Biography, Cork history

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

The Peard family were substantial landlords in the area of north-east County Cork for near 300 years. There were numerous branches of the family who lived in a number of great houses. Yet today none remain and some of their former homes are in ruins or totally destroyed. The family does not appear in any genealogical publication of note and so this article is an attempt to reconstruct their lives from the pages of the past.

This article is in no way the final finished product but a working document in progress with changes expected as new information comes to hand.

Peard surname in Devon

The ancient records of Devonshire give reference to a number of people with the Peard surname. In 1332 Richard Peard of the parish of Hatherleigh paid 2s in the lay subsidy tax of that year. [Audrey M. Erskine (ed.), The Devonshire Lay Subsidy of 1332 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 14, 1969), p. 66]

Later records in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries make reference to people with the Peard surname. In 1701 Henry Peard, merchant and apprentice of Malachi Pyne, was made a freeman of Exeter. In 1722 another Henry Peard, hotpressman and apprentice of Samuel Wardell, was made a freeman. In 1754 Thomas Peard, fuller and apprentice of Henry Peard, was made a freeman. In 1757 Henry Peard, tailor, became a freeman in succession of his father, Henry Peard. In 1767 Abraham Peard, fuller and apprentice of Joseph Stephens, was made a freeman of Exeter. [Margery M. Rowe & Andrew M. Jackson (eds.), Exeter Freemen 1266-1967 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, Extra Series, No. 1, 1973), pp. 206, 232, 281, 282, 293]

In 1733 when Oliver Peard of Tiverton was a clothier and merchant with insured property worth £1,900 (this increased to £6,100 by 1744). [Stanley D. Chapman (ed.), The Devon cloth industry in the Eighteenth Century (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 23, 1978), pp. 122, 138]

In about 1693 to 1707 Oliver Peard of Barnstaple was co-pastor of the United Brethren Assembly with John Hanmer. In 1698 and later years William Peard was a member of the United Brethren Assembly at Exeter. He was the son of Oliver Peard of Barnstaple and succeeded John Hanmer as moderator in 1707 at Barnstaple where he was not the most favoured of ministers. William Peard died in 1716. [Allan Brockett (ed.), The Exeter Assembly: The minutes of the Assemblies of the United Brethren of Devon and Cornwall, 1691-1717 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 6, 1963), pp. 14, 39, 60, 61, 140, 144]

Early Peard family of Cork in Devon

[101] George Peard (b. 1505, d. 1578)

He was the great grand father of Richard Peard [104] (the first of the family to come to Ireland). [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[102] John Peard (b. 1525, d. 1574)

He was Chamberlain of Barnstaple in Devon and father of John Peard [103] of Upcott, Devon. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[103] John Peard (b. 1559, d. 1632)

John was the father of Richard Peard [104] who came to Ireland. He has a monument in Burnum Church. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[104] Richard Peard (b. 1595; d. 1683)

Listed for Coole as a husbandman in the 1641 depositions – married a miss Cole and had three sons; Richard [105], Henry [106] and William [107].

Richard Peard is listed as one of 7 tituladoes for Castlelyons town [Seamus Pender (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin), p. 237].

In this tomb, erected at the charges of William [107] and Henry [106] Peard, it says here lieth the body of Ensign Richard Peard of Castlelyons, who departed this life February the 28 day anno Dom 1683 aged 88 years and (who) came from Upcott in the parish of Welcombe in Devonshire in England. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription]

It is interesting to note that in the parish register for Welcombe there is no person by the name of Peard at that time but there were a good number of people with the surname of Beard. The two surnames are very near each other – only a slip of the pen in the difference.

peard-tomb

Peard tomb at Kill-St-Anne

[105] Richard Peard (b. 1620, d. 1684)

Here lieth, also, the body of Richard Peard of Coole, gent, eldest son of Ensign Richard [104] Peard, who departed this life November the sixth 1684 aged 54 years. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription] His will was proved in 1689 and from Coole. [Guide to Genealogical Office, p. 241] He married and had one son, William [129] and three daughters. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[107] William Peard

He could be the William Peard of Castlelyons who married Miss Wrixon of Cork in October 1762 at Glinfield, the home of Henry Wrixon. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2544] William wrote a series of letters to Francis Price in Wales from 1739 to 1750 about various aspects of life in Castlelyons and across Cork. These are now in the Puleston Papers at the National Library of Wales MS 3577C and MS 3579D. [There are copies on Microfilm at the National Library of Ireland Mic. P. 3,262 and P. 3,263] William Peard is mentioned as a cousin of Redmond Barry of Rathcormac in the latter’s will which was proved on 22 November 1750. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 642]

William Peard had three sons; Henry [133], Richard [134] and Thomas [135].

[106] Henry Cole Peard of Coole (b. 1661; d. 1731)

Henry Cole Peard was a former army captain and in 1698 he lately held the abbey lands of Castlelyons with the impropriator of its rector. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore Papers, MS 6146]

Henry is mentioned as trustee and overseer to the will of his brother-in-law of Christopher Vowell of Ballyorane in 1724. John Harrison of Castlelyons is also mentioned for the same job and is also referred to as brother-in-law of Christopher. Both gentlemen were also to be executors of his will if his wife, Elizabeth, remarried. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 678]

His will was proved in 1738 and he is a gent from Coole. [Guide to genealogical office, p. 241] The will was made on 6 August 1729 with his wife and two sons as executors. He asked to be buried in Castlelyons. The will also mentions his two daughters; Dorcas and Priscilla along with his nephew, Thomas Peard. The guardians appointed by him were; his brothers-in-law, John and Henry Harrison of Castlelyons, Samuel Harrison of Carrigabrick, his cousin Daniel Keeffe of Ballinglinhane and his friend Andrew Crotty. The latter was for many years the Irish land agent for the earl of Cork and lived for sometime at Modeligo House. E. William Troke, Richard Thorne and John Bryan were witnesses to the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 677]

He married Priscilla Harrison in 1701 and had two sons; John [108] and Richard [109] along with a daughter Priscilla [110].

[108] John Peard (d. November 1780)

He lived at Ballyclogh House and his will is dated 1785. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] John was trustee with Rev. William Vowell to the lands of Shanakill and that part of Glenatore called Carrow Towreen by will of his brother in 1772. John was trustee, with Richard Moore (heir-at-law of Rev. Vowell), of the marriage of his nephew, John and Margaret Mitchell. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81] He died in 1780 without any issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[110] Priscilla Peard

She was a daughter of Henry Cole Peard [106] of Coole.

[109] Richard Peard (d. 1773)

He married Elizabeth, sister of Rev. William Vowell, vicar of Aghern in 1731. He had issue by her of; Henry [111], Christopher [112] John [113] and Peard Harrison [114] and another eight children. [Conna in History and Tradition, p.194; J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179 for order of sons] He lived at Carrigeen. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] His will was dated 10 May 1772 with his wife and his brother, John, as executors. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179]

In 1771, his daughter Ellen married Henry Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork and their daughter and co-heiress Mary Broderick married in June 1795 Grice Smyth of Ballinatray. She married secondly Captain John Irvine, the 7th son of Col William Irvine of Castle Irvine Co. Fermanagh (see Burke 1912). [Burke’s Irish Family records p. 1040] His other daughters were: Elizabeth married William Spread, Ballycannon in the liberties of Cork, at Mogeely church in May 1763 with a dowry of £2,000; [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2550] Dorcas, wife of Westropp Watkins, late of Old Court, Co. Cork and Priscilla who married Charles Widenham, esq., and attorney-at-law on 20 April 1776 at Carrigeen. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29] see also [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[111] Henry Peard of Coole (d. 1797)

Henry was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Mary Gumbleton in 1764 at Lismore. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559 and Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 15/9/1764]

He built Coole Abbey with David Duckert around 1765 – he planted 10,000 trees at Coole in 1794. Henry died before 1773. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He left six children including; Richard [115] and John [116] [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

Henry had a daughter, Charlotte, who in 1807 married Rev. John Lord. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 919]

[115] Richard Peard of Coole Abbey (d. 1830)

Richard Peard is mentioned with reminder to Carrigeen and part of Glenatore from his grandfather in a legal petition of his aunt-in-law in 1791. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179] He attended the John Anderson creditors meeting on 19 June 1816. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 51] In 1801 he married Elizabeth Hart and had a son; Henry Hawke Peard [117] and a daughter, Henrietta Maria Peard [118]. Richard had two other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[118] Henrietta Maria Peard

She married on 2 September 1837, Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park as his second wife. They had five sons and two daughters. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

[117] Henry Hawke Peard (b. 1804; d. 1858)

He married Elizabeth Cathrow in 1826 and had a son; Richard [119]. Henry Peard had eleven other children included Francis [120]. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

dsc03300

Coole Abbey

In 1836 Henry H. Peard reported to the Poor Law enquiry that no more than a dozen labourers left the Coole area for the U.S.A. he went on to say that ‘fifty-nine labourers [who] reside in this parish (Coole), all in constant work, besides many more from adjoining parishes’. Henry Peard said that the ordinary diet of the people was ‘potatoes with milk in summer, which is very cheap and in winter those that can afford it, the addition of bacon, salt fish etc., while the article of clothing is beyond belief improved’. Henry Peard further said that since 1815 the ‘condition of the poor is much improved in clothing particularly, you now never see a person without shoes and stockings, which used to be the case, clothing is much cheaper, they are also improved in cleanliness of the house, diet perhaps also improved. The population is about the same’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 66, 68, 71]

As for the wages of the labouring class in Coole, Henry Peard said that ‘including the sale of a couple of fat pigs, fowl, etc., together with constant work, a man can earn about £15 per year’. But the devoutness of many Catholic labourers prevents them from earning more money as they observe too many church holidays and ‘attending stations to confess, [which] take a good deal from what a labourer could earn, there are 11 holidays kept’. Henry Peard estimated that the cost of living ‘as the labourer does, he can procure a full supply of potatoes and milk for about £7 per year, many live on £5’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 69]

Henry Peard went on to tell the Poor Law enquiry that “the number employed on roads is very difficult to determine, they being almost in every case, belonging to other parishes, the resident labourers, as I before stated, having constant work. I know they are paid in money”. [Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 82 – 83]

On the houses of the Coole labourers Henry Hawke Peard said that those who owned cabins ‘with the exception of a few tradesmen such as carpenters, blacksmiths etc., they are the labourers of the different farmers in the parish’. The usual rent was ‘with a small patch of garden … from £1 10s to £2’. The conditions of the cabins were better than those at Aghern and were mostly ‘composed of mud walls, thatched [and] in almost all you will find good bed and bedding’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 71]

in 1837 Henry Hawke Peard was a subscriber to the large folio volumes of Samuel Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland.

In September 1845 Henry Hawke Peard backed a proposal for a railway between Cork and Fermoy at a meeting in Fermoy courthouse which was attended by many of the great and the good of the district. The proposed Cork and Fermoy Direct Railway Company was to have a share capital of £250,000 in 12,500 shares of £20 each. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 3]

On 16th March 1846 Henry Peard attended a meeting at Fermoy Courthouse, under the chairman of the Earl of Mountcashell, to appoint a relief committee for the Fermoy Poor Law Union. The potato blight which started in 1845 to rot the crops was now causing much distress in the area.

Henry Peard proposed that an estimate of the funds needed until 10th August be made and that the landlords would pay a rational proportion according to the value of their estates. Michael Mackey of Ballyroberts seconded the motion but the Earl of Mountcashel would not put it to a vote. Father Fitzpatrick then proposed a motion of a levy of one shilling in the pound according to the Poor Law Valuation (Griffith’s Valuation) of each rate payer and the money be deducted from the rent.

Both motions caused division, uproar and laughter and the Earl of Mountcashell stood down as chair with Hon. Gen Annesley of Annesgrove taking it. Subsequently both motions were denied a vote. Instead the meeting divided the area into 11 relief districts and left the issue of funding undecided. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 29]

At relief committee was established in Castlelyons at the end of March 1846 but no names of those attending were published. On 1st April 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the weekly meeting of the Fermoy Board of Guardian. There were 739 people in the workhouse and the Board had £705 5s 7d in the bank. The Board unanimously resolved to assist everyone within the Poor Law Union. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

On 28th August 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the presentment session for the Barony of Barrymore at Watergrasshill. The meeting resolved to employ labourers on the proposed Cork to Waterford railway which would pass through two parts of the Barony. They would further employ people on road maintenance and improvement after a new Government Act was passed to allow for such employment. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 52]

On 26th December 1846 R.G. Campion of Bushy Park attended the Kinnatalloon presentment session at Aghern schoolhouse as agent for Henry Hawke Peard. Mr. Campion reported that the tenants at Coole had their land at a fair rent from Henry Peard and there were no small tenants. Eugene Byrne contradicted this claim by saying that when Henry Peard was at home up to 40 people were employed but when he was away there was much unemployment and that the rent was too dear.

Mr. Campion said the rent was cheap while Byrne replied that the tenants were leaving fast. Campion responded with denial and the meeting fell into confusion and disorder. After order was restored Mr. Campion got £180 to drain 35 acres at Coole. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 69]

On 27th March 1851 Henry’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth married Francis Drew Campion, second son of Robert (or Richard) Gifford Campion of Bushy Park, Co. Cork, at Castlelyons. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

In 1850 Henry Hawke Peard rented Coole Upper and Coole Lower from James H. Smith Barry. Henry farmed 157 acres directly in Coole Lower of a total of 606 acres and rented out the remained. At Coole Upper, where Coole Abbey was situated (total buildings worth £36) Henry farmed directly 449 acres of a total of 545 acres. [Griffith’s Valuation, Coole, parish Coole, barony of Barrymore]

[119] Richard McCulloch Peard (b. 1829; d. 22 March 1880)

He lived at Coole Abbey. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 135] He married Ann Corban in 1858 and had a son Henry William [121] [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 78] There was also another unnamed child. Richard died in 1880 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

It is unclear if this was the Richard Peard who was in 1850 landlord of the townland of Kilmagner (637 acres of 765 acres – remained held by Michael Cagney in perpetuity).  [Griffith’s Valuation, Kilmagner, parish Castlelyons, barony of Condons and Clangibbon]

[121] Henry William Peard (b. 1860 – d. 1936)

He lived in Buenos Aires and married Flora Agusta Sewell in 1893 and she died in 1960 aged 86. Henry was a physician and surgeon. Before 1901 he sold Coole Abbey to Orr McCausland. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), pp. 78, 126]

[120] Francis Peard (d. 31 January 1864)

This Francis Peard died in 1864 at 84 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[116] John Peard (b. 1775, d. 1847)

John Peard lived at Towermore. He married Bridget Woodley in 1810 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and had two sons; Henry [122] and John [123] and one daughter Elizabeth [124].

In 1863 John’s widow, Bridget Peard otherwise Woodley late of Rathcormac died. Letters of administration of her estate (valued under £100) were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, widow and the administratrix of the son of the deceased [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 897]

towermore-house

Towermore house as seen from gate lodge

This John Peard of Towermore was possibly the same John Peard of Castlelyons who in 1847 was a member of the Fermoy Board of Guardians. In that year John complained to the rector about the cost of graves at 18d each at Beechfield. Plans were then in place for a new cemetery beside the workhouse. John Peard proposed an extra story to the fever hospital then under construction to accommodate 30 more patients and this was accepted. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 101] John Peard died in 1847 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

In 1850 Maria Oliver was the immediate landlord of the two townlands of Towermore Upper (Frederick C. Hayes was chief tenant) and Towermore Lower (John Fouhy was chief tenant). [Griffith’s Valuation, Towermore, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

In 1911 associates of John Peard lived at Knocknahorgan in Rathcooney, Co. Cork. They were John Richard Peard (28, bank official) and his brother Francis Woodley Peard (24, bank official) and their two sisters, Ethel Woodley Peard (34 years) and Maud Josephine Peard (29 years) – all unmarried. [http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001913770/]

[122] Henry Harrison Peard (b. 1810; d. 1918)

He lived at Towermore and died in 1918. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[123] John Peard (d. 1876)

It is unclear if this John Peard was the John Peard of Coole mentioned in 1850 as a member of the Board of Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 105], or is there confusion with John Peard [116] above.

In 1850 John Peard was the immediate landlord of Ballyrobert (169 acres), parish of Castlelyons with Michael Mackey as sole tenant. [Griffith’s Valuation, Ballyrobert, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

John Peard left a will under £3,000 at his death on 11th January 1876. On 21st March 1876 letters of administration per estate of John Peard, late of Brideville, Rathcormac, esq., deceased, was granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard also of Brideville, the widow of the said deceased. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 898]

[124] Elizabeth Peard (d. 1867)

Elizabeth Peard died on 23rd June 1867, late of Rathcormac, spinster leaving an estate valued at under £300. On 1st May 1867 letters of administration of per estate were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, Rathcormac, widow and the administratrix  of John Peard, brother of the deceased [Upper Blackwater, vol 14, p. 897]

[111] Christopher Peard (d. 1775)

Christopher was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Ann Cooke of Tallow and lived at Glantore where his house is marked on the Taylor and Skinner map and where he was a J.P. Christopher died intestate in 1775. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He had two sons and one daughter; William [125], Richard [126] and Mary [127].

Anne Peard filed two draft briefs in 1791 concerning her right to a legacy on various lands at Barranstown, Tallow and Curryglass. [Cork Archive Institute, U290; see J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81 for info on this petition]

[125] William Peard

He lived at Peardmount and is listed in the 1804 tithe books. Mary Boles of Killbree married William Peard of Peardmount. She was the daughter of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles of Ballinacurra and the latter was born in 1646 [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland 1899, p. 44 Bowles of Aghern]

He was possibly the William Peard, who transmitted a letter from Jane ____ to Mrs Henrietta Smyth in November 1827 from Dublin to Ballinatray. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 1, folder (7), 1827-8, Bill Fitzgerald to Mrs Henrietta Smyth, 21 November 1827]

On 7th August 1809 Walter Croker Poole of Ballyanchor, Co. Waterford made his will and it was witnessed by William Peard and Richard Peard. A cordicil made on 4th January 1810 was witnessed by Ann Peard and William Peard. It is unclear if the William Peard of the Poole will was the William Peard of Peardmount. [Eilish Ellis & P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds Dublin, Abstract of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 502]

In 1814 William Peard was still living at Peardmount, Co. Cork with Tallow, Co. Waterford as the postal town. [Ambrose Leet, Directory of market towns, villages and gentleman’s seats (Dublin, 1814), p. 318] In 1815 Peardmount was mentioned as a seat of the Peard family in the Barony of Kinnatalloon along with Carrigeen and Coole. [Horace Towsend, Statistical survey of County Cork (1815), p. 73]

[126] Richard Peard

It is unclear if this is the Richard Peard of Peardmount mention about 1799 as one of the many commissioners for building a road between Cork city and the bounds of County Tipperary north of Kilworth. [Anon, Statutes passed in the Parlaiments held in Ireland 1799-1800 (Dublin, 1801), p. 46]

[127] Mary Peard

[113] John Peard (d. June 1784)

John Peard married Margaret Mitchell in July 1776 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and lived at Peardmount. Margaret was the daughter and only child of Henry Mitchell and Mary Shears of Mitchellsfort. She remarried in September 1784 to Odell Spread. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29; J.C.H.A.S. vol 52 (1947), p. 180; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] By deed made on 10 July 1776, previous to her marriage with John Peard, Margaret became entitled to the charge of £1,500 on Barranstown and other lands of her father. By the will of his father, Richard Peard, John vested a charge of £80 on Glenatore and Shanakill as a jointure for Margaret.

John was obliged, by his father’s will, to pay his brother, Christopher £200 but though he possessed property valued at £300, John was in a poor financial state and despite repeated promises, never paid the amount. John died intestate in 1784 leaving his widow Margaret and very little else as P.H. Peard sold his effects for £130. Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[114] Peard Harrison Peard (d. 1798)

In 23 October 1784, he married Arabella Drew, daughter of Francis Drew of Mocollop by his wife, Arabella Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 159] In the same year, his brother, John died and Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He was the Captain Commandant of the Curryglass Volunteers infantry unit in April 1779. His lieutenant was Stephen Rollston with James Graham as secretary. [Robert Day, ‘Reprint of the Munster Volunteer Registry, 1782’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. III (1894), p. 326] Vicar’s index of wills gives his death for 1799 and an esq. from Carrigeen. [Vicar’s index, p. 370] He had two sons; Henry [128] and Richard Frederick [129] and two daughters along with two other unnamed children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[128] Henry Peard (b. 1791; d. 1832)

He lived at Carrigeen Hall and married Charity Jane Greene (she died 26 March 1841 at 41 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann), and had a son; Henry [130] along with three other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

carrigeen-hall

Entrance to Carrigeen Hall – old house no longer standing

In a court case at Carlow, Henry Peard was “disguised beyond redemption by his exposure of his attempts to deprive his poor dependent younger brother of the ___ of renewal of a small farm”. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

Henry Peard died in September of 1832 and letters of administration were written on 28 March 1833 at under £300. His wife as executrix of his will should have received the letter but she didn’t. Instead his son Henry got the letter of administration. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[130] Henry Peard (d. pre 1854)

Henry Peard was living at George Street in Cork city in 1833/34. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He lived at Carrigeen and farm 147 acres there in 1850

In December 1845 Henry Peard gave notice that his farm at Carrigeen Hall was for lease from 1st May 1846. The house, offices and land of 180 acres had a coach house, stables, and walled gardens and was well stocked. The gate keeper at the lower lodge was available to allow people see the property. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 17]

In February 1847 Henry Peard of Carrigeen was named as one of the local landed gentry who did not contribute money to the Kinnatalloon relief fund. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 78]

Henry Peard is said to have married in 1849 to Jane Roch of Woodbine Hill, Waterford, and daughter of George Butler Roch. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 392] Yet as daughter was said to marry in 1854 there may have been an earlier marriage or confusion between the different Henry Peards. His second daughter, Arabella, married at Kinsalebeg in 1854, Rev Mellanus Spread Campion, the second son of Rev Thomas Spread Campion of Knockmourne. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

In 1850 Henry Peard was landlord in fee of Carrigeen East (320 acres) and of 30 acres at Carrigeen Hill where he rented out the remaining 320 acres. Henry Peard was also landlord of Castleview where Richard Gumbleton was the chief tenant. Henry Peard was also landlord of Glantore Lower (139 acres) and Glantore Upper (173 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Carrigeen, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Henry Peard was landlord of Shanakill Lower (244 acres) and Shanakill Upper (244 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

For more on Shankill townland see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/shanakill-townland-in-the-barony-of-kinnatalloon-county-cork-2/

[129] Richard Frederick Peard

Richard Frederick Peard lived at Belvedere House and died in the 1840s. He planted 31,640 trees between 1815 and 1817. In various land deeds, Richard is mentioned as an attorney and solicitor, while one of the deeds was registered by a Francis Peard. [See appendix I, no. (I), (III) and (IV) for land deeds involving Richard Peard in 1828, 1833 and 1842] Richard Peard handled the Heathcote land sale of 1826 with his first cousin, Charles Maunsell, solicitor of Dublin. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth papers, PC 904, box 2, folder (6), 1826, letters to Richard Smyth]

belverdere-house-from-mogeely-bridge

Belverdere house from Mogeely Bridge

In 1831, he went to court in Carlow because his brother Henry Peard would not renew a lease on a small farm and Richard Peard was dependent on Henry for his livelihood. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

He married Maria Maunsell, the daughter of Charles Maunsell of Roseville, Tallow by Grace, daughter of John Green. Charles was great, great, great, grandson of Thomas Maunsell of Berkshire and later of Derryville, Co. Cork, who’s first son was Colonel Thomas Maunsell of Mocollop, who defended it against Cromwell’s forces in 1649. [Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 800-801, 803] The couple were married before 1822 and had two children, a son; John Maunsell [130] and a daughter; Grace. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), p. 78]

In 1850 Mrs. Maria Peard held Belvidere (171 acres) from Henry Peard of Carrigeen. She farmed 74 acres where the buildings were worth £15 12s and rented out the remainder. Maria Peard also had 5 acres at Castleview which was rented by Richard Gumbleton. At Glantore Lower Maria Peard rented the townland from Henry Peard and in turn rented the land out to other tenants. At Glantore Upper Maria Peard rented 19 acres from Richard Gumbleton and rented the remaining land (154 acres) from Henry Peard. This land she in turn rented out to others. [Griffith’s Valuation, Belvidere, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Maria Peard was the immediate landlord of Blackpool townland (38 acres) where the representatives of Lord Lisle appear to be the senior landlord. Maris Peard was also landlord of about 15 houses in Rosybower and a garden which she rented from the representatives of Lord Lisle. [Griffith’s Valuation, Blackpool, Rosybower, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

See appendix one below for some lands deeds involving Richard Frederick Peard.

[130] John Maunsell Peard

He lived at Belvedere House. He occupied Vinepark House near Curriglass in 1855. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 356] On 27 November 1855 his wife had a son at Vinepark. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29 – Faulkner’s Journal] But the child didn’t live to adulthood as John Peard died without issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[132] William Peard

He was the son of Richard Peard [105] and did not marry. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[133] Henry Peard (d. 19 July 1797)

He was the son of William Peard of Castlelyons and is mentioned as one of the three lives in a lease deed of 1750 between James, earl of Barrymore and John Nason of Newtown for property about Castlelyons. Henry Peard was still alive in 1777, but in poor health by 1791 and died 19 July 1797. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 183-4]

[134] Richard Peard (d. pre 1729)

He was the son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons. In the will of his uncle, Henry Peard [106] of Coole, dated 1729, it is mentioned that Richard was deceased. He may be that Richard Peard who made land deeds with a Mr. Croker between 1709 and 1729. [Registry of deeds = 0522803 2 320 481]

Richard Peard married Diana Mitchell in 1709. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101] There is a will dated 1716 for a Richard Peard of Castlelyons and this could be the same person. [Guide to Genealogical office, p. 241; Vicar’s index, p. 370]

[135] Thomas Peard

He was the second son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons and was mentioned in the will of his uncle, Henry Peard of Coole in 1729.

Twenty-first century Peard members

Darrell W. Peard

He restored the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann in September-December 2002 at a cost of €9,000. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 5]

Delphine Adele Peard

She died on 5 July 1909 at 75 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann.

[Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

029

Peard mausoleum

Eric W.E. Peard

Eric Peard and his brother-in-law Eric Balt entered the Peard mausoleum in 1985 following damaged by a falling tree. There they saw about 15 to 20 broken coffins with of the name plates having rusted away. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Francis Peard

He lived in South Africa where his daughter Gitta Brill passed on the family coat-of-arms to Noel Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Frank W. Peard

He wrote a short history on the Peard family in Ireland entitled Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003).

Noel P. Peard

Noel inherited a plaque with the Peard coat-of-arms from Gitta Brill, daughter of Francis Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

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Apart from the Peard family of north-east Cork outlined above, there were other people by the name of Peard living in north Cork in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. These people maybe cousins of the Peard family above but no clear line of connection has been made yet. Information on these, as yet, unconnected Peard people is recorded below.

Peard of Allworth

John Peard of Allworth

John Peard was married to Ellen and they had a son, William Peard who was baptised 4 December 1836. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Joseph Peard of Allworth

On 16th February 1839 Joseph Peard and his wife Ellen had a son, Matthew Peard baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Thomas Peard of Allworth

Denis son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, baptised 28 July 1812 and died on 12th November 1812. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 319]

On 24th April 1813 —– Peard daughter of Thomas Peard of Allworth, died and on 4th October 1813 Henry Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 29th November 1818 Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised while on 15th April 1821 their son Matthew Peard was baptised. On 21st January 1827 Richard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 4th April 1828 —- Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 319, 298, 299, 300, 303, 319, 322]

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Peard family of Glountane

[PG110] Henry Peard of Glountane

On 11th October 1838 Thomas Peard [PG111], son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane was baptised. On 12th April 1842 Thomas Peard, son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 306, 325]

On 17th February 1840 Robert Peard [PG112], son of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 307]

On 1st April 1842 Frances Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 26th July 1846 Elizabeth Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 5th April 1846 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

On 11th March 1848 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to George Dormer in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

John Peard of Glountane

On 7th August 1845 John Peard lived at Glountane and married Mary Phillpott of Newmarket by licence. John Peard was 25 years old and a farmer. He was son of Thomas Peard who was also a farmer. Mary was 28 in 1845 and daughter of Robert Philpot of Glantane (farmer). The witnesses were Thomas Peard and Robert Philpot with M. Becker as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, pp. 20, 340]

Thomas Peard of Glantane

On 4th November 1832 Robert Peard, son of Thomas and Frances of Glountane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304]

John Peard, the son of Thomas Peard, got married on 7 August 1845. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20 and see above under John of Glantane]

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Peard family of Knockanesweeny

[PK108] Thomas Peard of Knockanesweeny

He married Katherine Callaghan and they had a daughter Katherine baptised on 28 November 1761. Thomas Peard died on 27 August 1786. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1728; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 316]

[PK110] Henry Peard of Knockanesweeny

He and his wife Catherine had a daughter Jane baptised on 27 December 1789. On 4th December 1791 they had a son Thomas Peard [AK111] baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1736]

Henry Peard died on 6 September 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 317]

Richard Peard of Knockanesweeny

On 23rd October 1810 Richard Peard and his wife Mary had a daughter baptised. On 27th December 1812 their son, Denis Peard was baptised and in December 1815 another son called Thomas Peard was baptised. On 12th April 1818 a third son, Richard Peard was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 298, 299]

Matthew Peard

He lived at Knockanesweeny and died 13 January 1839 at 68 years. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 324]

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Peard family of Knocknemony

[AKP110] Henry Peard of Knocknemony

He and his wife Katherine had a daughter Elizabeth baptised on 22 June 1794. They had a son John Peard [AKP111] baptised on 2 April 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1737, 1738]

[AKP111] John Peard of Knocknamoney

His wife Ellen had a daughter Elizabeth Peard who was baptised on 6 March 1835. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 305]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamony

On 25th October 1778 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter, Jane, baptised and on 8th October 1779 they had a son Thomas Peard baptised on 8 October 1779. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1732, 1733]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamoney

Thomas was a shoemaker in Knocknamonee. His daughter, Elizabeth (spinster) was a servant and married in Kilshannig parish on 14 February 1854 to Isaac Jones (servant) of Rockforest and son of Thomas Jones (steward). Thomas Peard and Thomas Peard junior were the two witnesses and H. Swanson was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 25]

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Peard family of Lombardstown

Catherine Peard of Lombardstown

She lived at Lombardstown and died a widow on 21 October 1836 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 323]

[PL110] John Peard of Lombardstown

On 2nd November 1825 John Peard and his wife Ellen had a daughter, Catherine Peard baptised. On 6th April 1828 they had a son, Henry Peard [PL111] baptised. On 7th September 1830 they had a daughter, Ellen baptised and on 29th July 1832 another daughter, Jane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 302, 303, 304]

John Peard was a yeoman and his son Denis Peard [PL112] got married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

[PL112] Denis Peard of Lombardstown

Denis Peard was the son of John Peard of Lombardstown. He was a wood-ranger and married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish to Bridget Boyle (spinster) of Duclayne and daughter of James Boyle (yeoman). The witnesses were James Berry and Richard Berry with H. Swanson as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

Denis Peard and his wife Bridget had a son called Henry Peard baptised 28 September 1851. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 310]

Thomas Peard of Lombardstown

In February 1820 Thomas Peard and his wife, Elizabeth had a son, Henry Peard baptised. On 11th January 1822 they had a daughter, Catherine baptised in Kilshannig church. On 14th May 1826 Thomas and Elizabeth Peard had a son, Denis Peard baptised and on 23rd November 1828 another son, Thomas Peard was baptised. On 23rd October 1831 their daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 300, 302, 303, 304]

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Peard family of Scarragh

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a son John baptised on 20 November 1763 (he died on 18th December 1763) and a daughter Mary was baptised on 25th August 1773. They had a daughter Mary baptised on 25 August 1773. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1728, 1731; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 314]

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

On 19th August 1824 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a daughter, Celia baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 301]

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Unassigned Peards

In additional to the above a number of people with the Peard surname have appeared for which it is as yet not possible to connect them with any of the Peard families above.

Alice Peard

She married Hercules Jones in 1814. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anna Maria Peard

She married Joseph Busteed in 1820. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anne Peard

She married Thomas Williamson in 1811. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Annie Peard

Mrs Annie Peard lived at 4 College View Terrace, Western Road, Cork in 1881. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78] She was a widow in 1897 and got letters of administration to the estate of her sister, Sarah Land who died 19 December 1897. Both lived at Woodview, Glanmire. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2105]

Catherine Peard

She lived in Fermoy and married, in 1832, Rev. Robert Spread Nash. Rev. Nash was a grandson of Rev. William Nash and died in November 1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 922]

Diana Peard

Diana Peard married John Mowbay in 1717. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Elinor Jane Peard

She married 24 October 1854 her second cousin, Richard Gifford Campion son of Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park by his wife, Lucinda Catherine Drew. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard was a witness to a marriage in Kilshannig parish on 7 July 1796 and also a witness to another marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Thomas Peard. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 334, 335]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard married Thomas O’Grady of Aghamarta castle and had four sons and one daughter – Louise who in 1891 married George Foott of Carrigacunna castle, Co. Cork. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 345]

Frances Peard

She left a will under £1,500 after her death on 31 January 1864 at Fermoy, Co. Cork. She died a spinster and John Thomas Sherlock, solicitor, Fermoy proved the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1517]

Francis Peard

See under Richard Frederick Peard – also Ellen Peard, full age spinster from Curryglass, daughter of Francis Peard, married 9 December 1847, James Wynne, full age bachelor of Curryglass and land steward (son of Richard Wynne, steward) in Mogeely Church by Rev. M.S. Campion. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2669]

Henry Peard (d. 1773)

From near Castlelyons [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

Henry Pearde

He married Hannah Dickenson in 1837. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] She died on 16 October 1868 at Dunkerreen, Bandon, Co. Cork. Letters of administration were granted to her husband and only next of kin. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1626]

Henry Peard of Kilshannig

His daughter Mary died 22 January 1847. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 326]

Henry Peard

He lived a Millview, Fermoy Co. Cork and was party to a number of deeds with the Nash family around 1843 to 1853 and with Catherine Peard, a possible daughter who was wife of Robert Spread Nash of Fermoy, Co. Cork. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2179]

Henry Peard

He was a witness to the will of Jonathan Tanner of Bandon, which was proved on 17 May 1776. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 703]

Henry Peard of Mountpleasant

His will is dated 1805 at Mountpleasant. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Jane Peard

She married William Berry in 1834. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard

She married James Crothers in 1807. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 11th October 1814 Jane Peard married John Farmer of Kilshannig parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, p. 335]

Jane Peard of Youghal

She lived at number 14 Knockaverry, Youghal in the 1901 census with Margaret O’Reilly. [Youghal family roots, p. 7]

John Peard

In 1698, John Peard along with Henry Ellin lately held Coole with its two ploughlands. He shared a fine of £2,000 with Ellin from Charles, earl of Burlington in consideration of their interest there on 4 August 1698 because Charles wished to sell the property to financiers. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore papers, MS 6146]

John Peard

John married Mary Seward in 1732. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

John Holmer Harrison Peard

He lived on Western Road, Cork in 1881 and had a veterinary practice at 28½ Princess Street. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78]

On 25th June 1922 Henry Holmer Peard, son of John Holmer Harrison Peard of Ashtown House, Castleknock, Co. Dublin, married Fanny McClintock (born 8th May 1902), third daughter of Frederick Foster McClintock of Termonfeckin, Co. Louth. Henry Holmer Peard died on 12th September 1950. [Burke’s Irish Family Record, 1976, p. 753]

John Peard of St. Finbarry

He left a will dated 1782 with an address in St. Finbarry. [‘Index testamentorum olim in Registro Corcagle’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 390]

Mary Peard

In 1774 Mary Peard married John Bennet. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Mary Peard

In 1787 Mary Peard married William Dobbyn. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

He married Catherine Ring in 1810. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

Witness the marriage of Elizabeth Peard of Brittas to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas at Kilshannig in April 1846. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

Nicholas Peard

He was a witness to the will of John Williams of Cork which was proved on 22 January 1662. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1452]

Rebecca Peard

Rebecca married Thomas Connaway in 1704. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Richard Peard of Kilshannig

On 25th February 1810 Richard Peard married Mary Lynch. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 335]

Richard Peard of Mallow

His son Richard Peard died 30th July 1820 and on 19th June 1828 his son Matthew Peard died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 321, 322]

Richard Peard (living c.1846)

In March 1846 Richard Peard reported on the state of the poor and the condition of the potato crop in the area of Ballyclough, Kilmagner and Knockdromaclough to the Fermoy Relief Committee. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

Richard William Peard

He lived at Butlerstown, barony of Barrymore, Co. Cork and Elizabeth Phair was his wife. He was party to a Phair family deed of 13/8/1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2170]

Robert Peard of Roscommon

His will is dated 1794 at the Cottage, Roscommon and a gent. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Rosanna Peard

In 1772 Rosanna Peard married George Ward. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Sarah Peard

In 1764 Sarah Peard married George Pearse. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Thomas Peard of Brittas

In April 1846 Thomas Peard of Brittas, farmer, saw his daughter Elizabeth marry at Kilshannig to Laurence O’Connor, a smither of Brittas. Elizabeth was twenty five years old at the time. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

In 1848 Thomas Peard was a farmer and his daughter Elizabeth O’Connor (a widow) married in Kilshannig parish on 11 March 1848 to George Dormer (constable), the son of Richard Dormer (weaver). Henry Peard and John Vanston were the witnesses and F. Brady was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

Thomas Peard of Dromore

William Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Dromore was baptised on 6 March 1831.

Later in 1835 Thomas Peard was witness to Murphy/Buckley land deed of 16/3/1835 in the barony of Duhallow. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304; Ibid, vol. 15, p. 2202]

Thomas Peard of Keal

On 21st January 1765 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter Elizabeth baptised. They had a son Henry Peard baptised on 28 June 1767. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1729, 1730]

Thomas Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 24th August 1783 Thomas Peard and his wife June had a son Richard Peard baptised. He was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Elizabeth Peard and also on 14 November 1804. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1734; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 335]

On 20th February 1810 Thomas Peard married Frances Lynch of Kilshannig parish by licence. On 23rd November 1810 Thomas Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 296, 335]

On 1st September 1815 Thomas Peard of Kilshannig married Elizabeth Lynch of same parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

On 7th January 1823 Thomas Peard was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

In April 1850 Thomas Peard was a witness to a marriage at Mourne Abbey church. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2495]

Robert Henry Peard was baptised on 2 September 1855 to Thomas and Elizabeth Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 311]

Thomas Peard of Newberry

On 22nd September 1816 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a son, John Peard, baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 299]

William Peard

He was brother-in-law of John Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork who died 16th March 1755 and had his will proved on 2nd April 1755 and executor to the will. Among the witnesses were Thomas Browne, John Barry and Henry Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 729]

William Harrison Peard (b. 9 May 1822)

He was born at St. Helier in Jersey and married in 1875 Maude Anna King Palmer. She was born about 1851 and died in 1891. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003)]

The will of Maude Palmer Peard was proved on 27th October 1892 with an address of Riverstown, Co. Cork. The registrar of the will stated that she died 19 September 1891 at the same place. Letters of administration for her will was granted at Cork to William Harrison Peard of same place, gent, and described as farmer and the husband. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1797]

William Love Peard

Major William L. Peard of Rathbarry sent 29 letters, via his solicitor, G.W. Shannon, to Henry Dennehy, agent of Villiers Stuart, about the lease of a field near Youghal in 1844-48. A legal case resulted which was entitled Peard v Lord Stuart. [P.R.O.N.I. Villiers Stuart papers, T. 3131/G/16/1-29]

Major William Love Peard was chief tenant of Rathbarry (47 acres) which he rented from Rev. R. Gumbleton. [Griffith’s Valuation, Rathbarry, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

W. Peard

In 1881 W. Peard lived at Richmond Lodge, Riverstown. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

W. Peard

He wrote a book entitled “A Year of Liberty-Salmon Angling in Ireland, 1867”. [Hamilton Osbourne King, House sale at Ileclash House, Fermoy, Co. Cork, 26 May 1998, lot 389]

William Peard

In 1881 William Peard lived at Skahabeg on the Old Douglas Road. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

William Peard

His will was proved in Cork by John Harris, solicitor, Sullivan’s Quay as one of his executors. William died 14 August 1885 at Duhallow, gent. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1568]

William Pearde

Ellen Pearde … effects £2,340 … July 7 … letters of admin … will annexed … per est … late of Kilbrogan Hill, Bandon and wife of William Pearde, died 9 October 1889 at same place and left unadmin by Frances Anne Beamish, sole executor, were granted at Cork to Ellen W. Beamish of Neelin House, Bandon, spinster, attorney of one of the resident legatees [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1844]

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Appendix I

Some land deeds involving members of the Peard family

(I)        CROKER/HANNA (869/432/578432); barony of east Muskerry; 7/3/1828; indented deed – Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork, Francis Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, merchant;

Walter Croker made over to Francis Hanna the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; Witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard and John O’Brien, writing clerk; sworn 19/5/1828; registered by Francis Peard. [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 1752]

(II)       PEARD/WESTROPP (866/56/576556) Barony west Muskerry 27/5/1830 – indented deed – Richard Peard. Coole, Co. Cork (eldest son & exec, of last will and testament of Henry Peard), Edward Morgan, Birdstown, co. Cork, Maria Morgan (nee Spread) his wife, Eliza Albina Spread, Ballincollig Co. Cork (spinster – exec of last will & testament of Rev Thomas Westropp, Richard Spread, Ballincollig, Co. Cork, Mountiford Westropp, Westmount, Co. Cork.

In consideration of the marriage of Wm Spread & Elizabeth Peard; Richard Peard, Ed Morgan, Maria his wife & Eliza A. Spread made over to Mountiford Westropp, in trust for Richard Spread, the lands at Ballycannon & Kilbeg – Barony Barretts – Upper and Lower Coolnageragh – Barony Muskerry lands of Behina, Knockaroghery, Lansvaghy, and Carrigatow & £142/17 part of a trust of £1,000. Witnesses; John Lysaght, Richard Pope Hackett (gent); sworn 24/11/1830; reg. Richard Foot [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2160]

(III)     HANNA/CROKER (1833/15/1911); barony of east Muskerry – 28/5/1833 – indented deed of reassignment by William Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, (?) and Elizabeth O’Hea (widow), Co. Waterford (both administrators and executors of the will of Francis Hanna, deceased merchant) to Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork

William Hanna and Elizabeth O’Hea reassigned and made over to Walter Croker the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard (attorney) and John O’Brien (writing clerk); sworn; 8/10/1833 and registered by Francis Peard

(IV)     BOWLES/WOODLEY (1842/21/282); barony of East Muskerry – 7/10/1842 – indenture of removal; Catherine Jones Bowles, Mount Prospect, Co. Cork, widow and administrator of George Bowles; Ellen Harman Woodley, Tallow, Co. Waterford, widow and devises of Joseph Woodley and Francis George Woodley, Leads, Co. Cork. Catherine Bowles and Ellen Woodley demised and let unto Francis Woodley, in his actual possession, the lands of Leads East (401 acres), Leads West (354 acres) and Ballyvougane (877 acres) in the barony of Muskerry for life at yearly rent of £110 0s 5d together with 11d per (hereceives) fees, also 1 fat hog at Christmas. Witnessed by William Woodley and Richard Frederick Peard, solicitor; sworn 12/10/1842 and registered by John Cranitch

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Cork history

Modeligo House, County Cork and its servants

Modeligo House, County Cork and its servants

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the Cork Constitution newspaper of 21st March 1921, Miss Braddell of Modeligo House placed an advert. The advert said “Wanted for country place, cook-general: small family: please send references and state age and wages [to] Miss Braddell, Modeligo, Fermoy.” It is not known if Miss Braddell got her cook. This article attempts to gather the names and particulars of servants who did work at Modeligo House.

Modeligo House

Modeligo House stands in the townland of Moydilliga in the Barony of Condons and Clangibbon in north-eat County Cork. The original structure was built in the 1780s with many additions over the years including a major addition in the 1877.[1] The estate was part of the Condon territory in medieval times and was acquired by Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, in the seventeenth century.

John Armstead acquired Modeligo from Sir William Heathcote of Hampshire, England sometime after the latter purchased it from the third Earl of Burlington in 1737. John was partner in the Cork bank of Harper and Armstead and the bank acted as Irish land agents for Heathcote.[2] Mary, one of the three daughters of John Armstead, married Matthew Braddell of Mallow, son of John Braddell of Ballyshane, Clonmore in County Carlow and brought Modeligo into the Braddell family. The Braddell family originally settled in County Wexford in the seventeenth century.

1901 census

The earliest records on servants working at Modeligo House comes from the 1901 census. In the 1901 census Modeligo House was described as having ten windows in the front of the house and thirty-five rooms within. Around the house were sixteen outbuildings.[3] The composition of these outbuildings in 1901 is unknown as the surviving B2 form has not been published.

Inside the house on census night, 9th April 1901, were six people, three members of the Braddell family and three servants. The three Braddell members were Henry Braddell (head of the house, aged 65, born Co. Cork, married), his wife Minnie Braddell (aged 55, born in Italy, married) and their daughter, Emily Braddell (aged 30, born Co. Cork, single). All three were members of the Church of Ireland and could read & write.[4]

The three servants in Modeligo House on census night in 1901 were Michael Fuail (aged 20, born Co. Cork, agricultural labourer/servant), Bridget Caplep (aged 25, domestic cook) and Jane Shaw (aged 24, domestic servant/parlour maid). All three servants were Roman Catholic, single and could read & write.[5] The Surname of Michael Fuail is difficult to establish. The name “Fuail” appears to be a misspelling of something else. The surname of Bridget Caplep is odd and the correct spelling is more likely to be Caples as there were a number of people of that name in the townland of Moydilliga in 1901 and members of the family still live locally in 2016. There were seventy-one people in County Cork in 1901 with the Shaw surname and many of them were Roman Catholic but it is difficult to determine which family Jane was a member of. Because two of the servants are women and the third has a misspelt surname it is not possible to find these people in the 1911 census.

Around the outside of Modeligo House a number of additional servants can be identified such as Owen Geary (aged 38, gardener/domestic servant, born Co. Waterford).[6]

In the wider area of Moydilliga townland in 1901 there were 113 people of whom the following were in the servant class John Hartigan (farm servant), Michael Stapleton (agricultural labourer), Margaret Dowling (unemployed cook), Edward Gayer (farm servant), William Norris (farm servant), James Stapleton (agricultural labourer), William Caples (farm servant), William Hartigan (farm servant), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), John Hennessy (farm servant), Michael Revins (agricultural labourer), Michael Gayer (agricultural labourer), Michael Caples (agricultural labourer), Patrick Gayer (agricultural labourer), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer) and Thomas Maher (agricultural labourer).[7] All these people may not have worked on the Modeligo estate but some could have.

As well as finding work locally servants also travelled far distances as they followed the work. Sometimes these journeys were to get new jobs on ne estates but also could be on related properties. In this regard relations of these Modeligo servants were in the employment of Henry Armstead Braddell of Newhill, Two Mile Borris, Co. Tipperary, a son of Henry Braddell of Modeligo. These servants were Ellen Prendergast (aged 25, born co. Cork, house maid/domestic servant) and Edmond Guair (aged 27, born Co. Cork, coachman/domestic servant).[8]

Later records say that Michael Gayer (Gear) died 26th August 1901 as a labourer.[9]

Between 1901 and 1911 census

In the years between the publish census records of 1901 and 1911 other sources provide the names of labourers and servants in Moydilliga townland. Labourers often moved from place to place, staying for a few years or maybe just for a season before moving on to find work elsewhere. On 9th August 1905 Richard Mellerick of Modeligo died as a bachelor and labourer. On 26th June 1907 Patrick Hogan, labourer, died in Moydilliga townland.[10]

1911 census

The 1911 census found three members of the Braddell family living in Modeligo House on census night. They were Henry Braddell (aged 70, a magistrate for Co. Cork), Laura Noeme Braddell (aged 60, wife, born Co. Cork) and Emily Braddell (daughter, aged 30 and single). All were members of the Church of Ireland. Henry and Laura Braddell were married forty-four years and had three children who were all living in 1911.

The 1911 information contains some questionable differences from the 1901 information. Henry Braddell only aged five years in ten years while Emily was thirty in 1901 and 1911. When Henry Braddell died two years later, on 9th March 1913, his aged was given as eighty-seven (that’s aging 17 years in 2 years!).[11] Laura Braddell is called Minnie in 1901 and born in Italy but she was born in Co. Cork for the later return.[12] When Laura Braddell died in July 1915 her age was given as eighty-two, an advance of twenty-two years in four years![13]

Modeligo House in 1911

The structure of Modeligo House is different in 1911 compared to 1901. In 1911 there were eight windows in front of the house compared to ten in 1901. The number of rooms had drastically reduced since 1901 from 35 rooms to 12 rooms. The number of outhouses in 1901 was sixteen and in 1911 had increased to eighteen. It seems that some of the dwelling house was converted into outhouses between the census returns.[14] The description list of the outhouses in 1911 give us one stable, one coach house, one harness house, two cow houses, one calf house, one dairy, two piggery houses, one fowl house, one barn, one potato house, one workshop and two sheds along with three store houses.[15] Unfortunately we don’t have the descriptive listing for 1901 to compare the different houses. The big fall in the number of rooms is a subject for future investigation.

photo-2

Modeligo House

1911 servants

Meanwhile there were four servants in Modeligo House on census night 1911. These were Ellen Corcoran (aged 50, born Co. Cork, house maid/domestic servant), James Barry (aged 26, born Co. Waterford, laundress/domestic servant), Norah Hugh (aged 25, born Co. Cork, cook/domestic servant), and Ellen Coughlan (aged 20, born Co. Cork, kitchen maid/domestic servant).[16] Ellen Corcoran was the daughter of Daniel Corcoran of Ballinscourlogue in the parish of Ballynoe. Her father, Daniel Corcoran was a widower and farmer. In Griffiths Valuation of about 1850 Daniel Corcoran rented a house, offices and garden from John Nason.[17] Ellen Coughlan was born on the Modeligo estate. In the 1901 census she was recorded as the daughter of William and Hannah Coughlan.[18] It was not possible to find 1901 records for James Barry and Norah Hugh. It is possible that Norah Hugh was related to the McHugh family of Castlelyons.

The small numbers of house servants at Modeligo are in keeping with attending a small landlord family. By 1901 the Braddell family had sold much of their estate to their tenants as most of the houses were owned by the occupiers. When the Braddell family sold Modeligo in 1950 the estate was about 400 acres and possibly was slightly bigger in about 1900. We cannot say if the number of servants was greater around 1850 when the estate was about fifteen hundred acres.[19]

Servants in Moydilliga townland

The 1911 census recorded 105 people in Moydilliga townland of whom the following were listed among the servants; Patrick Gair (coachman), John Coughlan (agricultural labourer), Michael Caples (farm keeper), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), Edmond Gair (agricultural labourer), John Hynes (agricultural labourer), Batt Murphy (agricultural labourer), Richard Gair (agricultural labourer), Ellen Cahill (general domestic servant), John Hartigan (agricultural labourer), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), John Hynes (agricultural labourer), and John McGrath (farm servant).[20] Some of these people worked on the Modeligo estate like Patrick Gair the coachman.

After 1911

Later records tell us that on 31st January 1930 Edmond Gair died and was described as a labourer. His wife Bridget died on 20th February 1936.[21] In the 1911 census Edmond and Bridget couldn’t read but they could speak Irish and English whereas their children could read and write but only speak English.[22] Many labourers and servants had literacy difficulties especially if they came from poor backgrounds. In the 1850s Thomas Gear rented a house and no land in Moydilliga townland from Thomas Morrissey.[23] This would suggest that Thomas Gear was a labourer and many of his descendants had the same occupation.

On 27th September 1955 Michael Caples died as a retired labourer. He was then eighty-five years old and so desired some retirement.[24] In the years following 1955 mechanisation of farming made many labourers redundant. Domestically, rural electrification allowed electric dishwasher, clothes washers and electric cookers to enter people’s homes and make domestic servants a thing of the past, even in big houses like Modeligo.

Conclusion

In this study we can say that many of the servants at Modeligo House came from the surrounding estate. When people had to walk to work they didn’t travel far. The furthest servants came from a six mile radius as far as can be determined. If we had earlier census returns before 1901, or estate papers, a better study could be done, but it is likely that most of the servants would still come from the surrounding estate. As for the 1921 advert for a cook, we can’t say if Miss Braddell was successful in her endeavours.

 

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[1] http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=CO&regno=20903705 accessed on 9 September 2016

[2] David Dickson, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 594, note 9

[3] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572544/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[4] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572565/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572565/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572569/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[7] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1901 townland=moydilliga  accessed on 9 September 2016

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001167517/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[9] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 275

[10] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), pp. 276, 277

[11] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 281

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926423/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[13] Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 246

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926405/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926407/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[16] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926423/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[17] Griffith’s Valuation, Ballinscourlogue, Ballynoe parish, Kinnatalloon barony, Co. Cork

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572564/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[19] Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 246

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1911 townland=moydilliga  accessed on 9 September 2016

[21] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), pp. 290, 293

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926431/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[23] Griffith’s Valuation, Moydilliga, Knockmourne parish, Condons & Clangibbon barony, Co. Cork

[24] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 301

Standard
Cork history

Shanakill townland in the Barony of Kinnatalloon, County Cork

Shanakill townland in the Barony of Kinnatalloon, County Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On the first Sunday of February Tallow point-to-point races are held at a place called Shanakill Cross between Curraglass and Conna, by the banks of the River Bride, in County Cork. This article provides a few historical notices relating to the townland of Shanakill.

The name of Shanakill is usually translated as “old church” but the “kill” element of the name could also be from the Irish “coil” or wood and so the townland name could be translated as “old wood”. Local tradition calls Shanakill as “Seana Chill” which means “old church” and local tradition is usually a good clue to fact – most of the time anyway.[1]

Tallow races

Early Christian times

So far no archaeological discovery of any site which could be called an “old church” has been made in Shanakill. Instead Shanakill Upper is dominated by a ringfort on the land of Edward and Catherine Casey, beside the Shanakill River. This ringfort is 35 meters in diameter and surrounded by a 2 meter high bank topped with large stones. The intervening fosse is well preserved. Within the interior is a possible souterrain showing a semi-circular depression and several flat sandstone blocks resembling capstones.[2]

The majority of ringforts were enclosed farmstead. Yet some excavated ringforts have shown industrial activity of iron working and such like. It also has to be said that the ringforts we see today, sitting quietly in green fields, are but the remains of a much more complex landscape. Just as many of the medieval tower houses stand isolated in green fields with their bawn wall and secondary buildings removed over time, ringforts were possibly once surrounded by other buildings outside with banks, ditches and fences.

Shanakill Lower also has possible Early Christian remains but as this part of the townland contains the better land for tillage purposes much of the remains have been ploughed out over the centuries. Still the 1842 Ordnance Survey map shows a circular enclosure, a possible ringfort, while an aerial photograph shows the crop mark of a large univallate circular enclosure of up to 100 meters in diameter.[3]

Shanakill c.1660

The earliest record for the townland so far discovered in documents is from the so-called “census of Ireland” taken in 1659-60. The census is actually a poll tax return for the country. This record shows Shanakill as part of the parish of Mogeely in the Barony of Kinnatalloon. John Russel was the tituladoe name (chief person) of the townland which had 2 English taxpayers and 17 Irish taxpayers. Shanakill was fifth out of 15 townlands in Mogeely parish in the number of its taxpayers (Lisnabrinn had 62 taxpayers).[4]

Eighteenth century

The eighteen century is presently a “dark age” period for the armchair historian as very few of the surviving manuscripts from that century are online or in printed books. The best source of information in the research of a townland is to be had from the Registry of Deeds in Dublin. Sadly work commitments prevent me from travelling to Dublin and spend a few days at the Registry. The information there is mainly deeds relating to land – a lease agreement – land appropriated as part of a marriage settlement or land secured against a mortgage. The landowner, associated people, tenants or people with a financial interest in the property appear in the various deeds. The deeds therefore provide information towards a history of a townland and also genealogy information.

Tithe Applotment 1830

In 1830 a number people held land in Shanakill for the purposes of paying tithe to the Church of Ireland. These were Henry Peard (48 acres 1 root 9 perches & 43a 3r 17p = £11 1s 4½d in tithe payment), John Gallagher (59a 1r 2p & 20a = £14 6s 3d), Patrick and William Gallagher (104a 2r 36p & 20a = £24 13s 4d), James Halpin (5a 2r = 8s 9½d), Richard Neville (38a 1r 12p & 18a = £6 8s 1d), Martin Brien (29a 0r 17p = £2 9s 2d), Thomas Wall (8a = 11s 2d), William Buckley (3a 2r 28p = 5s 2d), Widow Higgins (61a 2r 17p = £8 13s 2½d), Widow Kenefick (3a 0r 22p = 2s 7½d ), Widow Quirke (10a 2r 32p = 14s 11d), Widow Hillgrove (8a 1r 39p = 16s 10d). This gives a total acreage of 487 acres 2 roots and 31 perches.[5]

It would seem from the amount of tithe paid by the various people in Shanakill in 1830 that the townland was mostly under pasture land as pasture land was exempt from paying tithes.

Census 1841

In the census of 1841 there were 65 people living in Shanakill Lower in 9 houses and 65 people living in Shankill Upper in 10 houses.[6]

Shanakill Lower c.1853

In Griffith’s Valuation the townland of Shanakill Lower was measured as 244 acres no roots and 25 perches of land which was worth £285 16s. Land worth above one pound per acre was considered good agricultural land as Shanakill Lower was and still is. The buildings in the townland were worth £10 5s. The townland was owned by Henry Peard of Carrigeen Hall (townland north of the River Bride and across from Shanakill Lower) and was divided into seven individual plots. Carrigeen Hall was part of the Peard estate since the first half of the seventeenth century and possibly Shanakill was owned by the family from that time. Henry Peard held plot 1 comprising of 47 acres 35 perches (£73 14s).[7]

Patrick Gallagher rented plot 2a of house, offices and land (125 acres 27 perches, worth £137) from Henry Peard. The buildings were worth £4 5s. Patrick Gallagher had two vacant plots of a house and garden; plot 2b (14 perches, worth 4s, house worth 5s) and 2c (11 perches, worth 3s, house worth 4s).[8]

John Gallagher rented plot 3a (house, offices and land) from Henry Peard. The land was 66 acres 2 roots and 15 perches worth £72 12s and buildings worth £3 16s. In turn Henry Grey rented plot 3b, a house (worth 13s), from John Gallagher.[9] On 23rd July 1878 James Gallagher, farmer of Shanakill (aged 75), died.[10] His relationship with Patrick and John Gallagher is as yet unknown. On 28th April 1883 Mary Gallagher, farmer’s widow (aged 75) died.[11]

Plot 4 was house, offices and land rented by James Halpin from Henry Peard. The 2 acres 1 root and 3 perches were worth £2 3s and the buildings were worth £1 2s. In addition to the above there was 2 acres 3 roots of water and waste, worth nothing, in Shanakill Lower.[12]

Shanakill Upper c.1853

The townland of Shanakill Upper was slightly bigger than its lower counterpart at 244 acres 1 root and 35 perches. But the land was of poorer quality and only worth £125 18s. The buildings in the townland were worth £7 19s, less than the buildings in Shanakill Lower even though there were more buildings in Shanakill Upper.

The townland of Shanakill Upper was owned by the same Henry Peard and was divided into fourteen individual plots with Henry Peard holding plot 7, land (49a 1r 6p worth £9 10s), for his own use. Plot 1 was 2 acres 3 roots of land (worth £2 9s) rented by James Halpin from Henry Peard. Plot 2 was 12 acres 9 perches of land (worth £8 18s) rented by John Gallagher from Henry Peard.[13]

Plot 3a in Shanakill Upper comprised of a house, offices (buildings worth £2) and land (54 acres 1 root 34 perches, worth £28) rented by Richard Neville from Henry Peard. In turn Mary McGrath rented plot 3b, house (4s) and garden (14 perches worth 4s), from Richard Neville while Michael O’Keeffe rented plot 3c, house (3s) and garden (25 perches worth 6s), from Richard Neville. Mary Heffernan rented plot 3d from the same Richard Neville, house, office (buildings worth 7s) and land (11 perches worth 3s).[14] On 4th March 1871 Richard Neville (aged 73) died. His wife, Mary Neville, died on 14th January 1878.[15]

Patrick Gallagher rented plot 4, house (10s) and land (30a 2r 33p, worth £18 5s), from Henry Peard while Joshua Donnell rented plot 5 from Henry Peard, house (9s) and land (12a 1r 11p worth £5 15s).[16]

Robert Hillgrove rented plot 6a at Shanakill Upper townland from Henry Peard, comprising of house, office (buildings worth 13s) and land (8a 2s 38p, worth £4 9s). In turn Hugh Cleary rented plot 6b, a house (worth 3s) from Robert Hillgrove.[17] The Hillgrove family lived in the area of Mogeely parish since at least 1755 and possibly for some time before that. In Mogeely graveyard there is a headstone for Mary Hillgrove who died in 1755. On 5th March 1871 Susan Hillgrove, farmer’s wife (aged 58), died. She was the wife of Robert Hillgrove. On 24th March 1877 Robert Hillgrove, widower (aged 73), died. On 22nd May 1884 their son, William Hillgrove, married farmer (aged 32), died. On 8th April 1874 William’s son, Robert Hillgrove, died aged just 4 weeks.[18] The Hillgrove family continued to live and farm at Shanakill into the twentieth century. On 30th January 1965 John Hillgrove, a widower and retired farmer (aged 84), died.[19]

Thomas Quirke rented plot 8 from Henry Peard comprising of house, offices (buildings worth 14s) and land (10a 2r 24p worth £5 14s). On 5th April 1884 Thomas Quirke died as a bachelor small farmer (aged 56).[20]

Timothy Higgins rented plots 9AaB from Henry Peard of house, offices (buildings worth £2 4s) and land (62a 3r 20p worth £42). In turn John Murray rented plot 9b, house (12s) and garden (18 perches worth 5s), from Timothy Higgins.[21] Sometime after 1850 Timothy Higgins was succeeded by Edmond Higgins. On 21st October 1865 Edmond Higgins, bachelor farmer, died.[22]

IMG

Map of Shanakill townland

Census 1851

In the 1851 census there were 62 people living in Shanakill Lower in 9 houses and 36 people in Shanakill Upper in 6 houses. Shanakill Lower had only a slight fall from 1841 but Shanakill Upper was down from 65 people in 1841 and lost 4 houses. The Poor Law valuation was £240 6s (£296 1s in Griffith’s) for Shanakill Lower and £97 4s (£133 17s in Griffith’s) for Shanakill Upper.[23]

Census 1861

In the 1861 census there were 29 people (15 male & 14 female) living in Shanakill Lower in 4 houses and 31 people (14 male & 17 female) in Shanakill Upper in 8 houses. Shanakill Lower had lost 36 people from 1851 and lost 2 houses while Shanakill Upper was down 5 people from 1851 but gained 2 houses. The Poor Law valuation was £278 15s (up £38 on 1851) for Shanakill Lower and £109 10s (up £11 on 1851) for Shanakill Upper.[24] The story of Ireland after the Great Famine is one of decline but down at the level of individual townlands the story is of fall and rise as circumstances change.

Shanakill residents after 1861

After 1860 different people to those recorded in Griffith’s Valuation came to live at Shanakill and are noticed in various manuscripts. On 15th December 1864, Bartholomew Daly of Shanakill, a married pensioner (aged 60), died. On 28th October 1869 Margaret Callaghan, labourer’s widow (aged 72), died. On 1st January 1873 Julia Walsh of Shanakill, servant’s daughter (aged 13), died.[25]

In the 1870s the Fitzgerald family of Shanakill suffered a number of tragedies. On 28th January 1871 Johanna Fitzgerald, labourer’s daughter (aged 8 months), died. Two days later, on 30th January 1871, William Fitzgerald, a labourer’s son (aged 7 months), died. Five years later the Fitzgerald family had another son, also named William Fitzgerald. This child lived one year before dying on 1st May 1877.[26]

The Brien family of Shanakill also suffered a double loss. On 14th February 1878 James Brien, bachelor of Shanakill (aged 19), died. A few days later, on 25th February 1878, Julia Brien, service of Shanakill (aged 15), died.[27]

On 30th November 1875 John Higgins, a married labourer (aged 43), died. On 30th September 1880 Ida Daniels, widow of Shanakill (aged 74), died.[28]

The Healy labouring family of Shanakill also suffered a number of tragedies. On 23rd September 1887 an unnamed Healy child, a son, died after only 5 minutes of life. On 18th October 1889, two daughters, Mary and Bridget, both aged 4 months, died.[29]

On 19th June 1890 Bridget Gallagher, a farmer’s wife of Shanakill Lower (aged 36), died. On 27th December 1893, Ellen Gallagher, a spinster farmer’s daughter (aged 28), died.[30]

People who lived the religious life

The surviving records are not all about recording the deaths of Shanakill residents. Other records add something more to the passing of a life. Sister Thadeus Gallagher (died 1965) joined the Presentation Order in Cork while her sister, Sister Phillip Gallagher joined the Good Shepherd Order in Waterford and died in 1966.[31]

Shanakill lower

Shanakill Lower on race day

Census 1901

In 1901 there were 25 people living in Shanakill Upper and 13 people living in Shanakill Lower. There were five dwelling houses in Shanakill Upper, viz, Edmund Casey (3 people), Patrick O’Brien (10), Sarah Hillgrove (2), Patrick Geary (7) and Mary O’Brien (3).[32] Shanakill lower had two dwelling houses, namely, John Gallagher (5) and Michael Gallagher (8).[33]

The earlier Griffith’s Valuation (1853) often described a holding as “house, offices and land” but gave few clues as to what those offices were. The surviving census returns for 1901 and 1911 give us a view into those “offices”. In 1901 Edmond Casey has two stables and one each of a cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery, foul house, boiling house, barn and potato house. Patrick O’Brien had a stable, cow house and piggery. Sarah Hillgrove had a stable, cow house, piggery, foul house and barn while Patrick Geary had a piggery and foul house. Mary O’Brien had no out houses.[34]

At Shanakill Lower John Gallagher had a stable, cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery, foul house, boiling house, barn and a shed while Michael Gallagher had the same as John Gallagher but no boiling house.[35]

Census 1911

In the 1911 census 32 people lived in Shanakill Upper.[36] Patrick O’Brien, farmer, had six daughters and three sons living in his house along with his wife, Kate O’Brien.[37] John Scannell, labourer, lived with his wife, Kate, and one son and two daughters.[38] Sarah Hillgrove, widow and farmer, lived with her two sons and two daughters.[39] Edmond Casey, farmer, lived with his wife, Ellen and their son, James along with two servants.[40] Patrick Geary, farm labourer, lived with his wife, Nora and their son, two daughters and one grandson.[41]

There were 8 people living In Shanakill Lower. Michael Gallagher, farmer, lived with his daughter and two sons.[42] In another house John Gallagher lived with his wife Katie and two servants.[43]

Shanakill in 1945

Guy’s Postal Directory for 1945 named the principal residents of Shanakill as Mrs. Casey, farmer, Mrs. J. Gallagher, farmer, and John Lane.[44]

Conclusion

It is possible to find extra historical information on Shanakill townland on the internet, in newspapers and in manuscripts in libraries to mention a few places.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 398

[2] Denis Power (ed.), Archaeological inventory of County Cork, Vol. II – East & South Cork (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1994), nos. 4636, 5145; Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, p. 368

[3] Denis Power (ed.), Archaeological inventory of County Cork, Vol. II – East & South Cork, nos. 5010, 5472

[4] Seamus Pender (ed.), A census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2002), p. 234

[5] http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/reels/tab//004239504/004239504_00160.pdf

[6] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[7] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork; Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 270, 271

[8] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[9] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[10] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 250

[11] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 255

[12] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Lower, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[13] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[15] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 249

[16] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[17] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[18] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 248, 256, 275

[19] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 303

[20] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork ; Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 256

[21] Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill Upper, Parish of Mogeely, Barony of Kinnatalloon, Co. Cork

[22] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 236

[23] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[24] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/376176

[25] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 235, 241, 275

[26] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 243, 248

[27] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 249

[28] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 252, 276

[29] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, pp. 260, 262

[30] Anon, Conna Parish Death Records, p. 263

[31] Anon, St. Catherine’s Parish: Conna, Ballynoe, Glengoura, a Christian heritage (Conna Community Council, 2000), pp. 74, 75

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572163/

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572158/

[34] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572164/

[35] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572159/

[36] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1911 County Cork, ded Curraglass, townland Shanakill Upper

[37] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411843/

[38] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411841/

[39] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411842/

[40] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411844/

[41] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Upper/411840/

[42] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Lower/411839/

[43] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Curraglass/Shanakill_Lower/411838/

[44] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition, p. 393

Standard
Cork history

Kenneth L.P. Lely in Castlehyde graveyard

Kenneth L.P. Lely in Castlehyde graveyard

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

A visit to an old graveyard always presents an air of mystery and suspense. You look upon the old headstones with their faded inscriptions not knowing what to find. The people so commemorated are unknown to us. Many of the people that they knew are also dead and buried. How many times did they laugh or cry or were they good at getting up early in the morning or better working late into the night? These questions are for the most part left unanswered. On a recent visit to the graveyard surrounding the abandoned church at Castlehyde, west of Fermoy, Co. Cork I noticed a headstone recording the death in 1912 of Kenneth L.P. Lely. This article is an attempt to put some facts upon his life and make him less a stranger to this present generation.

On 20th July 1912 Kenneth Lyle Philpin Lely died at Fermoy as a Captain in the 1st Battalion Shropshire Light Infantry Regiment. He was thirty three years old according to the headstone inscription.

084

The headstone of Kenneth Lely at Castlehyde

Early years and family

In 1879 Kenneth L.P. Lely was born the son of K.S.P. Lely of Surat, Bombay in India. The K.S.P. Lely possibly meant Kenneth Styles Philpin Lely. If so, then Kenneth Lely of Castlehyde was a close relation of Sir Frederick Styles Philpin Lely.

Records tell us that Sir Frederick S.P. Lely (1846-1935) was the son of Rev. M. Philpin of Alcester by his wife Marietta, daughter of Styles Lely of Bath. Rev. M. Philpin was a Baptist cleric and in 1842 lived at Whitebrook in Monmouthshire.[1] In 1869 Frederick Philpin assumed the additional surname of Lely. As noted above, Kenneth’s father had the Styles Philpin names as part of his surname. Sir Frederick S.P. Lely married Helen, daughter of Rev. Dr. James Mitchell of Poona.[2] They had one daughter.[3]

Frederick Lely spent most of his career in India. He arrived in India in 1869 and first served in Bombay as a second assistant collector and magistrate. In October 1881 he was in charge of the Sachin state and December 1884 became first assistant at Surat. He stayed in Surat until June 1886 when he became administrator of the Porbandar state in Kathiawar.[4]

In 1901 Sir Frederick S.P. Lely was awarded the Companion of the Order of the Star of India in the Honours List.[5] In 1904-5 Sir Frederick Styles Philpin Lely was Chief Commissioner for the Central Provinces and Berar.[6] In 1906 Sir Frederick Lely wrote and published a book entitled “Suggestions for the better governing of India”.

Malvern College

In 1892 Kenneth Lely attended Malvern School in Worcestershire on the army side, which possibly means that he was sponsored by the army. At Malvern School Kenneth Lely was on the second eleven football team. In 1896 he left the College at the end of Christmas term. The Malvern Register of 1904 gives the impression that Kenneth Lely joined the 1st Battalion King’s Shropshire Light Infantry after leaving school.[7] But other records show that he first joined the 3rd Battalion the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles).

The Cameronians

The Cameronians was the only rifle regiment among the Scottish Regiments of Infantry. The Regiment was formed in 1881 with the amalgamation of the 26th Cameronian Regiment and the 90th Perthshire Light Infantry.[8] By 1899 records show Kenneth Lely in the 3rd Battalion of the Cameronians. On 18th January 1899 Kenneth L.P. Lely left the 3rd Battalion the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), on his promotion to the rank of second lieutenant in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry in succession to Lieutenant G. B. Arbouin.[9]

083

Castlehyde graveyard

King’s Shropshire Light Infantry

In 1881 the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry was formed by the union of the 53rd Regiment of Foot (Shropshire) which formed the 1st Battalion and the 85th Regiment of Foot (Buckinghamshire Volunteers) which became the 2nd Battalion. The 53rd Regiment of Foot was raised in 1755 as the 55th Regiment and became the 53rd in 1757. The Regiment served in many different parts of the British Empire. Before 1912 the Regiment served a few times in Ireland such as in 1768-1776, 1803-1807, 1809, 1826-1829, 1844, 1864-1866, and 1875-1877.[10] The Regiment fought in the Boer War (1899-1902) and at Paardeberg during Kenneth Lely’s time with the Regiment.[11]

Among the many soldiers serving in the Shropshire Light Infantry in 1899 was Edward Pendawe Smith-Dorrien.[12] This Edward Smith-Dorrien was a possible cousin of Horace Smith-Dorrien who was one of the senior commanders of the British Expeditionary Force in 1914.[13]

Promotion to Lieutenant

In October-November 1899 the 2nd Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry was sent to South Africa at the start of the Boer War.[14] On 9th May 1900 Second Lieutenant Kenneth L.P. Lely was made a Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry.[15] By that time the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry had gone to South Africa to fight in the War. In fact nearly every infantry regiment in the British Army fought in the Boer War.[16]

Kenneth Lely returns to India

In 1902 the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry was based at Poona, Bombay while the 2nd Battalion was still in South Africa. Sir Henry Percival le Bathe was then the Colonel of the Regiment.[17] By 1900 Sir Henry le Bathe had a long service career. He was with the Scots Fusiliers Guards in the Crimean War and was at the siege and fall of Sebastopol.[18]

Promotion and Africa

In July 1905 Lieutenant Kenneth L.P. Lely was adjutant to the 2nd Volunteer Captain of King’s Shropshire Light Infantry.[19] On 3rd August 1905 the London Gazette recorded that Lieutenant Kenneth L.P. Lely was seconded from the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry by the Colonial Office.[20] We later find out that he was attached to the King’s African Rifles.

On 15th September 1906 Lieutenant Kenneth L.P. Lely was made a Captain in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry to fill the vacancy caused by the retirement of Brevet Major W. S. W. Radcliffe. On the same day of 15th September 1906 Christopher H. Cautley, replaced Kenneth L.P. Lely, who was seconded for service under the Colonial Office while Peter F. FitzGerald, replaced C. H. Cautley, seconded for service as an Adjutant of Volunteers.[21]

In 1908 the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry was at Bordon Camp in East Liss. Sir Charles Knox was then the Regimental Colonel. Knox had served in the Bechuanaland expedition of 1884-5 and in the Boer War 1899-1900 where he was active in the Orange Free State. He was severely wounded at the battle for Paardeberg.[22]

In 1910 the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light infantry was based at Lichfield with Sir Henry Knox as its Colonel. At that time Captain Kenneth Lely was attached to the King’s African Rifles (Central African Battalion).[23] Captain Kenneth Lely was Nairobi, East Africa with the 2nd Battalion. On 22nd July 1908 he was made a company commander.[24]

King’s African Rifles

The King’s African Rifles was a multi-battalion British colonial regiment raised from Britain’s various possessions in British East Africa region from 1902 until independence in the 1960s. The rank and file were drawn from native inhabitants, while most of the officers were seconded from the British Army. Many detachments from the Indian Army also served in British East Africa and as Kenneth Lely was born in India and had family connections there he was well placed to be able to manage the various nationalities.

Again with the Shropshire Light Infantry

In 1912 the 1st Battalion of the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry was based at Fermoy, Co. Cork while the 2nd Battalion was at Secunderabad.[25] A list of servicemen in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry, taken in 1912, stated that Kenneth L.P. Lely was thirteen years with the Regiment.[26] By that time Captain Kenneth Lely had returned from Africa and was again with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry.

The records in Hart’s Annual Army List often give the military record of the senior officers saying in what battles they fought in. Captain Kenneth Lely does not feature in these accounts. This is unfortunate in establishing his military career but it also says that Kenneth Lely was a modest man who didn’t want to boast about the battles he fought in.

Fermoy Barracks

Fermoy in the nineteenth and early twentieth century was defined by its military presence. The barrack complex was one of the biggest in Ireland and dominated the northern ridge over the town. The first army barracks was built in 1806 in response to the desperate need for army accommodation. The war with France demanded a lot of resources, both human and material. By 1805 there were 50,000 soldiers in Ireland who needed a place to live and train.

Fermoy barrack

Part of Fermoy Barracks about 1922

The East Barracks stood on 16.5 acres of land. It was followed in 1809 by the West Barracks or New Barracks. Later a military hospital was built. After the end of the Napoleonic War the number of soldiers at Fermoy was reduced but later increased in times of need to quell unrest and train for overseas wars.[27]

In the 1890s the army purchased a large amount of land around Kilworth for a training ground. The people of Fermoy felt that the town would lose out to the new facilities at Kilworth but instead more soldiers came to the town. In 1907 the army did threaten to reduce the number of soldiers at Fermoy from two to one battalion. The Town Council petitioned against this and after agreeing to a list of conditions like suitable cottages for married soldiers, the army kept the two battalions at Fermoy.

In 1918 one of the few aerodromes established in Ireland was built at Fermoy even though the Royal Flying Corps preferred other locations such as at Moore Park by Kilworth. After the acceptance of the Treaty in 1922 the British Army left Fermoy and handed over the Barracks to the local Irish Army. The mostly empty barracks was later occupied by Anti-Treaty forces in the Civil War and many of the buildings were burnt by them in their retreat in the face of the Free State advance.[28] The ruins of the buildings were left for many decades until bulldozed in the 1970s.

Death at Fermoy

It was while in Fermoy that on 20th July 1912 Captain Kenneth Lyle Philpin Lely died and was buried at Castlehyde. It is not known how he died, possibly from some illness acquired in Africa. It is not known if Captain Kenneth Lely was married or not and if he left any children. The Irish 1901 and 1911 census returns are of no use as Kenneth Lely was not in Ireland in those years.

Captain Kenneth Lely was not the only member of the Regiment to die at Fermoy in 1912. Also buried at Castlehyde was Captain Leonard Duckworth Furber of the 1st Battalion King’s Shropshire Light Infantry.[29]

The Great War and Africa

It is beyond this present article to ever know if Captain Kenneth Lely would have survived the killing machine that was the Great War. It is possible that with his long experience in Africa that he would be part of the campaign against the Germans in German East Africa. During the Great War a small German force of about 10,000 kept an Allied force of over 300,000 fully occupied for the duration of the war. The German commander, Lieutenant Colonel Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, was one of the last German commanders to cease fighting in 1918; surrendering on 28 November 1918.[30]

Shropshire Light Infantry return to Fermoy

If he had survived he may have returned to Fermoy in 1919 with the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry. While stationed there on 7th September 1919 Corporal Frank Hudson and 15 privates marched from the barracks, down through the town, to the Wesleyan Church for Sunday service. At the same time a party of 25 Irish Volunteers entered the town and attacked the church. The Volunteers were after the soldier’s rifles which were left at the porch of the church. The rifles were successfully captured but Private William Jones of the Shropshire Light Infantry was killed trying to protect the rifles. In retaliation for this ambush the Shropshires returned to the town that night and ran amok. The Shropshires smashed shop windows and looted shops for over two hours before returning to the Barracks.[31]

Conclusion

This of course is a part of Kenneth’s life that never happened. Instead he rested at Castlehyde through it all and still does today. This article is but a brief account of his life and a way of adding some flesh to the inscription on a long forgotten headstone in a far away field.

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End of post

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[1] The Baptist Magazine for 1842 (Houlston, London, 1842), p. 367

[2] https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:The_Indian_Biographical_Dictionary.djvu/291 accessed on 9 September 2015

[3] http://www.mocavo.com/Whos-Who-Men-and-Women-of-the-Time-1935/107381/2016 accessed on 11 September 2015

[4] Anon, The India List and India Office List for 1905 (Harrison and Son, London, 1905), p. 546

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1901_New_Year_Honours accessed on 9 September 2015

[6] http://www.worldstatesmen.org/India_BrProvinces.htm accessed on 9 September 2015

[7] L.S. Milward & E.C. Bullock (ed.) The Malvern Register 1865-1904 (Malvern Advertiser, 1905), p. 309

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameronians_(Scottish_Rifles) accessed on 16 September 2015

[9] https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/27043/page/300/data.pdf accessed on 9 September 2015

[10] http://www.mocavo.com/The-New-Annual-Army-List-Militia-List-and-Yeomanry-Cavalry-List-1900-Volume-1900/372966/337 accessed on 9 September 2015

[11] http://www.mocavo.co.uk/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1912-Volume-Lxxiii/943522/489 accessed on 9 September 2015

[12] http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r/13?_q=WO%20258&_ps=30&_hb=tna accessed on 9 September 2015

[13] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horace_Smith-Dorrien accessed on 9 September 2015

[14] Donald Featherstone, Victorian Colonial Warfare: Africa (Blandford, London, 1993), p. 78

[15] http://www.mocavo.co.uk/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1912-Volume-Lxxiii/943522/489 accessed on 9 September 2015

[16] Donald Featherstone, Victorian Colonial Warfare: Africa, p. 81

[17] http://www.mocavo.com/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Militia-List-and-Yeomanry-Cavalry-List-1902/911560/402 accessed on 9 September 2015

[18] http://www.mocavo.com/The-New-Annual-Army-List-Militia-List-and-Yeomanry-Cavalry-List-1900-Volume-1900/372966/337 accessed on 9 September 2015

[19] http://www.mocavo.com/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Militia-List-and-Imperial-Yeomanry-List-1908/641934/540 accessed on 9 September 2015

[20] https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/27830/page/5843/data.pdf accessed on 9 September 2015

[21] https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/27956/page/6791/data.pdf accessed on 9 September 2015

[22] http://www.mocavo.com/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Militia-List-and-Imperial-Yeomanry-List-1908/641934/540 accessed on 9 September 2015

[23] http://www.mocavo.com/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1910-Volume-Lxxi/810331/1821#505 accessed on 9 September 2015

[24] http://www.mocavo.com/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1910-Volume-Lxxi/810331/508#594 accessed on 9 September 2015

[25] http://www.mocavo.co.uk/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1912-Volume-Lxxiii/943522/489 accessed on 9 September 2015

[26] http://www.mocavo.co.uk/Harts-Annual-Army-List-Special-Reserve-List-and-Territorial-Force-List-for-1912-Volume-Lxxiii/943522/489 accessed on ( September 2015

[27] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), pp. 261, 263

[28] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, pp. 321, 324

[29] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 137

[30] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_African_Campaign_(World_War_I) accessed on 16 September 2015

[31] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, pp. 295-299

Standard
Cork history

Denis Murphy of the Royal Munster Fusiliers

Denis Murphy of the Royal Munster Fusiliers

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Killanully old graveyard

On a south facing slope, overlooking the Owenboy River, about one kilometre east of Ballygarvan, Co. Cork, is the ruined medieval church of Killanully with its adjoining graveyard. The rectangular church was ruinous in 1615 but in repair by 1639. But by 1699 it was again in ruins.[1] The adjoining graveyard, which contains a number of eighteenth century grave stones, was extended northwards in the nineteenth century and extended again westwards in the twentieth century. Near the south-west corner of the graveyard is a ruinous two story nineteenth century watch tower.[2] Just to the west of the old church, among the eighteenth and early nineteenth century grave stones, is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone erected to remember “D. Murphy” of the Royal Munster Fusiliers.

138

Killanully looking south towards the old church

Denis Murphy

This “D. Murphy” was Denis Murphy who died on 3rd March 1919 in Ireland. Although the Great War ended with the Armistice on 11th November 1918 all British forces service personal who died up to 31st August 1921 qualified for a Commonwealth War Graves headstone. This was because of the Termination of the Present War (Definition) Act (Royal assent on 21st November 1918) provided for an Order in Council to specify when the war would officially be at an end. The Armistice of 1918 was just a truce and the war could have restarted again, even if unlikely.

Thus Denis Murphy has a Commonwealth War Graves headstone. Denis Murphy was formerly a private in the Royal Munster Fusiliers with a service number of 7243. At the time of his death Denis Murphy was in the Labour Corps as a private with 388476 as his service number.[3]

158

Grave headstone for Denis Murphy

Royal Munster Fusiliers

The Royal Munster Fusiliers was formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the old 101st and 104th Regiments of Foot. The 101st Regiment served as a unit of the East India Company between 1756 and 1861 when control of the Company Army passed to the British Army. The 101st was known as the Royal Bengal Fusiliers. In 1881 the 101st Regiment became the 1st Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers. Field Marshal Viscount Wolseley described the 1st Battalion as able to beat any of the Line Battalions in England. There were also four short lived regiments in the British Army with the 101st title. Two of these regiments had Irish connections.

In 1881 the 104th Bengal Fusiliers became the 2nd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers. In August 1903 King Edward VII presented the 2nd Battalion with new colours at Cork. During the Great War there were eleven battalions of the Royal Munster Fusiliers. After Irish independence in 1922 the Royal Munster Fusiliers was disbanded.[4]

Barack Street

Denis Murphy was the son of Mrs. D. Murphy of 85 Barrack Street, Cork city.[5] A search of the census returns for 1901 and 1911 showed a number of people in Cork called Denis Murphy but it was not possible to identify the Denis Murphy of this article.

From medieval times up to 1690, the road that was later called Barrack Street was the main southern approach road into the walled town of Cork. In subsequent centuries, Barrack Street became the focal point from which further residential development spread from the overpopulated city centre.

In the early twentieth century the area around Barrack Street was a warren of lanes. These lanes had some of the worst housing conditions in the city. In the 1920s Cork Corporation began a programme of slum clearance which demolished many of these old lanes.[6]

Elizabeth Fort

The name of Barrack Street could have taken its name from the star shaped Elizabeth Fort near the South Gate Bridge and at the north-west end of Barrack Street. The soldier’s barracks at Elizabeth Fort fulfilled necessary military and security functions. In January 1590, the order was given by Queen Elizabeth I to construct star-shaped forts outside the town walls of each major Irish coastal walled town, in particular at Waterford, Limerick, Galway and Cork. Cork’s Elizabeth Fort was erected on top of a rock outcrop and built round a pre-existing church. Early representations of the fort show that it was an irregular fortification in design with stone walls on three sides and an earthen bank facing the walled town.

In 1603 as a result of Cork’s refusal to honour the crowning of the Catholic King James I, the fort was attacked by an unnamed faction of rebel Irish figures, who considerably damaged the main structure. The Irish rebels stole the guns of the fort and brought them into the walled town to cause civil unrest. Shortly after Lord Mountjoy and his forces seized the city and made the citizens unwillingly rebuild the fort. The new structure received the name “New Fort”.

In 1624 the Fort was replaced by a stronger fortification but this was severely damaged by the end of the Confederate War (1641-1653). By 1677 the Fort was in a decayed condition. In 1719 a new barracks was built inside the fort.[7]

In the late eighteenth century a new army barracks was built on the east side of Barrack Street in what is now called Prosperity Square. By 1840 this barracks had gone into disrepair and was known as “Old Barracks”.[8]

Murphy in Killanully

It may seem strange for a person living in Barrack Street to be buried out in the countryside at Killanully. The journey from Barrack Street in 1919 was not an easy one. It is about five miles as the crow flies but there is a good climbing hill out of Cork and a steep hill down into the Owenboy valley.

The reason for the burial of Denis Murphy in Killanully may have some family connection. Griffith’s Valuation in 1850 names two people by the surname of Murphy in the townland of Killanully. William Murphy held 50 acres with a house and outbuildings (worth £25) from Rev. Edward Newenham.[9] During the Great Famine William Murphy contributed five shillings to the local famine relief fund.[10] Also in the townland of Killanully was John Murphy who held only a house (worth 8s) with no garden from Daniel Sullivan who in turn rented the property from the same Rev. Newenham.[11]

Rev. Edward Newenham

Rev. Edward Newenham was born on 16th August 1817 as the second son of Robert Newenham of Sandiford, Co. Dublin by his wife Jane, daughter of Edward Hoare of Factory Hill, Co. Cork. Robert Newenham was the second son of Thomas Newenham, a major in the militia, by his wife Mary, daughter of Edward Hoare of Factory Hill. Thomas Newenham was in turn a second son of Thomas Newenham of Coolmore House, near Carrigaline.

In April 1849 Rev. Edward Newenham succeeded his uncle to Coolmore House and its estate. On 15th November 1849 Rev. Newenham married Lady Helena Moore (died 8th March 1911), second daughter of the 3rd Earl Mount Cashell. The couple had two sons and three daughters. The eldest son, William Thomas Newenham, succeeded his father to Coolmore in October 1892 before his death on 26th December 1915.[12]

Coolmore Carraigaling

Coolmore House near Carrigaline 

Turning circles

Like Denis Murphy in Killanully graveyard, William Newenham was a member of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, serving in the 3rd Battalion (the Reserve Battalion).[13] History travels in circles and tenants and landlords of Killanully joined by enlisting in the same Regiment. The Barrack Street connection also travelled in circles for Denis Murphy. On a wet day in March 1914 Denis Murphy may have gone into Cork city to see the Barrack Street Band take part in the St. Patrick’s Day parade.[14] Europe and Ireland were then one big camp of large armies but actual war seemed distant. Yet within a few months the war to end all wars began and took the lives of millions. On 11th November 2008 the Barrack Street Band was at Ypres with the Lord Mayor of Cork to mark the ninetieth anniversary of the Armistice and remember the Cork people, like Denis Murphy, who gave their lives.[15]

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[1] David Sweetman (ed.), Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, Vol. 2 – East & South Cork (Government of Ireland, 1994), no. 5638

[2] David Sweetman (ed.), Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, Vol. 2 – East & South Cork, no. 5741

[3] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea, A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 368

[4] R.G. Harris, The Irish Regiments: A Pictorial History 1683-1987 (Nutshell, Tunbridge Wells, 1989), pp. 204, 210, 211, 214, 216

[5] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea, A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 368

[6] www.corkpastandpresent.ie/mapsimages/corkphotographs/michaelolearyphotos/barrackstreetarealane/ accessed on 2 September 2015

[7] David Sweetman (ed.), Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, Vol. 2 – East & South Cork, no. 5822

[8] http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,567217,571400,11,7 accessed on 4 September 2015

[9] Griffith’s Valuation, County Cork, Barony of Kerricurrihy, Parish of Killanully, townland of Killanully

[10] http://corkgen.org/publicgenealogy/cork/potpourri/corkancestors.com/DouglasBlackrock.htm accessed on 4 September 2015

[11] Griffith’s Valuation, County Cork, Barony of Kerricurrihy, Parish of Killanully, townland of Killanully

[12] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 881

[13] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 881

[14] Tim Cadogan, Cork in Old Photographs (Gill & Macmillan, Dublin, 2003), p. 5

[15] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea, A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 159

Standard
Cork history

A very long lease: Ummeraboy in Duhallow

A very long lease: Ummeraboy in Duhallow

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

In the civil parish of Kilmeen in the Barony of Duhallow in the County of Cork lies the two townlands of Ummeraboy East and Ummeraboy West. The townlands are situated on the north side of the road between Boherboy and Knocknagree with the Araglen River in the east and the Blackwater River in the west. The landscape is fine undulating farmland with views southwards towards the Boggeragh Mountains. The name of Ummeraboy means “yellow ridge” and the land is a ridge running east-west with lowland on the east, south and west.

On 26th July 1762 Ulick Roche of Ummeraboy, farmer, dismissed to Ulick Roche and Elizabeth Dickson Houghton for the sum of five shillings the town and land of Ummeraboy for a term of 20,000 years at a yearly rent of sixty-three pounds.[1] What! a lease for 20,000 years who could conceive of a thing. A lease for 20 years would be manageable, 200 years acceptable, 2,000 years a bit too much Roman wine to drink but 20,000 years is to walk to the supermarket with dinosaurs. As they would say in Duhallow, somebody was eiri in áirde (showing pride or airs and graces).[2]

Ancient history in Ummeraboy

Yet in this western part of Duhallow, the past, even the distant past can be very much found alive. In the 1830s the teacher/poet Edward Walsh wrote how one day he was walking by the Araglen River near Kiskeam, a few miles north-west of Ummeraboy, when he met a youthful herds-man minding a few cattle. There, as the lyric waters of the river flowed past, the boy recounted the tale of the day Finn Mac Cool came to Kiskeam to defeat the giant warriors of the King of the Eastern World. And by the way the story was told you could even smell the cake cooking on the fire in Finn’s house such was the past alive in the young boy’s words even though the story was by then some fifteen hundred or more years old.[3]

There are a number of archaeological antiquities in the townlands of Ummeraboy East and West. In the townland of Ummeraboy West there was a possible stone row of three stones (stones removed to field boundary in 1980s). Stone rows come from the Bronze Age and the majority of Irish examples occur in the south-west. The examples in North Cork (including Ummeraboy) are at the edge of this concentration. About 90 meters away were two standing stones one of which was reputed to have had cup marks. This latter stone was removed to a nearby field fence in the 1980s and shows no cup marks on the exposed side.[4]

Ummeraboy West has two examples of the prehistoric monument called a ring-barrow. These monuments are assigned to the Neolithic (4,000 BC to 2,000 BC), Bronze Age (2,000 BC to 500 BC) and Iron Age (500 BC to 400 AD). They were used for burials, although some ring-barrows have produced no evidence of burials.[5]

In the townland of Ummeraboy East there are three examples of fulacht fiadh while Ummeraboy West has four examples. The fulacht fiadh was a Bronze Age cooking site and the Barony of Duhallow has a high density of such sites.[6] Ummeraboy East has two ringforts and a possible site of a third ringfort. Ringforts are the most widespread and characteristic archaeological feature in the Irish landscape. The majority of ringforts were enclosed farmsteads of the Early Christian period with most built between the seventh and ninth centuries.[7]

Ummeraboy in the seventeenth century

In medieval times the lands of south-west Duhallow were held by the O’Keeffe family and the area was called Pobal O’Keeffe (the people of O’Keeffe) while the lands of Pobal McAuliffe were in the north-west of Duhallow. But the area between the Araglen and Blackwater Rivers was disputed territory with both peoples claiming ownership. The townland of Ummeraboy was in the disputed border area. In 1637 the disputed area was settled with all the land west of Glenreagh (a north-south upland ridge in the centre of the disputed area) going to O’Keeffe and the land sloping east going to McAuliffe.[8] The townland of Ummeraboy was split between the two peoples into Ummeraboy East (McAuliffe) and Ummeraboy West (O’Keeffe).

IMG_0003

Ummeraboy [marked in red] in the Down Survey map c. 1654

By 1640 Dermod McCarthy had acquired Ummeraboy and other adjacent lands. He also held much of the parish of Cullen to the south of Ummeraboy. After the Confederate War, Dermod McCarthy had his lands confiscated by the Cromwell government. With the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 the property passed to the crown. On 1st July 1663 Lewis Craige took out a mortgage on Ummeraboy and other places formerly held by Dermod McCarthy. On 10th July 1668 Ummeraboy was granted to Sir George Hamilton with most of the lands formerly owned by Dermod McCarthy in the parishes of Cullen and Kilmeen.[9]

Sir George Hamilton was the fourth son of James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Abercorn. About 1620 Sir George Hamilton married Mary Butler, sister of James Butler, 12th Earl of Ormond and later 1st Duke of Ormond. They had six sons and three daughters. His grandson, James Hamilton, succeeded his cousin in 1701 as the 6th Earl of Abercorn. In the Civil war Sir George Hamilton fought on the Royalist side and defended Nenagh against Henry Ireton. He went to France during the Cromwellian period and was restored to his lands with the Restoration. During the 1660s he was rewarded with further lands like at Ummeraboy.[10]

It is possible that Sir George Hamilton or one of his children made the first grant of a 20,000 year lease on Ummeraboy. Much of the Hamilton property was in Ulster and so Duhallow was far from the family’s main centre of activity. A long lease on Ummeraboy would earn some money without too much outlay in expenses. A lease of 20,000 years is very much a sale of Ummeraboy when normal leases for 999 years are described as effective sale of a property. The changing political climate between the 1530s and the 1660s with further changes likely because of a Catholic heir to the throne (James II) motivated Hamilton to make a lease of Ummeraboy rather than a clear sale.

Ummeraboy in the eighteenth century

Meanwhile we return to 1762 and the Dickson lease on Ummeraboy. The land of Ummeraboy was then in one townland and contained 657 acres. Hugh Dickson, the father of Elizabeth Dickson had previously demised the lands of Ummeraboy to George Bastable, farmer of County Cork, but under what terms is as yet unknown. The July 1762 witnesses to this amazing lease of 20,000 years included Cadwallader Waddy of County Wexford, Cornelius Sullivan of Gneeves, Co. Cork, tailor and Alex Moynihan of Newbridge, Co. Kerry.[11]

The Cloyne will of Charles Bastable, junior made in 1710 mentioned his brother George Bastable but it is unclear if this was the same George Bastable who had a lease of Ummeraboy.[12]

The family of Cadwallader Waddy are said to have come to Ireland in the person of a cavalry officer in the army of Oliver Cromwell.[13] There is mention of Cadwallader Waddy dying in 1843 at his seat of Kilmacoe House, Curracloe, Co. Wexford but it is unclear if this is the same person as in the Ummeraboy deed.[14] Elsewhere we learn that a person called Cadwallader Waddy was an attorney at the Irish Exchequer but no date was given as this fact.[15]

Elizabeth Dickson Houghton had married Charles Houghton of Mount Charles in County Wexford.[16] No such place appears in the Houses of Wexford book.[17] The name of Mount Charles possibly changed subsequent to the 1760s and its present location in County Wexford is uncertain. Elsewhere we learn that on 28th February 1766 Charles Houghton of Mount Charles died.[18] In the same year (1766) the probate of his will was granted.[19]

In 1722 Hugh Dickson of Ballybrickane, Co. Cork gave leases for lives on some of his Duhallow estates. The townlands named in Duhallow included Clontiforcull, Artrinagragh, Mantekillikeen, Island Duff and Derrynetubrid. Hugh’s sons, Abraham and William Dickson were named as witnesses to these leases.[20]

On 8th November 1738 the will of Hugh Dickson of Ballybrickane, Co. Cork, was proved. He left everything to Henry Boyle, Speaker of the Irish House of Commons as his “honoured friend and patron”. Among the creditors of Hugh Dickson were Herbert Phaire for £300, George Chinnery of Midleton for £23 13s 4d and George Chinnery of Mallow for £30 1s 2d. Among the tenants on his estate were Cornelius O’Callaghan of Banteer, Teige O’Callaghan of Killavoy and Daniel Callaghan of Coolclougher.[21]

On 2nd March 1768 Edward Shank, a shoemaker of the City of Dublin, sold to Thoby Roche of Dysert, Co. Cork his interest in the town and land of Ummeraboy. We are told that Edward Shank held this interest during the life of Carbery Egan, a named life in a previous lease deed relating to Ummeraboy. In the sale deed the 20,000 year lease is mentioned along with the more manageable term of thirty-one years. The sale by Edward Shank was witnessed by Thomas Franks and William Boy.[22]

It may seem strange for a Dublin tradesman to have land interests in eighteenth century County Cork but he was not alone in this regard or in selling those interests. In 1755 John Forester, bridle cutter of Dublin, sold the lands of Keelpatrick, a tenement in Macroom and the village of Killnegurteen in the Barong of Muskerry. Cornet Gilbert Mellefont of the Lord George Sackville Regiment purchased the property. In a later document, dated March 1756 we find that John Forester acted as a Protestant Discoverer for the lands of Ballyvallyshane in the Barony of Muskerry.[23]

As part of the Penal Laws against Catholics it was enacted in 1704 that no Catholic could have a lease on land longer than thirty-one years.[24] But loopholes were found in the 1704 Act and further legislation was introduced in 1709.[25] Further legislation was needed in 1733 in close more loopholes as Archbishop Hugh Boulter explained that “the business of the law from top to bottom is almost in the hands of these [Catholic converts to Protestantism]”.[26] Some Protestants made it their business to search out for land given to Catholics which contravened the law. And these were known as Protestant Discoverers. Having found such land that broke the law the Protestant Discoverer could claim the land. It is not as yet stated in documents but Edward Shank of Dublin may have been such a Protestant Discoverer in relation to Ummeraboy. The Catholic Relief Act of 1778 allowed Catholics to hold leases longer than thirty-one years.[27]

So far, like many of the other characters involved with Ummeraboy, it is not possible to gather much information on Edward Shank, the shoemaker from Dublin. There is an Edward Shand mentioned as executor to the will of Edward Bond in 1742 where in which document is also mentioned Rev. Edward Shand.[28] The spelling is different but a slip of the pen by the land deed registry official may have made the difference; further research work is needed.

In the first half of the eighteenth century much of western Duhallow was little influence by its landlords. The Boyle manor of Castlemacauliffe was left very much to its own devises while the Crown estate in the old Pobal O’Keeffe lands was left in very long leases to the O’Cronin family (it so remained Crown lands because nobody wanted it).[29] It was possibly these long leases that gave the unknown owner (possibly Hamilton) of Ummeraboy the idea of the 20,000 year lease.

055

A photo representing how the land of Ummeraboy looks 

Agricultural improvements

During the second half of the eighteenth century improvements in agriculture penetrated into western Duhallow and Ummeraboy. Yet it was reported that even though by 1800 much of eastern Duhallow had good plantations of trees the western part was denude of trees as it had been since the earliest times of history.[30] The use of lime as a fertilizer for the land increased crop yields and allowed more animals to be supported by the land.[31] The two parts of Ummeraboy were well served by lime kilns with nearby a dozen in the townland.

Yet cattle farming and not the more profitable dairy farming remained the chief enterprise. The problem was the difficulty of getting dairy produce to the largest butter market in the world, Cork City. Land transport across bog and mountain was slow and difficult. In the 1820s a series of new roads opened western Duhallow to the outside world but the area around Ummeraboy was still without good road connections. The engineer and surveyor, Richard Griffith, made efforts to correct this absence. By 1839 a new road from Castleisland to Ballydesmond and on through Kiskeam to the Mallow/Killarney road opened the area and helped improve the lives of the inhabitants.[32]

Ummeraboy in the 1780s

Long before the construction of these new roads the ownership of Ummeraboy had changed hands. On 9th March 1781 Thoby Roche, gent of the City of Cork, sold Ummeraboy for 999 years to Patrick Creagh, merchant of Cork, in consideration of £600. The land contained about 657 acres for which Patrick Creagh paid a yearly rent of £63 with the provision of redemption by Thoby Roche. The lease sale didn’t last long and in 1784 Patrick Creagh surrendered the lease back to Thoby Roche who was then living at Dysert, Co. Cork. On 17th December 1784 (the same day of the surrender) Thoby Roche granted Ummeraboy to his eldest son, Ulick Roche of Dysert for 100 years after Ulick Roche had paid over £835 to Peirce Purcell of Altamera, Co. Cork and William Purcell of Mount Purcell, Co. Cork (likely creditors of Thoby Roche). This payment of £835 was not enough to satisfy the debts and the two Purcells were given a 12 year lease on Ummeraboy and another townland called Killeterigh.[33]

By December 1788 the 657 plantation acres of Ummeraboy had passed to John McAllen of Athy, Co. Kildare. On 4th December 1788 John McAllen made a lease and release with Rev. Joseph Miller of Wexford of the lands of Ummeraboy so that the lands would be held for John for life while Rev. Miller got £63 of yearly rent from lands in County Wexford.[34]

Ummeraboy in the nineteenth century

In Griffith’s Valuation (c.1850) Ummeraboy East contained 371 acres and was held Denis McCarthy with about thirteen different tenancies while Ummeraboy West contained 709 acres and was held by the same Denis McCarthy with about twenty-five different tenancies.[35] In June 1863 the estate of Denis McCarthy at Ummeraboy East and West was offered for sale.[36] Florence McCarthy held Ummeraboy in about 1834 according to the Tithe Applotment books.

Previously on 24th January 1854 the overlord owner of Ummeraboy, John Chrysostom Hennessy of Ballinhassig, Co. Cork sold Ummeraboy to Jonas Morris of Dunkettel, Co. Cork for £3,838.[37] John Chrysostom Hennessy was the eldest son of Michael Hennessy and Jane, daughter of Samuel Welply. John Hennessy was born in 1816 and succeeded his father in 1846. In 1850 he married Mary, second daughter of Richard Kenifeck of Ballindeasig House. In 1851 they had a son called Michael Hennessy.[38]

With all the centuries of English intrusion into western Duhallow and the plague of the Great Famine the old traditions live long in the area around Ummeraboy. The practice of transhumance or of taking cattle up into the high ground for summer grazing and back down to the lowland for winter shelter, continued from ancient times and was still practiced in the Ummeraboy area well into the twentieth century.[39]

If we returned to Ummeraboy in 19,700 years’ time what kind of place will it be. Will society have returned to transhumance or will it be totally unrecognisable to this generation. What we do know is that the descendants of the original person who gave the 20,000 year lease will not be able to claim their inheritance as the Land Acts made between 1870 and 1903 gave absolute ownership to the then tenant farmers.

IMG

Ummeraboy in about 1850 [in red] showing the plot numbers from Griffith’s Valuation

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[1] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 7, p. 1136

[2] Louis McCarthy, ‘The Hiberno-English of West Duhallow’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XIV (2006), p. 107

[3] John J. Ó Ríordáin, Where Araglen so gently flows (author, 2007), pp. 26-30

[4] Denis Power, Sheila Lane & others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork: Volume 4: North Cork Part 1 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 2000), pp. 11, 14, 16, 176

[5] D. Power, S. Lane & others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork: Volume 4, Part 1, pp. 184, 190

[6] D. Power, S. Lane & others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork: Volume 4, Part 1, pp. 43, 168, 169

[7] D. Power, S. Lane & others, Archaeological Inventory of County Cork: Vol. 4, Part 1, pp. 217, 330, 358

[8] John J. Ó Ríordáin, Where Araglen so gently flows, pp. 51, 107

[9] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 7, pp. 608, 609, 610

[10] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_George_Hamilton,_1st_Baronet,_of_Donalong accessed on 4th October 2014

[11] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 7, p. 1136

[12] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 716

[13] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 661

[14] David Rowe & Eithne Scallan, Houses of Wexford (Whitegate, Ballinakella Press, 2004), no. 617

[15] Edward Keane, P. Beryl Eustace & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inn admission papers, 1607-1867 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 1982), p. 493

[16] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 7, p. 1136

[17] David Rowe & Eithne Scallan, Houses of Wexford (Whitegate, Ballinakella Press, 2004)

[18] The Gentleman’s and London Magazine for 1766 (Dublin, 1766), p. 312

[19] Rev. Wallace Clare (ed.), A guide to copies and abstract of Irish wills (editor, 1930), p. 58

[20] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 7, p. 2017

[21] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 646

[22] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 7, p. 1156

[23] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 8, pp. 2320, 2321, 2322

[24] David Dickson, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork University Press, 2005), p. 185

[25] Maureen Wall, The Penal Laws, 1691-1760 (Dublin Historical Association, Irish History Series, No. 1, 1976), p. 21

[26] Conor Cruise O’Brien, The Great Melody: a thematic biography of Edmund Burke (London, 1992), pp. 10, 11

[27] Miriam Lambe, A Tipperary Landed Estate: Castle Otway 1750-1853 (Dublin, 1998), p. 26

[28] P. Beryl Eustace (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, Vol. 1, 1708-1745 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1956), no. 699

[29] David Dickson, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork University Press, 2005), p. 224

[30] Seamus O Cróinin, ‘Duhallow- Two Hundred Years Ago’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), p. 33

[31] John J. Ó Ríordáin, Where Araglen so gently flows, p. 177

[32] John J. Ó Ríordáin, Where Araglen so gently flows, pp. 177, 179, 185

[33] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 11, pp. 1286, 1288, 1289

[34] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 11, p. 1303

[35] Griffith’s Valuation, Barony of Duhallow, Parish of Kilmeen

[36] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2625 7 September 2014

[37] A.E. Casey & T. O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 15, p. 2051

[38] Edward Walford, County Families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 303

[39] John J. Ó Ríordáin, Where Araglen so gently flows, p. 115

 

 

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Cork history

Grant family of Kilmurry, Co. Cork

 

 

Grant family of Kilmurry, Co. Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Overlooking the River Blackwater, on the north bank, between Fermoy and Ballyduff stands Kilmurry House or at least the ruins of the house. So-called New Age Travellers illegally occupied the house during the 1990s and took everything but the four walls. For about 250 years Kilmurry was the home of the Grant family. This article gives a short account of this family.

Image

Kilmurry House in recent years

Origins of the Grant family

In Ireland people bearing the surname of Grant usually come from two main places of origin. North of a line from Dublin to Galway most Grant families are of Scottish origin. South of that line most Grant families are of Norman origin.[1]

Early medieval documents show members of the Le Graunte family living in South Kilkenny in the decades after the Norman invasion of 1169. The chief Le Graunte family were descendent from Milo Fitz David, a knight of the Norman Conquest and son of David Fitz Gerald, Bishop of St. David’s, Wales, 1148-1176.[2] After the death of Dermot MacMurrough in 1176 Milo Fitz David received the Barony of Overk in South Kilkenny which included the modern Baronies of Iverk, Ida and part of Knocktopher (about 100,000 acres).[3]

Milo Fitz David was succeeded by his son, David Fitz Milo le Graunte, the first of his family to use the name of le Graunte. The name means ‘strong’ and was later changed to the modern form of Grant.[4] David Fitz Milo le Graunte richly endowed the Augustinian nunnery of St. Mary at Kilculliheen as Baron of Overk.[5]   

The last Baron of Overk, Roger Fitz Milo le Graunte, sold the lordship of Overk to Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, in 1319. Edmund Butler’s son, James Butler, became the first Earl of Ormond in 1328.[6] The adjoining fee of Logeran was lost by Sir William le Graunte in 1345 after the Desmond rebellion. By that time some members of the le Graunte family had moved out from South Kilkenny into South Tipperary and northwards into Connacht while others moved south into County Waterford. Some le Graunte families stayed in South Kilkenny until the Commonwealth confiscations (1653-1660).[7]

Grant family in Waterford City

By around 1500 members of the Grant families had moved into Waterford city where they became successful merchants involved with trade to Spain and the Continent. Thomas Grant was a bailiff of the city in 1542 and 1546.[8] James Grant was city bailiff in 1549, 1557 and 1560.[9] In the seventeenth century Matthew Grant was bailiff of Waterford City in 1626, sheriff in 1634 and mayor of Waterford in 1640.[10] During the Civil War of 1641-1653 members of the Grant families fought on different sides with those around Waterford City on the Royalist side and those from Wexford and Tipperary fighting for the Confederate army.[11] Following the victory of the Parliamentary side over the Royalists and Confederates the property of many Grant families were seized and their former owners transplanted to Connacht. Even Grants who stayed loyal and were innocent of any rebellion were not spared.

John Fitz Jasper Grant

But before all that, the first appearance of the Grant family of Kilmurry in documents is seen. A person called Jasper Grant was admitted as a freeman of Waterford City in 1632 and paid 4 shillings for that entry.[12] The Christian name of Jasper is not that common yet it features very much in the Grant family of Kilmurry. Among other people with the name of Jasper include Jasper Archer, a Waterford freeman in 1570 and three people called Jasper Lombard lived in Waterford in 1596-1626 and Jasper White, a freeman in 1558. There were also three people of the Woodlock family called Jasper between 1552 and 1614.[13] 

Yet long before 1632 another person had Jasper as his first name. This Jasper Grant lived in the first half of the sixteenth century. In 1567 his son, John Fitz Jasper Grant, was admitted as a freeman of Waterford City in return for 2 half barge loads of stones to help build the Corporation quay.[14] Little else is known about Jasper Grant or his son but it is very possible that they were ancestors of Jasper Grant I of Kilmurry and later generations.

Jasper Grant I

 As said, Jasper Grant was admitted a freeman of Waterford in 1632. It is said that he was born around 1595 and that his family held Grantstown in the parish of Ballinakill.[15] It is suggested that his son was Jasper Grant II but positive proof has yet to be found.

Jasper Grant II

After the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 many people who had lost their property, including many Grants, petitioned for the return of their property. Few were successful. The one notable exception was Jasper Grant of Waterford, ancestor of the Grant family of Kilmurry. During the Commonwealth Jasper Grant made good use of his time in exile by prospering as a merchant on the Continent.[16]

Initially Jasper Grant was not more successful than others who lost their property. His first petition to the Duke of Ormond in November 1660 was unsuccessful. But Jasper Grant did not give up. In 1664 he wrote again, with six other people, to the Duke of Ormond from St. Malo to plead their case as banished merchants of Waterford.[17] 

Sometime between 1664 and 1666 Jasper Grant returned to Ireland. Not willing to wait for the long process of government decision-making Jasper Grant used his acquired wealth to make his own way in the world In 1667 Jasper Grant obtained as assignment of a mortgage of the lands of Grantstown or Ballygraunt outside Waterford City.[18]

Grantstown was owned by Peter Dobbyn in 1640 and held by his wife, Beale Dobbyn, after his death. The land was restored to William Dobbyn in 1666.[19] In 1668 William Dobbyn conveyed these lands to Jasper Grant in fee.[20] To receive land in fee would suggest that by 1668 Jasper Grant had become a Protestant but this is far from certain.

Jasper Grant continued to work his way into acceptance by the new government. During the wars against the Dutch Republic Jasper Grant joined the Royal Navy as a privateer.[21] Sailing around the English Channel and the Irish Sea Jasper Grant attacked Dutch merchant vessels, disrupting trade and making money in the process.[22]

Captain Jasper Grant also operated in the regular Royal Navy. In the summer of 1666 he was captain of H.M.S. Sapphire. Captain Jasper Grant operated out of the County Cork ports on convey protection duties between Ireland and England. In late May 1666 Captain Jasper Grant was at Kinsale with three other warships.[23] He was also involved in merchant convoy protection beyond the waters of Ireland and England. On 7th June 1666 the Duke of Ormond wrote to Captain Jasper Grant of H.M.S. Sapphire that he was to sail to the Caribbean Islands as escort for a fleet of merchant vessels loaded at Kinsale. The vessels were laden with beef and other merchandise by a French merchant.[24] It would seem that there was a delay in the French convoy leaving Kinsale.

On 19th June 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and his squadron were about seventy leagues to the south-west of the Cape. They were waiting for an incoming merchant fleet convoy to give it protection on the way into England. Major John Love recommended that the pleasure boat of the Duke of Ormond should stay in England because Captain Grant was not available to offer protection. The Duke had intended sending arms and ammunition to Ireland on his boat.[25]

By 26th June 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and the Sapphire had returned to Kinsale. On that later date the Sapphire and the Swift were directed to sail round from the south coast to Dublin and await further orders.[26] Some date later, Captain Grant had returned to Kinsale for new orders. By 6th July 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and his squadron were sailing along the west coast of Ireland. They were searching for a merchant fleet inbound from the East Indies.[27] There were no radios or radar to help them find the inbound fleet and so it was no easy task. Of course it was not easy for the Dutch warships to find the merchant fleet and the weather can always upset things for everyone, friend and foe alike.

Around 20th July 1666 Sir George Lane sent a letter to Captain Grant but the port commander at Kinsale, Major Love, said Captain Grant and six other warships were gone to England on convoy protection duties. The content of the letter to Captain Jasper Grant is unknown. Major Love told Sir George Lane that he would deliver the letter on Grant’s return to Ireland.[28]

The Sapphire was a 38-gun fourth-rate frigate, originally built for the Commonwealth navy in 1651. In 1666 it is recorded that the gun stock of the Sapphire was reduced to 36 guns (in wartime conditions) and 30 guns (in peacetime). She was 100 feet long and 28 foot 10 inches wide at the beam. In 1666 she had a wartime crew of 160 men and boys. In March 1670 her then captain, John Pearce, ran the Sapphire aground of Sicily to escape what he believed to be four Algerian ships and the ship was lost. A Royal Navy court judged his actions, and those of his lieutenant, to be cowardice and both were executed in August 1670.[29] Reminds one of those soldiers shot at dawn in the Great War for cowardice. History changes at a slow pace sometimes.   

In is said that Captain Jasper Grant fought at the battle of Lowestoft in June 1672. He was then in command of the frigate Mermaid (28 guns).[30]

Sometime around 1667 Jasper Grant, R.N. of Grantstown got married. His wife was Gillian Hely of Kinsale, sister of Francis Hely of Kinsale and later of Cork City.[31] They had at least two sons, Thomas Grant (died 1706 without issue) and Jasper Grant III along with two daughters, Margaret Butler and Mary Phillips.[32]

Sometime before Trinity term 1687 Jasper Grant, late of Waterford, had travelled to England. While there he was charged with an indictment of trespass. Jasper Grant was to appear before the King’s Bench relating to this but failed to appear. His goods were declared forfeited to the value of £2,000. In January 1690 the Attorney General was asked to report on the bail forfeiture of Jasper Grant. Unfortunately this report has not survived. In February 1690 this bill of £2,000 was granted to William, Bishop of St. Asaph.[33] But things didn’t turn out well for the Bishop of St. Asaph. The Barons of the Exchequer claimed first call for the £2,000 and declared the grant to the Bishop of St. Asaph as defective. The Bishop complained to the Treasury about the impasse. The Treasury directed the Attorney General to draw up a fresh grant to the money to the Bishop.[34] It is not known if the Bishop ever got the money. It is presumed that Jasper Grant was eventually clear of forfeiture.   

In 1697-8 Jasper Grant II made his will and gave his address as Grantstown.[35]

Jasper Grant III

Jasper Grant III was born around 1655. He is accredited by some as the person who purchased Kilmurry, Co. Cork, which became the family home until sold around 1930.[36]

Kilmurry was once the property of Robert Walsh junior and contained 500 acres. In 1640 Mary Walsh, widow and wife of the late Robert Walsh, held Kilmurry. Although George Norton claimed part of Kilmurry, on 27th July 1663 the whole townland was granted to Mary’s son Sir Robert Walsh. It was from the latter gentleman that Jasper Grant purchased Kilmurry.[37]

The Walsh family were possibly from Waterford City and could have been known to Jasper Grant from previous times. Next door neighbours to the Walsh family in the 1640s were John and Patrick Sherlock. The Sherlock family were a long established family in Waterford City.

In 1681 Jasper Grant III married Annabella Fitzgerald of unknown pedigree. The couple had two sons, Jasper Grant IV and Thomas Grant I.[38]

During the war between King James and King William Jasper Grant was a captain in Carrol’s dragoons in the army of King James.[39] Jasper Grant of Kilmurry was indicted for high treason committed between 1st June 1689 and 12th November 1691 with numerous others. He thus became a forfeited proprietor and lost his lands.[40]

On 14th March 1694 the lands of Kilmurry were granted to Manus O’Brien by the Lords of the Treasury at a moderate rent. During the siege of Limerick, Manus O’Brien had told the Williamite army of the planned attack by Patrick Sarsfield on the siege cannon travelling to Limerick. The 500 acres at Kilmurry were valued at £60 per annum.[41]

On 1st May 1695 a royal warrant was issued to the Lords Justice of Ireland to allow Manus O’Brien to have Kilmurry for three years. The rent for the land was to be set by the Lords Justice while allowing Manus O’Brien to have £50 per year for his own use after the rent charge was paid.[42] But Manus O’Brien died before he could get full possession of Kilmurry. Therefore on 2nd May 1696 the Treasury Lords wrote to the Lord Deputy of Ireland that the King in Council had ordered a new royal warrant for Kilmurry to be issued to Daniel O’Brien, son of Manus O’Brien. The Lord Deputy was to fill a report on the suitability of Daniel O’Brien to have Kilmurry.[43]

It is not known when Kilmurry was restored to the Grant family. The record of Jasper Grant II may have helped. Jasper Grant III is said to have died around 1694.

Jasper Grant IV

Jasper Grant IV succeeded to his father’s lands at Kilmurry and Grantstown around 1700. This would suggest that the family were Protestants by 1700 as in Catholic families the property would have to be shared equally between all the sons. Protestant heirs could inherit the full property of their father.

A further reflection of his Protestant faith was that Jasper Grant was a cavalry officer in the army of George II.

Jasper Grant IV is accredited with building the present Kilmurry House in 1734.[44] Jasper Grant IV married Jane Vaughan, daughter of James Vaughan of Golden Grove, but left no children. Following the death of Jasper Grant IV in 1715 his brother Thomas Grant I succeeded to Kilmurry and Grantstown.

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Early chief members of the Grant family

Thomas Grant I

Despite their principal residence being at Kilmurry, just inside County Cork and west of the county boundary with Waterford the family did not neglect Grantstown and East Waterford. The Grant marriage of 1719 showed the family keeping in with East Waterford society. On 29th July 1719 Thomas Grant I married Anne, daughter of Beverly Ussher of Ballytaylor, near Waterford City.[45] The couple had at least one child, Thomas Grant II.

Thomas Grant II

Thomas Grant II was born around 1721. His early education was in the school operated by Dr. St. Leger Chinnery at Bandon. On 16th November 1738 Thomas Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin.[46]

If his father kept in with East Waterford society, Thomas Grant II took more than an interest in North-East Cork society. On 11th October 1748 he married his next door neighbour, Elizabeth Campion, daughter of Thomas Campion III of Leitrim House.[47] The couple had at least four sons and two daughters. One son, William Alexander Grant, was born in 1771 (the same year in which his father died). His early education was under Mr. Kerr before he entered Trinity College, Dublin on 30th October 1788. William Grant got a B.A. in 1792 but was deceased by the end of 1794.[48]

By his will of 30th May 1794 William Grant left his estates in Counties Cork and Limerick along with property in Cork city to his haft sister, Sarah Clinch and his two aunts; Frances Robinett nee Fenwick and Catherine Fenwick. This will was proved in December 1794.[49]

In July 1777 their daughter Mary married William Conner while in 1790 their other daughter, Eliza married H. Campion.[50]

Jasper Grant VI

The second son of Thomas Grant II and Elizabeth Campion was called Jasper Grant IV. He was born in 1762. After schooling Jasper Grant joined the army. He began his military career with the 4th Regiment of Foot as an ensign in 1781. By the end of 1793, Jasper Grant had attained the rank of Captain and transferred to the 41st Regiment with which he remained to the end of his career. He was promoted to the rank of Major in 1798,

In 1799, Jasper Grant married Isabella Odell. Shortly after their marriage the couple moved to Canada with the posting of the 41st Regiment. Jasper Grant would serve out the remainder of his army carer in Canada until his death in 1812. It was in Canada that three of the four children of Jasper and Isabella Grant were born. These children were: Isabella (b. 1801), Thomas (b. 1803) and Susannah. In later life Susannah Grant married J.F.W. Des Barres, grandson of J.F.W. Des Barres, Lieutenant Governor of Cape Breton.[51]

A kinswoman of J.F.W. Des Barres and Susannah Grant, Isabella Des Barres married Richard Maxwell Gumbleton of Castleview, near Mogeely, Co. Cork in 1858. Isabella’s brother, Joseph F.W. Des Barres lived at Mogeely House, beside Mogeely Castle in the 1880s.[52]

The eldest daughter, Isabella Grant got married on 2nd February 1836 to Richard Kiely Ussher of Cappagh House, Co. Waterford. Richard Kiely Ussher was a retired army man having served against the French in the West Indies. Richard Kiely Ussher was a brother of Arthur Ussher of Camphire. Richard and Isabella Ussher (died 20th July 1881) had one child, Richard John Ussher.[53] Richard John Ussher was a noted ornithologist. In 1906 he was principal author of Birds of Ireland which remains an important reference book.[54]

The eldest son of Jasper and Isabella Grant was Jasper St. James Grant who was born in London in 1800. Young Jasper Grant went to school under Mr. Gwynne and afterwards entered Trinity College, Dublin on 2nd November 1818. He got a B.A. in the spring of 1825.[55]

Meanwhile Jasper Grant continued to rise up through the ranks. In 1803 he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1803 and was made Colonel in 1811. While still a major, Jasper Grant was the Commanding Officer at Fort George, Upper Canada, and later, Commanding Officer at Amherstburg.[56] It is written that Colonel Jasper Grant was at some time Governor of Upper Canada (now Ontario).[57] Yet the published lists of governors do not have Jasper Grant as governor (actually known as Lieutenant Governor).[58]

During the War of 1812 the 41st Regiment fought with distinction and gained more battle honours than any other British army unit.[59] Jasper Grant missed out on the fighting as he died on 3rd March 1812 and was buried at the Grant family cemetery north-east of Kilmurry House. The National Library of Ireland holds copies of fifteen letters between Jasper Grant in Canada and his family at Kilmurry (Mss 31,820).[60]

The table slab grave at Kilmurry records that Jasper Grant was Lieutenant Colonel in the 41st Regiment of Foot. The grave memorial also records that Jasper Grant served for a time as Lieutenant Governor of Carlisle.[61] This was possibly New Carlisle in modern Quebec which was founded in 1784 as a settlement for discharged British soldiers and people from the American colonies who wished to stay loyal to Britain after American independence, known as the “United Empire Loyalists”.[62]

Rev. John Alexander Grant

The third son of Thomas Grant II was born in 1765 and named, John Alexander Grant. On 26th July 1792 John Alexander Grant continued the interest in local North-East Cork society when he married Ann Carey, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville (on the south bank of the River Blackwater from Kilmurry). The couple were married in St. Nicholas Church, Cork.[63] They had at least two sons and two daughters (who both married their Grant cousins).

On 5th October 1794 John Alexander Grant was made a deacon at Cork and on the same day became curate of Mogeely parish on the River Bride.[64] Sometime later Rev. John Alexander Grant became vicar of Clondulane by the banks of the River Blackwater. While holding that position Rev. Grant attended a great meeting in the King’s Arms Inn of Fermoy on Wednesday, 19th June 1816. They came from far and wide to attend the meeting of creditors of that famed entrepreneur, John Anderson. This Scottish gentleman came to Ireland many years before to make his money in trade. Such was his success that he could buy the Fermoy estate.

Fermoy in the 1790s was just a poor hamlet by an old bridge across the Blackwater. Within twenty years John Anderson had transformed it into the town we see today. In 1762 the Fermoy rental was £800 per year. After the work of John Anderson this climbed to £5,250 per year. But it was the purchase of the Barrymore estate and the economic depression at the end of the Napoleonic Wars which was his undoing. John Anderson was declared bankrupt.[65] The town of Fermoy was sold to a Scottish absentee landlord and life went on. 

Meanwhile in 1812 a dispensary was established in Fermoy. A subscriber’s list survives from 1822. In it Rev. John Alexander Grant contributed £1 2 shillings 9 pence.[66] 

On 15th December 1818 Rev. John Alexander Grant became rector of Clondulane parish (in which parish is Careysville). Rev. John Grant remained as rector of Clondulane until his death on 23rd October 1833. He was buried at Kilworth.[67]

Meanwhile the eldest son of Thomas Grant II succeeded to Kilmurry as Thomas Grant III.

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Later chief members of the Grant family

Thomas Grant III

Thomas Grant III was born in 1762. He attended the school operated by Mr. Crawford before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 14th July 1778. He got a B.A. in 1782.[68]

Thomas Grant III continued the family tradition of marriages with local families along the River Blackwater when on 28th November 1792 he married Sarah Musgrave, daughter of Christopher Musgrave of Tourin, Co. Waterford.[69] The Musgrave family were important people in the social and political life of West Waterford. Sarah’s brother was Sir Richard Musgrave, baronet, the author of a history of the 1798 rebellion. It was this political involvement which possibly helped Thomas Grant III to become High Sheriff of County Waterford in 1797.[70]

During the time of Thomas Grant, a farm labourer on the Grant estate would gain national reputation and his name was Willie Brennan, otherwise known as Brennan on the Moor. Willie Brennan was born on the estate in the later eighteenth century. He was working near the big house one day when an army officer came to visit the Grant family, possibly a friend of Colonel Jasper Grant. Some other servants challenged Willie Brennan to steal the officer’s watch and chain which he did.

For this crime Willie Brennan went on the run and made his home in the Kilworth Mountains. There he took up the occupation as a highwayman. At that time the Cork to Dublin road crossed over the Kilworth Mountains. The road surface was not good and traffic travelled slowly making easy targets for robbery. By 1809 Brennan had moved from highwayman to robbing houses including some around Clonmel within sight of the military barracks.

The authorities and military stepped up their efforts to capture Brennan but were unsuccessful. Instead they forced him by 1812 to move to the remoter areas of west Cork and South Kerry. Yet his days were soon number. As he was robbing a solicitor on a remote road the solicitor wounded Brennan with a concealed pistol. Willie Brennan was able to crawl away but died the following day. Willie Brennan’s body was returned to his native home and buried at Kilcrumper cemetery, between Kilworth and Fermoy. Willie Brennan’s fame as a highwayman was spread far and wide in ballads and song.[71]   

Thomas St. John Grant I

Thomas Grant III was succeeded at Kilmurry by his son; Thomas St. John Grant I. Thomas St. John Grant was born about 1794. He attended the school in Fermoy operated by Rev. Dr. William Adair. On 20th December 1811 Thomas St. John Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin. He received a B.A. in the summer of 1815.[72]

In September 1821 Thomas St. John Grant I married his cousin, Anna Esther, daughter of Rev. John Alexander Grant. The couple had three daughters (Sarah married Samuel Morton Tuckey of Killindonnell, Co. Cork; Anna; and Susan Mary married Monsieur Francois Jules Turquet, judge of the Imperial Court at Angers, France) and a son and heir, Thomas St. John Grant II.[73]

Thomas St. John Grant was involved in local affairs and in the affairs of his extended family. In 1822 Thomas St. John Grant was a subscriber to the dispensary in Fermoy. His cousin, Rev. John Alexander Grant was also a subscriber.[74] Elsewhere Thomas St. John Grant was a trustee to the marriage of his cousin Roland Campion and his wife, Anne Campion.[75]

Thomas St. John Grant I died on 17th January 1832 and was succeeded at Kilmurry by his son, Thomas St. John Grant II.[76]

Thomas St. John Grant II

Thomas St. John Grant II was born on 20th September 1822.[77] His early education was at Eton followed by a time at Exeter College, Oxford where he got a B.A. in 1843.[78]

Shortly after graduation the Great Famine began. Thomas St. John Grant was an ex-offico member of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[79] He attended a number of meetings in 1847, at the height of the Famine.[80] In the summer of 1847 Thomas St. John Grant organised a summer festival at Kilmurry to relieve the air of doom and gloom.[81] Of course famine relief would be achieved by more than just having a party. Thus in the same year of 1847 Thomas St. John Grant gave financial support to the Kilworth Relief Fund.[82] 

On 15th August 1849 Tomas St. John Grant married Eliza Anna Louisa (born 1829), youngest daughter of Rev. Thomas Hoare of Glenamore by Mary Anne, daughter of Henry Jesse Lloyd of Lloydsboro, Co. Tipperary. The bride was granddaughter of Sir Edward Hoare, baronet, of Annabella, Mallow. The couple had two sons, Thomas St. John Grant III and Edward Hoare Grant.[83]

Edward Hoare Grant was born on 4th May 1859. In June 1888 he married Lena Colliachoune and they had one daughter, Lena Clotilda (born June 1889).[84]

In the absence of any estate papers it is difficult to get information on the Grant family apart from the usual biographical details. The Primary Valuation of Tenements, known popularly as Griffith’s Valuation, is therefore an important source. In 1850, around Kilmurry House, Thomas St. John Grant held the following estate in the parish of Leitrim, County Cork.

Kilmurry North (567 acres) 18 tenants and 3 under tenants – total value £152-4-0

Kilmurry South (521 acres) 16 tenants and 4 under tenants – total value £394-3-0

In that part of Leitrim parish located in County Waterford Thomas St. John Grant held the following lands.

Cahergal (210 acres) 1 tenant – total value £13-10-0

Countygate (154 acres) 7 tenants and 1 under tenant – total value £56-8-0

Inchinleamy East (161 acres) 4 tenants and 2 under tenants – total value £106-2-0

Inchinleamy West (332 acres) 9 tenants and 4 under tenants – total value £288-13-0

Knockaunroe (108 acres) 4 tenants – total value £22

In east County Waterford Thomas St. John Grant held a number of properties in the parish of Ballynakill which included:

Farranshoneen (174 acres) 2 tenants and 6 under tenants – total value £466-1-0

Grantstown (106 acres) 2 tenants and 5 under tenants and 1 sub tenant – total value £296

The full extent of Grantstown was 276 acres at a total valuation of £705. It would seem that this additional land was owned by other people and quite possibly had not formed part of the Grant estate for many decades. It is of interest to note that the highest valued house on the Grant estate was not Kilmurry House (£37) but Grantstown House at £74.

In total the estate of Thomas St. John Grant was about 2,333 acres at a valuation of £1,795. Yet the quality of the land varied considerably between east Waterford and that in Leitrim parish. In Grantstown much of the land was worth £2 per acre which is very good. The mostly hilly land in Leitrim parish gave a much lower valuation. At Countygate for example the land was 50 pence per acre. In flat inch land beside the River Blackwater did manage to get near £1 per acre in Inchinleamy but this land was and still is subject to flooding.

An interesting feature of the Grant estate was that most tenants rented their land directly from the Grant family. Where under tenants were present, they were mostly farm labourer cottages. Only in the outlaying estate at Grantstown was there a sub tenant, but only one. Source documents from the Land Commission courts around 1907 give the average rents on the Grant estate as about £1 per acre.[85]

During the 1850s Thomas St. John Grant achieved new heights in social standing for the family. In 1852 he was High Sheriff of County Waterford and in 1858 he was High Sheriff of County Cork.[86] Thomas St. John Grant also became a Justice of the Peace and more importantly Deputy Lieutenant of County Cork.[87]

On a more local level Thomas St. John Grant advanced education for his tenants and the wider community. Around the year 1800 there were two hedge schools in the area at Leddy’s Boreen and at Raspberry Hill. By 1826 these were replaced by more public schools in a building. A thatched cabin in Leitrim served as a school under Master Clancy while another thatched cabin at Knockaskehane served as a school under Master Moore.

In 1861 Thomas St. John Grant replaced these schools with a purposely built school in the townland of Kilmurry North. The one building had two separate rooms – one for boys – the other for girls. From 1887 the school became a mixed school and in 1909 a doorway was made connecting the two former schoolrooms. The first master was a Mr. Barrett and there were over a hundred pupils in 1862. The school closed in 1967.[88]

Thomas St. John Grant II died on 18th September 1868 and was succeeded by his son, Thomas St. John Grant III.

Thomas St. John Grant III

Thomas St. John Grant III was born on 25th September 1852.[89]

In his search for a bride Thomas St. John Grant kept things local and in his marriage renewed his connection with two local families. On 4th February 1874 Thomas St. John Grant II married Margaret Anna, second daughter and co-heir of Edward Kiely Carey of Careysville by his wife, Margaret, eldest daughter of Captain Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke.[90] The couple had two sons, Thomas St. John Grant IV and Edward Kiely Grant.[91]

In the 1870s the Grant family owned a landed estate of about 1,000 acres in County Cork and 1,217 acres in County Waterford.[92] In the grand scheme of things this was a modest estate. Yet the era of the landlord estate was passing. During the 1890s the Grant family estate around Kilmurry House was sold off to the tenants. Thus by 1901 of the seventeen houses in the townland of Kilmurry South tenant proprietors owned nine of the seventeen houses.[93] In Kilmurry North all nine houses were owner occupied.[94]

The mother-in-law of Thomas St. John Grant, Margaret Carey, died on 13th September 1881. Administration of her will, valued at £399 was granted in October 1881 to her daughter, Margaret Ann Grant.[95] This family loss was added to a year later when Margaret Ann’s aunt, Sarah Carey, died on 14th December 1882 at the asylum of Dr. Osborne at Lindville near Cork. Sarah Carey never married and left a will worth £981 7 shillings. Margaret Ann Grant was given administration of this will.[96]

The asylum at Lindville in the present Cork suburb of Blackrock was established in 1828 by Thomas Carey Osborne as a private lunatic asylum on fourteen acres of private grounds, far from the madding crowds of other asylums. Dr. John Osborne succeeded his father as proprietor and was succeeded in turn by his son, Cecil A. Osborne in 1897. A government inspection report in 1892 found 12 ladies and 7 gents as patients in the asylum. The report found they were well treated by the staff. One concern was the inadequate fire escape provision for patients.[97]

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Grant coat of arms on the main staircase 

Meanwhile back at Kilmurry, the days of landlord may have been coming to a close but Kilmurry House was, for a brief time, the centre of Irish society. In March 1890 the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lawrence Dundas, 3rd Earl of Zetland, was on a fishing holiday along the River Blackwater. During his holidays the Lord Lieutenant stayed at Kilmurry House.[98] Having the Lord Lieutenant in your house was the next best thing to having Queen Victoria for tea.

On the 7th July 1899, Thomas St. John Grant III died at the age of forty-eight.[99] He was buried in the family cemetery near Kilmurry House. On 20th April 1899 administration of his will was granted, at Dublin, to his widow, Margaret Ann. The value of the will was £1,175 19 shillings.[100]

In the 1901 census Margaret Ann Grant (born 1855) was head of the household at Kilmurry House. With her in the house was her mother-in-law, Eliza Grant, widow of Thomas St. John Grant II and her son, Edward Kiely Grant. They were served by two servants; Mary Rainey (63 years), a cook who could not read and Julia Regan (23 years), a house parlour maid who could both read and write.[101]

The second son of Thomas St. John Grant III was Edward Kiely Grant as previously mentioned. He was born on 29th August 1877.[102] In 1901 he was living with his mother and grandmother at Kilmurry House where he described himself as a gentleman farmer.[103] Yet the sale of much of the family estate to the former tenants must have taken its toll on Edward Grant. Thus we find him at Kilmurry in 1911 listing his occupation as retired farmer. He was by then head of the household.[104]

In 1911 Edward Kiely Grant was at Kilmurry with his mother and two domestic servants. These servants were; Sarah Godson (29 years), cook-domestic servant and Mary Flynn (29 years), house parlour maid-domestic servant.[105]

Thomas St. John Grant IV

Thomas St. John Grant IV was born on 1st December 1874.[106] On 25th January 1905 he married Katherine Sophia, daughter of Colonel W. Cooke-Collis, D.L., of Castle Cooke, near Kilworth, Co. Cork.[107] Shortly after his marriage Thomas St. John Grant IV left Ireland for service in the British Colonial Office. He became a District Magistrate in the Orange River Colony.[108]

Thomas St. John Grant IV died on 22nd April 1943 leaving two sons, Thomas St. John Grant V and Maurice William Grant.[109]

Maurice William Grant was born on 23rd January 1910. He was educated at St. John’s College in Johannesburg. After school he returned to Southern Rhodesia where he took up a job at the Standard Bank of South Africa in Salisbury. Maurice Grant rose through the ranks to become chief teller. When World War II broke out Maurice Grant left for the army. He became a lieutenant colonel in the Gold Coast Regiment. Maurice William Grant died unmarried on 4th April 1954.[110] 

Thomas St. John Grant V

The eldest son of Thomas St. John Grant IV was Thomas St. John Grant V. He was born on 6th December 1907.[111] The love of southern Africa captured his heart in a way that the south facing slopes of Kilmurry could not. But of course Thomas did not see much of Ireland to be enchanted by the misty isle. Thomas St. John Grant went to school at St. John’s College, Johannesburg after which he went to work in Southern Rhodesia. There he became Register of Deeds, Companies, Patents and Trade Marks.[112]

On 12th December 1936 Thomas St. John Grant V married Irene Ethel, daughter of W.E. Bouette of Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe). The couple had one son, Thomas St. John Grant VI, and one daughter, Katherine Diana (born 28th May 1940). In 1958 the couple were still living in Salisbury.[113]

Thomas St. John Grant VI

Thomas St. John Grant VI was born on 16th December 1942.[114] Sadly little else is known to this author about Thomas St. John Grant V.

Other branches of the Grant family

Jasper St. James Grant

This Jasper Grant was a son of Colonel Jasper Grant V. He was born in Canada around 1800/1801. In 1848 he married Thomasine Grant, daughter of Rev. Alexander Grant of Clondulane. Jasper St. James Grant lived for a time in Lismore before moving to Cork where he lived at Mount Verdon Terrace in Cork City and died there on 28th September 1859. Jasper Grant’s will was valued under £500 and Thomasine was left a widow and one of the executors.[115] They had two sons, Jasper and Thomas.[116]

Children of Rev. John Alexander Grant

As noted earlier Rev. John Alexander Grant was the second son of Thomas Grant II of Kilmurry. Rev. Grant had two sons and two daughters by his wife Ann, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville. The eldest daughter Ann Esther Grant married her cousin, Thomas John Grant of Kilmurry while the second daughter, Thomasine Croker Grant married her cousin, Jasper St. James Grant of Cork.[117]

Joseph Grant

The eldest son of Rev. John Alexander Grant was Joseph Grant.[118] Joseph Grant was born in Waterford, possibly at Grantstown. He was born about 1804 and had his early education under his father. On 6th December 1819 Joseph Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin.[119]

Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant

The second son of Rev. John Alexander Grant following his father into the church and his name was Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant.

Rev. Richard Jasper Grant was born at Tallow, Co. Waterford in 1804. He graduated from Trinity College, Dublin with a B.A. in 1825. In 1829 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant was made a deacon in the Cloyne diocese and given his first job as curate at Clondulane, his father’s parish. In 1836 he was ordained a priest at Cork and moved over the River Blackwater in 1839 to become curate at Kilworth parish. In that same year of 1839 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant married a local girl, Jane Leslie Collis, daughter of William Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke in the parish of Kilworth. The couple had nine children. To help support this large family Rev. Richard Jasper Grant received promotion in January 1848 when he became rector-vicar of Litter parish. Little is otherwise known as Castle Hyde and is located just west of Fermoy on the road to Mallow.[120]

Like his cousin, Thomas St. John Grant I, we know much about Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant in the 1840s from published newspaper reports. On 16th October 1845 the full impact of the Great Famine was still in the future. Instead locals of all backgrounds were interested in the newest form of transport, the railways. A meeting was called in Fermoy, attended by Rev. Grant, to discuss different railway routes between Fermoy and Cork via Rathcormac and Watergrasshill.[121] The railway would continue north from Fermoy towards Cashel where a proposed railway to Dublin was to terminate. With so many options nothing was decided and the railway between Cork and Dublin went by Mallow instead of Fermoy. It would be 1860 before a branch line from Mallow brought the railway to Fermoy.   

As 1846 began, the Great Famine started to take its toll on people and society. Local relief committees were establish in each area to distribute food and help the needy. In May 1846 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant gave £10 to the Kilworth Relief fund.[122]

By July 1846 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant Alexander was secretary of the Kilworth Relief Committee. In that month he wrote to the Relief Commission in Dublin asking the Office of Public Works to transfer control of local road works from the Mitchelstown Committee to the Kilworth Committee. This control would help to provide relief work in exchange for food in a way to serve best the local needs.[123] The reply from Dublin is unknown but if no further requests for change were written it is possible that the Kilworth Committee was successful. The attendance of Rev. Grant at the presentments session of the Condons and Clangibbon in December 1846 to decide of future road works possibly reflects the involvement of the Kilworth Committee in road work provision.[124]

In the dark days of ‘Black ‘47’ Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant continued to give financial support to the Kilworth Committee.[125] Yet in the mist of death new life was born. In April 1847 Mrs. Grant returned to her home at Castle Cooke to give birth to a daughter.[126] This happy occasion may have gone someway to lessen the loss the family suffered in 1842 when their daughter, Sarah, died young.[127]  

In January 1848 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant became rector-vicar at Litter parish. He would remain in this parish until his retirement in 1875 as rector-vicar.[128] After the retirement of Rev. Grant the parish of Litter was joined with that of Clondulane and Fermoy to form the Union of Fermoy. The local Church of Ireland community had so declined in number that the church at Castle Hyde was empty more times than full. After many attempts to permanently close the church final deconsecration was not until November 1965. Since then the church has fallen very much into ruins.[129]

In 1870 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant owned 181 acres in County Cork, valued at £94. He would enjoy this property and the company of his family for another fourteen years. On 14th December 1884 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant died and was buried at Castle Hyde beside his old parish church. His wife, Jane Leslie Grant died on 30th November 1892, aged seventy-nine years.

Alexander Grant

The third son of Rev. John Alexander Grant was called Alexander Grant. He married in 1830 to Margaret Crossley and died in 1848 having had four sons; William Grant (went to India), Alexander Grant (died young), Jasper VI Grant and Charles Grant (JP of Fermoy).[130]

Thomas William Grant

Thomas William Grant lived in Cork and was the father of Alexander George William Grant.

Alexander George William Grant

Alexander George William Grant was born about 1868. He married Margaret Florence Grant (she moved to Carmel-by-Sea, California after her husband’s death). At the outbreak of World War One Alexander Grant was serving with the West African Regiment. He initially operated in the West African front before moving to France. There he joined the newly formed 8th Battalion Devonshire Regiment and attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. On 25th September 1915 Alexander Grant was killed while commanding his troops in action. He is remembered at the Loos cemetery memorial in Northern France.[131] There is also a memorial to his memory in the Church of Ireland church, Fermoy where other people with North-East Cork connections are remembered.[132] It may be of interest to note that the Devonshire Regiment was formed in 1685 and saw its first military action at the Battle of the Boyne on the side of King William.[133]

The battle in which Alexander Grant was killed began on 12th September 1915 when the French army launched a major offensive in the Loos-Artois area of the Western Front. The French attack continued until 25th September when the British took over the offensive. The British used gas for the first time as an offensive weapon in this battle. In the first day of fighting, in which Alexander Grant was killed, the British scored a victory with the capture of the town of Loos. But the Germans recovered their situation after the disorientation of the gas attack and launched a counter-attack. Over the following three days the British suffered heavy causalities as the Germans came on good and hard. When the battle ended on 28th September both sides were nearly back where they started from – such was the repeated story of the Western Front.[134]

Kilmurry after the Grant family

In the 1930s Kilmurry House and gardens were sold to the Rosminian Order, who ran it as a seminary. During the 1940s the blunderbuss once owned by Willie Brennan, the highwayman, disappeared from Kilmurry House. The house suffered a partial fire in the 1950s when the large ballroom at the rear of the house was destroyed. It seemed the ghosts of the past were leaving one by one.

In the 1970s the house was sold to the Unification Church after whom the house returned briefly to private ownership. There were plans to convert the house into a nursing home but this was refused by the planning authorities.

The cost of up-keeping the house in the absence of a stable income was too much for the owners and the house was abandoned and became derelict. In the 1990s numerous members of the so called “new age travellers” community learnt of this abandoned house and moved in. The roof along with the fixtures and fittings were removed for ready cash leaving just the four walls.[135]

 

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[1] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, July-December 1972, p. 74

[2] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua (author, 2001), p. 63

[3] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 63; Kathleen Laffan, History of Kilmacow (author, 1998), p. 34

[4] Kathleen Laffan, History of Kilmacow, p. 252

[5] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 67

[6] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 67

[7] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, pp. 66, 74

[8] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford (Waterford County Council), p. 66

[9] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford, pp. 66, 67

[10] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford, p. 68

[11] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 66

[12] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford: Liber Antiquissimus Civitatis Waterfordiae (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2007), p. 228

[13] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford, pp. 122, 134, 155, 183, 206, 210, 220, 224

[14] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford, p. 151

[15] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed 20 March 2014

[16] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[17] J.S. Carroll, ‘Land ownerships in East Waterford, 1640-1703’, in Decies, No. XI, p. 36

[18] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[19] J.S. Carroll, ‘Land ownerships in East Waterford, 1640-1703’, in Decies, No. XI, p. 38

[20] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[21] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[22] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[23] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond at Kilkenny Castle, new series, vol. III (Historic Manuscripts Commission & Stationery Office, London, 1904), p. 223

[24] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 144, folio 76, Duke of Ormond to Captain Jasper Grant, commander of H.M.S. Sapphire, 7 June 1666

[25] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 231

[26] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 144, folio 76v, Duke of Ormond to Captain Richard Rooth, 26 June 1666

[27] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 233

[28] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 239

[29] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Sapphire_(1651) accessed on 17 March 2014

[30] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 24 March 2014

[31] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[32] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[33] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 9, 1689-1692 (Institute of Historical Research, 1931), pp. 456, 497

[34] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 9, 1689-1692, p. 746

[35] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[36] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[37] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 932

[38] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[39] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[40] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 11, p. 930

[41] Joseph Redington (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Papers, Vol. 1, 1556-1696 (Institute of Historical Research, 1868), p. 430

[42] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 10, 1693-1696 (Institute of Historical Research, 1935), pp. 1026, 1027

[43] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 11, 1696-1697 (Institute of Historical Research, 1933), p. 133

[44] Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of County Cork, Vol. 1 (Ballinakella Press, Whitegate, 2002), p. 227

[45] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274; Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1952, p. 274 – The 1912 edition has the father-in-law as James Ussher of Taylorstown. 

[46] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, 2001), vol. 2, p. 340

[47] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[48] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[49] Eilish Ellis and P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, vol. 3, 1782-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 156

[50] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 24 March 2014

[51] http://www.archivescanada.ca/english/search/Jasper_Grant accessed on 16 March 2014

[52] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 291, 297

[53] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (2007 facsimile edition), p. 1157

[54] T.N. Frewer, Waterford People: A Biographical Dictionary (Ballylough Books, Waterford, 1998), p. 151

[55] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 339

[56] http://www.archivescanada.ca/english/search/Jasper_Grant accessed on 16 March 2014

[57] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (2007 facsimile edition), p. 1157

[58] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lieutenant_governors_of_Ontario accessed on 17 March 2014

[59] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/41st_(Welch)_Regiment_of_Foot accessed on 17 March 2014

[60] http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000018906 accessed on 17 March 2014

[61] Grave memorial inscription recorded by the author

[62] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Carlisle,_Quebec accessed 17 March 2014

[63] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[64] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[65] Niall Brunicardi, John Anderson, pp. 102-107

[66] Niall Brunicardi, Fermoy, a history, p. 137

[67] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[68] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[69] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[70] P. M. Egan, History of Waterford City and County (author, 1895), p. 301

[71] Stephen Dunford, The Irish Highwayman (Merlin Publications, Dublin, 2000), pp. 229-245

[72] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[73] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, pp. 274-5

[74] Niall Brunicardi, Fermoy, a history, p. 137

[75] Author’s history notebooks, book 9 (1), p. 2243

[76] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[77] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[78] Edward Walford, The county families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 265

[79] Edward Garner, To die by inches (), p. 136

[80] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 98’, and, ‘The Famine, part 103’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[81] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 104’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[82] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 87’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[83] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[84] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[85] Court of the Land Commission, List of Appeals, April 1907, Kilkenny and Waterford, f. 8, authors copy

[86] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[87] Edward Walford, The county families of the United Kingdom, p. 265

[88] Mary Crowley, ‘Education in the Kilmurry Area’, in The High School: Kilmurry National School, Kilworth, Co. Cork, 1861-1967, edited by Tony O’Brien (Kilmurry Reunion Committee, no date), pp. 6, 7

[89] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[90] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[91] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[92] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2930 accessed on 16 March 2014

[93] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000576047/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[94] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000576035/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[95] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 1054

[96] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 1141

[97] http://eppi.dippam.ac.uk/documents/18900/eppi_pages/508096 accessed on 17 March 2014

[98] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 355

[99] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[100] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 2198

[101] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/1146023/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[102] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[103] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/1146023/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[104] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/414514/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[105] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/414514/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[106] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[107] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[108] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[109] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[110] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[111] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[112] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[113] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[114] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[115] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 11, p. 1432

[116] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[117] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[118] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 5 April 2014

[119] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[120] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 855

[121] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 7’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[122] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 39’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[123] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 47’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[124] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 67’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[125] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 87’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[126] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 86’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[127] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 7, p. 2220

[128] Christ Church, Fermoy: a brief guide, p. 3

[129] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 132

[130] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 5 April 2014

[131] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 276

[132] http://www.tripadvisor.ie/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g212987-d4975253-i89016725-Christ_Church_Church_of_Ireland_Fermoy_County_Cork-Fermoy_County_Cork.html#89016730 accessed on 16 March 2014

[133] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devonshire_Regiment accessed on 16 March 2014

[134] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice, pp. 603-4

[135] Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of County Cork, Vol. 1, pp. 227, 228

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