smith.[9] Slater’s Postal Directory for 1846 says that Henry Smyth was operating the mill at that time but this may be the corn mill owned by Edward Carey as Robert Briscoe still had the Clondulane mill in the early 1850s. in 1856 the lands of Clondulane were offered for sale as part of the Encumbered Estates Court as the Earl of Mount Cashell was heavily bankrupt.[10]

The Hallinan family & Clondulane mill

In 1875 John Hallinan was the leasee of Clondulane flour mill. The mill not only received wheat from neighbouring farmers but now was served by three trains a day on the new Fermoy and Lismore Railway. This railway joined the Great Southern & Western Railway line linking Fermoy to Mallow.[11]

In 1886 the firm of T. Hallinan and Sons operated the Clondulane flour mill.[12]

By the early twentieth century the Clondulane mill was using the railway station at Clondulane to import wheat from Manitoba to mix with local wheat to produce highly acclaimed flour. An aerial ropeway was constructed on derricks which carried the wheat from the station to the mill and the returning baskets from flour to the station for sale around Ireland.[13] The aerial wire rope-way was about 700 meters long and was marked on the 1935 Ordinance Survey map.[14] The railway also allowed the mill to buy large quantities of coal (about 40 to 160 tons a week). The stations at Ballyduff and Tallow only handled about 2 to 10 tons. Lismore station only managed about 30 to 100 tons.[15] This coal must have provided additional power to the mill when water levels were low or when the mill was working at top capacity.

Workers at the mill in 1911

In the 1911 census Joseph Hallinan (aged 46) was the miller in charge of Clondulane flour mill. Joseph Hallinan was born in May 1864 as the second son of Timothy Hallinan. Joseph Hallinan, January 1986, Muriel, daughter Col. Frederick Bell of Fermoy and ded in December 1954 leaving two sons (Donough and Hugh) and two daughters (Muriel and Ruth).[16] Ruth Hallinan was the last of her family to live in Glandalane House and was noted for flying a monoplane to visit friends in the neighbouring estates.[17]

In 1911 Maurice Twomey (45) was a store keeper at the mill. John J. Hallinan (30), Edmund Murphy (40), Stephen Barry (46), Patrick Ronan (50), Jeremiah Power (15), James O’Brien (26), John Leahy (34), Thomas Hallinan (60), John Fitzgerald (27), William Coleman (50), Edmund Thornberry (23), James Fanning (51), James Fanning (18), John Fanning (16), and John Kelleher (18) were mill labourers. William Crosse (38) was described as a ‘mill operator’ while Robert Crosse (39) and Albert Crosse (25) were millers. All these people lived in the two townlands of Clondulane North and Clondulane South.

Also working at the mill according to the 1911 census were Thomas Swaine (36) and John Swaine (40), both from Careysville, with Denis Twomey (50, a carrier) and Charles Quaid (21, a commercial clerk), both from Bettyville; along with Denis Egan (26), Thomas Egan (15), and Patrick Mulcahy (36), from Garrynoe and Patrick Madden (42) Patrick Bransfield (34) both from Kilbarry, all mill labourers.[18] In the period before his arrest in 1919, Michael Fitzgerald, C.O. of the Fermoy Battalion of the Irish Volunteers, worked for a time at the Clondulane flour mill.[19]

The mill in trouble

In the 1920s the Clondulane mill faced increased competition from foreign flour supplies and employment at the mill was under treat. By early 1928 the mill was virtually closed. On 23rd May 1928 William Kent T.D. (National Centre Party, Cork East), asked the Minister of Commerce (Patrick McGilligan) what he was going to do about foreign suppliers dumping flour on the Irish market. The Minister was aware that the mill was closed but when the Irish Flour Millers Association was asked about foreign dumping they could supply no evidence to justify application of custom duties.[20] In the 1937 Dáil debate on agriculture it was mentioned how the Clondulane mill had closed in 1931 due to government actions but reopened after the Fianna Fail government had placed a ban on flour imports.[21]

In 1934 and 1945 the firm of T. Hallinan & Sons operated a number of mills around Co. Cork (at Midleton and Mallow), including the Clondulane mill.[22]

The end of Clondulane mill

In the 1950s the Cork Milling Company had become owners of the Clondulane mill but they made little investments. By 1953 they had closed the mill. In July 1953 Martin Corry, T.D. (Fianna Fail, Cork North-East), asked the Minister of Commerce (Sean Lemass) concerning the reopening Clondulane mill and if the Cork Milling Company would not open it, could the Minster find another owner willing to do so.[23] But little positive action was taken. By the 1960s the mill buildings were idle and nature was recovering the landscape with trees and ivy. A local builder, Dan Noonan, made a bargain with the mill owners to remove the floor and roof timbers. The removal of the roof meant the owners didn’t have to pay rates on the building and this was a great saving for a building that had ceased to generate its own income.

Removing Clondulane mill weir

In 2006 an order of the Minster of Public Works was made to remove the weir at Clondulane as it was said that the weir was a major barrier for the migration of fish up the River Blackwater. European legislation was used to back up the order for removal. But the Duke of Devonshire (owner of the neighbouring Careysville estate – an important fishing centre on the river) and others objected that removal would damage their businesses without being of any great benefit to the migrating fish. Further government orders to remove the weir were made without effect. In 2018 a new government order was made to remove the weir.

If the weir is removed then the water entering the Clondulane mill race will be much reduced and make ineffective any attempt to reused the old mill buildings for the generation of hydro-electric power. It would be the end of an era in which Clondulane flour mill was not just of local importance but a business that covered the country and crossed the Atlantic in its influence.

 

==============

 

End of post

 

=============

 

[1] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 28; Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of the Parishes, Towns and Villages of Cork City and County, Cadogan, T. (ed.), (Wilton, 1998), p. 115

[2] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Wilton, 1998), pp. 283, 284

[3] Power, D., Lane, S., and others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, Vol. IV – North Cork, part 2 (Dublin, 2000), no. 15206

[4] Hogg, W.E., The Millers and Mills of Ireland (Dublin, 2011), Co. Cork, Clondulane North townland

[5] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 28. Information based on that published by Samuel Lewis in his Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (2 vols. London 1837).

[6] Wilson, C.A., A new lease on life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland & Canada (Montreal, 1994), p. 37

[7] Griffith’s Valuation, Co. Cork, Condons & Clangibbon barony, Clondulane parish, Careysville townland

[8] Griffith’s Valuation, Co. Cork, Condons & Clangibbon barony, Clondulane parish, Clondulane North townland

[9] Hogg, W.E., The Millers and Mills of Ireland (Dublin, 2011), Co. Cork, Clondulane North townland

[10] http://allens-ucs.com/page/8/ [accessed on 8th December 2018]

[11] Guy’s Postal Directory, 1875, pp. 217, 221 under Fermoy

[12] Guy’s Postal Directory, 1886, p. 482 under Fermoy

[13] Pochin Mould, D.D.C., Discovering Cork (Dingle, 1991), p. 160

[14] Power, Lane, & others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, Vol. IV – North Cork, part 2, no. 15206

[15] Waterford County Archives, Lismore Papers, Fermoy & Lismore Railway, IE/WCA/PP/LISM/811 and IE/WCA/PP/LISM/817

[16] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 545

[17] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2002), p. 177

[18] 1911 census for the Coole District Electoral Division at http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/ [accessed on 8th December 2018]

[19] http://fermoyireland.50megs.com/FITZGERALD_Michael.htm [accessed on 8th December 2018]

[20] https://www.oireachtas.ie/en/debates/debate/dail/1928-05-23/17/ [accessed on 8th December 2018]

[21] http://oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie/debates%20authoring/debateswebpack.nsf/takes/dail1937111000064?opendocument [accessed on 17th September 2017]

[22] Thom’s Directory of Ireland, 1934, p. 2693; Guy’s Postal Directory, 1945, p. 207

[23] http://oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie/debates%20authoring/debateswebpack.nsf/takes/dail1953072900006?opendocument [accessed on 17th September 2017]

Standard
Cork history

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Careysville lies on the south bank of the River Blackwater a few miles to the east of Fermoy in County Cork. In medieval times and up until the early eighteenth century the place was known as Ballymacpatrick. The name of Careysville came from the Carey family who had acquired the property in the 1650s. In the early eighteenth century people liked to place the word ‘ville’ behind a place-name like at nearby Bettyville and Abbeyville in north Co. Dublin in keeping with the fashion of all things French even if the British were busy fighting King Louis XIV of France.

There is no fully published history of the Carey family and they seem to have stayed out of the usual genealogical publications like Burke’s Landed Gentry. They family also left their own challenges for any researcher in that so many members of the family are called Peter or John and it is sometimes difficult to distinguish one Peter Carey from another Peter Carey. It could be worst of course. The neighbouring Campion family of Leitrim near Kilworth had six generations of people all called Thomas Campion.

 

Careysville

Careysville

Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick

Peter Carey was the first of his family to come to Ballymacpatrick in the mid seventeenth century. Within a generation the family would change the name of the place from Ballymacpatrick to Careysville by which name the place is known today. The Carey family came from Devon and early spelling of the name was Cary/Carew.[1] The name is said to be derived from the manor of Cary and this is possibly true.[2]

Peter Carey was born about 1625 in Devon. At the start of the rebellion in Ireland Peter Carey went there as part of the Royalist army.[3] In 1645, at Cork, he married Sarah Graham of Dromore, Co. Cork.[4] In the Confederate War (1641-53) Peter Carey served as a major in the Royalist army in Ireland under the Marquess of Ormonde. At Cork on 23rd October 1649 Major Peter Carey submitted to the English Parliament and Cromwell. Also there on that day was Captain Samuel Pomeroy who was a later friend of Peter Carey.[5]

During the period of the Cromwellian regime Captain Peter Carey acquired part of the confiscated estate of the Condons of Kilworth as part of his war wages. In 1660 Captain Petr Carey and his son, Peter Carey junior, were living at Ballymacpatrick. In 1660 Peter Carey (written as Carew) was appointed with many others in County Cork to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1660 and was also appointed to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1661.[6]

Following the restoration of King Charles II it was feared that much of the property acquired by the soldiers and adventurers, as part of their payment by Parliament, would be returned to the former owners. Some property was returned to the former owners but most of the confiscated land was kept by the new settlers. On 27th July 1666 Captain Peter Carey received certifications from the Court of Claims to retain the land he was given. This property formed the core of the Careysville estate.

In Macrony parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 55 acres 2 roots 16 perches at Curraheen Atmurry (also written as Curaghnalmory), 10ac 1r 12p at the Two Balleraths (held in 1640 by Richard Crofton) and 196ac at Crognalane (held in 1640 by David Sarsfield).[7] In Clondulane parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 166ac 2r 16p at Ballymacpatrick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon), 236ac 1r 16p at Curraballymurraboe (also written as Curraghballymorogh), and 173ac at Carrigtotane (Carrigturtane). In the same parish a person called Roger Carey got land at Lishnesillagh and Carrimoe in April 1663 but this land was later taken over by the Lord Chancellor.[8]

In Killgullane parish on 24th July 1666 Peter Carey got 100acres at Ballyshanbegg while on 27th July 1666 he got 105ac 3r 16p at Ballyadick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon) in the prebendary of Kealane.[9]

It would seem that Captain Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Burnell. In the 1664 will of Richard Burnell it was said that Elizabeth Carey should receive a grey mare while Peter Carey should get a grey horse and his son, Michael Carey, should get a colt. Richard Burnell also said that if all of Richard’s daughters should die, then Captain Peter Carey and Lieutenant Samuel Pomeroy should receive half his estate while the other half went to Henry Tanner. Peter Carey and Samuel Pomeroy were made the two executors. Richard Burnell’s sister was Elizabeth Campion, possibly of the Campion of Leitrim near Kilworth.[10] In 1676 Sarah, one of the daughters and co-heirs of Colonel Richard Burnell, married Edward Hoare. This Edward Hoare established Hoare bank with his brother Joseph Hoare before 1680, possibly using the inheritance of Sarah Burnell. The other daughter, Mary married Captain Thomas Lane.[11]

Captain Peter Carey died in 1670 and on 16th November 1670 his son, Peter Carey, took out administration of the estate.[12]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick was a cousin of Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, and was mentioned in the will of Thomas Campion in 1699 as the overseer of the will with Thomas Wight of Cork. Thomas Campion was a Quaker and it seems that Peter Carey was also.[13] In about 1679 Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick wrote his will in which he mentioned his wife Elizabeth, along with his sons, Peter and Thomas and two daughters, Sarah and Elizabeth. Peter Carey also mentioned his deceased son, Michael Carey.[14]

In 1712 Peter Carey junior was mentioned as one of the executors of the will of Henry Pyne of Waterpark, Co. Cork, with William Maynard.[15] Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Greene (died after March 1694) and died in 1714.[16] Records say that Peter Carey had at least two sons, Peter Carey and John Carey.[17]

Michael Carey

Michael Carey, who lived about 1657, was the second son of Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick, yet other records say that Michael was the grandson of Captain Carey.[18] Michael Carey was mentioned in the 1657 will of Richard Fisher of Fermoy (proved in 1661). Initially Richard Fisher left his estate to his wife, Dame Ann Boyle but after her death the estate would pass to Michel Carey. The estate of Richard Fisher in Mayo was gifted to his nephew, Andrew Fisher, son of Sir Edward Fisher.[19]

Michael Carey was alive in 1664 as he was mentioned in the will of Richard Burnell from whom he was to receive a colt but was dead before 1679 as his father mentioned his deceased son, Michael, in his own will.[20]

It is not clear if this was the Michael Carey of Ballymackee, Co. Waterford, who only daughter and heiress, Mary, married Rodolphus Greene (High Sheriff of Co. Waterford 1717), fourth son of Captain Godfrey Greene, a 49th officer.[21]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Sources say that that Peter Carey, son of Captain Carey, had a son called Peter Carey who in 1677 married Elizabeth Langer, daughter of John Langer of Youghal and was the father of eight children. These children were Peter (died 1773), John, Roger, Thomas, George, Catherine, Elizabeth and Ann.[22]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1683. In April 1699 John Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in the spring of 1703 with a B.A.[23]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey of Careysville was the son of Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville. He was born about 1681 and was educated by Mr. St. Clare of Cork. In July 1698 Peter Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1711 he was called to the Irish Bar.[24]

On 21st May 1736 Peter Carey of Careysville made his will. In it he mentioned his two sisters, Catherine and Anna and his brother George. Also mentioned were his other brothers John and Thomas and another sister called Mrs. Power. Peter Carey also remembered his cousins John Dillon of Quarterstown, Co. Cork and Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, Co. Cork. Peter’s three brothers were the executors for the will. The witnesses of the will, which was proved on 10th October 1737, were John Kerby, James Fling and William Condon.[25]

Penelope Carey

About 1728 Penelope Carey of Careysville married Nicholas Power of Careysville, eldest son of Pierce Power of Ballyhane, Co. Waterford. Nicholas Power lived for a time at Careysville and in January 1728 converted from Roman Catholicism to the Protestant Church of Ireland. Nicholas and Penelope Power had one son, Pierce Power, of Affane and Mogeehy, who was the ancestor of the Protestant Power families of Affane House, Mount Rivers and Belleville Park, all in Co. Waterford. Rev. John Power of Tallow was another convert and a younger son of Pierce Power.[26]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey of Careysville was the brother of Peter Carey (1736) of Careysville. In 1737 John Carey married Ann, daughter of John Causidice Maunsell, merchant of Cork and High Sheriff in 1719, by his wife Elizabeth Campion and had children. In 1767 Anne’s sister Elizabeth married John Carey of Carey’s Lodge.[27] In 1753 John Carey died and his will was proved by his widow on 2nd August 1753. He was succeeded by his eldest son Peter.[28]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was the third son of John Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Rev. Sullivan and entered Trinity College, Dublin, in May 1760. Langer Carey was a scholar there in 1763 and in the spring of 1765 graduated with a B.A. In 1664 he joined the Middle Temple. In 1770 Langer Carey was called to the Irish Bar.[29] He died unmarried on 16th June 1773 at his apartments in Trinity College.[30]

John Carey of Carey’s Lodge

In 1767 John Carey of Carey’s Lodge near Fermoy, married Elizabeth Maunsell, fourth daughter of John Causidice Maunsell of Cork and younger sister of Anne Maunsell who married John Carey of Careysville. John and Elizabeth left issue. Carey’s Lodge is located in the townland of Billeragh West which came to Peter Carey in the 1650s. In 1798 Carey’s Lodge was the scene of the notorious murder of Jasper Uniacke (the resident land agent), his wife and Colonel Richard Mansergh who were hacked to death by a gang of United Irishmen.[31]

In 1760 John Carey was a witness to the will of Thomas Campion of Cork city along with Peter Carey.[32]

John Carey

John Carey was the son of John Carey of Carey’s Lodge. He was educated in Fermoy and entered King’s Inns in Easter 1845 on the affidavit of his father as he was under 18 years old.[33]

Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge

On 21st September 1825, the wife of Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge, died.[34]

Peter Carey, armiger

In May 1747 Peter Carey married Penelope Minchin (as her second husband), eldest daughter of John Minchin of Anngh, Co. Tipperary and later Castle Inch, by his second wife, Penelope, daughter of Joseph Cuffe of Castle Inch, Co. Kilkenny. John Minchin’s first wife Frances, was the widow of Major Valentine Power of Clashmore, Co. Waterford.[35]

On 22nd September 1748 Humphrey Minchin of Inchmore, Co. Kilkenny mentioned his sister Penelope in his will and his brother-in-law, Peter Carey who was named as executor. Humphrey also mentioned William Minchin, son of Penelope by her first husband, Thomas Minchin along with other nephews. At the bottom of the will Peter Carey affixed his seal and the will was proved on 7th November 1748.[36]

Peter Carey was described as an armiger in 1779 and came from Cork. In 1779 his son, Peter Carey, entered Trinity College, Dublin.[37]

Peter Carey, son of the armiger

Peter Carey was born in about 1763 as the son of Peter Carey, armiger of Cork. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1779 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[38] In March 1783 Peter Carey, eldest son of Peter Carey, was made a freeman of Cork city with five other people.[39] On 13th September 1792 at Bloomfield, David Foley married the daughter of Peter Carey of Cork city.[40]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was born in 1738 and died in 1817.[41] On 23rd August 1759, at St. Paul’s church in Cork city, Peter Carey married Ann, daughter of Hugh Lawton merchant of Castle Jane, Co. Cork. Ann came with a dowry of £3,000, a not inconsiderable sum.[42]

 

peterofcareysville

Peter Carey

Jane Carey, the eldest daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville, married William Collis (died April 1839) of Richmond, Co. Waterford and Mountford Lodge, near Fermoy, Co. Cork. William Collis was the second son of Rev. William Collis of Co. Kerry and a descendent of the Cooke family of Castle Cooke near Kilworth, Co. Cork. William Collis and Jane Carey had five sons and one daughter. The second son, Peter Collis married in 1843 to Elizabeth, daughter of John Carey of South Cregg, near Fermoy.[43]

On 26th July 1792 Ann, the second daughter of Peter Carey married Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane.[44] Careysville was located in the parish of Clondulane.

Richard Carey, merchant

Richard Carey, merchant, was the father of John Carey who in 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[45]

John Carey

John Carey was born about 1757 as the son of Richard Carey, merchant. John Carey was educated by Mr. West and In June 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[46]

John Carey of Straw Hall

On 19th August 1793 James Connell of Castlelyons married Mary, the second daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall.[47] In 1767-1771 David Crotty held Straw Hall from where he sold mature oak trees and young trees for planting.[48]

Charlotte, the youngest daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall, near Fermoy, married John Mansergh as his second wife. John Mansergh was the eldest son of Nicholas Mansergh of Grenane, Co. Tipperary by his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John Carden of Templemore. Charlotte and John had one son, Robert Mansergh, who died without issue in May 1871[49]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was a son of Peter Carey, gent of Cork and was born in 1799. He was educated by Mr. Hincks and in January 1818 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1821 he graduated with a B.A. and in the summer of 1824 he got a M.A. and a M.B.[50] After graduation Langer Carey became a physician and surgeon, operating at Newport in Co. Tipperary. In 1828 he married Margaret Hunter of Dublin.[51] Langer Carey died on 16th August 1866 at Newport, Tipperary.[52] His will (valued under £4,000) was proved on 7th September 1866 by his wife Margaret Carey of Churchfield, Newport.[53]

On 7th July 1864 his daughter, Margaret Anna (born 1835) married Francis George Fosbery of Blennerville, Co. Kerry. Francis Fosbery died 1897 and Margaret Anna died 30th December 1917 leaving issue, a daughter and a son. In 1897 the son, George Francis Fosbery married Vivian de Burgh Lewis and was the father of four sons who in turn left living descendants.[54]

Langer Carey of Garrynoe

In December 1846 Langer Carey got £45 for drainage works on 9 acres at Ballyrice so as to provide work relief for the starving people in the Great Famine.[55] In about 1850 Langer Carey (or Langworth Carey as he is recorded in Griffith’s Valuation) owned Garrynoe townland (169 acres) in Clondulane parish. Langer Carey died on 31st March 1876 at Garrynoe leaving a will valued under £600 and which was proved 27th June 1876 by his wife Mary Anne Carey and Richard Carey, farmer of Garrynoe.[56]

Rev. Richard Carey

Rev. Richard Carey was the son of John Carey of Careysville. He was born about 1740 and was a prebendary of Donoughmore and Kiltegan in the diocese of Lismore. In 1787 Rev. Richard Carey was involved in the Clonmel Free School.[57] His appointment was made by the Earl of Mountcashell (a neighbour of the Careys at Careysville and the mayor of Clonmel). In 1809 a report said that the school was in a poor state of repair and that there were no boarders and that the attending students went to another school in the town to received their actual education.[58] In 1820 Rev. Richard Carey was still master of the Lismore Diocesan School. Rev. Richard Carey also acted as an assistant curate for Rev. Daniel Sullivan at Rathronan parish.[59]

In April 1791 Rev. Richard Carey was made a freeman of Cork city with about fifteen other people.[60] In June 1810 Rev. Richard Carey was elected bailiff of Clonmel town by the Corporation along with John Howell under the new mayor, John Croker.[61] He died in 1821 and was buried in Kiltegan graveyard. Rev. Richard Carey married Jane, daughter of Robert Bell, surgeon of Cork city and had at least three sons two of whom entered the church, Rev. Langer Carey and Rev. Robert Carey.[62] Rev. Richard Carey had at least two daughters, Ann married (1769) Humphrey Croly and Elizabeth married (1763) John Peddar.[63]

Rev. Richard Carey had at least one daughter, Martha (died 1876), who in 1836 married Francis Boxwel of Butlerstown, Co. Wexford, son of John Boxwell of same place. Francis and Martha Boxwell had three sons and three daughters.[64]

Rev. Langer Carey

Rev. Langer Carey was born near Clonmel as the eldest son of Rev. Richard Carey. In March 1806 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, and in the spring of 1810 graduated with a B.A.[65] In 1820 Rev. Langer Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Garret Wall in the parish of Dromkeen in the Diocese of Emly.[66] Rev. Langer Carey got married and had at least one son, Richard Garret Carey. Rev. Langer Carey died in 1830 and was buried in Marlfield church near Clonmel.[67]

Richard Garret Carey

Richard Garret Carey was the son of Rev. Langer Carey. Richard Carey was born about 1814 and in October 1830 entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1835 he graduated with a B.A.[68] In about 1850 Richard Garret Carey lived at Glen Abbey on the south side of the River Suir, near Clonmel. The property of 83 acres was known locally as ‘Carey’s Castle’.[69]

Rev. Robert Carey

Rev. Robert Carey was born about 1794 as a younger son of Rev. Richard Carey. In January 1811 Robert Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1815 he graduated with a B.A.[70] In 1818 he was made a priest at Cork.[71] In 1820 Rev. Robert Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Thomas Crawford in the parish of Derrygarth.[72] In about 1850 Rev. Robert Carey was rector of Kiltegan parish near Clonmel and held a number of properties in Clonmel and also at Donoughmore.[73]

John Peter Carey

John Peter Carey was the fourth son of Rev. Richard Carey and Anne Bell. He was born on 17th March 1809.[74] He was educated by Mr. Bell and entered Trinity College Dublin in July 1824 where in spring 1829 he graduated with a B.A.[75] In 1831 he entered the Middle Temple.[76]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was the eldest son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. In 1793 he married Elizabeth Keily (died 1801) by whom he had children and married secondly to Sarah Moore who died in 1839 without issue. Peter Carey was living at Careysville in 1814 and died in 1823.[77]

 

10a-1024x576

Careysville by the River Blackwater – home to good fishing

Peter Carey

Peter Carey was born about 1793 as the son of Peter Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1814 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[78] In 1831 he married Anne Clarke.[79] Peter Carey was originally living in Clondulane House in 1844 and 1856 but later moved into Fermoy. He died on 25th August 1863 and his will (valued under £800) was proved on 8th October 1863 by his son, Peter Wellington Carey of Fermoy.[80]

Rev. Richard Carey

Richard Carey was another son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. He took holy orders and was made a deacon in 1818 and a priest at Cloyne in 1819.[81] He later served as was a vicar in Skibbereen. About 1835 he married Elizabeth, daughter of John Labarte and was the father of Richard Carey.[82] Many years before, on 1st June 1789 John Labarte of Cork city had married Miss Crowley of Cork city at Careysville, the home of Peter Carey, esq.[83]

Richard Carey

Richard Carey son of Rev. Richard Carey was born in 1838 and was educated at Fermoy College. He became manager of the Munster and Leinster Bank at Skibbereen. In 1866 Ricard Carey married Kathleen Hill, daughter of William Hill. Richard Carey was the father of six sons Langer, William, Henry, Sidney, Arthur, and Edward.[84] Richard Carey was also the father of two daughters, Kathleen and Ethel (or Elizabeth and Sarah as another source has it).[85]

William Carey of Ballymacmoy

On 11th September 1819 William Carey of Ballymacmoy got a gaming licence for the year 1819 along with other local landowners from north-east Cork. On 17th September 1827, Margaret Theresa, eldest daughter of William Carey of Ballymacmoy died.[86] It is not clear this William Carey was one of the sons of Richard Carey of Skibbereen or a different person unconnected to the family.

 

f9d926d87c83ab2717fdd5aab7782275

Careysville

Edward Keily Carey of Careysville

Edward Keily Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1801, the year of his mother’s death. In January 1818 Edward Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin where in Easter 1821 he graduated with a B.A.[87]

On 1st September 1821 Edward Keily Carey married Elizabeth Margaret (died 13th September 1881), eldest daughter of William Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke, by his wife Elizabeth de Courcy, daughter of Maurice Uniacke Atkin of Leadington, Co. Cork. Elizabeth’s sister, Jane married her cousin Rev. Jasper Grant, rector of Castlehyde and member of the Grant family of Kilmurry.[88] Rev. Jasper Grant was the son of Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane, third son of Thomas Grant of Kilmurry by his wife Elizabeth Campion. In 1792 Rev. Alexander Grant had married Ann, second daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[89] William Cooke-Collis was the eldest son of Rev. Zachery Cooke-Collis and nephew of that William Collis who married Jane, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[90]

In 1823 Edward Keily Carey inherited Careysville according to his father’s will.[91] It seems that in the 1820’s or early 1830’s Edward Keily Carey remodelled Careysville house as Samuel Lewis in 1837 described it as a ‘handsome modern mansion’ lately built by Edward.[92]

In about 1850 the estate of Edward Keily Carey was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation. In Clondulane parish (barony of Condons and Clangibbon) he had Ballinveelig (147ac 0r 22p), Bawnnaclogh (81ac 2r 16p), Careysville (291ac 0r 19p), Carrigatoortane (170ac held jointly with Stephen Moore and George Lukey), Clondulane South (1ac 0r 3p), Curragh Lower (120ac 3r 11p), and Curragh Upper (312ac 3r 18p). In Macroney parish Edward Carey held Billeragh West (810ac 1r 10p) while Billeragh East (held in 1666 by Peter Carey) was owned by the Earl of Kingston, Crinnaghtane (236ac 3r 33p), and Curraghanolomer (367ac 3r 35p). Thus in about 1850 the total estate amounted to about 2,430 acres.

In June 1859 Edward Keily Carey sold 388 acres in the Estates court. By the 1870s the estate of Edward Keily Carey amounted to 1,670 acres.[93]

The big event in the middle years of Edward’s life was the Great Famine which killed many people and bankrupted many an estate. On 15th October 1845 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law Union meeting to discuss the growing problem with potato blight. Captain Carey said that the potato crop in the parish of Macroney was seriously affected and beyond remedy.[94] On 22nd October 1845 the Guardians of the Poor Law meet for their weekly meeting at which it was reported that a few people had already died in the workhouse and the Union was under financial pressure to cope.[95]

As the situation developed it was difficult to maintain the social and property barriers of previous times. On 7th November 1845 Edward Keily Carey summoned Mick Leahy, kiln labourer at Clondulane Mills, for the audacity to enter his field and quench his thirst in a spring. At the Fermoy petty sessions, Leahy was fined one shilling and one shilling 2 pence in costs.[96]

On 13th April 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Presentment session where a number of local road works were approved. At the Poor Law meeting of 13th May 1846, attended by Edward Carey, the members discussed building a new fever hospital to cope with the increasing famine which was further discussed on 17th June 1846.[97] In late June 1846 Edward Carey gave £5 to the Glanworth relief fund.[98]

The labouring class were particularly affected by the famine as they relied on the produce of their small gardens attached to their poor cottages. On 20th August 1846 Edward Carey was the chairman of the Fermoy petty sessions before which a good number of labourers were charged with not providing work service in lieu of rent payments under the Parliament Act of 43 George 3, C86. The labourers wanted cash for their work so they could buy food as their potato crops had failed. Chairman Carey agreed with four of the seven magistrates to dismiss the cases and not send the labourers to prison due to the exceptional nature of the times.[99]

To help provide work for the starving people a number of work schemes were organised. In December 1846 Edward Carey got £221 for drainage works on 45 acres at Curragh and Careysville.[100] On 18th August 1847 Edward Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law meeting where a big discussion occurred over the striking of a rate upon property owners to fund the Union’s famine relief works. A minority, led by the Earl of Mountcashell, were for asking the government to fund the Union rather than local taxation. Edward Carey supported the majority who were for setting a rate and asking the government for reimbursement afterwards.  The Union was under pressure to do so or the government would take over the Union and charge the local landlords an additional £800 to £1,000 to administrate the Union.[101] In the event the Union struck as a rate and continued in business under stressful times. In 1850 Edward Keily Carey was an ex-officio member of the Fermoy Poor Law Union with other local landlords.[102] By then the worst of the Great Famine had passed and life was beginning to return to normal but the undercurrent of society had changed utterly and the days of the landlord were on the countdown to termination.

Today (2017) the Careysville estate is well known as an important fishery location on the River Blackwater with visitors coming there from near and far, the famous and the not so famous. Back in the 1840s, during the height of the Great Famine, Careysville was still an important fishery location. On 2nd July 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended a meeting in Fermoy to ask parliament to extend the angling fishery season by one month and to ask for restrictions on net fishing as the salmon were not getting upriver in the same numbers as previously.[103]

In 1867 Edward Keily Carey was asked to judge on the attack by a mob on the daughter of the Bridewell jail in Fermoy. A local man, John McCarthy, had been arrested for involvement in the Fenian movement and was detained in the Bridewell, now known as Kneller Villas. When the warden came to take McCarthy out for exercise, he was locked in the cell and McCarthy attempted to make good his escape. But the warden’s daughter raised the alarm and McCarthy in panic dropped the jail keys and returned to his cell. For her troubles a mob attacked the girl the following Sunday. Ten days later Magistrate Carey and other local landlords had the mob up before the Fermoy petty sessions but decided to leave them off with a caution.[104]

On 4th February 1874 Margaret Anna, the second daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey, married her near neighbour, Thomas St. John Grant (born September 1852) of Kilmurry, eldest son of Thomas St. John Grant by his wife Eliza, youngest daughter of Rev. Thomas Hoare by his wife Mary, daughter of Henry Lloyd of Lloydsboro, Co. Tipperary. Thomas and Jane Grant had two sons.[105]

Edward Keily Carey died on 18th December 1876 and his wife Margaret died in 1881. Later a memorial tablet was erected to their memory in Christ Church, Fermoy, by their daughter, Elizabeth Montgomery.[106] The will of Edward Keily Carey (valued under £3,000) was proved on 6th March 1877 by Rev. Maurice Cooke Collis and Rev. Jasper Alexander Grant.[107]

George Montgomery of Killee and Careysville

In 1866 George Montgomery of Killee House, near Mitchelstown, married Elizabeth Jane, eldest daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey of Careysville. George Montgomery (born 12th July 1843 – died 4th September 1910) was the eldest son of Rev. William Quin Montgomery of Killee and Alice, daughter of Rev. P. Sleeman of Devon, and grandson of George Montgomery of Killee and Mary Quin of Loloher, Cahir, Co. Tipperary. George’s grandfather, Hugh Montgomery, fought under William III in Ireland and Hugh was the grandson of Rev. James Montgomery from Scotland who first settled in Co. Down in the early seventeenth century.[108]

Killee was first granted in 1699 to Colonel Francis De la Rue and his wife Elizabeth Howard and inherited by their son, Wriothesley De la Rue. In the early eighteenth century Wriothesley devised all his Irish estate to his half-brother, George Montgomery (son of Hugh Montgomery and Elizabeth Howard by her second marriage). This George died in 1778 and his third son, George Montgomery inherited Killee and married Mary Quin, as above.[109]

George and Elizabeth Montgomery had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, William Montgomery inherited Killee while the second son, Edward Hugh Montgomery inherited Careysville.[110]

Edward Hugh Montgomery of Careysville

Edward Hugh Montgomery was born on 10th November 1871 and attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he qualified as a medical doctor. On 12th July 1894 he married Lilla, daughter of W. Perrott and in March 1896 they had a son, Edward Henry Montgomery.[111]

After the Second World War Careysville was sold to the Duke of Devonshire whose descendants still own the property ending nearly three hundred years of Carey association.

 

=================

 

End of post

 

================

 

[1] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[2] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd Sept 2017

[3] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 97

[4] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[5] Caulfield, R., The Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal: From 1610 to 1659, from 1666 to 1687, and From 1690 to 1800 (Guildford, 1878), p. lvi

[6] Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), pp. 235, 623, 642

[7] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 932; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 236

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 933; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 235

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 934

[10] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[11] White, Col. J.G., Historical and Topographical notes, Etc. on Buttevant, Castletownroche, Doneraile, Mallow and Places in their Vicinity (Cork, 1905), vol. 1, pp. 36, 40

[12] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 746, 747

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 721

[16] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[17] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses: A Register of the Students, Graduates, Professors and Provosts of Trinity College in the University of Dublin, 1593-1860 (Bristol, 2001), vol. 1, p. 133

[18] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[19] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 627

[20] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[21] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 493

[22] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[23] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[24] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 75

[25] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 633

[26] O’Byrne, E. (ed.), The Convert Rolls (Dublin, 2005), no. 998; Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 174

[27] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804

[28] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[29] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 74

[30] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[31] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 96

[32] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 747

[33] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[34] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1607

[35] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 824, 826

[36] Eustace, P. Beryl (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, Vol. II, 1746-1785 (Dublin, 1954), no. 42

[37] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[38] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[39] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2111

[40] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1437

[41] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[42] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 15, p. 2523

[43] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 259

[44] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[45] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[46] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[47] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 143

[48] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1359, 1383

[49] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 782, 783, 784

[50] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[51] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[52] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[53] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014887/005014887_00035.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[54] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[55] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[56] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014892/005014892_00056.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[57] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[58] Reports from the commissioners of the board of education in Ireland, 1813-14, pp. 279, 280

[59] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register: Containing the Names of the Prelates, Dignitaries and Parochial Clergy in Ireland (Dublin, 1820), pp. 90, 93

[60] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2124

[61] http://nickreddan.net/newspaper/np_abst13.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[62] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017; http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[63] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[64] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 159

[65] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[66] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 78

[67] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[68] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[69] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[70] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[71] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[72] Erck, The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 93

[73] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[74] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867, p. 74

[75] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[76] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[77] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[78] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[79] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[80] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014885/005014885_00249.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 119

[81] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[82] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[83] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1422

[84] Pike, W.T., ‘Contemporary Biographies’, in Hodges, R.J. (ed.), Cork and Cork County in the Twentieth Century (Brighton, 1911), p. 176

[85] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[86] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1583, 1610

[87] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[88] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[89] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[90] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[91] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[92] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[93] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[94] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 7’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[95] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 8’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[96] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 11’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[97] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 33 and 37, and 42’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[98] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 43’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[99] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 51’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[100] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[101] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 103’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[102] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

[103] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 44’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[104] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 210

[105] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 176

[106] http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/cork/photos/tombstones/1headstones/fermoy-mem.txt accessed on 3rd September 2017

[107] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014893/005014893_00061.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[108] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, pp. 485, 486

[109] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 485

[110] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

[111] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

Standard