Railway History, Waterford history

Mallow to Waterford Diesel Locomotives: A Class

 Mallow to Waterford Diesel Locomotives: A Class

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

“A” Class

As late as 1948 a report for Córas Iompair Éireann recommended continuing with steam tractor traction and proposed building 50 new steam trains. Meanwhile in the late 1940s the Inchicore works experimented with building five diesel-electric locomotives which proved successful. In 1950 Oliver Bulleid was appointed as Chief Mechanical Engineer from his work with Southern Railways in England. Bulleid favoured buying North American locomotives but a shortage of dollars meant the government favoured a British manufacture. In 1954 CIE signed a contract with Metropolitan-Vickers for 90 locomotives of which 60 were to have a Co-Co wheel arrangement and 1,200hp and these units became known as A Class with the letter A signifying the top power rating of the planned diesel fleet. The Co-Co wheel arrangement means three axles on each bogie given 6 wheels per bogie and twelve per locomotive. [Source: Irish Railway Models, Córas Iompair Éireann/Irish Rail, A/001 Class Diesel-Electric Locomotive (Dublin, 2021), pp. 1, 2]

Metropolitan-Cammell of Birmingham made the bodywork while the bogies were by the English Steel Castings Corporation of Sheffield. The bogies proved highly successful and it was said that on the worst line in Ireland that you wouldn’t feel a bump. The engines were manufactured by Crossley Brothers of Manchester. The locomotives were assembled at Dukinfield with delivery beginning in 1955. The A Class pulled passenger and freight trains across the network. The braking system on the A Class was very responsive to its work load, especially working loose couple freight trains. The Crossley engines were not so satisfactory. Although powerful the engine caused excessive vibrations and imbalanced the locomotive. In 1968 the engines were replaced by General Motors Electro-Motive Division 1,325hp engines. A58 and A59 were the first two to get the new engines and had the letter R applied to their loco number to become A58R and A59R. The GM motors saved the A Class from the scrap yard as the Crossley engines cost an arm and a leg to maintain. [Source: Irish Railway Models, Córas Iompair Éireann/Irish Rail, A/001 Class Diesel-Electric Locomotive (Dublin, 2021), pp. 2, 3, 7]

The specifications of the A Class were 51feet long with a wheel base of 12foot 3inches and a wheel diameter of 3foot 2inches. The locomotive weighted 85 tons with an axle load of 14.1 tons. The Crossley V8 engine gave a max speed of 75 miles per hour with a traction effort of 61,000lbs (pounds). Before getting the GM motors the locomotives often developed oil leaks in the engine room and had a high failure rate with the cabs noisy and draughty. After re-engineering the locomotives proved to be the work horses of the system with few failures and better driver comfort. [Source: Jack O’Neill, Engines and Men, Irish Railways: a View from the Footplate (Portlaw, 2005), pp. 59, 60] Michael Baker once travelled between Waterford and Cork via Dungarvan in a passenger train pulled by an A Class loco with a Crossley engine. The machine billowed brown smoke and proceeded with a ‘continuous shattering roar’. The engine struggled on the steeper inclines pulling the wooden-bodied carriages. [Source: Michael Baker, Irish Railways Since 1916 (London, 1972), p. 151] The re-engineering programme only began with A58 in 1968, a year too late to have any chance to prove itself on the Mallow to Waterford line.

In 1955 the A Class arrived with a silver grey livery which proved to be ill suited to the Irish weather. Over the next forty years the locomotives received various different liveries from green to black and tan, to super-train livery and everything in between. [Source: Tom Ferris, Irish Railways in colour: From Steam to Diesel 1955-1967 (Dublin, 1992), pp. 88, 89] In 1972 CIE replaced the letter classification to a number system and the A Class became the 001 Class. In 1977 the arrival of the 071 Class displayed the 001 to branch duty. By 1990 some 43 locomotives of the A Class were still in service but these were quickly withdrawn by the arrival of the 201 Class. The lack of air brakes to handle the new freight liner trains of the late 1970s onwards meant that the A Class was left to do secondary work on the network. In 1995 the last A Class was withdrawn. [Source: Irish Railway Models, Córas Iompair Éireann/Irish Rail, A/001 Class Diesel-Electric Locomotive (Dublin, 2021), p. 4]

A39r at Downpatrick

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Loco number A9: in 1966 Tony Price travelled in the cab of A9 between Dungarvan and Waterford (driven by Harry Acheson of Waterford) as it hauled a goods train and took a film of the journey. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ A Class A9 – Dungarvan to Waterford Railway (1966) = accessed on 31st October 2020]

In 1967 loco A9 was filmed by Tony Price at Ballyduff hauling a goods train from Waterford to Mallow. On another occasion A9 was filmed at Cappagh station pulling a freight train from Mallow to Waterford. She was in the black livery with the CIE broken wheel logo on the side. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ – Passenger + Freight trains @ Mallow – Waterford (1967) = accessed on 31st October 2020]

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Loco number A11: in March 1963 loco A11 was photographed at Fermoy station pulling a west bound goods train. Beside it on the station platform was B141 pulling a passenger train bound for Cork while loco 90 was standing in the Mitchelstown platform. [Source: photo uploaded to Facebook group “North Cork Railways by Paudie McGrath on 19th September 2020 = https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=10223944706501185&set=pcb.1337308653274373 accessed 26th November 2020]

In 1982 Tony Price filmed 011 passing through Kilmacthomas station as the driver collected the token from Jim Kirwan, the signalman. The loco was pulling 20 freight cars possibly containing dolomite for Ballinacourty. Another part of the film shows 011 parked at Ballinacourty with some Quigley magnesite factory workers and the C.I.E. crew standing in front of it. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ – Freight trains @ Ballinacourty to Waterford Railway (1982) = accessed 31st October 2020]

A11 remained in service on the Irish railway network for many years after the closure of the Mallow to Waterford line. In 1988 she was filmed by Joe St Leger pulling a permanent way train around Mallow area. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ A Class PWD-trains @ Mallow (1988) = accessed 7th December 2021]

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Loco number A19r: in 1971 Joe St. Leger filmed A19r pulling a fifteen car magnesite train from Ballinacourty to Tivoli in Cork through Limerick Junction. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ – Passenger + Freight trains @ Limerick Junction & Rathpeacon (1971) = accessed on 31st October 2020]

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Loco number A20: in about 1960 Tom Tobin photographed the A20 at Dungarvan station pulling a passenger train westwards to Fermoy and Mallow. It appears to have the grey livery. [Source: Waterford County Museum, No. TT476]

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Loco number 030: on 6th June 1975 Liam O’Mahony took a photograph of loco 030 near the magnesite plant at Ballinacourty pulling a train of tanker wagons. The photograph included Liam O’Mahony sitting on a farm gate with the train driver looking out of the cab right window. [Source: Waterford County Museum, No. UK2519] 

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Loco number A39r: this loco was a member of the A class of locomotives. In January 1971 Joe St. Leger filmed the A39r pulling a lifting train between Abbeyside and the Ballinacourty junction. The train uplifted and took away both rails and sleepers. [Source: Irish Railway Record Society film uploaded to YouTube entitled CIÉ A Class A39R lifting train – Ballinacourty-Dungarvan (1971) = accessed on 31st October 2020]

The A39r is persevered by the Irish Traction Group in Co. Down at the D.C.D.R.

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Loco number 041: in July 1982 number 041 pulled a five car passenger train for the Irish Railway Record Society between Waterford and Ballinacourty and back on a farewell tour of the railway. She had the black and tan livery. [Source: film by Tom Ryan posted on the Facebook page Mallow Fermoy Lismore Waterford Railway & Branch Lines on 3rd December 2020]

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Waterford history

Ballinacourty Magnesite Factory and the Railway

Ballinacourty Magnesite Factory and the Railway

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

The Quigley Magnesite Limited factory at Ballinacourty by the sea, and east of Dungarvan, operated from 1970 to 1982 producing magnesite which was used in the manufacture of heavy duty furnace bricks.[1] The factory was situated beside Ballinacourty lighthouse and is now (2021) the location of the Gold Coast golf course. It used dolomite limestone from Bennettsbridge to manufactory the magnesite. The enterprise was established by John A. Mulcahy, an emigrant with ancestors in the Dungarvan area. The plant was built in 1969 by P.J. Hegarty and Sons of Cork.[2] The railway network was an essential component in the success of the enterprise. The Waterford to Kilkenny railway passed along the west side of the quarry at Bennettsbridge, just south of milepost 32. Freight wagons carried the dolomite to Waterford where it passed over the Suir Railway Bridge and onto the Waterford to Dungarvan railway. At milepost 49 a short spur line of 1½ miles was built off the Waterford to Dungarvan railway to reach the Ballinacourty factory. On 4th September 1968 Córas Iompair Éireann (C.I.É.) applied to the Minister for Transport and Power for permission to construct the new line of track. A ministerial order of 9th December 1968 gave powers to C.I.É. to compulsory purchase the necessary land, and to build the single line of railway.[3]

030 brings full oil wagons and empty magnesite wagons to Ballinacourty (Waterford County Museum photo)

Not everybody in Ballinacourty was happy with the new railway. The area was noted for its early potatoes and the new railway seemed to like travelling across the best of farmland.[4] Although angry at first, the local farmers accepted the railway.[5] They possibly found the seemingly endless white clouds that came out of the magnesite factory more irritating.

On 5th June 1968 Deputy Richard Barry, T.D. (Fine Gael, North-East Cork), asked Deputy Patrick Lalor, T.D. (Fianna Fail, Laois-Offaly, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport and Power), if it was intended by C.I.É. to re-open the Mallow to Waterford railway for passengers and freight following the awarding of a contract to bring dolomite to the proposed new Ballinacourty factory. The last service on the Mallow to Waterford line ended on Saturday 25th March 1967.[6] Deputy Lalor replied that C.I.É. had no intention of re-opening the line for passengers or freight. Instead the Waterford to Ballinacourty line was purely just for the dolomite traffic and the magnesite would be transported to Cork via Waterford and Limerick Junction.[7] C.I.É. said the magnesite/oil train between Cork and Ballinacourty would not of itself make it economic to open the line between Ballinacourty and Mallow. By March 1968 a large section of the railway between Lismore (milepost 32) and Ballyhane (milepost 38) east of Cappoquin had already been removed. This was even done before an extraordinary general meeting of the Fishguard & Rosslare Railway Company (owners of the line) on 4th April 1968 approved the Abandonment Order and appointed C.I.É. to implement the winding up proceedings.[8] Deputy Thomas Kyne, T.D. (Labour, Waterford), asked Deputy Lalor, T.D., if the 1½ miles of track from Dungarvan to the proposed Ballinacourty junction be retained so to allow passenger services to continue between Dungarvan and Waterford. Deputy Lalor expressed no personal objections but that the re-opening of the line was only for a specific purpose.[9]

On 3rd April 1970 the first dolomite train travelled over the newly reconditioned Waterford to Ballinacourty railway.[10] The line was in pretty good condition in 1970 to take the heavy freight traffic.[11] The first production manager at Quigley-Magnesite was Frank O’Riordan. Yet the satisfaction of seeing the new factory begin operations and provide employment in the Dungarvan was short lived for John Mulcahy. The cost of setting up the facility was a bit too much and in 1971 John Mulcahy sold the factory.[12] Fortunately the new owners, Pfizers, were willing to continue operations for another eleven years.

Initially there were two dolomite trains at day travelling in each direction with one train a day service to Cork. The business for C.I.É. was worth about £1½ million per year.[13] The service with Cork supplied the factory with usually five tank wagons of heavy fuel oil and about a dozen empty magnesite wagons. The return journey carried the loaded magnesite wagons to Tivoli, east of Cork, for export and the empty oil wagons. Occasionally the empty dolomite wagons would collect ballast at Carroll’s Cross quarry as the railway line passed through the quarry.[14]

The magnesite/oil train between Ballinacourty and Cork was usually pulled by an A Class diesel locomotive.[15] The A Class locomotives were built in 1955 by Metropolitan-Vickers using parts made by Metro-Cammell and engines by the Crossley Works. The original Crossley engine was insufficient for the mainline work asked of the A Class and so in 1968-70 the locomotives received the better General Motors engine from the US and so could work the freight trains.[16] The loaded wagons were placed next behind the locomotive for better braking effect. Thus coming from Cork the oil wagons were next to the locomotive with the empty magnesite wagons at the rear. On the return journey the magnesite wagons would be next to the locomotive with the empty oil wagons at the rear.[17] A20r pulled such a train towards Cork as seen on the section of track between Clonmel and Cahir.[18]

The oil tankers and the magnesite wagons began their journey at Tivoli but were hauled as separate trains through Glanmire station and Glanmire tunnel uphill as far as Rathpeacon. There a number of sidings beside the double track mainline allowed the two trains to be joined into one train for the long journey to Ballinacourty. At Limerick Junction the locomotive had to do a run around and push the train around a curved track onto the Limerick railway. After straightening up and given the all clear to cross the Cork-Dublin mainline, the driver received the staff from the signalman as he proceeded onto the Waterford bound railway.[19] At Waterford the locomotive had to run around the train again so as to face the curved track onto the Suir Railway Bridge. As he went the driver would have received another staff to take him as far as Kilmacthomas where Jim Kirwan exchanged the staff for another one to allow the train to proceed onwards to Ballinacourty. The Dungarvan to Mallow railway would have eliminated all that running around by a short west facing spur line at Ballinacourty junction with an east facing spur for the dolomite trains.

Sometimes, depending on production schedules, an A Class locomotive would bring a train of only empty magnesite wagons to Ballinacourty, usually about 15 to 22, and return to Waterford with just empty oil tank cars, usually 5 wagons. A loaded magnesite train would be about 15 to 22 wagons. The number of oil cars varied between 3 and 5 wagons. Sometimes empty oil wagons would be left in the sidings at Kilmacthomas station.[20] Occasionally a longer 9 to 10 empty oil wagons train came off the Ballinacourty railway across the Suir Bridge and onto Cork hauled sometimes by A8r. This 10 wagon train would later return to Ballinacourty from Cork with full wagons without any magnesite wagons.[21] In the beginning the magnesite wagons were often covered with just a tarpaulin cover.[22] Later an iron roof was placed over the wagons which could be opened and closed for loading and unloading.[23]    

The dolomite train was usually hauled by a pair of locomotives of the 141 Class.[24] The 141 Class were built by General Motors of the USA and introduced in 1962 with double cabs. The heavy dolomite trains often required the driver to work the route with the throttle at full power.[25] Before the development of the Tara Mines railway freight traffic, the dolomite trains from Bennettsbridge to Ballinacourty were the heaviest on the railway network. The dolomite train was usually about 24 wagons long.[26] Occasionally a single 141 Class locomotive would haul a short dolomite train of about a dozen wagons between Bennettsbridge and Ballinacourty as B144 did in 1971.[27] The Waterford to Ballinacourty railway was serviced by the engineering department at Waterford station. Line inspection vans, permanent way crew, weed spraying train and mechanical serving units at various times travelled and worked on the line.

Ballinacourty
freight wagons
   
    
 DolomiteMagnesiteOil
Capacity20 tonnes20 tonnes20 tonnes
Load empty10 tonnes10 tonnes12 tonnes
Maximum load30 tonnes30 tonnes32 tonnes
Car numbers26612/2662726590/2659326570/26589
Car numbers26632/2663526595/2659626628/26631
Car numbers26594/26597/2659826599/2660026636/26652
Car numbers26601/26607/2661026602/2660626723/26728
Car numbers26760/2676926608/26609 
Car numbers 26611 
    

To extract the magnesite from the dolomite the rock needed to be mixed with sea salt hence the location of the factory at Ballinacourty beside the sea. The factory was able to achieve an extraction rate of 92%.[28] Apart from the endless white clouds across Dungarvan Bay, the factory was a major boost to the local economy. Some 150 workers were employed at the factory generating about £1½ million in annual wages for the local economy. Local business also benefitted from about £3½ million in local supply contracts.

Before the Ballinacourty factory closed in 1982 the volume of magnesite transported to Cork/Tivoli by rail had decreased with an increasing amount carried by road as there were difficulties offloading the railway wagons at Tivoli.[29] By 1982 the Quigley-Magnesite Company discovered magnesium carbonate in East Asia that could be extracted cheaper by open cast mining. The seams at Bennettsbridge were still available and further seams of dolomite limestone were available at the Ballyellen quarry on the east side of the River Barrow. The manufacturing process could also be done cheaper in Asia.[30] Another consideration was that the factory had outlived the ten year obligatory period for state grant aid. Thus the company announced the closure of the factory in 1982. The last railway traffic serving the factory was made on 28th July 1982.[31] Inspection cars and the occasional locomotive without any wagons travelled the line until 1990.   

In August 1993 the Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company announced that they intended to abandon the railway between Waterford West junction and milepost 49 on the Waterford/Ballinacourty railway. The 1½ mile rail line from milepost 49 to the former Ballinacourty factory was owned by C.I.É. The crossover at Waterford West was discounted and the signals were removed. On Sunday 21st November 1993 the line at Waterford West was converted into a railway siding.[32] The track was lifted using diggers and excavators. Much of the track was recycled for use elsewhere on the railway network.[33] In 1997 a group was formed in Waterford with the purpose of building a narrow gauge railway between Kilmeaden and Waterford. In 2002 the group took on their first passengers as the Waterford and Suir Valley Railway with the line extending from Kilmeaden to Bilberry by 2004.[34] In the 1990s the Gold Coast Golf Club purchased the derelict Quigley-Magnesite factory. The site was cleared of its industrial past and the Club’s previous 9-hole golf course was expanded into an 18-hole one.[35]

Weed spray train at Ballinacourty (Waterford County Museum photo)

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[1] Waterford County Museum, photo image, No. UK2530

[2] Power, Patrick C., A history of Dungarvan Town and District (Dungarvan, 2000), p. 294

[3] Shepherd, Ernie, Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company: An illustrated history (Newtownards, 2015), pp. 161, 162

[4] Cantwell, Eddie, The Way it Was, Ballinacourty, Ballinroad & Clonea: The Families & their History (Dungarvan, 2004), pp. 14, 16

[5] Barry, Michael, Tales of the Permanent Way: Stories from the Heart of Ireland’s Railways (Dublin, 2009), p. 87

[6] Flaherty, Cian, William Fraher, Julian Walton & Willie Whelan (eds.), The Towns & Villages of the Waterford Greenway: a history of Dungarvan, Abbeyside, Stradbally, Kilmacthomas, Portlaw & Waterford City (Dungarvan, 2018), p. 254

[7] Dáil Éireann debates, Vol. 235, No. 4, 5th June 1968, oral questions and answers, Mallow-Waterford Railway Line.

[8] Shepherd, Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company, p. 162

[9] Dáil Éireann debates, Vol. 235, No. 4, 5th June 1968, oral questions and answers, Mallow-Waterford Railway Line.

[10] Baker, Michael H.C., Irish Railways Since 1916 (London, 1972), p. 151

[11] Barry, Tales of the Permanent Way: Stories from the Heart of Ireland’s Railways, p. 87

[12] Power, A history of Dungarvan Town and District, p. 294, based on information given by Frank O’Riordan to Patrick C. Power, 21st March 1999

[13] Flaherty, Fraher, Walton & Whelan (eds.), The Towns & Villages of the Waterford Greenway, p. 254

[14] www.irishrailwaymodeller.com questions and answers, Waterford Station, answer posted 17th October 2014 by Junctionmad who occasionally travelled on the dolomite train and saw it stop at Carroll’s Cross (accessed 8th November 2021)

[15] www.irishrailwaymodeller.com questions and answers, Waterford Station, answer posted 17th October 2014 by aclass007 (accessed 8th November 2021)

[16] Baker, Irish Railways Since 1916, pp. 171, 188

[17] www.irishrailwaymodeller.com questions and answers, Waterford Station, answer posted 10th October 2014 by aclass007 (accessed 8th November 2021)

[18] Irish Railway Record Society, film, Irish Railway Film Show-“From Cork to Mayo and the Suir Valley” by Joe St Leger/Ciarán Cooney as seen on YouTube

[19] Irish Railway Record Society, film, Irish Railway Film Show-“From Cork to Mayo and the Suir Valley” by Joe St Leger/Ciarán Cooney as seen on YouTube

[20] Irish Railway Record Society, film, CIÉ-Freight Trains @ Ballinacourty to Waterford Railway (1982) as seen on YouTube

[21] Irish Railway Record Society, film, Irish Railway Film Show-“From Cork to Mayo and the Suir Valley” by Joe St Leger/Ciarán Cooney as seen on YouTube

[22] Irish Railway Record Society, film, Irish Railway Film Show-“From Cork to Mayo and the Suir Valley” by Joe St Leger/Ciarán Cooney as seen on YouTube

[23] Irish Railway Record Society, film, CIÉ-Freight Trains @ Ballinacourty to Waterford Railway (1982) as seen on YouTube

[24] www.irishrailwaymodeller.com questions and answers, Waterford Station, answer posted 17th October 2014 by aclass007 (accessed 8th November 2021)

[25] O’Neill, Jack, Engines and Men, Irish Railways: a View from the Footplate (Portlaw, 2005), p. 63

[26] Irish Railway Record Society, film, CIÉ-Freight Trains @ Ballinacourty to Waterford Railway (1982) as seen on YouTube

[27] Irish Railway Record Society, film, CIÉ-Passenger + Freight trains @ Waterford West (1971) as seen on YouTube

[28] Power, A history of Dungarvan Town and District, p. 294

[29] www.irishrailwaymodeller.com questions and answers, Waterford Station, answer posted 18th October 2014 by aclass007 (accessed 8th November 2021)

[30] Power, A history of Dungarvan Town and District, p. 294

[31] Anon, ‘Irish Railway News’, in the Journal of the Irish Railway Record Society, Vol. 18, No. 123 (February 1994), pp. 353-363, at p. 359

[32] Anon, ‘Irish Railway News’, in the Journal of the Irish Railway Record Society, Vol. 18, No. 123 (February 1994), pp. 353-363, at p. 359

[33] Barry, Tales of the Permanent Way: Stories from the Heart of Ireland’s Railways, p. 87

[34] Shepherd, Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company, pp. 173, 174

[35] Power, A history of Dungarvan Town and District, p. 294

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Waterford history

Kilmeaden Railway Station Staff

Kilmeaden Railway Station Staff

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

In 1872 construction began on building the Waterford, Dungarvan and Lismore Railway which linked the city of Waterford via a station at Bilberry on the south side of the River Suir with the town of Lismore via Dungarvan. At Lismore the line joined the existing Fermoy & Lismore Railway (opened 1872) which took passengers and goods to Fermoy from where they continued on to Mallow via a railway built in 1860. The line took six years to build and was opened in August 1878. Kilmeaden was the first station on the line out of Waterford after the railway had passed along by the River Suir. The location of the station not only facilitated local access for passengers and goods to the port cities of Waterford and Cork but also had good road communication with the important industrial town of Portlaw. In 1906 the construction of the Suir Railway Bridge linked the Mallow to Waterford line with the station at Waterford North. This connection allowed the through run of the Rosslare express from the ferry at Rosslare to Cork via the new South Wexford Railway. The bridge also connected Kilmeaden with the other railway lines in the south-east such as through Kilkenny and Carlow and a more direct route to Dublin than going all the way around via Mallow. [Cian Flaherty, William Fraher, Julian Walton & Willie Whelan (eds.), The Towns and Villages of the Waterford Greenway (Dungarvan, 2018), pages 246, 250]

Modern Kilmeaden Railway Station

In 1916 a number of local farmers in the Kilmeaden area came together to form Kilmeaden Co-op and a new creamery was built in the village. The first month of operations (October 1916) processed 10,932 gallons of milk and by July 1920 some 38,000 gallons per month was received. The railway facilitated the transportation of this milk and process butter and cheese to Waterford, Cork and further afield. The train time table allowed a few minutes for the engines of passenger trains to attach freight cars of milk and butter for transportation to the big cities. [Michael Carberry, (edited by Donnchadh Ó Ceallacháin), Ballyduff-Kilmeaden: Portrait of a Parish (Kilmeaden, 1998), page 31]

Since before 1900, the Mallow to Waterford railway had competed with the Waterford and Limerick Railway for the best connection between the Rosslare ferry and Cork city. The 1906 gave the route through Kilmeaden the edge but it was never outright victory for the southern route. In 1950 CIE proposed closing the Mallow to Waterford railway and send the ferry train through Clonmel and Limerick Junction but this was opposed locally and the idea was put on the back burner. In 1959 CIE changed the train time table and made the Rosslare express stand at Mallow for ten minutes so as to give the impression that the route was slow. On 26th March 1967 the last passenger train passed through Kilmeaden as CIE finally won its plan to close the line. Work at dismantling the line began almost overnight at Mallow and had reached Dungarvan before the building of the Quigley Magnesite factory at Ballinacourty required the reopening of the line between Waterford and Ballinacourty. CIE agreed to this but removed the track between Ballinacourty and Dungarvan to make sure the line was only for freight traffic. Government regulations and the changing economic environment forced the closure of the factory in 1982 and the last loaded freight train passed through Kilmeaden on 28th April 1982. [Cian Flaherty, William Fraher, Julian Walton & Willie Whelan (eds.), The Towns and Villages of the Waterford Greenway (Dungarvan, 2018), pages 250, 254] The permanent way was thereafter occasionally inspected by an inspection railcar and a loco engine until 1990. In August 1993 the Fishguard & Rosslare Railway Company got permission to remove the tracks while CIE were allowed to remove the short section of track between Ballinacourty and milepost 49. [Journal of the Irish Railway Record Society, Vol. 18, No. 123 (February 1994), page 359]

It was likely that the permanent way between Waterford and Ballinacourty would be totally destroyed like that between Mallow and Dungarvan but ideas of opening the line as a heritage railway quickly surfaced. It was considered that reopening the full line with the standard gauge to be overly ambitious so a narrow gauge railway was begun at Kilmeaden station in 2003 and it has progressively extended the line back towards Waterford city and presently (2021) reaches the old WD&LR station at Bilberry. The old line from Bilberry to Dungarvan was opened in 2017 as a greenway with a hard surface roadway for walkers and cyclists. 

John Connington, station master = in April 1885 Mr. Connington was the station master at Kilmeaden when on 17th April their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales arrived at the station. They were accompanied by Prince Albert Victor, the Marquess of Ormond, the Earl and Countess of Listowel along with Lord and Lady Lismore. The royal party was greeting by the station decked out with flowers and flags along with a large police presence and a large crowd of local people observing in silence from the railway bridge overlooking the station. [Ian d’Alton, ‘Before Molly Keane: image and reality in the lives of the nineteenth-century gentry of east Cork and west Waterford’, in Decies, No. 70 pp. 85-101, at p. 91, note 30 a transcript of the newspaper article in the Waterford News, 19th April 1885]

In 1901 census records a John Connington, aged 50, as a station master at Carrick-on-Suir. He was originally from County Mayo. John could read and write but only speak English. He was a Roman Catholic as was his wife Margaret Connington. Margaret Connington, aged 43, was a native of County Waterford and could read and write. In the house at Knocknaconnery was a general servant, Mary Connington, aged 14. The house was the Carrick-on-Suir station house owned by the GS&WR and had three rooms within for the family use with four windows in the front elevation and no outbuildings. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901] By 1911 John Connington had moved house to become the station master at Milltown in County Kerry. Living with him at house number 4 in Rathpoge East was his wife of 27 years Margaret Connington. The couple had no children of their own and nobody else lived in the house. The house was separate from the railway station house and had six rooms with four windows in the front elevation and no outbuildings. It was owned by the GS&WR as was the house of Timothy Sullivan next door. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

John Burgess, station master = in September 1889 John Burgess was appointed station master at Kilmeaden. [Ernie Shepherd, Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company (Newtownards, 2015), page 273] The periods of employment at Kilmeaden station of John Burgess, George Mulcahy and James Cunningham appear to be a bit incoherent in the published history books and warrants further investigation. 

George Mulcahy, station master = on 1st May 1892 George Mulcahy was appointed station master at Kilmeaden. It would seem that George only stayed a short time before he was replaced by James Cunningham in 1893 but George was reappointed station master at Kilmeaden on 25th April 1904. [Ernie Shepherd, Fishguard & Rosslare Railways & Harbours Company (Newtownards, 2015), page 273]

James Cunningham, station master = in 1893 James Cunningham was the station master at Kilmeaden [Guy’s Postal Directory, 1893, County Waterford, page 47] In 1901 census records a James Cunningham, aged 50, who was a railway ganger in Ballyragget, Co. Kilkenny. The 1901 census records a James Cunningham, aged 44, at Cooltederry near Portarlington who was a train examiner. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

John Burgess, station master = In 1901 John Burgess was the station master at Kilmeaden. John Burgess was then 28 years old, a Roman Catholic, born in County Waterford who could read and write but not speak any Irish. John Burgess was unmarried in 1901 and lived with Kate Power, aged 67, an unmarried house keeper who could read and write and was born in County Waterford. John Burgess described himself as the son of Kate Power yet Kate said she was unmarried. John and Kate lived in the station master’s house which had four rooms, five windows in the front elevation and one outbuilding. The Great Southern & Western Railway Company owned the building which still stands today (2021). [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

In 1911 John Burgess was aged 40 and a mill labourer at Kilmeaden. He was married to Mary Burgess for six years and they had four children, three sons (John, aged 6; Patrick, aged 1 and Francis a few weeks old) and one daughter (Kate, aged 3). They lived in a house rented from Robert Ardagh. The house had three rooms with three windows in the front elevation and one outbuilding. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Francis Lappin, station master = in 1901 Francis Lappin (aged 22) was living in Bennetsbridge where he worked as a postman. He lived with his sister Jane Lappin, aged 24. Both were born in County Kilkenny and members of the Church of Ireland. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901] In 1911 Francis Lappin, aged 31, from County Kilkenny, was the station master at Kilmeaden. He could read and write and was a member of the Church of Ireland. Francis Lappin was married to Kate Lappin (aged 30, from County Waterford) for six years and they had three children of whom only one, Martha, was alive in 1911. On census night there were two visitors in the station master’s house; Maurice Herbert, aged 74, a gardener from County Cork and Martha Stafford, aged 14, a school pupil from County Kilkenny. Both were members of the Church of Ireland. Maurice Herbert was a widower along with being deaf and dumb. The station master’s house had seven rooms with five windows in the front elevation and one outbuilding, a fowl house. Initially somebody wrote on the census form that the G.S. & W.R. Company owned the house but this was later crossed out. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Patrick O’Keeffe, railway porter = in 1901 Patrick O’Keeffe was a railway porter at Kilmeaden station and he lived in the townland of Stonehouse. Patrick O’Keeffe was aged 24 years, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. In 1901 Patrick O’Keeffe was unmarried and lived with his widowed father and three sisters. Patrick’s father was William O’Keeffe, a railway labourer. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Peter Sweeney, railway porter = in 1911 Peter Sweeney, aged 17, was a railway porter at Kilmeaden station. He lived in the townland of Gortaclade with his father Edmond Sweeney (general labourer at the woollen mill) and his mother Kate Sweeney. Also in the house were Peter’s five brothers and two sisters.  [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Michael Cuddihey, railway labourer = in 1901 Michael Cuddihey lived in house number 15 in the townland of Kilmeaden, County Waterford. Michael was 52 years old, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. He was married to Bridget Cuddihey, aged 46, a house keeper and native of County Waterford who could not read or write. The couple had four sons (Thomas, 19; Edmond, 12; Patrick, 10 and Michael, aged 7) and four daughters (Kate, 17; Bridget, 15; Margaret, 5 and Ann aged 1) who were all born in County Waterford. Michael Cuddihey lived in his own house with four rooms, three windows in the front elevation and one outbuilding. The house was built of stone with a slate roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

In 1911 Michael Cuddihey, aged 62, was described as a milesman for the Great Southern and Western Railway Company. He was married to Bridget Cuddihey for 34 years and they had ten children of whom nine were alive in 1911. In 1911 one son (Patrick) and three daughters (Maggie, aged 15; Annie, aged 11 and Katie, aged 9) lived in the family home and all were unmarried. Patrick Cuddihey also worked as a milesman for the railway. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Patrick Cuddihey, railway milesman = in 1911 Patrick Cuddihey was a railway milesman for the Great Southern and Western Railway operating in the Kilmeaden area. His father Michael Cuddihey was also a milesman making the Cuddihey household a railway family. Patrick Cuddihey was 20 years old, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. He was unmarried and lived with his parents and three sisters at house 14 in Kilmeaden townland. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Peter Dee, railway labourer = in 1901 Peter Dee lived in the townland of Kilmoyemoge East. Peter Dee was aged 59 years, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. Peter Dee could speak both Irish and English as could his wife Margaret. Margaret Dee was aged 56 years, a house keeper born in County Waterford. Living with the Dee family in 1901 was Margaret Mulcahy, a boarder aged 11 from County Tipperary who was a school pupil who could read and write. The Dee family lived in a house owned by the Great Southern and Western Railway. The house had two rooms with two windows in the front elevation and no outbuildings. The house was built with stone walls and had a slate roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

In 1911 Peter Dee described himself as a railway servant. He was married to Margaret Dee for 46 years and they had five children all of whom were still alive in 1911. Margaret Dee couldn’t read. Also in the house was Margaret Mulcahy, aged 20, who was still a boarder in the Dee household and worked as a dressmaker. She was unmarried and could speak only English but could read and write. Contrary to her statement in the 1901 census Margaret now said that she was born somewhere in County Waterford. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Train at Kilmeaden Station

Patrick Hearne, railway servant = in 1901 Patrick Hearne was a railway servant living house number 8 in the townland of Gortaclade in Kilmeaden District Electoral Division. Patrick Hearne was aged 55 years, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. Patrick Hearne was married to Bridget Hearne, aged 58, a house keeper born in County Waterford who could also read and write. They had two sons, Patrick (aged 22, labourer) and P. William (aged 15, scholar). The family lived in a house rented from Robert Ardagh that had three rooms and two windows in the front elevation with one outbuilding. The house had mud walls and a thatched roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

By 1911 Patrick Hearne had retired from the railway and was employed as a general labourer. Patrick and Bridget Hearne was still living in Gortaclade. They were married for 41 years and had seven children of whom six were still alive in 1911. At census time their son Patrick Hearne was living with them. Young Patrick was aged 34 years and was employed as a general labourer. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Thomas O’Keeffe, railway labourer = in 1901 Thomas O’Keeffe lived in house number 29 in the townland of Ballyduff East in the District Electoral Division of Kilmeadan. Thomas O’Keeffe was aged 50, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who couldn’t read. Thomas was married to Margaret O’Keeffe, aged 43 who was born in County Waterford and could read and write. The couple had two children, Anastasia, aged 11 and Patrick aged 5. They lived in a house rented from Mrs. K. Nichol that had two rooms and two windows in the front elevation with one outbuilding. The house had mud walls and a thatched roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

In 1911 Thomas O’Keeffe was employed as a railway milesman and was aged 62 years. Thomas could speak Irish and English. Thomas and his wife Margaret O’Keeffe were married 25 years and had two children of whom one (Patrick) was deceased by 1911. A granddaughter, Anastasia, was only a few weeks old. The records say their house was built with stone walls and had a thatched roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

William O’Keeffe, railway labourer = in 1901 William O’Keeffe lived in Stonehouse townland in the Kilmeaden District Electoral Division. William O’Keeffe was aged 50 years, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. By 1901 William O’Keeffe was a widower. In 1901 William lived with his son Patrick and his three daughters, Minnie (aged 22, domestic servant), Anastasia (aged 19, domestic servant) and Sarah (aged 12, scholar). In 1901 William’s son Patrick O’Keeffe was a railway porter at Kilmeaden station and lived in the family house. The O’Keefe house had four rooms with two windows in the front elevation and two outbuildings. It was built of stone with a slate roof. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Maurice Fitzgerald, general railway labourer = in 1911 Maurice Fitzgerald lived in house number 2 in the townland of Stonehouse. He was 31 years old, a Roman Catholic born in County Waterford who could read and write. He was married for 12 years to Kate Fitzgerald (aged 28) and they had three daughters who were all alive. Their children were Kate, aged 11; Bridget aged 1 and Mary a few weeks old. Kate junior could read and write. The house had only one room with only one window in the front elevation and no outbuildings. The house was made with mud walls and a thatch roof. It was rented from Daniel Lynch. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Richard and William Joy, engine drivers = the 1911 census records Richard (aged 25) and William Joy (aged 27) as living in the townland of Curraghataggart in Kilmeaden and that both were engine drivers. They lived with their mother Catherine Joy (widow), farmer, and brothers, Ned (aged 28, farmer’s son) and Michael (aged 21, farmer) with their sister Anastasia (aged 33, farmer’s daughter). All were unmarried. Their house had six rooms and three windows in the front elevation with five outbuildings. [National Archives of Ireland, census returns 1911] It is not clear if the Joy brothers were train engine drivers or drivers of steam lorries.

Robert McBride, signalman = in the 1960s Bob McBride was the signalman at Kilmeaden station. [Michael Carberry, (edited by Donnchadh Ó Ceallacháin), Ballyduff-Kilmeaden: Portrait of a Parish (Kilmeaden, 1998), page 46]

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Waterford history

Ballyduff Upper Railway Station Staff

Ballyduff Upper Railway Station Staff

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

On 17th May 1860 the Great Southern and Western Railway opened a 17 mile railway to Fermoy from Mallow at a cost of £109,000 or costing £6,411 per mile. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), page 194] In 1865 two railway companies were formed to connect Fermoy with Waterford city. The Waterford, Lismore and Fermoy Railway proposed to connect Waterford to Dungarvan and Fermoy to Lismore. The other company, the Clonmel, Lismore and Dungarvan Railway was to bridge the gap between Lismore and Dungarvan with a connecting line to Clonmel from Dungarvan. None of the two companies succeeded in attracting enough investment money. Late in the 1860s the Duke of Devonshire decided to build his own railway line between Fermoy and Lismore. In June 1869 The Fermoy and Lismore Railway Act was passed. On 26th July 1872 the Duke of Devonshire made the first private railway journey on the line from Fermoy to Lismore and it was officially opened for business on 1st October 1872. The local landlord, Basil Orpin, who was a solicitor acting for the Duke of Devonshire, got the station at Ballyduff erected on his land and near his own house. In 1878 the Waterford, Dungarvan and Lismore Railway built the line to connect Lismore to Waterford and so establish the through line from Mallow to Waterford. Ballyduff had the lowest goods traffic on the network before and after 1878 so that its most important facility was as a double track station which allowed trains to pass each other on what was otherwise a single track line. Every train had to stop at Ballyduff to receive a token which would allow them to proceed into the next section of railway track. Although processing a signal box to regulate traffic Ballyduff appears to have had no full time signalman employed. Instead the station master or one of the porters worked the signal box. In a report on railway rationalisation in 1950 C.I.E. proposed closing the Mallow to Waterford railway but the powers that be said no. In 1966 C.I.E. tried again to close the line and were successful. On 25th March 1967 the last passenger train stopped at Ballyduff and the line from Mallow to Waterford was closed. Demolition of the railway began almost immediately from Mallow towards Dungarvan. The fixture and fittings at Ballyduff station were removed and the station building was sold.

Ballyduff station 1961, photographer unknown, care of Waterford County Museum

James Jones, station master = in 1881 James Jones was station master at Ballyduff. [Slater’s Commercial Directory of Ireland, 1881, Munster, page 139] In 1886 James Jones was station master at Ballyduff [Guy’s Postal Directory, 1886] In 1901 a person called James Jones was station master at Milltown, County Kerry. He was 58 years old and was born in County Kerry. By 1901 James Jones was a widower. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901] On 24th December 1903 James Jones, station master, died at Cork leaving effects worth £332 1s 9d. Administration of his estate was granted to Annie Maguire, widow. [Source = National Archives of Ireland, Calendar of Wills and Administrations 1858-1920]

Thomas O’Keeffe, station master = in 1893 Thomas O’Keeffe was the station master at Ballyduff [Guy’s Postal Directory, 1893, County Waterford, page 34] In 1901 a person called Thomas O’Keeffe (aged 34) was a railway goods agent at Tipperary town. He was born in County Cork and was married to Maria O’Keeffe (aged 34), born in County Waterford. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Denis A. O’Regan, station master = in 1901 Denis O’Regan (aged 36) lived in the station house at Ballyduff in Marshtown townland. Denis was born in Lismore, County Waterford. He declared on the census form that he could read and write as well as speak Irish and English. His wife, Mary E. O’Regan (aged 38) came from Kilcalf, near Tallow, Co. Waterford and her maiden name was Mary Connors. She could also read and write and speak both languages. They had a daughter, Mary Agnes (aged 4), and two sons, Maurice Joseph (2) and John Benedict (1). There was one visitor in the house on census night; Ellen Cunningham (aged 14). The station house had five rooms and five outbuildings, a shed and four store houses. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901] In 1911 Denis O’Regan was station master at Ballyhooly railway station. He was then 48 years old. His wife of 15 years, Mary Regan was aged 40. By 1911 they had seven children of whom six were alive. Mary (aged 14) and Maurice (aged 13) were both born in County Waterford while their other children, John (aged 11), Hannah (aged 10), Denis (aged 8) and Bridget (aged 5) were born in County Cork. All the family were Roman Catholics. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

Peter Carroll, station master = in 1911 Peter Carroll was the station master at Ballyduff and lived in the station house in the townland of Marshtown. Peter was 36 years old and was born in County Limerick. He could read and write and was a Roman Catholic. He was married to Anastasia Carroll (aged 35) for nine years and they had two children of whom one was living in 1911, Margaret (aged 4). Anastasia was born in County Limerick while Margaret was born in County Kildare. The station house had only one room for the family to live in and three outbuildings, a piggery, a fowl house and a store. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911] In 1901 Peter Carroll was living in house number 3 in Power’s Court townland near Newbridge, County Kildare. He was unmarried and worked as a railway porter. Living with him was his brother, Denis Carroll (aged 24) who also worked as a railway porter and their uncle, Michael Carroll (aged 41), a farm labourer. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Christy Cusack, station master = by 1918 Christy Cusack was the station master at Ballyduff. In that year his young son, Dermot Cusack, was photographed standing on the station platform. in 1920 Christy Cusack was photographed at Ballyduff station in his railway uniform standing behind a bench upon which Jack O’Neill (in railway uniform) and Ned Higgins were sitting on. In 1924 Christy Cusack was photographed standing on the platform in suit, hat and dicky bow with a group of other Ballyduff waiting for the train to take them to the senior football county final. The game was played by Ballyduff against Rathgormuck and Ballyduff were victorious. Dermot Cusack was photographed in 1928 at Ballyduff in his confirmation suit suggesting that his father was still station master at Ballyduff. [Paddy John Feeney & Maurice Geary (eds.), Ballyduff Pictorial Past, volume one (Ballyduff, n.d.), pages 8, 11, 15, 18] It is not know where Christy Cusack came from or where he went after Ballyduff.

Hugh Collins, railway porter = in 1901 and 1911 Hugh Collins worked as a railway porter. In 1911 Hugh Collins lived in house number 3 in Ballyduff Upper townland. Hugh was then 40 years old and was born in County Waterford (in the 1901 census he was 28 years old). He could read and write as well as being able to speak Irish and English. He was married to Margaret Collins (aged 35) for six years. Margaret could also speak Irish and English along with reading and writing. She was born in County Cork. The couple had two children, John Joseph (aged 5) and Mary Catherine. Living in the house was Hugh’s father, John Collins (aged 78), a farm labourer born in County Waterford. In the 1901 census John Collins was described as a road contractor. John’s wife had died pre 1901 and his married daughter, Jane, did the house keeping. John Collins could read and write as well as speak Irish and English. The house had three rooms and four outbuildings, a stable, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901 and 1911]

John Corcoran, railway porter = in 1901 John Corcoran lived in house number two in Cloonbeg townland. John was aged 32 years and was born in County Cork. He could read and write and was married to Nora Corcoran (aged 27). Nora was born in County Waterford and could read and write. The couple had two sons, James (aged 2) and Thomas (aged 1). The house had three rooms and three outbuildings. The family rented the house from Basil Orpin. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Edward A. Coleman, railway milesman = in 1901 Edward Coleman (aged 26) lived in house number three in Glenagurteen townland. Edward was born in County Waterford as was his father and could read and write. In 1901 Edward was unmarried and lived with his father, Edmond Coleman (aged 74, farm labourer) and mother. Mary Coleman (aged 67, born county Cork). The house had three rooms and one outbuilding, a fowl house. The Coleman family rented the house from Hanora Maher [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Richard Barry, railway labourer = in 1911 Richard Barry lived in house number four in Ballinaroone East townland. He was 22 years old and was born in County Waterford. Richard was unmarried and lived with his widower father, John Barry (aged 70), an agricultural labourer. Richard could read and write while his father could only read. The house had two rooms and three outbuildings, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911] In the 1901 census Richard’s mother, Anne (aged 46) was alive. She could only write and was described as deaf yet could speak Irish and English. Richard had a brother, William (aged 20) and two sisters, Mary (14) and Anne (aged 9). [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Jeremiah Keane, railway labourer = in 1911 Jeremiah Keane lived in house number one in Glenagurteen townland. He described himself as a labourer for the Great Southern and Western Railway. Jeremiah was 45 years old and was born in County Cork. He could read and write and was a Roman Catholic. Jeremiah was married for seven years to Minnie Keane (aged 30) and they had five children, Annie (13), John (7), Lizzie (5), Michael (2) and Maggie (3 months). Minnie Keane was born in County Waterford. The house had two rooms and two outbuildings, a piggery and a fowl house. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911]

William O’Keeffe, railway labourer = in 1911 William O’Keefe lived in house number four in Ballyduff Lower townland. He was then aged 42 years old and was married to Mary O’Keeffe (aged 33) for nine years. They had five children, Bridget (7), Mary (6), William (5), Maurice (3) and Michael (2). Also living with the family was a boarder, Kate Whelan (aged 14). William O’Keeffe could read and write as could his wife while she could speak Irish and English. The house had two rooms and two outbuildings, a piggery and a fowl house. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911] In 1901 William O’Keeffe lived with his widowed mother, Bridget (aged 72) and gave his aged as 27 and his employment as workman on the railway line. William O’Keeffe said he could speak Irish and English. They then lived in house number three in Glenbeg townland. The house was owned by Thomas Barry of Glenbeg house. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

Peter Ryan, railway labourer = in 1911 Peter Ryan lived in hose number three in Ballydorgan townland. He was 34 years old and unmarried. Peter was born in County Cork and could read and write. He lived with his parents, Peter (70) and Mary (64). Peter Ryan senior was an army pensioner and was born in County Tipperary. Peter could read and write but his wife didn’t have either skill. She was born in County Cork and was married for 36 years with only one child, Peter Ryan junior. The house had four rooms and three outbuildings, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed. It was owned by the Fermoy Rural District Council. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1911] In 1901 Peter Ryan junior lived in house number 13 in Waterpark townland where he worked as an agricultural labourer. Also in the house were his parents, Peter Ryan senior (aged 50) and Mary Ryan (aged 49). Mary couldn’t read yet could speak Irish and English. The house had two rooms and three outbuildings. The family rented the house from William Brien. [Source = National archives of Ireland, census returns 1901]

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Waterford history

Tallow Church of Ireland church

Tallow Church of Ireland church

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Tallow Church of Ireland church is variously dedicated to St. Paul and St. Catherine. The most common dedication is to St. Catherine. Sometime between 1177 and 1199 Richard de Carreu gave Tallow church to the abbey of St. Thomas in Dublin.[1] In the 1190s the bishop of Cork claimed the church of Tallow as part of the paruchia of Cork but was unsuccessful.[2] Sometime afterwards Tallow parish and church became the property of Molana Abbey near the mouth of the River Blackwater. Yet Molana had difficulties controlling Tallow parish.

Sometime before 7th April 1469 Molana Abbey petitioned the pope for the recovery of the Tallow vicarage. The vicarage was occupied by Raymund Staccabul for about eight years without title. The previous vicar appointed by Molana, William Nurruyn, was long since dead (pre 1461). The petition of Molana said that its fruits etc. were so slight that they could not decently maintain themselves, or have the buildings repaired and keep hospitality. Molana said that the rectory of Tallow church was canonically united to the said monastery, and that the values of the said vicarage and monastery did not exceed 6 and 40 marks sterling respectively. The abbot of Inislounaght was to examine the case and if the facts were correct, unite the vicarage to Molana in perpetuity. Thereafter Molana could appoint, and remove at pleasure, its own canons as vicars to Tallow.[3]

At the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540 Molana held Tallow church.

 

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Tallow 18th century church 

Tallow church was subsequently granted to the new Protestant Church of Ireland. in December 1616 Sir Richard Boyle paid to have a gallery installed in Tallow church. Mr. Langredg was paid ten pounds for the work.[4] In 1746 Tallow church was one of only 16 churches in repair in the Diocese of Lismore.[5]

In 1746 Charles Smith described Tallow church as ‘the church is low, and has but an indifferent aspect’.[6] The low-church aspect is in keeping with a medieval church design with its small windows.

The present church is described as a detached four-bay double-height single-cell with single-bay single-storey lean-to vestry to south-east, and single-bay three-stage entrance tower to west on a square plan.[7] It was built about 1772-3 as three new registry books were started in 1772 to record baptisms, marriages burials.[8] In the map of Tallow in 1774 a drawing of the church is depicted showing a tall structure as like the present church and not the low church described in 1746 and so confirming the 1772-3 date. An un-dated front elevation drawing of the new church exists in the Lismore papers in Dublin.[9]

In 1827 the church expenditure included: parish clerk £20, sexton £10, elements £4, washing church linen £2 5s, repairs to the church £8, coffins for paupers £2 and foundling children £10 giving a total of £56 5s. The churchwardens in 1827 were A. Burrudge and William Hudson.[10]

In 1834 Tallow parish had 352 Anglican Protestant residents, making it the second largest rural parish in County Waterford after Lismore which had 494 Anglican Protestants. As a percentage of the total parish population, Tallow came in fourth in size (7.1%) after Killea (9.7%), Kill St. Nicholas (9.7%) and Clonegam (8.7%). The Anglican community in Lismore was only 3.1% of the total population.[11] A report in 1835 gave the Protestant population of Tallow as 357 people, second in County Waterford behind Lismore with 539 Anglican Protestants. In percentage terms against the total population Tallow was fourth (7.2%) behind St. Mary’s Clonmel (11.1%), Clonegam (9.2%) and Monksland (8.0%).[12]

In 1833 it was noted that Rev. John Jackson of Tallow was owed £260 in unpaid tithe. This placed him twelfth in the order of unpaid clergymen in the Lismore part of the Diocese. Yet the amount owed to Rev. Jackson amounted to almost his entire income and he was reduced to some ‘painful embarrassments’ when it came to paying his bills.[13]

In 1943 G.B. Nason (Sandy Hill, Tallow) and J.B. Tuckey of Tallow were the churchwardens.[14] In 1945 the value of the rectory at Tallow was given as £28.[15] Rev. R.B. Bryan, MA, MD, was then the rector.[16] The glebe land was sold sometime before 1942 for £1,419 1s 3d with the money realised going into the parish fund.[17]

Tallow church closed in the late 1960s and many of its fixtures and fittings were removed to other local churches. The east window (originally donated by the Percival family in 1894) was moved to St. Luke’s church at Curraheen. The pews and lectern were also removed to Curraheen.[18] A number of other items were removed to St. Carthage’s Cathedral in Lismore. Having concluded all income and expenditure the vestry books were closed in 1972.[19]

Hayden gateway

At the southern boundary of the graveyard is a pair of cut-stone panelled piers with moulded capping and quatrefoil panels. Between the piers is a decorative wrought iron double gate with spear-head finials, with sections of wrought iron railings flaking the piers. This gateway is said to date to about 1775 but this is incorrect.[20]

 

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Church gateway

In a map of Tallow in 1774 the area of present-day Mill Road didn’t exist. Instead the road was the glebe land of the church. Access to the graveyard was via a lane coming south from Tallow mill and another lane coming west from the Glenaboy River. This western lane turned north at the Glenaboy river and linked up with West Street beside O’Neill’s house.

In the 1840 Ordnance Survey map Mill Road was still not built. Instead a new access road was constructed directly north from the church towards West Street opening at the gateway into MacCarthy’s former hardware premises. When Griffin’s Valuation was done in 1851 no Mill Road was mentioned. The glebe land of the church was included on Mill Lane, a small lane, still in existence, south of the present Mill Road. Sometime after 1856 Michael Hayden of West Street, the man who made the gates and railings died or ceased trading. Therefore Mill road and the gateway date to sometime in the 1850s.

 

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Site of Michael Hayden’s forge behind the wall on West Street

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A biography of the 18th and 19th century vicars of Tallow is available at

https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2014/05/15/the-vicars-of-tallow-co-waterford-1639-1910/

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[1] Flanagan, M.T., ‘Conquestus and adquisicio: Some early charters relating to St. Thomas’ abbey, Dublin’, in Clerics, Kings and Vikings: Essays on medieval Ireland in honour of Donnchadh Ó Corráin (Dublin, 2015), pp. 127-146, at p. 137

[2] MacCotter, P., A history of the Medieval Diocese of Cloyne (Blackrock, 2013), p. 75

[3] Twemlow, J.A. (ed.), Calendar of Papal Letters relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume XII, 1458-1471 (Stationery Office, London, 1933), p. 668

[4] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 363

[5] MacCarthy, R.B., The diocese of Lismore, 1801-69 (Dublin, 2008), p. 42

[6] Charles Smith, The ancient and present state of the County and City of Waterford, edited by D. Brady (Dungarvan, 2008), p. 36

[7] http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=WA&regno=22818047 [accessed on 21 May 2019]

[8] https://www.ireland.anglican.org/cmsfiles/pdf/AboutUs/library/registers/ParishRegisters/PARISHREGISTERS.pdf [accessed on 26 May 2019]

[9] National Library of Ireland, Lismore Castle Papers, AD 3,594/8

[10] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/10167/page/224867 [accessed on 21 May 2019] Report on Account of Sums applotted by Vestries in Ireland under Parochial Rates, 1927, p. 119

[11] Broderick, E., ‘Waterford’s Minority Anglican Community during three crises – 1824-25; 1831-35; and 1848’, in Decies, Number 59 (2003), pp. 161-183, at p. 168

[12] Broderick, E., ‘Protestants and the 1826 Waterford County Election’, in Decies, Number 53 (1997), pp. 45-66, at p. 65

[13] Broderick, E., ‘Waterford’s Minority Anglican Community during three crises – 1824-25; 1831-35; and 1848’, in Decies, Number 59 (2003), pp. 161-183, at pp. 173, 174

[14] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report of the Diocesan Council, 1945 (Waterford, 1946), p. 33

[15] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report of the Diocesan Council, 1945 (Waterford, 1946), p. 28

[16] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report of the Diocesan Council, 1945 (Waterford, 1946), p. 8

[17] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report of the Diocesan Council, 1942 (Waterford, 1942), p. 24; Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report of the Diocesan Council, 1945 (Waterford, 1946), p. 12

[18] Anon, St. Catherine’s Parish: Conna, Ballynoe Glengoura: A Christian Heritage (Conna, 2000), p. 109

[19] https://www.ireland.anglican.org/cmsfiles/pdf/AboutUs/library/vestrybooks.pdf [accessed 26 May 2019] Vestry book at the Representative Church Body Library, Dublin

[20] http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=WA&regno=22818047 [accessed on 21 May 2019]

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Waterford history

Tallow Army Barracks

Tallow Army Barracks

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Before a national police force was organised in the mid-19th century, the army was employed to keep the peace and enforce the laws under direction of the local magistrates. In the 17th century the army was billeted in private houses and inns. This divided the army about a town and exposed the soldiers to the evil drink. In the 18th century this practice of army deployment was phrased out and purpose built army barracks were constructed at key locations around the country. The town of Tallow in west County Waterford had accommodated a troop of cavalry in the 17th century and was strategically located at a crossing point on the River Bride allowing troops to move north or south of the river as the situation demanded.[1]

 

IMG_0039

The ruins of the army barracks at Tallow.

 

Building the barracks

It is not known exactly when the Tallow army barracks was built but a reference in the Journal of the Irish House of Commons places the building of the barracks as occurring between 1743 and 1752 during the time when Arthur Neville was Surveyor-General. Neville employed his clerk, George Ensor to be the contracting builder of Tallow barracks while at the same time constructing a barracks at Cappoquin and Mallow.[2] A British Parliamentary report on the date of the erection of army barracks across the United Kingdom, taken in 1847, fails to mention Tallow as it was no longer an army barracks by that time. Mallow barracks is mentioned but unfortunately no date of construction is given.[3] It was possibly the Earl of Cork who provided the site for the barracks at the southern end of what would become Barrack Street. The rising ground would give the soldiers an observation platform to see all approaches to the town.

The setup costs and economic benefits

In 1719 the initial cost of building a barracks for a troop of horse was about £500-£700 while in operation it would generate £500 to £1,000 per year for the local economy. A barracks for a troop of horse, like Tallow, would fall into the higher range.[4]

Designer and builder

George Ensor went on later in the 1760s to become a recognised architect with his own practice. In 1766-69 he designed the new church of St. John the Evangelist in Fishamble Street, Dublin. The church was demolished in 1884 as part of a road widening scheme.[5]

The dragoons in 1762

Like in the 17th century Tallow was home to a troop of horse which could give a greater range of operations compared to foot soldiers. It is not known when the first troops arrived. In March/April 1762 a troop and a half of dragoons were stationed in the army barracks at the southern end of Barrack Street. But the dragoons were of limited value for security when trouble came. In April 1762 during the Whiteboys disturbances across west Waterford, a large assembly of people invaded the town with weapons of guns and pikes. They freed all the prisoners in the town jail and took over the town.[6] Troops from Youghal had to come and restore order. About 13 Whiteboy prisoners were then confined to the barracks. In November 1763 the army barracks at Tallow and Cappoquin were united under the control of Youghal army barracks.[7]

Later dragoons

In 1789 two companies of the 18th Regiment of Dragoons was stationed at Tallow. Another two companies were stationed at Clogheen while there was one company at Clonmel, and Cappoquin.[8] In 1811 we get a better glimpse into the size and structure of the Tallow army barracks. In that year there were eight cavalry officers and 68 privates were stationed in the barracks. There were no infantry units.[9] The cavalry had 76 horses.[10] It is not exactly clear where these people and horses were accommodated in the barracks. It is possible the horses were on the ground floor with the day rooms on the first floor and the sleeping quarters on the top storey.

Closure of the army barracks

After the end of the war with France in 1815 and the growth of Fermoy as the main army garrison in the south of Ireland, small local army barracks like Tallow were closed down. It is not known when Tallow was closed but the site was an auxiliary workhouse in the second half of the 1840s. In 1818-1826 the Army department in Dublin was in talk with the agents of the Duke of Devonshire about the future of the army barracks suggesting the army had no further use for it.[11] In 1819 a proposal letter was sent to William Curry, agent for the Duke on the sale of the barracks.[12] In 1824 another offer of sale was made to the Duke.[13]

Later life of the barracks buildings

After its use as an auxiliary workhouse from the 1840s to the 1890s the old army barracks became a corn store by 1900 under the Jacob family and was later known as Bride valley Stores when owned by the Kelleher family. In 1920-22 the army barracks was re-occupied by the military – first the British army, then the Irish Republican Army and then by the Irish Free State army. In 1923 the Duke of Devonshire sought compensation from the Board of Works for damaged to the army barracks.[14]

Today (2019) the barracks continues to stand at the southern end of Barrack Street. Even in its ruinous state the barracks still exerts an influence upon the town as the building lives on in the street name of Barrack Street. Such was its impact that it is unknown what the name of the street was before the barracks was built in the 1740s. As the barracks at Mallow is no longer standing and that at Cappoquin much altered, the barracks at Tallow is a time capsule of George Ensor’s work and a picture into how a barracks for cavalry was built.

 

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[1] For more on the 17th century soldiers at Tallow see https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/a-seventeenth-century-horse-troop-in-tallow-2/

[2] McParland, E., Public Architecture in Ireland, 1680-1760 (New Haven, 2001), p. 129 which referred on note 46 to the Journal of the House of Commons, V, p. xxi ff. Volume V covers the period 1723 to 1730 and so the correct reference must be to a later volume.

[3] British parliamentary Papers, Barracks return from each barracks in the United Kingdom relative to its date of erection, 1847 (169), XXXVI, pp. 376-405, at p. 402

[4] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 424

[5] Bennett, D., Encyclopaedia of Dublin (Dublin, 1994), p. 188

[6] Hayman, Rev. S., The Hand-book for Youghal (reprint Youghal, 1973), p. 67

[7] Hayman, Rev. S., The Hand-book for Youghal (reprint Youghal, 1973), pp. 68, 69

[8] The Gentleman’s and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, 1741-1794, p. 222

[9] British Parliamentary Papers, Return of Army Barracks, 1811, p. 187

[10] Butler, D., South Tipperary 1570-1841 (Dublin, 2007), p. 285

[11] National Library of Ireland, Lismore Castle Papers, MS 43,388/3

[12] National Library of Ireland, Lismore Castle Papers, MS 43,545/11

[13] National Library of Ireland, Lismore Castle Papers, MS 43,545/19

[14] Waterford County Archives, Lismore Castle papers, IE/WCA/PP/LISM/515

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Cork history, Maritime History, Waterford history

Dr. Eaton William Waters of Brideweir

Dr. Eaton William Waters of Brideweir

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Dr. Eaton William Waters was born in Co. Waterford on 17th January 1865.[1] He had an older brother, George Alexander Waters born about 1863.[2] Eaton Waters was the son of another Eaton William Waters and Mary Waters of Tramore, Co. Waterford.[3] Eaton Waters senior was a physician and surgeon.[4] Eaton Waters junior had three sisters, Bessie, Anne and Helen.[5] The family grew up fast as on 14th September 1870 Dr. Eaton Waters senior died leaving Mary a widow with a young family to bring up. His personal effects were worth under £800 so the family were not poor.[6] In 1876 Marys Waters, living in Tramore, was the owner of 67 acres of land.[7] Eaton Waters junior’s grandfather was George Alexander Waters, M.D., who lived at Crobally Upper in the parish of Drmcannon, County Waterford, in the 1850s.[8] George Alexander Waters was a surgeon in the Royal Navy and was born in Cork in 1774 and died in Tramore in October 1858.[9]

Education

Eaton Waters began his education in Waterford High School before moving onto Queens College, Galway, and the Carmichael College of Medicine in Dublin. As the son of a doctor and grandson of a doctor the medical profession was in his blood. In 1886 he obtained a M.Ch. from the Royal University of Ireland and in 1887 got a M.A.O. (Hons.). After qualification he became a Demonstrator of Anatomy at Queens College, Galway before moving to England to pursue his medical career.[10]

Medical doctor

In England, Eaton Waters operated a private practice in Huddersfield and Bolton for many years before returning to Ireland in the early twentieth century.[11]

Census 1911

In the 1911 census Dr. Eaton Waters was living at Brideweir, Knocknagapple, Aghern. He was then aged 46 years and a member of the Church of Ireland. A physician and graduate of the Royal University of Ireland, Eaton Waters could read and write and was a bachelor. In the house with him on census night was Lizzie Griffin, a thirty year old general domestic servant of the Roman Catholic faith. Lizzie could read and write and was single in keeping with the usual marital status for domestic servants.[12] Lizzie was an experience domestic servant. In 1901 she worked for Rev. John Nason, curate of Mogeely, at his house in Ballynoe village where he lived with his widowed mother, Angelina Nason.[13] In 1911 Rev. John Nason was married and living in Glenville with his mother and new wife along with a single domestic servant of the Church of Ireland faith.[14]

Interest in history

Eaton Waters and his elder brother George Waters, both had a great interest in Irish history. In 1920 Eaton Waters was a subscriber to the Succession list of the Bishop, Cathedral and Parochial Clergy of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore (Dublin, 1920) by Rev. W.H. Rennison. Later Eaton Waters joined the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. In 1939 Eaton Waters was a member of the Council of the Royal Society of Antiquaries.[15] George Waters was a member of the Irish Text Society.[16] In 1939 Eaton’s son Adrian became a member of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society.[17]

 

eaton-waters.jpg

Dr. Eaton Waters (care of Conna in History and Tradition, p. 327)

Cork Historical and Archaeological Society

In 1911 Dr. Eaton Waters was elected a member of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society.[18] He took an active part in the Society, in its proceedings and welfare and was a member of the governing council for a number of years. In the Society journal and on Society outings Eaton waters enjoyed sharing his knowledge of local topography with members and entertaining members on Society tours of north-east Cork.[19] In 1931 Dr. Eaton Waters wrote a history of the Waters family in the Society journal.[20] In 1939-1941 Dr. Eaton Waters was president of the Society.[21]

The Great War

Eaton’s elder brother, George Waters also took up a medical career becoming a surgeon in the Royal Navy. At the start of the Great War in 1914 George Alexander Waters was a fleet surgeon serving aboard H.M.S. Drake at Gibraltar as part of the 5th Cruiser Squadron.[22] When the Gallipoli campaign began in early 1915 George Waters got involved as a fleet surgeon aboard H.M.S. Goliath.[23] On 13th May 1915 he was killed off Gallipoli when the ship was torpedoed.[24]

Life at Brideweir

Brideweir house was built as a vicarage in 1822 by the then vicar of Aghern and Britway, Rev. Ludlow Tonson for £923. The last vicar to live in the house died in 1899 and it was sold as a private residence to Clement Broad.[25] In 1901 Brideweir house was owned by Clement Broad but was unoccupied.[26] In 1905 Dr. Eaton Waters purchased the house and made it his home.[27] In 1911 Brideweir house had five windows in the front of the house and seventeen rooms within.[28] There were eight outhouses made up by one stable, one coach house, one harness room, one cow house, one dairy, one fowl house, one workshop and one shed.[29] In the 1930s Eaton Waters had his own electricity in the house by the use of a water wheel on the river.[30]

Away from Brideweir Dr. Eaton waters invested in the number of house properties in at Chapel Street and Barrack Street in Tallow, Co. Waterford. There he employed a Mr. Conway to collect the rent. But just like the landlords of the nineteenth century the rent was not always forthcoming and some tenants who made improvements to the houses sought to put the cost against the rent. In 1936 Michael Harty of Barrack Street sought such accosts against his rent but Eaton Waters said the costs were unauthorised and Harty was in arrears of rent and was served with an ejectment order. In court Harty’s wife promised to pay the rnet and E. Carroll, solicitor of Fermoy, acting for Eaton Waters, agreed.[31]

Marriage and family

On 11th December 1918 Dr. Eaton Waters married Annie Martin Orr from Bengal in India. They had six children: Helen (d. 18th March 1933), Christopher (d. 20th March 1936), Cicely (wife of Martin Hurley), Adrain, Ormond and Maeve.[32]

In 1919-21 the Aghern area saw action during the War of Independence. On 16th February 1920 the R.I.C. barracks in the village was attacked. One stray bullet with through a window of Brideweir and after hitting off the wall landed on the floor but thankfully the room was unoccupied at the time. After a four hour gun battle, the barracks was not captured but six weeks the police abandoned the building. Two weeks later the empty building was burnt down on a night when the wind blew from the north so as not to burn any of Dr. Waters’ trees.[33] During the War Dr. Waters treated injured soldiers from both sides.[34]

In the summer of 1921 the central arch of Aghern Bridge was blown up. After the Truce it was repaired but during the Civil War the bridge was blown up again. Some of the demolition crew had breakfast at Brideweir by their own invitation.[35]

Death

On 28th February 1945, Dr. Eaton Waters died at his residence, Brideweir, after a protracted illness.[36] He was buried in the nearby Aghern graveyard. Eaton’s son Adrian continued to live at Brideweir until 1954 when he sold the house to Dr. Kevin McCarthy who established a thriving medical practice.[37] Annie Orr Waters moved to New Zealand where she died on 30th March 1969 in Hamilton.[38]

 

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[1] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/eaton-william-waters-birth-1865-death-1945-ireland/192514554 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[2] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War (Cork, 2010), p. 479

[3] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 479

[4] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014889/005014889_00643.pdf [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[5] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/eaton-william-waters-birth-1865-death-1945-ireland/192514554 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[6] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014889/005014889_00643.pdf [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[7] Anon, Return of Owners of Land on one acres and upwards in the several Counties, Counties of cities and Counties of towns in Ireland (Dublin, 1876), p. 178

[8] Griffiths Valuation, Crobally Upper, Drumcannon parish

[9] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/george-alexander-waters-birth-1774-death-1858/192545266 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[10] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[11] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924742/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000571942/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001851234/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[15] Report of the Council, 1939, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Seventh Series, Vol. 10, No. 2 (Jun. 30, 1940), pp. 103-109, at p. 103

[16] Irish Text Society, Vol. XVI (1914), p. 22

[17] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XLIX, No. 170 (July-December 1944), p. 7

[18] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XLIX, No. 170 (July-December 1944), p. 7

[19] Holland, M., ‘Obituary, Eaton W. Waters, M.B., M.Ch., M.A.O., F.R.S.A.I.’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. L, No. 171 (January-June 1945), p. 68

[20] Martin, J., ‘Annual Report for 1931’, in the Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1931), pp. 444-449, at p. 444

[21] http://corkhist.ie/about-chas/past-presidents-of-the-society/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[22] Irish Text Society, Vol. XVI (1914), p. 22

[23] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 479

[24] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[25] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 277

[26] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000571710/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[27] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[28] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924720/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924722/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[30] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 330

[31] Dungarvan Observer, 19 December 1936, page 3; For the purchase of Tallow town by Dr. Waters from the Duke of Devonshire (1904-1932) see Waterford County Archive, Lismore castle papers, IE/WCA/PP/LISM/512

[32] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[33] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), pp. 101, 102

[34] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 101

[35] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 102

[36] Holland, M., ‘Obituary, Eaton W. Waters, M.B., M.Ch., M.A.O., F.R.S.A.I.’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. L, No. 171 (January-June 1945), p. 68

[37] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[38] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

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Cork history, Maritime History, Waterford history

The Hope of Cork

The Hope of Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In 2008, I wrote in Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007 that the Claggan of Barrow, purchased by David O’Keeffe of Tallow in 1912, was just the latest in a number of vessels owned by O’Keeffe over his long business career.[1] One of these other vessels owned by O’Keeffe was the Hope of Cork.

 

179786_499441156796443_949584805_n

 

The Hope was built in 1858 at Ulverston as a wooden schooner. Ulverston was then in Lnacastershire but is now in Cumbria. The Hope’s original port of registration was Lancaster and so she was called the Hope of Lancaster.[2] The vessel’s dimensions were given as 71 X 19.6 X 8.9 feet.[3] The Hope had 75 net registered tons. Her official number was 20484 and she displayed a signal hoist of NBJP.[4]

In 1860 the Hope was owned by Petty & Co. of Ulverston who operated the vessel as a coaster and J. Pernic was her master.[5] Petty & Co. was a private bank founded in Ulverston in 1804 under that name of Petty & Postlethwaite. In 1863 the bank was purchased by the Wakefield, Crewsdon & Co. bank of Kendal.[6] Petty & Co. was involved in building and owning ships since the 1810s.[7] By 1865 the Hope was still owned by Petty & Co. of Ulverston who continued to operate the vessel as a coaster while M. Wilson was her new master.[8]

Later in 1865 Matthew Wilson of Ulverston was given as the owner of the Hope.[9] As her former master he must have liked the vessel sufficiently to purchase her. But Matthew Wilson didn’t long enjoy the Hope of Lancaster as by 1867 the vessel was owned by John Bell of Ulverston[10]. In about 1876 the Hope of Lancaster was sold to James Geldart of Barrow in Lancastershire.[11]

In 1889 the Hope sailed up the Blackwater to Cappoquin, Co. Waterford, with a cargo for John Stanley. Her captain on that occasion was named Dalton. In the same year, the Hope exported three cargos of timber for David O’Keeffe of Tallow and another two cargos for John Stanley. The Hope sailed up the Bride, a tributary of the Blackwater, twice in 1890 and again in 1895 to export oats (948 barrels). The vessel sailed up the Blackwater once in 1890 and twice in 1891. Captain Allin was her master in 1891.[12]

After seeing the Hope in 1889 David O’Keeffe of Tallow liked the vessel so much that her brought her and re-registered the Hope at Cork. Although David O’Keeffe is listed as the owner and manager it is unlikely that he was the actual master of the Hope. David O’Keeffe was a large coal, timber and grain merchant in west Waterford/east Cork and would have little time to sail merchant vessels and little training. Later, during the Great War, David O’Keeffe was the owner of the Claggan of Barrow.[13]

 

David

David O’Keeffe

But owning and operating a sailing merchant vessel was a specialist activity. By 1891 David O’Keeffe decided to sell the Hope yet still use her to carry his cargoes as in 1893 the vessel exported oats for O’Keeffe from the Bride River.[14]

Between 1891 and 1897 the Hope of Cork was owned by Mrs. Emma Nance of Placetenton Place, Cardiff and Horatio Nance of Dock Chambers, Cardiff was the master.[15] Horatio Nance was born about 1849 in Cornwall and in 1881 was living in Glamorgan. His wife was Emma Nance but it is not clear if it was Emma Nance of Placetenton Place or another woman of the same name.[16] The purchase of the Hope by the Nance family must have given them hope for a better future as in October 1888 Horatio Nance and his partner William Edwin Nance (merchant, ship brokers and coal agents) were in the Cardiff bankruptcy court.[17] By 1896 Horatio Nance was the owner of a coal mine at West Llantwit, near Beddau, Pontypridd. The mine was managed by David Thomas and had 12 workers underground and 3 on the surface.[18] In 1898 and 1899 the Hope of Cork was owned and manged by Ellis Roberts of Port Dinorwic, Carnarvon.[19]

After 1899 the Hope of Cork disappeared from the records and its fate is unknown.

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[1] O’Brien, N., Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007 (Ballyduff, 2008), p. 397

[2] Mercantile Navy List, 1889

[3] Lloyd’s List, 1865

[4] Mercantile Navy List, 1889

[5] Lloyd’s List, 1860

[6] Orbell, J., & Turton, A., British Banking: a guide to historical records (Abingdon, 2017), p. 522

[7] https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/~cmi/books/storm1826.html [accessed on 2 March 2019]

[8] Lloyd’s List, 1865

[9] Mercantile Navy List, 1865

[10] Mercantile Navy List, 1875

[11] Mercantile Navy List, 1885 & 1889

[12] Cork City & County Archives, Youghal Port Records, U138, Import & Export Returns, 1870-1912; O’Brien, Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007, p. 414

[13] Mercantile Navy List, 1890; O’Brien, Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007, pp. 268, 270, 271

[14] Cork City & County Archives, Youghal Port Records, U138, Import & Export Returns, 1870-1912;

[15] Mercantile Navy List, 1891 & 1897

[16] https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/categories/1881uki/?name=_Nance&pg=5&count=50&name_x=_1 [accessed on 2 March 2019]

[17] South Wales Daily News, 4th October 1888 https://newspapers.library.wales/view/3669790/3669791/2/LIVERPOOL [accessed on 2 March 2019]

[18] http://projects.exeter.ac.uk/mhn/1896-59.htm [accessed 2 March 2019]

[19] Mercantile Navy List, 1898 & 1899

Standard
Cork history, General History, Maritime History, Waterford history

Blackwater and Bride book: ten years on

Blackwater and Bride book: ten years on

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In December 2008 (ten years ago this month) I published my history book (and to date, December 2018, my only history book) entitled Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007. The book ran to 562 pages including numerous illustrations and tables. The vast majority of historians first attend college, then write a few articles for various historical journals and then publish a book or two as the culmination of their gathered knowledge. I kind of did the sequence of stages in reverse – firstly publishing a book, then writing articles for various historical journals and then, in 2017-19, attending the University College Cork education course, entitled: Diploma in Local and Regional Studies.

As the preface of the book recounted (reprinted below) the book originally began as a project for an article in Decies: the journal of the Waterford Archaeological and Historical Society, in the summer of 2002. Having finished the article on navigation on the Rivers Blackwater and Bride, I asked Mike Hackett of Youghal was there anything else to know relating to the subject. Before I could say ‘Hop, skip and jump’, the word had travelled around the historian community of east Cork and west Waterford that I was writing a book about the two rivers. I tried repeatedly to tell them that I was just writing an article for a historical journal but eventually just gave up. In 2002 the Rivers Blackwater and Bride were just noted fishing rivers and the present of numerous quays marked on the Ordinance Survey maps was possibly just done in the hope of river traffic rather than responding to a substantial level of river traffic in former times. I was confident that the book would be 100 pages at most and, like the Great War, be finished by Christmas. It was to be six years later before the book was done – ah the foolishness of youth.

 

179786_499441156796443_949584805_n

 

The official launch of the book in the Walter Raleigh Hotel, Youghal, 9th December 2008, was a nervous affair as I was then an unknown historian. The dust jacket of the book said that I had ‘written a number of articles in various historical journals’. This was a stretch of the truth. Up until 2008 I had only published two articles – one in a historical journal and another in a school history book. But to help promote the book I wrote off two articles during 2008 for two journals – Niall O’Brien, ‘The Earl of Desmond’s Navy’, in the Journal of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society, Series 2, Vol. 8 (2008), pp. 87-96 and Niall O’Brien, ‘The Estate of Maurice Brown of Rathmoylan: Its Origins and Descent’, in Decies, No. 64 (2008), pp. 41-46. The choice of these two journals was that they include a biography of the author and thus I could write in these biographies that I published the Blackwater and Bride book. The article in Decies did result in a direct sale of a copy of the book but I am not sure did it do much more.

In total 1,000 copies of the Blackwater and Bride book was produced of which 127 copies were sold at the book launch. It then took another 4 years to sell most of the books mainly through shops in Fermoy, Dungarvan and Youghal. The slow rate of sales, the end of Heritage Council funding of book publication and other distractions for my funds has meant that the Blackwater and Bride is so far my only book although the number of articles published in historical journals has increased to over sixteen.

The Blackwater and Bride book not only recorded the navigation and river trade on the two rivers and the Lismore canal but helped generate an appreciation of the two rivers among the communities along its banks. The river boating services offered by Denis Murray and Tony Gallagher acquired more customers. The Gathering 2013 festival in Knockanore used the river to boat people between Youghal and Cappoquin as an important part of its programme. A number of people have explored the idea of a restaurant river boat service on the Blackwater and the Bride. In 2016 the Villierstown community has established a boating service that includes a special boat for wheelchair people. Recently, the various communities along the Blackwater between Clashmore and Lismore have come together to develop the economy of the region with the river as a central theme. Before 2008 people along the two rivers had mostly forgotten about the river as they drove their cars to destinations away from the rivers. Since 2008 the two rivers have once again become a linkage between the communities.

On a personal level, the Blackwater and Bride book generated invitations to give history talks about the rivers and trade in Youghal, Tallow and Waterford city, which would not previously happen. The book further generated an invitation to write an article on the history of the Irish timber trade for the journal, Irish Forestry, which was nice to do and also opened my eyes to other places to publish history rather than keeping it too local.[1]

A further development by the book was the establishment of a Facebook page, entitled, Sailing Merchant Vessels, which records the history of various sailing vessels and accounts of sailing history that is today long gone.[2] The page has (December 2018) over 2,300 followers and it is hoped to continue to develop the site with more maritime history.

Hopefully someday I will get a chance to publish another book if I don’t get too distracted with articles in historical journals, or by two history blogs[3] or by two history pages on Facebook[4] as well as the fun of life, work and family. Should be good fun as the Blackwater book was even with all the work involved.

 

 

 

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Contents

 

Preface

 

Acknowledgements

 

Chapters

 

  1. Early years of travel, 8,000 B.C. – 1600                               1
  2. The Rivers 1580 – 1700                                                          17
  3. Tidal river traffic 1700 – 1800                                              37
  4. Opening the river 1700 – 1850                                             53
  5. The ferries                                                                                67
  6. Lismore canal                                                                          81
  7. Tidal river traffic 1800 – 1900                                              98
  8. Shipbuilding by the river                                                     128
  9. Passenger traffic and steamboats                                       135
  10. The Bride River 1902 – 1922                                                145
  11. Blackwater dredging and river improvements              159
  12. River quays and bridges                                                      165
  13. Rowing, coting and yachting                                               187
  14. Tidal river traffic 1936 – 1958                                             196
  15. Bride and Blackwater vessels                                              213
  16. Conclusion                                                                              272

 

Bibliography                                                                                     274

 

Appendices

 

Appendix I

Partial returns of trade on the Lismore canal                      283

Appendix II

Local corn and flour mills from Griffith’s Valuation           284

Appendix III

Personalities of the river in the nineteenth century           285

Appendix IV

Types of vessels on the river                                                   286

Appendix V

Time table of the Blackwater Steamer Company                287

Appendix VI

Coastal trade at Youghal 1866 to 1879                                  288

Appendix VII

Some mallow canal accounts for 1761                                   289

Appendix VIII

Figures by Musgrave to get £10,000 savings on river traffic 291

Appendix IX

Notes on the Youghal Harbour records                                  292

Appendix X

Notes on the Lismore Canal Lockage accounts                     293

Appendix XI

Miscellaneous trade on the two rivers 1879 to 1898           294

Appendix XII

Line drawings of a Blackwater market boat                          296

 

Index of people and places                                           200

 

Index of ships                                                                317

 

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Preface

 

 

Today when we think of travel, we mention cars, buses, trains and planes. But for an island nation we often fail to mention ships. Yet to people in the past, ships would be their first choice. The Blackwater and Bride are today noted all over the world as rivers for good fishing. For our forefathers, they were the super highways of their time. If we want to go to England, France or Australia, many hours in a car and at an airport would have to be endured. Our grandparents just had to go down to the bottom of the garden and board a ship which would take them there direct.

The first river navigators came to do shopping and find accommodation. The Irish of the early medieval period used the rivers to export their agriculture surplus as did the later Normans while importing luxury items from across the globe.  The seventeenth century saw a great expansion in river traffic with the influence of the new English and the happy survival of more documents than the medieval period. After such activity, the first haft of the eighteenth century was one of rest until 1750 when the Mallow Canal and the growth of the corn trade brought an increase in traffic. From this time until the 1950’s, the corn trade provided varied levels of river activity, along with imports of coal and exports of timber. Such trade was carried on the river lighters and after1884 principally on the merchant schooners. Facilities such as the many river quays and warehouses were constructed while many of the fishing weirs were removed to aid navigation. The two rivers saw some of the first navigators to Ireland and had visits from some of the last merchant schooners at the end of sail.

The origin of this book was a request by Patrick Grogan that I write an article on west Waterford for the Waterford Archaeological and Historical Society journal, Decies. Navigation on the Suir had been well written about in Decies and I felt a little balance to marine affairs in Waterford would do no harm. Therefore I wrote a piece on the opening of the Blackwater River above Lismore from 1700 to 1850 (which now forms chapter four).

Having finished the proposed article in just a few months, I felt really happy with myself. This article encompassed the whole picture of Blackwater navigation, as I supposed it to be. But just to make sure that I had covered all the aspects of the subject, I wrote a letter to Mike Hackett of Youghal, asking was there anything else to be learnt on the subject. Mike had written so many books on Youghal and the Blackwater that he seemed like a good fellow to ask (he also happen to be the only marine person I knew at the time). Mike replied that Frank Mills of Knockanore was the person to ask. He wisely never let on that only the tip of the iceberg had been touched. So I rang Frank in February 2003 and five years later, this book is the bigger picture. Even Frank was amazed at the amount of information available.

But despite the bigger picture, this book does not tell the full story. People may find the use of notes to be excessive. I apologize if the notes break the flow of your reading and enjoyment. The subject of navigation on the Blackwater and Bride Rivers has never been written in book form before. Some aspects like the Mallow Canal and the passenger steam boats of the nineteenth century have appeared in articles of historical journals or in a chapter of a book, but not the full story. Therefore this book not just corrects this lacking but also forms an information source for future research and publications. Hence the excessive notes are I hope an aid to the next voyage of discovery.

I could even have spent more time on further research. We didn’t consult old newspapers. What! Didn’t consult newspapers; what scandal. Yea well some people are full of scandal. To do so would postpone publication for two or three more years. As the living memory of navigation is fast leaving us with the last vessel having left the Blackwater in 1958, it was felt that further postponement would deprive of us all of giving acknowledgement to the men (they were mostly men), who sailed the Blackwater and Bride where now only fish and ducks travel.

In such a work there have been high and low points. Meeting Frank Mills and the legendary Dick Scott was a joy and pleasure which long years will never diminish. Johnny McGrath looking into a skip full of papers in Dungarvan, from where he pulled out the bridge log books of Camphire (for 1902 to 1956), and of Youghal (from 1936 to 1958) was an invaluable piece of salvage. Some would express disappointment that he didn’t pull out more papers, but without those log books the navigation story would certainly be the poorer. Finding the log books for the Lismore Canal in Dublin and, in greater number, at Dungarvan was great. The disappointment came with only one book for before for the fifty four years before 1851 (and that book only covering three years).[5] Further sorrow arrived with the Youghal harbour books only surviving for the period after 1878, made establishing the level of trade on the two rivers extremely hard. Thankfully the harbour books after 1878 gave us wonderful information. Chapter seven and fifteen are based heavily upon these books.

Dr. Johnson once wrote to Charles O’Connor on his “Dissertations on the History of Ireland” that “I hope you will continue to cultivate this kind of learning, which has too long lain neglected, and which if it be suffered to remain in oblivion for another century, may, perhaps, never be retrieved.” This book is slightly late in time to retrieve much of the living folklore, but I trust, not too late to tell this remarkable story, and keep it from oblivion.

If there any errors or omissions, I hope they are few and that if readers note any, we can correct same in a further edition. With this proviso, hopefully you will find the result of this book to be worthwhile and enjoyable, fascinating and interesting.

 

 

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[1] O’Brien, N.C.E.J., ‘Timber exports in the south east’, in Irish Forestry, Vol. 74, Nos. 1 & 2 (2017), pp. 168-190

[2] https://www.facebook.com/sailingmerchantvessels/?ref=bookmarks [accessed 30 December 2018]

[3] http://celtic2realms-medievalnews.blogspot.com/ [accessed on 30 December 2018] covering medieval history and https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/ [accessed on 30 December 2018] covering modern history.

[4] https://www.facebook.com/MallowFermoyLismoreWaterfordRailwayBranchLines/?ref=bookmarks [accessed on 30 December 2018] and https://www.facebook.com/sailingmerchantvessels/?ref=bookmarks [accessed 30 December 2018]

[5] Since the writing of the preface in 2007 the National Library of Ireland completed a new catalogue of the Lismore Papers by Stephen Ball in which additional information on the Lismore canal before 1851 was discovered. MS 43,786/1 is an Account for the Lismore Canal with Samuel Kenah & Co. (1816-9), returns of lockage received (1828-49), and return of proceeds of lockage from the Lismore Canal (1855-7), 6 items; MS 43,786/2 is entitled Lockage account book for the years 1828 to 1840, 1 item

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Biography, Waterford history

Power family of Ballygarran in Seventeenth Century

Power family of Ballygarran in Seventeenth Century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the seventeenth century Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, dominated the landed estate landscape of west Waterford – he owned many of those estates including the land of Ballygarran. Today (2018) the castle and townland of Ballygarran is not on any map. Instead the castle is usually referred to as Glencairn Abbey and the townland as Castlerichard. The seventeenth century Ballygarran extended from Glencairn Abbey and the River Blackwater south to the main road between Tallow and Lismore. For much of the seventeen the century the tenant of Ballygarran was the Power family.

Ballygarran

At the start of the seventeenth century (in 1602-3) Ballygarran is listed among the lands in the manor of Lisfinny containing one carucate of land.[1] The manor of Lisfinny was owned by the Fitzgerald family, Earls of Desmond, from about 1215 until 1583 when it was seized along with much of the vast earldom at the end of the Second Desmond Rebellion. In 1586 Lisfinny and Ballygarran passed to Sir Walter Raleigh as part of his grant by the government of 42,000 acres in west Waterford and east Cork. In 1602 Sir Walter Raleigh sold his Irish estates to Sir Richard Boyle. On 26th December 1595 Sir Walter Raleigh leased Ballygarran to Roger Suyvener, merchant, with other unnamed lands.[2] At some unknown time after 1595 Pierce Power acquired the lease on Ballygarran.

Pierce Power

In about 1600 Pierce Power married Elizabeth Boyle, sister of Sir Richard Boyle (later first Earl of Cork 1620).[3] In 1604 Lieutenant Pierce Power of Lismore apprehended three notorious malefactors in Co. Waterford, Callaghan McOwen, Daragh McOwen, his brother and Cormock McOwen. As a reward for the arrest, Pierce Power got ten pounds per head (£30 in total) which prize money was to be raise equally among the inhabitants of County Waterford.[4] As part of the Munster Plantation each grantee of land was to provide a military force to maintain order and assemble together in a larger force under the President of Munster if needed. On 30th August 1611 Pierce Power was in Tallow for the muster of Sir Richard Boyle’s tenants and the inhabitants of the surrounding area before Sir Richard Morrison, Vice-President of Munster. On the day Pierce Power was a lieutenant in the foot company of pikemen.[5]

Pierce Power and his brother-in-law, Sir Richard Boyle had a number of recorded transactions over the years. In February 1613 Sir Richard Boyle paid Pierce Power £40 for the use of Lady Honora.[6] While this show of trust was good, on a personal level Pierce Power was experiencing financial trouble. In March 1613 Sir Richard Boyle demanded Pierce Power to repay the money advanced by Boyle to clear Power’s debts. Yet this didn’t prevent Boyle from using Power in the former’s land dealings. In May 1613 Pierce Power gained possession of Jinnyshkeen from Garret Fitzjames Barry on behalf of Sir Richard Boyle.[7] In August 1614 Pierce Power got authority from Sir Richard Boyle to let the latter’s lands in the barony of Kinnatalloon for one year.[8] In October 1619 Sir Richard Boyle lent Pierce Power money to pay his bills.[9]

As previously said, it is not known when Pierce Power acquired the lease on Ballygarran. In June 1620 Pierce Power refused to renew the old lease on Ballygarran which was for life at £20 per year.[10] It is not known what were the terms of the new lease but as the Power family continued to live at Ballygarran then thy must have sign some lease agreement. It is possible that Pierce Power built a castle at Ballygarran but he could have also just redecorated an existing castle. In April 1617 Pierce Power got a ton of iron from Sir Richard Boyle for construction work on Ballygarran castle. at the same time Lieutenant Dowling got ten barrels of iron from Boyle for Ballysaggart house.[11]

 

Glencairn abbey

Glencairn Abbey – built on or near Ballygarran castle

(Niall O Brien photo)

From at least 1612 Pierce Power seems to have acted as a rent collector for Sir Richard Boyle in the manors of Lisfinny and Tallow. In October 1614 Pierce Power paid £10 to Thomas Fitzjohn Fitzgerald for the lease of Tallow on behalf of Sir Richard Boyle.[12] In April 1612, June 1614 and July 1616 Pierce Power collected rent for Sir Richard Boyle on part of the manor of Lisfinny.[13] In May 1615 Pierce Power collected £95 for Sir Richard Boyle as part of rent for lands in the manors of Lisfinny and Tallow and paid another £94 in November 1617.[14] In June 1618 Pierce Power paid £70 of the rents of Lisfinny and Tallow to Mitchel.[15] In April 1617 Pierce Power gave Sir Richard Boyle a velvet satin coat to cover money he was to pay the inhabitants of Tallow for some unknown purpose. Later in the month Sir Richard Boyle purchased provisions for his table from Pierce Power.[16]

Meanwhile on the Ballygarran estate Pierce Power breed cattle and was involved in the timber trade. In July 1617 Pierce Power sent 20 beeves (beef) to St. Leger’s ship.[17] In the 1620s Pierce Power got involved in the pipe staves trade. In March 1620 Pierce Power purchased 10,000 hogheads of pipe staves from Sir Richard Boyle.[18] The pipe staves trade was a big industry in the lower Blackwater region. Between 1616 and 1628 Sir Richard Boyle exported four million staves for £24,000 pounds.[19]

Elizabeth Power

It is not known when Pierce Power died but his wife, Elizabeth Boyle was a widow by 1634. On 20 October 1634 Mrs. Elizabeth Power, widow of Ballygarran, made her will. In it she asked to be buried in Youghal parish church (St. Mary collegiate church), as near as may be to her late husband Pierce Power. Her bequests included £5 to the poor of Lismore, 50 shillings to the poor of Youghal and 50 shillings to the poor of Ardmore. Elizabeth’s grandson, Pierce Power (son of Roger Power) was to get £100 while the residue of her estate went to her son and executor, Roger Power. The witnesses included Robert Naylor (dean of Lismore and cousin of Sir Richard Boyle), Aphra Maunsell, and Anne Begg. The will was proved on 28 November 1634.[20]

Roger Power

Roger Power succeeded his father Pierce Power before 1634 and succeeded to his mother’s estate in November 1634.[21]  In the same month of November 1634 Roger Power signed a new lease on Ballygarran for £50 per year and one fat bore. Also in November 1634 Roger Power travelled from Lismore to Dublin to deliver £2,660 on behalf of his uncle, Sir Richard Boyle.[22] In the first half of 1635 William Wiseman of Bandon died. In his will Wiseman mentioned his cousins, Sir Robert Travers, Sir Peter Smyth and Roger Power of Ballygarran.[23] The wife of William Wiseman was Alice Smyth, third daughter of Sir Richard Smyth of Ballynatray.[24] Alice’s aunt was Elizabeth Boyle, wife of Pierce Power of Ballygarran.

In February 1637 Roger Power acted with Sir Richard Boyle in securing the mortgage of Robert Stephenson for the latter’s house and lands in Dungarvan which he had mortgaged to John Fitzmathew Hore.[25] Before 1641 Roger Power held half of burgessmchenry outside Lismore (containing 20 arable acres worth £7). By 1654 this land was held by his son, Pierce Power.[26] At the start of the Confederate War in 1641 Roger Power served as a major in the army of King Charles I.[27] He was granted lands in Co. Wicklow for his services to the royalist cause.[28] In 1641 Catherine Power, a Protestant widow, held Ballygarran with its one ploughland of 320 acres of which 300 acres was arable (worth £24) and 10 acres of meadow (worth £5) with 10 acres of a coppice wood (worth £1). The property had a small castle and was held of Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork.[29] A good proportion of Ballygarran is still today (2018) devoted to tillage production.

Pierce Power

Pierce Power was the son and heir of Major Roger Power. In 1660 there were 3 English families living at Ballygarran and 33 Irish families.[30] In 1662 Pierce Power had goods valued at £7 10s upon which he paid £1 in tax. This was the usual tax rate for medium size landholders in Lismore parish at that time but not on the scale of the big landlords like George Knollys of Ballygally (the neighbouring townland o the west of Ballygarran) who had goods worth £18 15s.[31] On 11 May 1687 he secured an exchequer decree against Bethel Vaughan and others for lands granted to his father in Co. Wicklow. The decree was granted.[32]

Roger Power

In February 1687 Richard Cox informed the dowager Countess of Orrery that he was moving to England to live and as such would be retiring as guardian of the estate of Lady Mary Boyle (daughter of the 2nd Earl of Orrery). Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork and Burlington, recommended Mr. Roche (a lawyer) or Roger Power as the most suitable people to succeeded Cox.[33] On 12th August 1698 a mortgage was made by William Oldfield of Abbeyside, Co. Waterford to Roger Power of Lismore for £70 10s 1d on the lands of Nugents Burgery, Knockoulehane, Ardrmone, and Robertstown plus an unnamed location in the Barony of Decies, Co. Waterford. This was signed and sealed by Roger Power. The two witnesses to the mortgage were Benjamin Gumbleton and Michael Bagge.[34]

By 1708 the townland of Ardemone was back within the Oldfield family as Thomas Oldfield gave it in lese for five years to John Meagher of Ballykeroge, Co. Waterford. The rent was £11 for the first year, £12 for the next two years and £13 for the last two years.[35] If Roger Power was able to earn £11 from each of the five townlands in the 1698 mortgage then he could recoup his money within two years. His kinsman, the first Earl of Cork, would arrange it so the mortgage could not be repaid and the Earl would acquire more land.

Richard Power

On 19th September 1684 Richard Power of Carrigline made his will. In it Richard mentioned his son, Francis Power, to whom he left his interest in the lands of Carrigline and Ballygarran. Richard Power left £600 to his eldest daughter, Ann Power and £500 to each of his younger daughters, Catherine and Hanna Power. Richard Power left £5 to the poor of Carrigline and his watch and signet to his brother Robert Power (he had another brother called Pierce Power). Richard Power appointed his son Francis Power as executor and William Babington and his brother Robert Power as overseers and guardians of Francis during his minority. The witnessed to the will were Arthur Pomeroy, John Archdeacon and Robert Power. On 13th November 1684 Robert Power and William Babington took out administration of Richard’s estate. On 4th June 1695 Francis Power was of age and proved the will in the Prerogative Court.[36] But by 1695 the Power family had surrendered or loss the lease on Ballygarran from the 2nd Earl of Cork and 1st Earl of Burlington.

Richard Gumbleton

In 1695 Richard Gumbleton of Curraglass near Tallow acquired the lands of Ballygarran and Ralph, amounting to 542 and 79 acres respectively. In about 1720 Richard Gumbleton took out a fee farm grant on Ballygarran and on 9th June 1739 purchased the fee farm lease for £2,354 16s with a chief rent of £5 to Lord Burlington.[37] The descendants of Richard Gumbleton continued ownership of Ballygarran until the early twentieth century when the property was sold to the Cistercian Order and is today (2018) home to a house of Cistercian nuns called Glencairn Abbey.

 

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[1] Hayman, Rev. S., The hand-book for Youghal (Youghal, 1896, reprinted 1973), pp. 17, 20

[2] Hayman, The hand-book for Youghal, p. 18

[3] Kelly, Sr. V.G., OCSO, Glimpses of Glencairn (St. Mary’s Abbey, Glencairn, 2005), p. 2

[4] Clayton, M.C. (ed.), The Council Book for the Province of Munster, c.1599-1649 (Dublin, 2008), pp. 53, 54

[5] Brewer, J.S., & Bullen, W. (eds.), Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal library at Lambeth (6 vols. London, 1873, reprint Liechtenstein, 1974), vol. 6 (1603-1614), p. 89

[6] Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 6, p. 344

[7] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 344

[8] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 345

[9] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 379

[10] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 382

[11] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 378

[12] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 349

[13] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 340, 348, 360

[14] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 353, 369

[15] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 372

[16] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 377, 378

[17] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 367

[18] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 381

[19] O’Brien, N., Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007 (Ballyduff, 2008), p. 39

[20] Ainsworth, J.F. (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 177

[21] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 177

[22] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 8, p. 496

[23] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 14, p. 731

[24] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 1039

[25] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 8, p. 500

[26] Simington, R. (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 County of Waterford vol. VI with appendices: Muskerry barony, Co. Cork: Kilkenny city and liberties (part) also valuations, circa 1663-64 for Waterford and Cork cities (Dublin, 1942), p. 15

[27] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200 accessed on 18th February 2016

[28] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200

[29] Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 County of Waterford, p. 8

[30] Pender, S. (ed.), A census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661 (Dublin, 2002), p. 338

[31] Walton, J., ‘The subsidy roll of County Waterford, 1662’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 30 (1982), pp. 49-96, at p. 62

[32] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200

[33] MacLysaght, E. (ed.), Calendar of the Orrery Papers (Dublin, 1941), pp. 324, 325

[34] Ainsworth, J.F. & MacLysaght, E. (eds.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power O’Shee Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 20 (1958), p. 243

[35] Ainsworth & MacLysaght (eds.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power O’Shee Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 20 (1958), p. 244

[36] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 197

[37] Kelly, OCSO, Glimpses of Glencairn, pp. 3, 5

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