Cork history, Waterford history

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the nineteenth century the Perry family were the landlords of about 1,000 acres at Kilwatermoy in west Co. Waterford, including the village of Kilwatermoy. It is not known when the family first acquired an interest in Kilwatermoy. What follows therefore is a life story of the family from the earliest times to the turn of the twentieth century when like so many other landlords, they sold their estates to the occupying tenants and the end of an era occurred.

John Perry

The earliest ancestor of the family was John Perry of Woodrooff, Co. Tipperary who had two sons by his wife Anne, second daughter of John Neville of Newrath, Co. Wicklow.

Samuel Perry

The younger son of John Perry was Samuel Perry, who in turn had two sons and two daughters by his wife Phoebe, daughter of William Norcott. The eldest son, William Perry, inherited Woodrooff and was the ancestor of the Perry family of that place.

Richard Perry

The younger son of Samuel Perry, Richard Perry, moved to Cork City where he established a merchant business. Richard Perry got married three times. His first wife was Ellen, daughter of Alderman Lavitt who gave his name to Lavitt’s Quay in the city, in 1763. They had a son, Samuel who got married and had children.[1] We will return to Samuel Perry later.

Richard Perry secondly got married on 7th March 1769 to Mary, daughter of Adam Newman of Dromore. They had four sons and one daughter.[2] The eldest son, Adam Perry got married in 1804 to Mary Anne Sarsfield. They had at least two sons. The elder, Richard Newman Perry, was born in late 1805 or early in 1806 and entered Trinity College, Dublin in 1824.[3]

The younger son, Adam Newman Perry got married on 17th September 1848 at St. Nicholas church, Cork to Catherine, third daughter of John Drew of Rockfield, Co. Kerry by his wife, Helen, eldest daughter of John Elmore of Hollyhill, Cork.[4] Adam Newman Perry had an address in Cork City and at South Tourine, Co. Waterford in 1848.[5]

Samuel Perry

Returning to Samuel Perry of Cork we find that he was born in 1764. Samuel Perry took his first schooling under Rev. Reid before he entered Trinity College, Dublin in November 1780 as a pensioner. At that time, his father, Richard Perry, was described as an esquire rather than a merchant. Samuel Perry graduated with a B.A. in 1784.[6]

On 23 April 1790 Samuel Richard Perry, eldest son of Richard Perry, was admitted to the freedom at large of Cork City with about thirty other people.[7]

Richard Lavitt Perry

At some time later Samuel Perry got married Elizabeth Clewlow and had a son Richard Lavitt Perry. In 1819 Richard Lavitt Perry married Jane Deane.[8] It appears that Richard Lavitt Perry held an army career as he was listed as a soldier in 1843.[9]

Richard Lavitt Perry was a member of the 44th Regiment of Foot. On 20th December 1810 he was a cornet in the Regiment and on 3rd September 1812 Richard was made a Lieutenant. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars there were less soldiers need and so on 25th March 1817 Richard Lavitt Perry was put on half pay.[10]

Robert Deane Perry

One of the children of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Robert Deane Perry who was born about 1828 in Cork. Robert first began school under Dr. O’Brien which school was possibly in the Cork area. On 13th October 1843 he entered Trinity College, Dublin as a pensioner which usually equates to a middle class background. In the spring of 1848 Robert Perry got a B.A.[11]

Thomas Deane Perry

Another son of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Thomas Deane Perry. On 6th May 1842 Thomas Perry became an ensign in the 81st Regiment of Foot and on 30th July 1844 was made a Lieutenant. In 1846 the Regiment was serving in Canada.[12]

 

DSC05000

View east from Kilwatermoy medieval church across the Perry estate

The 1851 estate of Robert Deane Perry

In 1851 the estate of Robert Deane Perry at Kilwatermoy was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation for the purposes of setting a Poor Law rate to support the local Lismore Poor Law Union. Thus we find that Robert Perry held Ballymoat Upper (165acres 2roots 21perches), Churchquarter (128ac 2r 4p), Close (115ac 3r 8p), Kilwatermoy (202ac 3r 20p), Kilwatermoy Mountain (206ac 3r 24p), Lyrenacarriga (275ac 2r 6p), and Shanapollagh (62ac 2r 30p).[13]

Also holding land in Kilwatermoy in 1851 was Richard Lavitt Perry (Robert’s father) at Ballymoat Lower (169ac 0r 22p) and Mrs. Robert Perry at Ballymoat Lower (15ac 1r 16p).[14]

For more on other landlords surrounding the Perry estate in 1851 see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/kilwatermoy-landlords-in-1851/

Death of Richard Lavitt Perry

In 1875 Captain Richard Lavitt Perry was living at 3 Belgrave Place, Cork.[15] Richard Lavitt Perry died on 17th December 1878 at his home at Belgrave Place, Cork. His will was proved at Cork on 13th February 1879 by the oath of Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House. Richard Perry left effects to the value of under £1,000.[16] Clyda house and townland just 2.5km south west of Mallow was the home of Robert Deane Perry since 1861 as a tenant of the Webb family of Quarterstown house.[17]

Robert Deane Perry after 1879

On 11th September 1889 Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House and Rupert Deering attended court in Cork as executors to the will of Anne Perry, spinster, of Albert Place, Cork. Anne Perry died on 17th March 1889. The proving of her will noted the value of her effects at £2,235 10s 10d.[18]

A few months later, on 23rd August, Robert’s cousin, Richard John Perry of Rocklodge, Monkstown, County Cork, died.[19] Robert Deane Perry was a colonel in the North Cork Militia.[20]

Death of Robert Deane Perry

Robert Deane Perry died on 22nd May 1897 in County Cork leaving Eliza Matilda Perry as a widow and that his effects were valued at £2,600 9s 2d. The probate of his will was granted at Cork on 11th November 1897.[21] Eliza Matilda Perry was born in Somersetshire about 1840.[22] It is not known when Robert Deane Perry married Eliza Matilda but by 1858 they had a daughter named Helena Perry while living in Cork. Around 1872 they had another daughter who they named Eliza and she was born at Mallow.[23] A third daughter Jane married Charles William Bagge of Summerville house.[24]

Within two years Robert’s only son, Robert Deane Perry, junior, had died on 14th March 1899. The administration of his will was granted to his mother on 29th June. The effects of Robert junior were valued at £1,561 1s 9d.[25]

The Perry house in 1901 census

In the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was living at Clyda House with her two unmarried daughters, Helena and Eliza. They had two servants, Hannah and Ellen Mansfield. Of all the household only Ellen Mansfield could speak Irish and English. The fact that she was born in County Waterford, a good Irish speaking area at the end of the nineteenth century, possibly aided her ability. Eliza Matilda Perry said her occupation was living off dividends. The two daughters gave their occupation as “land and houses”.[26]

The census returns record that there were fourteen rooms in Clyda House that were used by the family. Around the house there were sixteen outbuildings. These included 3 stables, a coach house and a harness room. There was also a cow house, calf house, dairy house and 4 piggeries with 1 foul house. There were a further 3 sheds to service the house and farm.[27]

At the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was not just owner of Clyda House but also had three other houses in the townland. The full townland contained just over 62 acres.[28] One of these houses was occupied by Thomas Mansfield.[29] Thomas Mansfield was born in County Waterford and possibly on the Perry estate at Kilwatermoy. Like his daughter Ellen in the “big house” Thomas could speak Irish and English. Thomas Mansfield was 48 years old and worked as the head gardener at Clyda House. His wife, Anne (born in County Cork), was the cook while their eldest son Maurice was the groom. The couple had another son James and two daughters, Elli and Lizzie.[30]

The third house at Clyda was occupied by County Cork born John Condon who was the coachman. John Condon was only 25 years old like his wife Ellen. They had a baby daughter called Eliza Mary.[31] Outside the house the Condons had a piggery and a foul house.[32]

The fourth house on the estate was occupied by 45 year old Thomas Flanagan who worked as an agricultural labourer. With that job he had to support his 29 year old wife, Mary, along with their son and three daughters. Their eldest child was just 7 years old. Like the Condons, the Flanagans had a baby daughter which gave each other mutual support.[33]

Perry family after 1901

In 1906 Eliza Perry would need support for her own comfort as two of her cousins died within two months of each other. Richard T. Perry of Albert Place, Cork died on 12th June with administration granted to James Perry, gent, of the same place. But, on 20th August 1906, James Perry died. With no immediate heirs his estate was entrusted to Graham Gould, solicitor.[34]

Perry in 1911 census

By 1911 Montague Mandeville, county engineer for the Great Southern and Western Railway was living in Clyda House.[35] By the time of the 1911 census it is not known where the Perry family were living. Helena and Eliza, two of the daughters of Robert Deane Perry, were recorded as visitors of the house of James Sugrue at Sidney Place in Cork city. They were both unmarried.[36]

By 1911 it would appear that most of the Perry estate in Kilwatermoy and the adjoining townlands had been sold to the occupying tenants under the various Land Acts.

 

Bibliography

Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004)

Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899

Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976

Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001)

Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6

Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002)

Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846)

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[1] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948; Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 4, p. 257

[2] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948

[3] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001), Vol. 2, p. 664

[4] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 123

[5] Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004), p. 7

[6] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[7] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 7, p. 2122

[8] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 4, p. 257

[9] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[10] Hart, Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846), p. 380

[11] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[12] Hart, Annual Army List, 1846, p. 233

[13] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[15] Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6, p, 721

[16] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014894/005014894_00718.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[17] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 123

[18] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[19] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[20] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014910/005014910_00206.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[21] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/search/cwa/details.jsp?id=1639337193 accessed on 25 August 2013

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[24] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[25] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014911/005014911_00215.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[26] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[27] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[28] http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,553643,597499,7,7 accessed on 23 August 2013

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550872/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[30] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550875/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[31] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550876/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550877/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[34] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014914/005014914_00504.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[35] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[36] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001856949/ accessed on 24th September 2017

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Antrim History, Cork history

Mount Cashell estate in Antrim

Mount Cashell estate in Antrim

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the 1830s Stephen Moore, 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell (the title is variously spelt as one word – Mountcashell or as two separate words), was the owner of 5,961 acres in Co. Cork (with his chief residence at Moore Park near Kilworth), 6,383 acres in Co. Tipperary and over 21,000 acres in Upper Canada, with smaller properties in Counties Waterford, Limerick, Dublin and Kildare, but the vast bulk of his estate, amounting to 48,629 acres, was in Co. Antrim.[1]

Finding the Antrim estate

With an estate of over 48,000 acres it surely will not be difficult to find records relating to same but that is where the adventurer would be wrong. Finding records on this vast estate is actually quite difficult, even to the extent of locating the estate on the ground. A number of accidents of history contribute to this absence. The last Earl of Mount Cashell died in 1915. Moore Park house was sold to the government in the late 1890s and was destroyed by fire in 1908 (the land around the house site is still owned by the Irish government and is a major centre for dairy farming research).

A further contributing factor was that much of the Antrim estates were sold in the 1850s just before the Griffith’s Valuation survey was made. This survey of tenants and immediate landlords in the 1850s and 1860s was made to help establish a Poor Law rate to fund the various workhouses and poor relief. Griffith’s Valuation is often used in many parts of the country as the foundation document for estate research in the nineteenth century.

But much more significantly to all the above to the absence of records was the actions of Alfred Cleverly who was appointed land agent for the Antrim estates in 1847. Within three years Alfred Cleverly had embezzled £24,000, sold the Earl’s gold snuff boxes, made away with his yacht and destroyed the account books to cover his tracks.[2]

Some information on locating the Antrim estate can be found among the records of the Encumbered Estates Court. Printed particulars of the Mount Cashell property in the vicinity of Ballymena, in 1850, can be found in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland among the sales catalogue.[3] Much of the estate centred around Galgorm, Kells and Cullybackey.[4] Elsewhere, a rental of turf bogs belonging to the Earl of Mount Cashell from 1834 gives us more locations for determining the bounds of the estate. Thus the Earl had bogs at Ballygalley, Buckna, and Ballywatermoy, Cargin and Carnstroan, Crankill, Carnlea, Dunnygarran, Elginny, Fenagh, Galgorm Parks, Kildowney, Lisnacrogher, and Moss-side, Mackadoo, Rokeel, Rooghan, Rasherry, Tannybrannon, Teeshan, Tullygrawley, and Tullaghgarley, Co. Antrim, along with Carnaboy, Claggan and Cromkill, Co. Londonderry.[5]

 

Galgorm castle

Galgorm castle

The Moore family in Ireland

The Moore family came to Ireland in the time of King James the first and settled in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary where Richard Moore established a successful merchant business. His son, Stephen Moore, purchased some 40,000 acres in the 1680s across Counties Cork (including Kilworth and the later Moore Park), Waterford and Tipperary. Included in the latter county was the famous Rock of Cashel from which Stephen’s grandson, also called Stephen Moore, took to form his peerage title of Viscount Mount Cashell in 1766. It was the Viscount’s son, another Stephen Moore who in 1781 became the first Earl of Mount Cashell.[6]

Acquiring the Antrim estate

In the 1720 Stephen Moore (later 1st Viscount), grandson of the man who purchased Kilworth, married Alicia, sister and heiress of Robert Colville and daughter of Hugh Colville. Stephen and Alicia had a number of children, Richard (1725-1761), Stephen (1st earl of Mount Cashell), William (of Moore Hill, Co. Waterford and ancestor of the Perceval Maxwell connection), Robert (left female heirs), Sarah (married Henry Sandford), Mary (married 4th Earl of Inchiquin), Elizabeth (Hon. Ponsonby Moore) and Catherine (married 1st Baron Hartland).[7] Thus the large Antrim estate came via the Colville family to the Moore family of County Cork – one end of the country to the other.

History of the Antrim estate

In May 1607, King James I granted the Ballymena Estate with Galgorm castle to Rory Og MacQuillan, grandson of the Elizabethan owner, Edward MacQuillan. In 1618 Sir Faithful Fortescue, a nephew Arthur Chichester, tricked Rory McQuillan out of the estate or purchased it legitimately depending on your view point.[8] It is suggested that it was Sir Faithful Fortescue that started to build Galgorm Castle. In the English Civil War between King and Parliament Sir Faithless Fortescue fought at first in the battle of Edghhill on the side of Parliament before he changed his mind and went over to the Royalists. Unfortunately he forgot to instruct his men and seventeen of them were slain by the Royalist as the enemy.

Some years before the war, in 1630, Sir Faithful Fortescue sold the Ballymena estate to the infamous Dr. Alexander Colville. Legend has it that Alexander Colville as an alchemist sold his soul to the devil for the knowledge of turning base metal into gold.[9] Alexander Colville was Professor of Divinity at St. Andrew’s (yet others say he was only educated there and was instead professor of Hebrew at Sedan University in Fance), and came to Ireland in 1630 to succeed to his new estate and got a number of rectory positions from his cousin Bishop Echlin.[10]

Alexander Colville died in 1679 and was succeeded at Galgorm by his son Captain Robert Colville. Captain Robert purchased additional estates in Counties Antrim and Down.

The Mount Cashell Antrim agent

As the various Viscounts and Earls of Mount Cashell lived mainly in County Cork a local land agent was needed to manage the affairs of the Antrim estate. In the late eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century three generations of the Joy family fulfilled that role, sometimes on their own. George Joy, agent from 1809 to 1847, managed the 48,000 acres and 800 tenants with the help of just one clerk.[11]

This was typical of the Mount Cashell estate in Ireland and Canada where only local agents were employed but no chief agent to oversee the entire operation. Lord Mount Cashell tried to act as chief agent himself but was too involved in political matters (in 1826 he was elected a life peer at the Westminster Parliament).[12] The Earl was in addition a poor judge of character and employed ineffective agents who turned upon the Earl after they were fired and caused him problems both in and out of employment.

In addition to this work George Joy had his own estates in Counties Antrim and Wicklow to manage through his own agent, John Jones (who was agent for a number of Wicklow estates). In Wicklow the Joy family had 1,541 acres in 1838 survey.[13] George Joy lived at Galgorm Castle (now a upmarket hotel) and at Rathfarnham in Co. Dublin. Fortunately the Public Records Office Northern Ireland has a number of records of the agent correspondence with Lord Mount Cashell in the years from January 1835 to November 1848 (T1248 & T1289/19) which helps fill in the gaps made by the lost material.[14]

Balancing income and expenditure

A landed estate was a means of generating income which income was then spent reinvesting in the estate or building a big house or financing fine living. The income from the estate was insufficient to meet all the running expenses of an eighteenth century or nineteenth century landlord family, and so borrowing money on the securing of the estate was common. Often the estate income just covered the loan interest with little of the principle being repaid. This was fine in the good times but the depression after the Napoleonic Wars and the collapse of the tenant economy during the Great Famine bankrupted many an estate including that of the Earl of Mount Cashell. During the famine the Earl was so burdened with mortgages, debts and other charges that he could barely offer the smallest level of support to his starving tenants.[15]

Some eighteenth century letters in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland show loan interest payments coming out of the Antrim estates. On 31st December 1796 Thomas Black of Dublin, wrote to Dr. Joseph Black of Edinburgh, informing him that Mr. Joy had remitted the balance of the half year’s interest due by the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell (£11 16s 8d), to Sir Robert Herries & Company of London. But Thomas Black added that the economy was not well and money was hard to come by with the result that future interest payments could be difficult.[16]

Rental income

The main source of income on a landed estate of the eighteen and nineteenth century was in collecting rents. Rental income was mainly got from leasing out farms but also came from other sources like turf rights from bogs. On the Antrim estate rents were set by a professional surveyor rather than by public auction. Amongst the leases granted in 1846 the rents charged varied from 6s to £3 4s 9d per acre according to the location, type of soil and buildings on the property.[17] Many tenants had other income like from the linen industry to help them pay for the rent.

Estate leases

Most leases on the Antrim estate were for three lives in contrast to the Cork estates where many rentals were just on a yearly basis. The majority Protestant population allowed this difference of management as Catholics were not allowed to have long term leases on land. Long leases allowed a landlord to get a higher income upfront but also locked in his land so that he would not be able to take advantage of a rising economy. In about 1850 a survey of the estate, prepared for the Encumbered Estates Court showed that of leases signed between 1724 and 1822 there were still 224 leases for three lives still in operation, 14 leases in perpetuity, 8 leases for three lives renewable forever, 1 lease for three lives plus 31 years and 1 deed of fee farm.[18]

One of these eighteenth century leases was renewed on 3rd October 1818 between the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell and William Rea and Enoch Craig, both of Ballykennedy, Co. Antrim. The original lease was made on 2nd October 1724 between Robert Colville, Newtown, Co. Down, and Robert Cook, Galgorm, Co. Antrim, respecting lands in the parish of Ahoghill, Co. Antrim for 3 lives renewable forever.[19]

On 8th May 1812 the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell renewed another eighteenth century lease to James Owens of Taldarg, for property in Racavan alias Tulloge, Ballygally and Cloggnenerriny alias Cloughinarny.[20] On 5th November 1827 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell renewed the lease to James Owens of Holestone, for the land in Racavan, Ballygally and Cloggnenerriny.[21]

 

800px-Stephen_Moore,_Vanity_Fair,_1883-09-08

3rd Earl of Mount Cashell in Vanity Fair

Nineteenth century leases

In the nineteenth century the 3rd Earl of Mount Cashel continued to offer long leases to his Antrim tenants at a time when other landlords were going for shorter rental agreements. Up to 1847 the number of long leases increased on the Antrim estate but also a substantial number of tenants preferred tenancies at will.[22]

In rental agreements made after 1822 there were 18 for one life, 474 for 29 years, 60 yearly tenancies, 8 at will and 11 other types. In the 1840s, as the tenants could see the Earl descending into greater debt, many asked for longer leases to protect them from a new landlord if the Earl died or more if the estate was sold. as Mr. Brown, a tenant of 15 acres at Kildrum remarked ‘If Mr. Joy and Lord Mount Cashell were to live, and I was to live, I should not care to have a lease; but Lord Mount Cashell may be gathered to his fathers and Mr. Joy may die, and another Pharaoh may arise, who knew not Joseph, and we may be put under other circumstances.[23]

1820 Antrim election

The possession of a great landed estate was more than just a source of income. It was also a means to gaining political power. In a time when voting rights went with how much property you had rather just your age, it was important to manage an estate to maximise your voting strength and even gain election to public office.

The Moore family control of Clonmel in Tipperary facilitated the election of ten members of the family to the Irish Parliament in Dublin during the eighteenth century.[24] Much of the political management in Antrim was done by the local estate agent, George Joy, as the Earl of Mount Cashell lived mostly in Cork.[25] Yet even while on holidays in Europe the second Earl was not beyond thinking of Antrim politics.

On 10th March 1820 Lord Hertford wrote to Mount Cashell, who was holidaying in Paris that Lord Belfast and Mr. Ker had started for Antrim to drum up support for their own candidates in the upcoming general election. At the same time Lord Belfast wrote directly to Mount Cashell seeking the Earl’s support. On 16th March 1820 Lord Mount Cashell to Lord Hertford from Paris saying that he told Lord Belfast clearly that his support was ‘already engaged’. On the same day (20th March) Lord Mount Cashell wrote to George Joy ‘requesting him to use every exertion amongst my tenantry to induce them to come forward and vote for Colonel [Hugh] Seymour’. Lord Mount Cashell added that he would feel ‘greatly disappointed if any of my freeholders hold back and do not render every assistance … to Colonel Seymour’.

Yet even before Lord Hertford told Mount Cashell of the new candidates entering Antrim, the Earl had written to George Joy about the 13th March that, ‘in the event of any new candidate starting for Antrim, he should apprise my tenantry that I had given my interest to Colonel Seymour and Colonel [John Bruce] O’Neill’.[26] In the event Lord Belfast and Mr. Ker withdrew from the race and Seymour and O’Neill took the two seats for the Westminster Parliament unopposed.[27] The influence of Mount Cashell and the number of voters he could muster for Seymour and O’Neill may have frighten off the other candidates.

The Antrim estates in the Great Famine

The exceptional demands made on the economy and society by the Great Famine (1845-51) placed great pressure on even the largest of estates like that of Mount Cashell in Antrim. In late 1846 George Joy, the agent, wrote to Mount Cashell that he was only able to collect rents after threats of eviction and carrots on inducement. In 1847 George Joy hoped to get sufficient income to cover loan interest and the tithe rent charge but things only got worst. Although the people had enough money to avoid starvation they didn’t have enough to pay the rent. But Lord Mount Cashell was desperate for money and in 1847 fired George Joy for failing to press the tenants for arrears.[28] As it turned out the Earl had fired a good man to be replaced by a scoundrel who robbed Mount Cashell of more money than all of the arrears.

Selling the Antrim estate

By the end of the 1840s many landed estates in Ireland were bankrupt and beyond recovery. In 1848 the English Parliament passed the Encumbered Estates Act with a revised Act in 1849 to help facilitate the sale of these estates. Lord Mount Cashell was outraged and said ‘a more arbitrary Act never passed through the House’.[29] But Mount Cashell’s enormous debts made it impossible for him to stop the end from happening.

The large Antrim estate was one of the biggest sales conducted by the Encumbered Estates Court. The estate of 48,000 acres was offered in four smaller lots: the Kells estate of 3,556 acres, the Galgorm estate of 8,700 acres, the Glenwhirry estate of 11,401 acres and the big Baird estate of 24,975 acres.[30] The first sale on the 8th November 1850 was unsuccessful with only six out of thirty-one lots sold. The sale of so much land around the country all at once had depressed the market.

The estate was reoffered for sale in December 1850 and January 1851 with much better success. It is said that Lord Mount Cashell planted relatives in the auction room to push up the price. The total sale realised about £65,000 which was equivalent to 17 to 25 years of rental income.[31]

 

Galgorm

Galgorm castle

Sale of Galgorm castle

In 1850 Galgorm castle was offered for sale by the Commissioners for the Sale of Encumbered Estates in Ireland on behalf of the Earl of Mount Cashell or more particularly his creditors.[32] William Young of Ballymena put in an offer for part of the estate. On 30th October 1850 P. Scott, of 15 Merchants Quay, Dublin, wrote to William Young saying that ‘Lord Mount Cashell has a decided objection to any partition of the lots as arranged in the rentals’. But then Scott went on to say, that if the lot was not sold by the 8th November, then Young’s offer would be considered.[33]

William Young already had an interest in part of the Mount Cashell estate as on 15th November 1847 a fee farm grant was made by the Earl of Mount Cashell to Dr. William Young of the townland of Fenaghy, in the parish of Ahoghill, in consideration of an annual rent of £72 10s.[34]

In 1851 Galgorm Castle and the surrounding estate was sold to Dr. William Young of Ballymena by the Encumbered Estates Court.[35] On 28th May 1851 the sheriff of Co. Antrim was instructed to hand over possession of lands at Galgorm, including the castle and demesne containing 191 acres 8 perches, to Dr William Young.[36]

After the Antrim sale

The sale of the Antrim estates went some way to relief the Earl of Mount Cashell of his debt troubles but the sale also reduced his sources of income. During the 1850s the Earl descended into more debt. Even the financial help of his cousin, Robert Perceval Maxwell, could not save him. Even the furniture of Moore Park was taken by the sheriff to pay debts. When the third Earl died on 10th October 1883 in London he had only £30 to his name.[37]

 

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[1] Wilson, C.A., A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada (Montreal, 1994), pp. 15, 16

[2] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 27

[3] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/5

[4] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 16

[5] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/3/3

[6] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 13, 15; Debrett’s Peerage, 1901, p. 582

[7] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 819, 820

[8] Dickson, J.M., ‘The Colville family in Ulster’, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Second Series, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1899), pp. 139-45, at pp. 143-44

[9] http://www.galgormcastle.com/the-castle/ accessed on 4th September 2017

[10] Dickson, J.M., ‘The Colville family in Ulster’, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Second Series, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1899), pp. 139-45, at pp. 139-40; https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Colville,_Alexander_(1620-1676)_(DNB00) accessed on 4th September 2017

[11] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[12] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[13] Nolan, W., ‘Land and Landscape in County Wicklow c.1840’, Hannigan, K. & Nolan, W. (eds.), Wicklow History and Society (Dublin, ), pp. 649-691, at p. 658, 669

[14] http://www.from-ireland.net/irish-estate-records-antrim/ accessed on 2 November 2016; P.R.O.N.I. T1289/19

[15] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 83

[16] P.R.O.N.I. D1950/32

[17] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 31

[18] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 83

[19] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/8

[20] P.R.O.N.I. D1824/B/1/1/7/9

[21] P.R.O.N.I. D1824/B/1/1/7/10

[22] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 28

[23] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 29

[24] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clonmel_(Parliament_of_Ireland_constituency) accessed on 4th September 2017

[25] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[26] P.R.O.N.I. T3076/2/77

[27] Walker, B.M. (ed.), Parliamentary Election results in Ireland, 1801-1922 (Dublin, 1978), p. 30

[28] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 26, 82

[29] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 86

[30] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 87

[31] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 87

[32] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/3/4

[33] P.R.O.N.I. D1364/B/9

[34] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/12

[35] P.R.O.N.I. D3027

[36] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/14

[37] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 90, 91, 95

Standard
Cork history

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Careysville lies on the south bank of the River Blackwater a few miles to the east of Fermoy in County Cork. In medieval times and up until the early eighteenth century the place was known as Ballymacpatrick. The name of Careysville came from the Carey family who had acquired the property in the 1650s. In the early eighteenth century people liked to place the word ‘ville’ behind a place-name like at nearby Bettyville and Abbeyville in north Co. Dublin in keeping with the fashion of all things French even if the British were busy fighting King Louis XIV of France.

There is no fully published history of the Carey family and they seem to have stayed out of the usual genealogical publications like Burke’s Landed Gentry. They family also left their own challenges for any researcher in that so many members of the family are called Peter or John and it is sometimes difficult to distinguish one Peter Carey from another Peter Carey. It could be worst of course. The neighbouring Campion family of Leitrim near Kilworth had six generations of people all called Thomas Campion.

 

Careysville

Careysville

Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick

Peter Carey was the first of his family to come to Ballymacpatrick in the mid seventeenth century. Within a generation the family would change the name of the place from Ballymacpatrick to Careysville by which name the place is known today. The Carey family came from Devon and early spelling of the name was Cary/Carew.[1] The name is said to be derived from the manor of Cary and this is possibly true.[2]

Peter Carey was born about 1625 in Devon. At the start of the rebellion in Ireland Peter Carey went there as part of the Royalist army.[3] In 1645, at Cork, he married Sarah Graham of Dromore, Co. Cork.[4] In the Confederate War (1641-53) Peter Carey served as a major in the Royalist army in Ireland under the Marquess of Ormonde. At Cork on 23rd October 1649 Major Peter Carey submitted to the English Parliament and Cromwell. Also there on that day was Captain Samuel Pomeroy who was a later friend of Peter Carey.[5]

During the period of the Cromwellian regime Captain Peter Carey acquired part of the confiscated estate of the Condons of Kilworth as part of his war wages. In 1660 Captain Petr Carey and his son, Peter Carey junior, were living at Ballymacpatrick. In 1660 Peter Carey (written as Carew) was appointed with many others in County Cork to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1660 and was also appointed to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1661.[6]

Following the restoration of King Charles II it was feared that much of the property acquired by the soldiers and adventurers, as part of their payment by Parliament, would be returned to the former owners. Some property was returned to the former owners but most of the confiscated land was kept by the new settlers. On 27th July 1666 Captain Peter Carey received certifications from the Court of Claims to retain the land he was given. This property formed the core of the Careysville estate.

In Macrony parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 55 acres 2 roots 16 perches at Curraheen Atmurry (also written as Curaghnalmory), 10ac 1r 12p at the Two Balleraths (held in 1640 by Richard Crofton) and 196ac at Crognalane (held in 1640 by David Sarsfield).[7] In Clondulane parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 166ac 2r 16p at Ballymacpatrick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon), 236ac 1r 16p at Curraballymurraboe (also written as Curraghballymorogh), and 173ac at Carrigtotane (Carrigturtane). In the same parish a person called Roger Carey got land at Lishnesillagh and Carrimoe in April 1663 but this land was later taken over by the Lord Chancellor.[8]

In Killgullane parish on 24th July 1666 Peter Carey got 100acres at Ballyshanbegg while on 27th July 1666 he got 105ac 3r 16p at Ballyadick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon) in the prebendary of Kealane.[9]

It would seem that Captain Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Burnell. In the 1664 will of Richard Burnell it was said that Elizabeth Carey should receive a grey mare while Peter Carey should get a grey horse and his son, Michael Carey, should get a colt. Richard Burnell also said that if all of Richard’s daughters should die, then Captain Peter Carey and Lieutenant Samuel Pomeroy should receive half his estate while the other half went to Henry Tanner. Peter Carey and Samuel Pomeroy were made the two executors. Richard Burnell’s sister was Elizabeth Campion, possibly of the Campion of Leitrim near Kilworth.[10] In 1676 Sarah, one of the daughters and co-heirs of Colonel Richard Burnell, married Edward Hoare. This Edward Hoare established Hoare bank with his brother Joseph Hoare before 1680, possibly using the inheritance of Sarah Burnell. The other daughter, Mary married Captain Thomas Lane.[11]

Captain Peter Carey died in 1670 and on 16th November 1670 his son, Peter Carey, took out administration of the estate.[12]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick was a cousin of Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, and was mentioned in the will of Thomas Campion in 1699 as the overseer of the will with Thomas Wight of Cork. Thomas Campion was a Quaker and it seems that Peter Carey was also.[13] In about 1679 Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick wrote his will in which he mentioned his wife Elizabeth, along with his sons, Peter and Thomas and two daughters, Sarah and Elizabeth. Peter Carey also mentioned his deceased son, Michael Carey.[14]

In 1712 Peter Carey junior was mentioned as one of the executors of the will of Henry Pyne of Waterpark, Co. Cork, with William Maynard.[15] Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Greene (died after March 1694) and died in 1714.[16] Records say that Peter Carey had at least two sons, Peter Carey and John Carey.[17]

Michael Carey

Michael Carey, who lived about 1657, was the second son of Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick, yet other records say that Michael was the grandson of Captain Carey.[18] Michael Carey was mentioned in the 1657 will of Richard Fisher of Fermoy (proved in 1661). Initially Richard Fisher left his estate to his wife, Dame Ann Boyle but after her death the estate would pass to Michel Carey. The estate of Richard Fisher in Mayo was gifted to his nephew, Andrew Fisher, son of Sir Edward Fisher.[19]

Michael Carey was alive in 1664 as he was mentioned in the will of Richard Burnell from whom he was to receive a colt but was dead before 1679 as his father mentioned his deceased son, Michael, in his own will.[20]

It is not clear if this was the Michael Carey of Ballymackee, Co. Waterford, who only daughter and heiress, Mary, married Rodolphus Greene (High Sheriff of Co. Waterford 1717), fourth son of Captain Godfrey Greene, a 49th officer.[21]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Sources say that that Peter Carey, son of Captain Carey, had a son called Peter Carey who in 1677 married Elizabeth Langer, daughter of John Langer of Youghal and was the father of eight children. These children were Peter (died 1773), John, Roger, Thomas, George, Catherine, Elizabeth and Ann.[22]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1683. In April 1699 John Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in the spring of 1703 with a B.A.[23]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey of Careysville was the son of Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville. He was born about 1681 and was educated by Mr. St. Clare of Cork. In July 1698 Peter Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1711 he was called to the Irish Bar.[24]

On 21st May 1736 Peter Carey of Careysville made his will. In it he mentioned his two sisters, Catherine and Anna and his brother George. Also mentioned were his other brothers John and Thomas and another sister called Mrs. Power. Peter Carey also remembered his cousins John Dillon of Quarterstown, Co. Cork and Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, Co. Cork. Peter’s three brothers were the executors for the will. The witnesses of the will, which was proved on 10th October 1737, were John Kerby, James Fling and William Condon.[25]

Penelope Carey

About 1728 Penelope Carey of Careysville married Nicholas Power of Careysville, eldest son of Pierce Power of Ballyhane, Co. Waterford. Nicholas Power lived for a time at Careysville and in January 1728 converted from Roman Catholicism to the Protestant Church of Ireland. Nicholas and Penelope Power had one son, Pierce Power, of Affane and Mogeehy, who was the ancestor of the Protestant Power families of Affane House, Mount Rivers and Belleville Park, all in Co. Waterford. Rev. John Power of Tallow was another convert and a younger son of Pierce Power.[26]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey of Careysville was the brother of Peter Carey (1736) of Careysville. In 1737 John Carey married Ann, daughter of John Causidice Maunsell, merchant of Cork and High Sheriff in 1719, by his wife Elizabeth Campion and had children. In 1767 Anne’s sister Elizabeth married John Carey of Carey’s Lodge.[27] In 1753 John Carey died and his will was proved by his widow on 2nd August 1753. He was succeeded by his eldest son Peter.[28]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was the third son of John Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Rev. Sullivan and entered Trinity College, Dublin, in May 1760. Langer Carey was a scholar there in 1763 and in the spring of 1765 graduated with a B.A. In 1664 he joined the Middle Temple. In 1770 Langer Carey was called to the Irish Bar.[29] He died unmarried on 16th June 1773 at his apartments in Trinity College.[30]

John Carey of Carey’s Lodge

In 1767 John Carey of Carey’s Lodge near Fermoy, married Elizabeth Maunsell, fourth daughter of John Causidice Maunsell of Cork and younger sister of Anne Maunsell who married John Carey of Careysville. John and Elizabeth left issue. Carey’s Lodge is located in the townland of Billeragh West which came to Peter Carey in the 1650s. In 1798 Carey’s Lodge was the scene of the notorious murder of Jasper Uniacke (the resident land agent), his wife and Colonel Richard Mansergh who were hacked to death by a gang of United Irishmen.[31]

In 1760 John Carey was a witness to the will of Thomas Campion of Cork city along with Peter Carey.[32]

John Carey

John Carey was the son of John Carey of Carey’s Lodge. He was educated in Fermoy and entered King’s Inns in Easter 1845 on the affidavit of his father as he was under 18 years old.[33]

Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge

On 21st September 1825, the wife of Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge, died.[34]

Peter Carey, armiger

In May 1747 Peter Carey married Penelope Minchin (as her second husband), eldest daughter of John Minchin of Anngh, Co. Tipperary and later Castle Inch, by his second wife, Penelope, daughter of Joseph Cuffe of Castle Inch, Co. Kilkenny. John Minchin’s first wife Frances, was the widow of Major Valentine Power of Clashmore, Co. Waterford.[35]

On 22nd September 1748 Humphrey Minchin of Inchmore, Co. Kilkenny mentioned his sister Penelope in his will and his brother-in-law, Peter Carey who was named as executor. Humphrey also mentioned William Minchin, son of Penelope by her first husband, Thomas Minchin along with other nephews. At the bottom of the will Peter Carey affixed his seal and the will was proved on 7th November 1748.[36]

Peter Carey was described as an armiger in 1779 and came from Cork. In 1779 his son, Peter Carey, entered Trinity College, Dublin.[37]

Peter Carey, son of the armiger

Peter Carey was born in about 1763 as the son of Peter Carey, armiger of Cork. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1779 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[38] In March 1783 Peter Carey, eldest son of Peter Carey, was made a freeman of Cork city with five other people.[39] On 13th September 1792 at Bloomfield, David Foley married the daughter of Peter Carey of Cork city.[40]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was born in 1738 and died in 1817.[41] On 23rd August 1759, at St. Paul’s church in Cork city, Peter Carey married Ann, daughter of Hugh Lawton merchant of Castle Jane, Co. Cork. Ann came with a dowry of £3,000, a not inconsiderable sum.[42]

 

peterofcareysville

Peter Carey

Jane Carey, the eldest daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville, married William Collis (died April 1839) of Richmond, Co. Waterford and Mountford Lodge, near Fermoy, Co. Cork. William Collis was the second son of Rev. William Collis of Co. Kerry and a descendent of the Cooke family of Castle Cooke near Kilworth, Co. Cork. William Collis and Jane Carey had five sons and one daughter. The second son, Peter Collis married in 1843 to Elizabeth, daughter of John Carey of South Cregg, near Fermoy.[43]

On 26th July 1792 Ann, the second daughter of Peter Carey married Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane.[44] Careysville was located in the parish of Clondulane.

Richard Carey, merchant

Richard Carey, merchant, was the father of John Carey who in 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[45]

John Carey

John Carey was born about 1757 as the son of Richard Carey, merchant. John Carey was educated by Mr. West and In June 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[46]

John Carey of Straw Hall

On 19th August 1793 James Connell of Castlelyons married Mary, the second daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall.[47] In 1767-1771 David Crotty held Straw Hall from where he sold mature oak trees and young trees for planting.[48]

Charlotte, the youngest daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall, near Fermoy, married John Mansergh as his second wife. John Mansergh was the eldest son of Nicholas Mansergh of Grenane, Co. Tipperary by his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John Carden of Templemore. Charlotte and John had one son, Robert Mansergh, who died without issue in May 1871[49]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was a son of Peter Carey, gent of Cork and was born in 1799. He was educated by Mr. Hincks and in January 1818 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1821 he graduated with a B.A. and in the summer of 1824 he got a M.A. and a M.B.[50] After graduation Langer Carey became a physician and surgeon, operating at Newport in Co. Tipperary. In 1828 he married Margaret Hunter of Dublin.[51] Langer Carey died on 16th August 1866 at Newport, Tipperary.[52] His will (valued under £4,000) was proved on 7th September 1866 by his wife Margaret Carey of Churchfield, Newport.[53]

On 7th July 1864 his daughter, Margaret Anna (born 1835) married Francis George Fosbery of Blennerville, Co. Kerry. Francis Fosbery died 1897 and Margaret Anna died 30th December 1917 leaving issue, a daughter and a son. In 1897 the son, George Francis Fosbery married Vivian de Burgh Lewis and was the father of four sons who in turn left living descendants.[54]

Langer Carey of Garrynoe

In December 1846 Langer Carey got £45 for drainage works on 9 acres at Ballyrice so as to provide work relief for the starving people in the Great Famine.[55] In about 1850 Langer Carey (or Langworth Carey as he is recorded in Griffith’s Valuation) owned Garrynoe townland (169 acres) in Clondulane parish. Langer Carey died on 31st March 1876 at Garrynoe leaving a will valued under £600 and which was proved 27th June 1876 by his wife Mary Anne Carey and Richard Carey, farmer of Garrynoe.[56]

Rev. Richard Carey

Rev. Richard Carey was the son of John Carey of Careysville. He was born about 1740 and was a prebendary of Donoughmore and Kiltegan in the diocese of Lismore. In 1787 Rev. Richard Carey was involved in the Clonmel Free School.[57] His appointment was made by the Earl of Mountcashell (a neighbour of the Careys at Careysville and the mayor of Clonmel). In 1809 a report said that the school was in a poor state of repair and that there were no boarders and that the attending students went to another school in the town to received their actual education.[58] In 1820 Rev. Richard Carey was still master of the Lismore Diocesan School. Rev. Richard Carey also acted as an assistant curate for Rev. Daniel Sullivan at Rathronan parish.[59]

In April 1791 Rev. Richard Carey was made a freeman of Cork city with about fifteen other people.[60] In June 1810 Rev. Richard Carey was elected bailiff of Clonmel town by the Corporation along with John Howell under the new mayor, John Croker.[61] He died in 1821 and was buried in Kiltegan graveyard. Rev. Richard Carey married Jane, daughter of Robert Bell, surgeon of Cork city and had at least three sons two of whom entered the church, Rev. Langer Carey and Rev. Robert Carey.[62] Rev. Richard Carey had at least two daughters, Ann married (1769) Humphrey Croly and Elizabeth married (1763) John Peddar.[63]

Rev. Richard Carey had at least one daughter, Martha (died 1876), who in 1836 married Francis Boxwel of Butlerstown, Co. Wexford, son of John Boxwell of same place. Francis and Martha Boxwell had three sons and three daughters.[64]

Rev. Langer Carey

Rev. Langer Carey was born near Clonmel as the eldest son of Rev. Richard Carey. In March 1806 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, and in the spring of 1810 graduated with a B.A.[65] In 1820 Rev. Langer Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Garret Wall in the parish of Dromkeen in the Diocese of Emly.[66] Rev. Langer Carey got married and had at least one son, Richard Garret Carey. Rev. Langer Carey died in 1830 and was buried in Marlfield church near Clonmel.[67]

Richard Garret Carey

Richard Garret Carey was the son of Rev. Langer Carey. Richard Carey was born about 1814 and in October 1830 entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1835 he graduated with a B.A.[68] In about 1850 Richard Garret Carey lived at Glen Abbey on the south side of the River Suir, near Clonmel. The property of 83 acres was known locally as ‘Carey’s Castle’.[69]

Rev. Robert Carey

Rev. Robert Carey was born about 1794 as a younger son of Rev. Richard Carey. In January 1811 Robert Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1815 he graduated with a B.A.[70] In 1818 he was made a priest at Cork.[71] In 1820 Rev. Robert Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Thomas Crawford in the parish of Derrygarth.[72] In about 1850 Rev. Robert Carey was rector of Kiltegan parish near Clonmel and held a number of properties in Clonmel and also at Donoughmore.[73]

John Peter Carey

John Peter Carey was the fourth son of Rev. Richard Carey and Anne Bell. He was born on 17th March 1809.[74] He was educated by Mr. Bell and entered Trinity College Dublin in July 1824 where in spring 1829 he graduated with a B.A.[75] In 1831 he entered the Middle Temple.[76]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was the eldest son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. In 1793 he married Elizabeth Keily (died 1801) by whom he had children and married secondly to Sarah Moore who died in 1839 without issue. Peter Carey was living at Careysville in 1814 and died in 1823.[77]

 

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Careysville by the River Blackwater – home to good fishing

Peter Carey

Peter Carey was born about 1793 as the son of Peter Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1814 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[78] In 1831 he married Anne Clarke.[79] Peter Carey was originally living in Clondulane House in 1844 and 1856 but later moved into Fermoy. He died on 25th August 1863 and his will (valued under £800) was proved on 8th October 1863 by his son, Peter Wellington Carey of Fermoy.[80]

Rev. Richard Carey

Richard Carey was another son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. He took holy orders and was made a deacon in 1818 and a priest at Cloyne in 1819.[81] He later served as was a vicar in Skibbereen. About 1835 he married Elizabeth, daughter of John Labarte and was the father of Richard Carey.[82] Many years before, on 1st June 1789 John Labarte of Cork city had married Miss Crowley of Cork city at Careysville, the home of Peter Carey, esq.[83]

Richard Carey

Richard Carey son of Rev. Richard Carey was born in 1838 and was educated at Fermoy College. He became manager of the Munster and Leinster Bank at Skibbereen. In 1866 Ricard Carey married Kathleen Hill, daughter of William Hill. Richard Carey was the father of six sons Langer, William, Henry, Sidney, Arthur, and Edward.[84] Richard Carey was also the father of two daughters, Kathleen and Ethel (or Elizabeth and Sarah as another source has it).[85]

William Carey of Ballymacmoy

On 11th September 1819 William Carey of Ballymacmoy got a gaming licence for the year 1819 along with other local landowners from north-east Cork. On 17th September 1827, Margaret Theresa, eldest daughter of William Carey of Ballymacmoy died.[86] It is not clear this William Carey was one of the sons of Richard Carey of Skibbereen or a different person unconnected to the family.

 

f9d926d87c83ab2717fdd5aab7782275

Careysville

Edward Keily Carey of Careysville

Edward Keily Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1801, the year of his mother’s death. In January 1818 Edward Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin where in Easter 1821 he graduated with a B.A.[87]

On 1st September 1821 Edward Keily Carey married Elizabeth Margaret (died 13th September 1881), eldest daughter of William Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke, by his wife Elizabeth de Courcy, daughter of Maurice Uniacke Atkin of Leadington, Co. Cork. Elizabeth’s sister, Jane married her cousin Rev. Jasper Grant, rector of Castlehyde and member of the Grant family of Kilmurry.[88] Rev. Jasper Grant was the son of Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane, third son of Thomas Grant of Kilmurry by his wife Elizabeth Campion. In 1792 Rev. Alexander Grant had married Ann, second daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[89] William Cooke-Collis was the eldest son of Rev. Zachery Cooke-Collis and nephew of that William Collis who married Jane, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[90]

In 1823 Edward Keily Carey inherited Careysville according to his father’s will.[91] It seems that in the 1820’s or early 1830’s Edward Keily Carey remodelled Careysville house as Samuel Lewis in 1837 described it as a ‘handsome modern mansion’ lately built by Edward.[92]

In about 1850 the estate of Edward Keily Carey was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation. In Clondulane parish (barony of Condons and Clangibbon) he had Ballinveelig (147ac 0r 22p), Bawnnaclogh (81ac 2r 16p), Careysville (291ac 0r 19p), Carrigatoortane (170ac held jointly with Stephen Moore and George Lukey), Clondulane South (1ac 0r 3p), Curragh Lower (120ac 3r 11p), and Curragh Upper (312ac 3r 18p). In Macroney parish Edward Carey held Billeragh West (810ac 1r 10p) while Billeragh East (held in 1666 by Peter Carey) was owned by the Earl of Kingston, Crinnaghtane (236ac 3r 33p), and Curraghanolomer (367ac 3r 35p). Thus in about 1850 the total estate amounted to about 2,430 acres.

In June 1859 Edward Keily Carey sold 388 acres in the Estates court. By the 1870s the estate of Edward Keily Carey amounted to 1,670 acres.[93]

The big event in the middle years of Edward’s life was the Great Famine which killed many people and bankrupted many an estate. On 15th October 1845 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law Union meeting to discuss the growing problem with potato blight. Captain Carey said that the potato crop in the parish of Macroney was seriously affected and beyond remedy.[94] On 22nd October 1845 the Guardians of the Poor Law meet for their weekly meeting at which it was reported that a few people had already died in the workhouse and the Union was under financial pressure to cope.[95]

As the situation developed it was difficult to maintain the social and property barriers of previous times. On 7th November 1845 Edward Keily Carey summoned Mick Leahy, kiln labourer at Clondulane Mills, for the audacity to enter his field and quench his thirst in a spring. At the Fermoy petty sessions, Leahy was fined one shilling and one shilling 2 pence in costs.[96]

On 13th April 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Presentment session where a number of local road works were approved. At the Poor Law meeting of 13th May 1846, attended by Edward Carey, the members discussed building a new fever hospital to cope with the increasing famine which was further discussed on 17th June 1846.[97] In late June 1846 Edward Carey gave £5 to the Glanworth relief fund.[98]

The labouring class were particularly affected by the famine as they relied on the produce of their small gardens attached to their poor cottages. On 20th August 1846 Edward Carey was the chairman of the Fermoy petty sessions before which a good number of labourers were charged with not providing work service in lieu of rent payments under the Parliament Act of 43 George 3, C86. The labourers wanted cash for their work so they could buy food as their potato crops had failed. Chairman Carey agreed with four of the seven magistrates to dismiss the cases and not send the labourers to prison due to the exceptional nature of the times.[99]

To help provide work for the starving people a number of work schemes were organised. In December 1846 Edward Carey got £221 for drainage works on 45 acres at Curragh and Careysville.[100] On 18th August 1847 Edward Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law meeting where a big discussion occurred over the striking of a rate upon property owners to fund the Union’s famine relief works. A minority, led by the Earl of Mountcashell, were for asking the government to fund the Union rather than local taxation. Edward Carey supported the majority who were for setting a rate and asking the government for reimbursement afterwards.  The Union was under pressure to do so or the government would take over the Union and charge the local landlords an additional £800 to £1,000 to administrate the Union.[101] In the event the Union struck as a rate and continued in business under stressful times. In 1850 Edward Keily Carey was an ex-officio member of the Fermoy Poor Law Union with other local landlords.[102] By then the worst of the Great Famine had passed and life was beginning to return to normal but the undercurrent of society had changed utterly and the days of the landlord were on the countdown to termination.

Today (2017) the Careysville estate is well known as an important fishery location on the River Blackwater with visitors coming there from near and far, the famous and the not so famous. Back in the 1840s, during the height of the Great Famine, Careysville was still an important fishery location. On 2nd July 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended a meeting in Fermoy to ask parliament to extend the angling fishery season by one month and to ask for restrictions on net fishing as the salmon were not getting upriver in the same numbers as previously.[103]

In 1867 Edward Keily Carey was asked to judge on the attack by a mob on the daughter of the Bridewell jail in Fermoy. A local man, John McCarthy, had been arrested for involvement in the Fenian movement and was detained in the Bridewell, now known as Kneller Villas. When the warden came to take McCarthy out for exercise, he was locked in the cell and McCarthy attempted to make good his escape. But the warden’s daughter raised the alarm and McCarthy in panic dropped the jail keys and returned to his cell. For her troubles a mob attacked the girl the following Sunday. Ten days later Magistrate Carey and other local landlords had the mob up before the Fermoy petty sessions but decided to leave them off with a caution.[104]

On 4th February 1874 Margaret Anna, the second daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey, married her near neighbour, Thomas St. John Grant (born September 1852) of Kilmurry, eldest son of Thomas St. John Grant by his wife Eliza, youngest daughter of Rev. Thomas Hoare by his wife Mary, daughter of Henry Lloyd of Lloydsboro, Co. Tipperary. Thomas and Jane Grant had two sons.[105]

Edward Keily Carey died on 18th December 1876 and his wife Margaret died in 1881. Later a memorial tablet was erected to their memory in Christ Church, Fermoy, by their daughter, Elizabeth Montgomery.[106] The will of Edward Keily Carey (valued under £3,000) was proved on 6th March 1877 by Rev. Maurice Cooke Collis and Rev. Jasper Alexander Grant.[107]

George Montgomery of Killee and Careysville

In 1866 George Montgomery of Killee House, near Mitchelstown, married Elizabeth Jane, eldest daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey of Careysville. George Montgomery (born 12th July 1843 – died 4th September 1910) was the eldest son of Rev. William Quin Montgomery of Killee and Alice, daughter of Rev. P. Sleeman of Devon, and grandson of George Montgomery of Killee and Mary Quin of Loloher, Cahir, Co. Tipperary. George’s grandfather, Hugh Montgomery, fought under William III in Ireland and Hugh was the grandson of Rev. James Montgomery from Scotland who first settled in Co. Down in the early seventeenth century.[108]

Killee was first granted in 1699 to Colonel Francis De la Rue and his wife Elizabeth Howard and inherited by their son, Wriothesley De la Rue. In the early eighteenth century Wriothesley devised all his Irish estate to his half-brother, George Montgomery (son of Hugh Montgomery and Elizabeth Howard by her second marriage). This George died in 1778 and his third son, George Montgomery inherited Killee and married Mary Quin, as above.[109]

George and Elizabeth Montgomery had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, William Montgomery inherited Killee while the second son, Edward Hugh Montgomery inherited Careysville.[110]

Edward Hugh Montgomery of Careysville

Edward Hugh Montgomery was born on 10th November 1871 and attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he qualified as a medical doctor. On 12th July 1894 he married Lilla, daughter of W. Perrott and in March 1896 they had a son, Edward Henry Montgomery.[111]

After the Second World War Careysville was sold to the Duke of Devonshire whose descendants still own the property ending nearly three hundred years of Carey association.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[2] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd Sept 2017

[3] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 97

[4] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[5] Caulfield, R., The Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal: From 1610 to 1659, from 1666 to 1687, and From 1690 to 1800 (Guildford, 1878), p. lvi

[6] Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), pp. 235, 623, 642

[7] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 932; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 236

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 933; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 235

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 934

[10] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[11] White, Col. J.G., Historical and Topographical notes, Etc. on Buttevant, Castletownroche, Doneraile, Mallow and Places in their Vicinity (Cork, 1905), vol. 1, pp. 36, 40

[12] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 746, 747

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 721

[16] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[17] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses: A Register of the Students, Graduates, Professors and Provosts of Trinity College in the University of Dublin, 1593-1860 (Bristol, 2001), vol. 1, p. 133

[18] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[19] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 627

[20] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[21] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 493

[22] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[23] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[24] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 75

[25] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 633

[26] O’Byrne, E. (ed.), The Convert Rolls (Dublin, 2005), no. 998; Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 174

[27] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804

[28] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[29] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 74

[30] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[31] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 96

[32] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 747

[33] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[34] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1607

[35] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 824, 826

[36] Eustace, P. Beryl (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, Vol. II, 1746-1785 (Dublin, 1954), no. 42

[37] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[38] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[39] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2111

[40] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1437

[41] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[42] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 15, p. 2523

[43] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 259

[44] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[45] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[46] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[47] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 143

[48] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1359, 1383

[49] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 782, 783, 784

[50] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[51] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[52] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[53] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014887/005014887_00035.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[54] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[55] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[56] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014892/005014892_00056.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[57] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[58] Reports from the commissioners of the board of education in Ireland, 1813-14, pp. 279, 280

[59] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register: Containing the Names of the Prelates, Dignitaries and Parochial Clergy in Ireland (Dublin, 1820), pp. 90, 93

[60] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2124

[61] http://nickreddan.net/newspaper/np_abst13.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[62] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017; http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[63] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[64] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 159

[65] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[66] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 78

[67] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[68] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[69] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[70] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[71] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[72] Erck, The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 93

[73] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[74] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867, p. 74

[75] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[76] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[77] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[78] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[79] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[80] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014885/005014885_00249.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 119

[81] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[82] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[83] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1422

[84] Pike, W.T., ‘Contemporary Biographies’, in Hodges, R.J. (ed.), Cork and Cork County in the Twentieth Century (Brighton, 1911), p. 176

[85] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[86] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1583, 1610

[87] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[88] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[89] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[90] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[91] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[92] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[93] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[94] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 7’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[95] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 8’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[96] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 11’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[97] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 33 and 37, and 42’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[98] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 43’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[99] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 51’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[100] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[101] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 103’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[102] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

[103] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 44’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[104] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 210

[105] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 176

[106] http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/cork/photos/tombstones/1headstones/fermoy-mem.txt accessed on 3rd September 2017

[107] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014893/005014893_00061.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[108] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, pp. 485, 486

[109] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 485

[110] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

[111] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

Standard
Cork history

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

For much of the eighteenth century the Forward family owned the site of the modern town of Fermoy, Co. Cork and the surrounding countryside. But in the history of Fermoy the family are passed over with only a few brief references as historians concentrate on the history of Fermoy after it was totally rebuilt by John Anderson. This article aims to add some more facts and flesh to the Forward family.

Christopher Forward senior

The earliest member of the family was Christopher Forward senior who was a merchant in Cork city around 1700. Many years before that, in 1682, Christopher Forward was assigned seat number 47 along with John Potts.[1] On 24th July 1705 Christopher Forward acquired an interest in the Fermoy estate, its lands and mills by indenture. These lands were got in trust for William Cockerell, merchant of Cork, for 1,000 years.[2] In 1690 William Cockerell had married Barbara Forward, sister of Christopher Forward.[3] Yet other sources say it was Henry Luther who purchased Fermoy on behalf of William Cockerill.[4]

The Fermoy estate was previously owned the Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, as part of his great estate across Counties Cork and Waterford. Fermoy was given to one of his sons, Robert Boyle, the famous scientist. When Robert Boyle died in 1698 the Fermoy estate was taken over by trustees on behalf of the 3rd Earl of Cork and sold in 1705 to William Cockerell.[5] But as we saw previously Christopher Forward was as much involved in the Fermoy estate as his brother-in-law, William Cockerell. Perhaps Christopher Forward provided some of the purchase money.

 

fermoy_king_street_vcbq

King Street (MacCurtain Street), Fermoy

The Cockerell family were prominent in Cork city politics at the turn of the eighteenth century. In 1700 Francis Cockerell was sheriff of Cork city and in 1705 he was mayor. In the same year of 1705 William Cockerell was city sheriff. In 1717 Charles Cockerell was the city sheriff.[6] In 1704 William Cockerill was one of the vestrymen of the church of St. Maria at Shandon.[7] Christopher Forward was also involved in the same church. In April 1711 Christopher Forward was church warden of the parish church of St. Maria of Shandon with Francis Gray. In that year £20 was laid out on the fabric of the church.[8] Elsewhere about the year 1709 Christopher Forward was a witness to a number of property deeds in and around Cork city with Samuel Hodder.[9]

Sadly William Cockerell didn’t enjoy his new estate at Fermoy for long as he died in 1707 and Fermoy was inherited by his wife.[10] His widow, Barbara Cockerill, later remarried to Thomas Hodder.[11]

Christopher Forward junior

It is not clear if the Christopher Forward who was brother-in-law of William Cockerill was known as Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior. Just five years after the purchase of Fermoy a merchant named Christopher Forward junior was very much part of the business world of the early eighteenth century.

By 1710 Joshua Savery, merchant of Mallow, was indebted to Christopher Forward junior, merchant of Cork, to the amount of £375. To help pay the debt on 13th July 1710 Joshua Savery gave Christopher Forward three leases he had on lands around Mallow (Killetra) and other property in the Baronies of Duhallow (Gortnagross) and Fermoy. Christopher Forward was allowed to hold these lands until redeemed by Joshua Savery.[12]

On 31st March 1727 Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Richard Lloyd (rector of Rathcormac 1742 to his death April 1775). They had four sons and two daughters of which the eldest was Richard Lloyd of Tullygreen House who married Jane, daughter of Thomas Austen and left issue. Christopher the second son married Elizabeth Bateman and left issue. William the third son died in 1736 aged two while the fourth son, Samuel married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Austen. The two daughters of Elizabeth Forward were; Elizabeth (died 1734 aged one year) and Barbara who married Lt. Stephen Sandys, Royal Navy. Elizabeth Forward died on 26th November 1778.[13]

In 1728 Barbara Forward married Richard Gaggin.[14] It is not known if she was a daughter of Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior.

In 1708 Christopher Forward married Elizabeth Austen.[15] Christopher Forward died sometime between 1727 and 1758. In early January 1758, Elizabeth Forward, the widow of Christopher Forward, died at Fermoy.[16] This was possibly Christopher Forward junior

William Forward

By her will, dated 20th February 1724 Barbara Cockerill gave the Fermoy estate to her nephew William Forward.[17]

At some date William Forward married Margaret Hely, daughter of Francis Hely of Gortroe, Co. Cork and his wife, Prudence Earbery (married 1719), daughter of Matthias Earbery of Ballincollig (son of Nicholas Earbery) and his wife Margaret Vowell.[18] It appears that the early members of the Earbery family in Ireland were Quakers. In July 1687 Elizabeth Earbery, a widow of Cork city, wished to be buried in the Quaker burial ground.[19] The Earbery family married into the Hendley family of Araglin and later of Mount Rivers, near Fermoy. In February 1760 Mrs. Hendley, widow of Roger Hendley, and sister of Christopher Earbery of Shandangan, died at Araglin near Kilworth.[20] William Forward’s sister Frances would later married James Hendley of Fermoy. Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers in the 1840s no doubt took his first name from his ancestor, Matthias Earbery.

Francis Hely had two other daughters, Prudence who married Thomas Spraight and another daughter who married Mr. Duquery, along with a son, John Hely. In 1751 John Hely married Christiana, daughter of Lorenzo Nixon of Co. Wicklow and niece and heir of Richard Hutchinson of Knocklofty, Co. Tipperary and took the name of John Hely Hutchinson. In 1783 Christiana was made Baroness Donoughmore (Matthias Earbery held land at Donoughmore in the barony of Muskerry, Co. Cork in early 18th century) and in 1800 her son Richard was made Earl of Donoughmore. In 1761 John Hely Hutchinson was elected M.P. for Cork city which he represented until his death in 1795.[21]

Fermoy in the Eighteenth century has often been described as a poor place of little activity, yet the records show some activity in the area. In 1755 William Crow operated an inn in Fermoy. In 1757 Owen Keeffe of Fermoy advertised that he had 1,000 apple trees for sale.[22]

The election of his brother-in-law in 1761 must have given William Forward bright hopes for the future but within four years a series of deaths would change everything. In the 1764 will of William Forward, he named his wife, Margaret, and eldest daughter, Barbara. Yet this must be the eldest surviving daughter as in May 1761 William Forward’s eldest daughter died at Mallow.[23] This sorrowful death was followed in 1762 by a more significant death. On Tuesday, 21st December 1762 at Fermoy, Francis Forward, the only son of William Forward, died.[24]

In the face of these deaths William Forward prepared for his own death by making his will. On 26th August 1764 William Forward of Fermoy made his will in which he made his wife Margaret and brother-in-law John Hely Hutchinson as his executors. He only made his will just in time as he died in the last week of September 1764 at Fermoy.[25] The will was proved on 5th January 1765. The witnesses to the will were James Hendley, Richard Page and Mathew Hendley.[26]

Also mentioned in William’s will was his niece Elizabeth Hendley and nephews James Hendley and William Hendley. These were the children of Francis Forward, William’s sister and her husband James Hendley of Fermoy.[27] This Hendley family could possibly be connected with that of Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers who between 1836 and 1847 was the agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Birkenbog, Scotland.[28]

It is said that it was John Anderson was the first to build Fermoy house on the north bank of the River Blackwater about 1800. The central block was a two storey five bay house with a three bay wing on each side terminated by a high pitched one bay end. The house was still standing in the 1960s but has since been demolished.[29] Yet with so many members of the Forward family dying at Fermoy it is unlikely that they lived in a mud house or a room in the ‘Carman’s Inn’. Somewhere under the modern town or in the grounds of the present Fermoy house must have been a house built by the Forward family as their residence.

 

fermoy house main section

Fermoy house as built by John Anderson

William Forward left six daughters (Barbara, Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca, Margaret and Christina) who each got an equal share of the Fermoy estate.[30] But it is uncertain if the estate was indeed divide into six parts as the eldest daughter had died in 1761 and so there was only five daughters living by the time William Forward died. The estate should then have only being divided into five parts and not six – clearly there is some work to do to solve that issue. In 1774 the heirs of William Forward were the impropriators of the extra parochial parish of Fermoy. Later in 1774 they sold the right of impropriator to John Nason. The right of impropriator was later acquired by John Anderson.[31]

By 1791 two of the daughters (Christina and Elizabeth – see below) of William Forward had married and acquired their sixth shares.[32] A third daughter, Rebecca, had also got married but seems not to have secure her sixth share or fifth share depending on how many heirs there truly were (see below).

In September 1765 Joshua Poultney died at Fermoy. He was a member of the King’s Bench and one of the oldest freemen of Cork city.[33]

Fermoy at the end of the eighteenth century was described as a small village of poor cabins surrounding the ruins of the medieval abbey. The one substantial building was a two story house described as a ‘carman’s inn’. The village did have three fair days; on 21st June, 20th August and 7th November, which provided some commercial benefits. The biggest asset of the town was thirteen arch stone bridge across the River Blackwater which was built in 1687 at a cost of £7,500.[34]

 

hodges_fermoybridge

Fermoy bridge in olden days 

Purchase of Fermoy by John Anderson

In 1791, John Anderson, a merchant and mail coach operator, purchased four parts of the Fermoy estate for £40,000 along with the associated tithes. By 1791 one unmarried daughter of William Forward was owner of four sixths of Fermoy but was interested in selling and John Anderson purchased the estate from her through the Court of Chancery.[35]

As the Fermoy historian J.R. O’Flanagan wrote ‘Learning Miss Forward was willing to dispose of her property at Fermoy, Anderson resolved to buy it and deal with the government. Not being possessed of sufficient means, he made tempting offers which enabled him to procure a loan of £40,000 from the Douglas family and become the proprietor of Fermoy’.[36]

The purchase of Fermoy has always being assumed to be the four parts held by four of the six daughters of William Forward. Yet other sources say that John Anderson purchased Fermoy for £50,000 in 1797 from William Forward, M.P. and Privy Councillor.[37]

John Anderson was originally from Scotland and founded a merchant business in Cork city. In 1789 John Anderson established Ireland’s first mail coach business with routes across Ireland. John Anderson borrowed the money from Sir William Douglas of Carlingwark, near Anderson’s home place in Scotland. Some this loan was still unpaid in 1830 when Sir William died.[38]

John Anderson had previous knowledge of Fermoy as he had established a coach-building and repair yard there as part of his mail coach business. The medieval Cistercian abbey ruins were still there in 1792 where the attached graveyard was frequented by pigs and other farm animals. Almost immediately after purchasing the estate, John Anderson demolished the abbey ruins and the hamlet around it and within a few years had built a totally new town with fine squares and straight streets.[39]

Mary Forward and Margaret Forward

Mary and Margaret Forward were two of the six daughters of William Forward of Fermoy. It would seem that one of them was possibly the eldest daughter of William Forward that died at Mallow in 1761.[40] The surviving sister or possibly Barbara was the unmarried heiress who by 1797 held fourth sixths of the Fermoy estate which was purchased by John Anderson.

Barbara Forward

Barbara was alive in 1764 when she was mentioned in her father’s will as the eldest daughter.[41] Yet this must be the eldest ‘surviving’ daughter as the eldest daughter was said to have died at Mallow in 1761.[42]

Rebecca Forward

Rebecca Forward was born about 1740. In 1778 (marriage licence 10th August) Rebecca Forward, daughter of William Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Wensley Bond, son of Rev. James Bond of Carbery, Co. Longford.[43] Rev. Wensley Bond was Dean of Ross (1773-1813), Treasurer of Ferns (1776-1820) and Rector of St. John’s, Sligo (1775-1820). They had two sons and four daughters.[44] One of the sons, Rev. James forward Bond married (21st May 1825) his cousin Christiana, daughter of Rev. Lorenzo Hely-Hutchinson.[45] It is not clear why Rebecca Forward did not get any share of the Fermoy estate when her two other married sisters did secure a sixth of the property each.

Elizabeth Forward

Elizabeth Forward married Garret Atty Nagle of Knockanevin. But this was no ordinary marriage as it is said that Garret Nagle abducted Elizabeth Forward and then married her. Elizabeth Forward received a sixth share of the Fermoy estate from her father and this share was centred on Grange West. In 1772 their son Garrett Nagle was born. In 1784 Garret Atty Nagle died. Elizabeth Forward died on the 9th November 1817 aged 75 years (born c.1742).[46]

On 16th March 1786 blackwater 7/1409

Garret Nagle fell into bad company without his father. He began drinking heavily and was involved in robberies. In 1798 Garret Nagle was a co-accused at the trail on Mon Roche. When Garret Nagle married Ellen Croker it was hoped that he would improve but instead Garret Nagle got the name of being a bad husband.

Christina Forward

Christina Forward got Grange East as her sixth part share of the Fermoy estate from her father. In 1788 Christina Forward was living in St. Ann’s Parish, Dublin, when she married William Tynte Austin of Dublin.[47] In 1837 their son, William Forward Austin of Grange Hill was mentioned as one of the principal gentlemen in the Fermoy area.[48] In 1839 William Forward Austin was elected among the first Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union. But his election was a close run affair. Matthias Hendley, agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, wrote to his boss that:

“The priests made very exertion to return a member of their own creed instead of Mr. Austin, who only succeeded by a majority of 221-220; but in the other Districts with the exception of 2, nominees of the priests were returned. We could not have a better Guardian than Mr. Austin; he owns a sixth of what was originally the Fermoy estate; and will I am convinced be an active member of the Board”.[49]

William Forward Austin was often mentioned in the newspapers during the Great Famine (1845-1850). In 1850 William Forward Austin was appointed one of the ex-officio members of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[50]

Conclusion

The grandchildren of William Forward of Fermoy are of a different generation and form a different to the Forward family in eighteenth century Fermoy. This article is no definite history of the family. As noted in many places above the source evidence for various events and people are conflicting. What this article does do is bring the family out of the shadows of the dark eighteenth century and put some fresh and blood behind the names. It is hoped in a future time to sort out the conflicting evidence and maybe add some new details – a task for another day.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 267

[2] Tenison, C.M., ‘Barrymore archives’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 5 (1896), pp. 178-9

[3] Index of the Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[4] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[5] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 26

[6] Charles Smith, ‘The ancient and present state of the County and City of Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. II (1893), pp. 403, 404

[7] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at p. 268

[8] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 269

[9] Some Cork Lawyers from 1199

[10] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[11] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[12] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 1995

[13] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 412; Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 872

[14] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[15] Index to Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[16] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2606, quoting the Cork Evening Post of 19th January 1758

[17] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[18] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969; Mosley, C. (ed.), Burke’s Peerage, Baronage and Knightage (3 vols. Wilmington, 2003), Vol. 1, p. 1162; https://www.myheritage.com/names/prudence_earbery accessed on 16th August 2017

[19] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 744

[20] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2526

[21] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969

[22] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, pp. 2593, 2604

[23] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[24] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2546

[25] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559, quoting Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 6th October 1764

[26] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[27] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[28] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 67

[29] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 14, 21, 33

[30] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[31] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 834

[32] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[33] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2563

[34] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 8, 10

[35] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[36] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[37] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[38] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), pp. 44, 350

[39] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44

[40] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[41] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[42] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[43] Brady, W.M., Clerical and Parochial Records of Cork, Cloyne and Ross (Dublin, 1863), Vol. II, p. 430

[44] Rev. James B. Leslie, Ferns Clergy and Parishes (author, 1936), p. 47

[45] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/ireland/81186/ accessed on 18th August 2017

[46] Freeman’s Journal, 18th November 1817

[47] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Dublin

[48] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 66

[49] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 72

[50] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

Standard
Cork history, Waterford history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

 

In the second half of the nineteenth century the Orpin family were the landlords of the Marston estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork. The first of the family we know of is Robert Orpin esq. who lived in Dublin in the early 1700’s. Anna–Maria Hajba in Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 says that this family of Orpin was a branch of the Kerry Orpen’s, but the listing for the Kerry Orpen’s in Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958 does not mention Robert Orpin.[1]

 

This is not to say that he was of a junior branch of that family as a good few of the early Orpen’s had Robert as a first name. John Orpen of Forleigh, Somerset, had a son Robert born 1553 who had a son Robert of Shaston, Dorset, a merchant who died of plague in 1645 and who had a son Robert Orpen of Killorglin, Co. Kerry where he lived in 1661 and had 3 sons the second of whom was another Robert Orpen, born in 1644, married in 1669 and died in 1699.[2]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin

 

But we do know that the first Robert Orpin of the later Marshtown family was descendent through his wife with the Kerry Orpen’s. She was Johanna Mansfield, daughter of William Mansfield, and Mary-Johanna Gandrum. Mary-Johanna was the daughter of Augustus Gandrum by his wife Margaret Bowen, daughter of William Bowen and granddaughter of Robert Bowen, Robert’s wife was Margaret Orpen daughter of Robert Orpen of Killorglin above.[3]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin had two sons by Johanna Gandrum, called Benjamin and Abel. Benjamin Orpin got married and had a son but we know little more about him. Abel Orpin got married twice and by his second wife Lucy Duant, had children. Abel Orpin became a cleric in the Church of Ireland. He was for a time curate in Drishane parish in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe.

 

Rev. Abel Orpin

 

Rev. Abel had at least three sons by his second wife. Basil Orpin also became a cleric in the Church of Ireland, married, had children and died in 1842. John Orpin lived in Cork City had a wife Mary and died in 1823. The third son, another Abel Orpin, is little known other than he was mentioned in the will of his brother John Orpin.[4]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin

 

As noted above the first son, Basil Orpin became a clergyman. He was ordained on 29th September 1786 and served in various curacies in the Cloyne Diocese. He got the curates job in Clonmeen and Roskeen parish in 1786 while still a deacon. Later Basil Orpin moved to Ballyhooly, and was curare to the rector William Berkeley, a nephew of Bishop Berkeley of Cloyne. There was a population of 60 Protestants in Ballyhooly in 1785 shortly before Basil Orpin came. There was one church, no glebe house and the curate had a salary of £50.[5]

 

Ballyhooly church

Ballyhooly church by Mike Searle

This was a nice income compared to other people of that time. A land steward in Tipperary working for 300 days got £12. Ten pence was given for one days mowing of hay and three pence for threshing a barrel of oats in 1779.[6]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin served at Ballyhooly until 1804 when for the next four years he was vicar at Tullilease parish while acting and living in Aghinagh parish as curate.  But his house must have been modest as no glebe house was built until 1862.[7]

 

In 1808 Rev. Basil Orpin was made vicar of Ballyvourney, a position he held until his death on 2nd November 1842. At Ballyvourney he also held the job of Rector, the highest church position he attained. In the early year Rev. Basil Orpin had little clerical duties to perform as in 1805 there were no Protestant families in the parish. By 1830 there were 30 people of that faith while the census of 1860 also recording 30 Protestant people. Rev. Basil Orpin made improvements in 1824 by building a church to seat 200 people as the old church was long in ruins.[8]

 

On the personnel front Rev. Basil Orpin was also making improvements.  He married Ellen Newce but it is unknown if she was his first wife or second.  In the will of his brother John Orpin in 1823, Benjamin Orpin was listed as son of Basil’s first marriage while the children Richard, Mary and Joanne were by other marriage.  Rev. Basil Orpin had other children, namely; John Orpin who married a Miss Manden and had two sons and Basil Orpin who later settled at Marshtown, along with two more daughters, Isabella and Charlotte. It is not known were these children from the first or second marriage or was there the possibility of a third marriage.[9]

 

Nothing further is known of Basil’s children except of Benjamin Orpin who was sometimes referred to Abel Orpin. He lived at Passage West and had a wife Lucinda who died on 1st May 1841. Ben Orpin died on 26th March 1880.[10]

 

Meanwhile it was not just religious matters and family life concerned Rev. Basil Orpin. He was sometimes asked to act in a legal capacity for people. Pierce Power asked Rev. Basil Orpin to be one of 6 executors of his will in 1819. By the time the will was sworn in 1838 only Rev. Basil Orpin was alive to see it implemented.  Richard Foot of Millfort Co. Cork was the beneficiary and got three townlands in the Barony of Duhallow.[11]

 

Basil Orpin

 

Rev. Basil Orpin died in 1842 and was buried in Millstreet, Drishane parish. The earliest reference we have to Basil Orpin, son of Rev. Basil Orpin is from 1834. In that year he acted as solicitor to a marriage settlement with an address of Lower Mount Street in Dublin. The married couple were George and Elizabeth Crofts. They gave Matthew and John Purcell £1,384 12s 3d for certain lands in the Barony of Fermoy, and in the Barony of Duhallow at Woodpark for 500 years. Basil Orpin was trustee to this agreement in 24th January 1834.[12]

 

Later in 1854 the Crofts had gone into bankrupacy and by order of the court of Chancery their lands were to be sold. Rev. Thomas Hamblin Porter gave Basil Orpin £695 12s 10d for the Duhallow lands along with other lands in Counties Cork, Kerry and Limerick. Anne Purcell gave consent for the sale but with a right of recovery of on payment of the £695 plus 5% interest. This was because the Purcell’s owned the ground title and had only given the land to the Croft’s on a long lease.[13]

 

Basil Orpin also did other land transactions for the Purcell’s. On 22nd of August 1848 he was solicitor to an agreement where by John Purcell gave Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers, Fermoy, lands in Counties Cork, Limerick and Tipperary in trust for money lent to John by Matthias.[14]

 

On the 14th of August 1854 Basil Orpin again was solicitor for a deed of conveyance from Edmond Boyle, 8th Earl of Cork and Orrery, to Ann Purcell, Burton Park, of Carrigacashell townland in Duhallow.[15] During the time of the last transaction Basil Orpin was also conducting legal business for the Earls cousin William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire. There is in the Lismore Castle papers housed in the National Library of Ireland where legal letters from Basil Orpin to the Duke cover the years from 1852 to 1857.[16] While in the papers in Lismore Castle there are legal letters covering from 1860 to 1882 when Basil died.[17]

 

Basil Orpin and the troubled Kerry lands

 

Meanwhile in 1850 Basil Orpin and his son John Orpin got legal papers of their own which were not nice. These papers were an ejectment notice served at their offices in Dublin, by Anthony Lynch of Dublin, acting for Sir William D. Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry.[18] The notice was for lands at Knockagurrane parish of Kilcolman in Kerry in order that Sir William could recover the rent arrears on the land that was owed by the Orpins. Their cousin Anne Orpin of Killarney who had a share in the land also got an ejectment notice. None of the Orpins contested the notice and Sir William got back his land.

 

The story of Knockagurrane is a long one. It began on 11th June 1798 when John Orpin, son of Rev. Abel Orpin, took out a 31 year lease on the 88 acres of Knockagurrane from John Godfrey of Bushfield Co. Kerry for 17 shillings per acre.  John Orpin was living at Temple Villa Co. Cork at the time. The lease was renewed on 17th August 1804, 10th September 1817, 24th September 1822 and 9th May 1823.[19]

 

John Orpin died on 10th September 1823 and passed his interest in Knockagurrane to his niece Ann Orpin, possibly the daughter of his brother Abel Orpin.[20] Basil Orpin, the solicitor, became a partner with Ann Orpin for the property. Further deeds on 20th August 1835, 10th April 1839 and 5th November 1840 changed the interest of various parties to the property.

 

By December 1847 instructions for ejectment of Ann Orpin were prepared by Stokes and Creagh, solicitors of Dublin for Sir William Duncan Godfrey. Ann had accumulated rent arrears of two years amounting to £98 6s 8d. Stokes and Creagh didn’t proceed with ejectment (eviction in the common language of the day) but consulted George Blake Hickson of South Great George’s Street who on examining the case said it was a very peculiar case and so full of difficulties that he advised against ejectment and to recover the arrears by other means.[21]

 

Whatever the other ways of getting the money Sir William Godfrey employed, it had no positive outcome. The rent arrears had risen to £180 2s 10d by January 1st 1850 when Sir William called it a day and brought ejectment proceeds in the Court of Queens Beach against Ann Orpin and her tenants.  Basil Orpin got the ejectment notice on the 10th. It was the 13th of July when the Court gave judgement in favour of Sir William with costs.

 

But it was a short-lived victory for Sir William Godfrey. In January 1856 Sir William Godfrey lost Knockagurrane with a number of other townlands because of a petition to the Encumbered Estates Court by Charles Sugrue of Cork for debts totalling £32,471 7s 11d.[22]

 

DSC05869

Former gates into the Marston estate –

now at St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore

Basil Orpin acquires Marshtown

 

About this time in the 1850s that Basil Orpin purchased the Marston Estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork from the trustees of Richard Henry Gumbleton and those lands of Georgina Gumbleton (Richard’s Sister-in-law) north of the river Blackwater. By 1870 Basil Orpin owned 406 acres in Co. Cork and 2,188 acres in Co. Waterford valued at £370 and £690 respectively.[23] But happiness was not to last long as his wife Mary Carthew died on the 11th of March 1866 and was buried at Mocollop. Basil Orpin was buried beside her after his death on 4th January 1882.[24]

 

Before his death notices of ejectment were again served but this time by Basil Orpin on a number of tenants at Mocollop.  It was decided to hold a huge protest meeting.  The local magistrates wanted to ban the meeting in the interest of public order.  Mr Redmond, the resident magistrate from Dungarvan, refused and the meeting proceeded without incident. This occurred in May 1881 during the Land War. It’s not recorded if the evictions went ahead.[25]

 

John Orpin

 

The son of Basil Orpin was John Orpin who was born in 1826 and died on 23rd March 1904 and was buried at Mocollop. Also buried there was his wife, Susan Lilias, born in 1832 and died on 26th April 1903.[26]

 

John Orpin, like his father, was a solicitor and is recorded living at Marston in 1886.[27] Also like his father, there are letters from John Orpin among the Lismore Castle papers in Lismore. These date from 1880 to 1889.[28]

 

Basil Orpin

 

John Orpin had at least two sons. The eldest, Basil Orpin, succeeded to the Marston Estate. He was born in 1860 and died on 31st July 1922 and is also buried at Mocollop.[29] Like his father and grandfather there are letters from Basil Orpin in Lismore Castle from 1900 to 1921 as the Orpin’s (of Orpen’s as Basil signed his name) were solicitors to the Castle for many decades.[30] Upon his headstone at Mocollop it says Basil Orpin of Marston also lived at 47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, where he could have carried on his legal practice.

 

47-49_St_Stephens_Green_v2-min-800x533

47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin – the door on the right

Cecil Orpin

 

His brother Cecil Orpin succeeded to Marston, where he lived in the gate lodge as the big house had burnt down in about 1908.  He was there until at least 1932 as he is listed as an occupier in that year.[31] The estate was divided soon after.

 

Cecil Orpin was a medical doctor and lived for many years in Youghal.  In the 1901 census he lived at No. 3 Marina Terrace. There was nobody else with him in the house on the night of the census.[32] By the time of the next census in 1911 Cecil Orpin had moved to No. 1 Marina Terrace with the Christian Brothers now in No. 3. With him in the house were his wife Ethel and daughters Lilias, Ruth and Susan. There also was five servants, Mabel Marque, Mary Courtney, Hannah Sherlocke, Mary O’ Connell and Catherine Scully.[33]  In the 1960s and 1970s a member of the Orpin family served as a news announcer on RTE television. This then is a brief outline of the history of the Orpin family as is presently known from their origins as Dublin merchants to church clerics and solicitors to estate landlords and medical doctors to television presenters.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Hajba, A., Historical genealogical architectural notes on some houses of Cork (Whitegate, 2002), Vol. 1, North Cork, p. 259; Burkes landed Gentry, 1958, pp. 556-560

[2] Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958, p. 556

[3] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 6, p. 1422

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol.6, p. 802

[5] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 6, p. 801

[6] Lambe, M., A Tipperary landed estate: Castle Otway, 1750-1853 (Dublin, 1998), p. 24

[7] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 870

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802; Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[10] Records of Old Cork Newspapers

[11] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2303

[12] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2182

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2184

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 15, p. 2182

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 1783

[16] Lismore Castle Paper, N.L.I., Ms. 7187

[17] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole C and D to K and C/2/20 room 4 the tower

[18] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at p. 48

[19] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at pp. 40-41

[20] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[21] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at p. 53

[22] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol, 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at pp. 61-62

[23] Owners of land of one acre and upwards, 1870 with information extracted for Counties Cork and Waterford

[24] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[25] Power, P.C., History of Waterford City and County (Cork, 1990), p. 201

[26] Headstone inscriptions in Mocollop church graveyard

[27] Guys Postal directory,1886

[28] Lismore Castle papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole M-R

[29] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[30] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/ pigeon hole (U-X)

[31] Hajba, Houses of Co. Cork, Vol. 1, p. 259

[32] Farrell, N., Youghal Family Roots: exploring family origins in Youghal (Longford, 2001), p. 8

[33] Farrell, Youghal Family Roots, p. 24.

Standard
Cork history

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On Tuesday, 18th November 1766 the wedding took place in Cork city of Ranigius Fallon of St. Kitts, merchant, to Miss Ann Sullivan, daughter of the eminent Cork bookseller, Cornelius Sullivan.[1] The Freeman Journal (2nd December 1766) gave the groom’s name as Redmond Fallon of St. Kitts.[2] Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 1766 also reported on the wedding and said that Mr. Fallen was a West-India merchant while Miss Sullivan had a considerable fortune.[3] This fortune was given in the Cork Constitution as about £1,000.[4] A woman with money was often mentioned in the newspapers accompanying marriage notices such as that of Miss Jackson of Co. Limerick in 1770, who was described as ‘a young lady endowed with every accomplishment that can render the marriage state truly happy, with a large fortune’.[5]

Cork’s trade with the West Indies was growing throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as the number of colonies grew. Cork’s chief export to the West Indies, to places like St. Kitts, was in the form of provisions such as beef, butter, pork, herrings, candles and sometimes linen.[6]

There were people called Fallon (such as Daniel Fallon) living on St. Kitts in the 1630s, then known as St. Christopher.[7] The first English colony on St. Kitts was established in 1623 and the French established their colony there in 1625. The island changed many times between French and English control in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.[8] St. Kitts was a major sugar growing colony and slaves played a vital role in the business. It is very possible that Redmond Fallon was some way involved in the save trade and sugar growing. It is possible that Redmond Fallon made the voyage to Cork from St. Kitts on a number of occasions, bringing sugar and returning with provisions and possibly some books from the Brown Street premises of Cornelius Sullivan.

 

CommProp17Dec14paulst_large

No. 14 Brown St. is the three story building in mid picture –

near where Cornelius Sullivan had his shop

 

Cornelius Sullivan

It is not known when Cornelius Sullivan first established his bookselling business in Cork. With a name like Sullivan he or his ancestors possibly came from south-west Cork around the coasts of Bantry and the Beare Peninsula.

So far, 1738, provides the earliest notice of Cornelius Sullivan as a bookseller. In May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan was operating a book shop under the Exchange Coffee House on Exchange Street. By that early date he must have been a successful bookseller for in May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan placed an advert in Harvey’s Jocular Medley that he was the letting agent for the inn called the Blew Bell in Cove Lane near the South Gate. it is not clear if he actually was the owner of the Blew Bell (J.C.H.A.S., vol. LXII, 1957, p. 95).

In 1741 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, was a subscriber to The Genuine Works of F. Josephus: Translated from the Original Greek by Flavius Josephus and edited by William Whiston of Cambridge University. The book was printed in Dublin by George Ewing.

In 1747 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, subscribed for four sets of The Life and Exploits of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel Cervantes de Saavedra and translated from Spanish by Charles Jarvis. The book was printed by Peter Wilson of Dame Street, Dublin.

In 1748 a person called Cornelius Sullivan, operated a bookselling business in Newry, subscribed for eight sets of A New History of the Holy Bible by the Rev. Thomas Stackhouse. It is not beyond the bounds of possibility that this Cornelius Sullivan of Newry and Cornelius Sullivan of Cork was one and the same person, but further research is needed to prove or disprove this case.

In the Corke Journal of 15th February 1754 Cornelius Sullivan was operating out of Castle Street in Cork city. In the Corke Journal (11/7/1754) and (15/8/1754) Cornelius Sullivan advertised his bookselling business on Castle Street. Castle Street in the mid eighteenth century was a good location for a bookselling business. The Exchange was built on that street c.1705-1710 by the city merchants to conduct business and exchange news. Therefore people with money were coming past the bookshop every day and it seems Cornelius Sullivan captured a good share of their custom.

exchange_castlestreet

Castle Street (now Exchange Street) –

one of these houses could have been the bookshop

Unlike George Bagnell (died March 1768) of Cork city who was both a printer and a bookseller in Cork city, Cornelius Sullivan stayed as a bookseller.[9] If he did print books as well as selling them he could have commanded more customers as they would have to come to him to get any book he printed and which would be unavailable at any other bookseller. Yet it seems that Cornelius Sullivan did acquire a sizeable clientele to his shop and became wealthy enough to give his daughter £1,000 as a dowry and purchase property.

In 1760 Cornelius Sullivan was listed among the tradesmen of Cork as a bookseller. In the same Cork Journal Cornelius Sullivan also gave notice that he had a house and slaughter-house in Blarney Lane to let. In 1770 a person called Sullivan died in Blarney Lane but it is unknown if he was any relation to the bookseller.[10] It is presumed Cornelius Sullivan had acquired that slaughter-house as an investment opportunity from his bookselling business.

In 1762 Cornelius Sullivan was listed amongst other Catholic inhabitants of Cork who were prepared to offer a reward for the capture of any Whiteboys or Levelers.[11] The business of the Cork booksellers was mainly among the select country customers with the biggest trade period around the social occasions in the city like the assizes time.[12] The Whiteboys and Levelers were challenging these country customers for control of the countryside and so were a threat to the business of Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1767 Cornelius Sullivan advertised his business as bookseller and stationer in Brown Street.[13] Brown Street no longer exists as it was demolished in the 1970s to make way for the Paul Street shopping centre and multi-story car park. The last independent bookseller on Brown Street, Connolly’s, closed in 2014 and their address was number 14 Brown Street. It is not known where on Brown Street Cornelius Sullivan had his premises.

 

BrownStreetCork1830s

Brown Street is marked in yellow on this old Cork map

In 1768 a person called Cornelius Sullivan of Cork died and left a will.[14] It is not known for certain but it is very possible that this was Cornelius Sullivan the bookseller as he appears in no later documents.

In 1787 a person called Bartholomew Sullivan operated a paper-making business in Hoar’s Lane while Jeremiah Sullivan was a bookseller and lottery agent in North Main Street.[15] This Jeremiah Sullivan went on to become an eminent printer and bookseller. He died in November 1824 at Sarsfield Court.[16] It is not known if they were any relation to Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1787 there were just eight booksellers in Cork city but this had grown to eighteen by 1824.[17] It is interesting to speculate that Cornelius Sullivan was at the vanguard to this expansion in the Cork bookselling trade.

Ann Sullivan Fallon

It is possible that Ann Sullivan returned to St. Kitts were her new husband, Redmond Fallon and reared a family. Yet she could have returned to Ireland in later years. In 1806 a person called Ann Fallon died at Hanover Street in Dublin and left a will.[18] Investigation into that story is sometime for a visit to St. Kitts and for another day. For the moment it is to take down a book from the book-shelve and have a good read while remembering Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork city, who in another time could have sold us that book.

 

Bibliography

Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Cork Evening Post, 1767

Corke Journal, 1760

Cork Trade Directory, 1787

Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005)

Limerick General Advertiser, 1824

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277

Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42

O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937)

Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897)

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[2] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568. The Cork Journal 20th November 1766 also mentioned the wedding.

[3] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42, at p. 33, no. 4131

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[5] Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 214

[6] O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937), p. 148

[7] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/soc.genealogy.west-indies/iBx7TO6B1nc accessed on 9th August 2017

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Kitts accessed on 9th August 2017

[9] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277, at p. 258

[10] Cork Journal, 1760; Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 221

[11] Cork Journal, 1762

[12] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 413

[13] Cork Evening Post, 6th April 1767

[14] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 444

[15] Cork Trade Directory, 1787

[16] Limerick General Advertiser, 24th November 1824

[17] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830, p. 413

[18] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 161

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Cork history

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons: A Great War casualty

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons:

A Great War casualty

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Among the dead of the Great War, otherwise known as World War One, was Brevet Colonel Henry Hendley Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. He died in a Dublin hospital on 10th November 1919 and even though his death was after the end of the Great War he is included among the dead of that War. He was buried at Kill St. Anne cemetery beside his home at Castlelyons and his name is inscribed on a memorial within the Church of Ireland church in Fermoy. This article sets out some information on the life and times of this soldier of the Royal Artillery.

Henry Bond

Henry Hendley Bond was the son of Major General Henry Bond and Mary Earbery Hendley Bond. Henry Bond senior was born in County Longford in about 1837. Shortly after leaving school he joined the Royal Artillery to see the world and find employment. On 7th April 1856 Henry Bond was made a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.[1] Thereafter he made a steady rise up the ranks. On 1st August 1866 he was made a Captain.[2] It was at this stage of his life that Captain Henry Bond met Mary Earbery Hendley of Mountrivers near Fermoy, Co. Cork. In 1868 they got married.

Mary Earbery Hendley and family

Mary Earbery Hendley was the daughter of Matthias Christopher Hendley of Mountrivers by his wife, Clementina (d 29th July 1867). Matthias and Clementina had one son, Matthias Christopher Hendley (d 22nd March 1885) and six daughters. One of these daughters, Mary Earbery Hendley (d 24th April 1931) it was who married Henry Bond.[3]

Matthias Christopher Hendley was the son of Matthias Hendley (1771-1847) of Mountrivers near Fermoy who was agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby. Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, had purchased the Fermoy estate in 1835 for £70,000. It was said that Abercromby was owed £10,000 from the Anderson family, the previous owners of Fermoy.[4] Matthias Hendley left at least two sons; Matthias Christopher Hendley (1813-1901) and John Leslie Hendley. John Leslie Hendley married, 15th August 1847, Marianne Ryder, daughter of Archdeacon William Ryder and left at least one son, John Leslie Hendley who went to live in New Zealand. John Leslie Hendley, senior, was killed while hunting in India.[5]

Henry Bond in the Royal Artillery

After his marriage Captain Henry Bond continued his career in the Roya Artillery. On 16th January 1875 he was promoted to Major. On 16th January 1882 Henry Bond was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and on 16th January 1886 was made a full Colonel in the Royal Artillery. On 1st November 1887 he was promoted to the rank of Major General.[6]

The Bond family in 1893

After many postings in India (1872), Ireland (1873), the East Indies and England (1880-85) Major General Henry Bond returned to Ireland to settle down. In 1893 Major General Henry Bond was living at the Manor, Castlelyons with his family.[7]

The Bond family in 1901

In 1901 Henry Bond (aged 64, born Co. Longford) lived at the Manor, Kill St Ann, near Castlelyons. By 1901 Henry Bond was a retired from the Royal Artillery. With him at the Manor was his wife, Mary Earbery Bond (aged 53, born Co. Cork) and their three daughters. The daughters were Edith Frances Bond (aged 29, born in India), Mary Kathleen Bond (aged 25, born in England) and Charlotte Emily Bond (aged 21, born in England), all single. The family was attended by two servants, Bridget Casey (aged 29, born Co. Cork, cook) and Mary Sullivan (aged 23, born Co. Cork, housemaid).[8]

In 1901 the Manor was classified as a first class house with 19 rooms, 7 windows at the front of the house and 7 outbuildings in the grounds.[9] These outbuildings consisted of two stables, one coach house, one harness room, two fowl houses and one shed.[10]

Also in the grounds of the Manor was situated another house held by Henry Bond. This house was lived in by Patrick Allen.[11] Patrick Allen (aged 25, born Co. Tipperary) worked as a coachman for the Bond family while his wife, Kate Allen (aged 24, born Co. Cork) worked as a house keeper. They had two sons, William aged two and John aged one.[12]

 

Phone photos February 2017 102

Entrance to the Manor, Castlelyons

The Bond family in 1911

Major General Henry Bond died sometime between 1901 and 1911. His widow, Mary Earbury Bond was head of the household at the Manor in the 1911 census. With her on the census night were her three daughters, all single, and her son, Henry Hendly Bond along with two servants; Annie Frances Stuart (aged 23, born Co. Cork, parlour maid, Church of Ireland), and Margaret Mahony (aged 19, born Co. Cork, cook, Roman Catholic).[13]

In 1911 the Manor had 16 rooms and 6 outbuildings while Patrick Allen and family still lived in the second house.[14] Henry Hendley Bond was aged 37 in 1911 and was born in Co. Longford. In 1911 he was a Major in the Royal Field Artillery and was on the active service list.[15]

Henry Hendley Bond

Henry Hendley Bond He was born at Ballymahon, Co. Longford on 13th June 1873 although some sources say it was at Ahmedabad in Gujarat in India. In the 1911 census Henry Hendley Bond said he was born in Co. Longford.[16]

Like any army family, the Bond family moved around a lot. They lived initially in Moigh, Ballymahon, before moving to the East Indies and later England (Solihull), before settling at the Manor, near Castlelyons, Co. Cork.[17]

Henry Hendley Bond attended Wellington College and as a teenager joined the Royal Horse Artillery and Field Artillery at Woolwich.[18] On 22nd July 1892 Henry Hendley Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. On 22nd July 1895 he was promoted to lieutenant and 6th April 1900 was made a Captain.[19]

In 1898-1900 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was posted to India. While there he became a noted cricket player. Between August 1898 and September 1900 he played five matches for the Europeans against the Indians.[20]

By 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 136 Battery at Woolwich under the command of Major Elton.[21] In that same year of 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond served in the closing stages of the South African War.[22]

By 1908 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 15th Battery at Dundalk.[23] At that time he was attached to the Sierra Leone Battalion.[24] In 1911 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was at home at Castlelyons for the census of that year.

After World War One started Captain Henry Hendley Bond saw action in a number of places including at Salonika.[25] On 4th June 1917 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).[26]

So after this occasion the health of Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond began to deteriorate. For the next eighteen months he suffered from degenerative neurological disease. On 10th November 1919 Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond died aged 46 years with the rank of Brevet Colonel and temporary title of Brigadier General.[27] He died at Hampstead, Glasnevin in north Dublin.[28] Henry Hendley Bond was buried in the graveyard at Kill-St-Ann, Castlelyons, near his old home.

The Bond family after 1919

After the death of Henry Hendley Bond in 1919 his family continued to live at the Manor near Castlelyons. In April 1931 his mother, Mary Earbery Hendley Bond, died. On 10th September 1945 Charlotte Emily (died 16th April 1960), daughter of Major General Henry Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons married Venerable Samuel Hobart Dorman, Rector of Knockmourne Union and Archdeacon of Cloyne, sixth son of Rev. Thomas Dorman of Richmond House, Cork.[29]

Other members of the Bond family of Castlelyons included Edward Leslie Bond and Charles Earbery Bond, both of whom joined the army.

Edward Leslie Bond

Edward Leslie Bond joined the Royal Garrison Artillery to keep the gunning tradition in the family. On 4th March 1899 Edward Leslie Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and on 16th February 1901 was promoted to lieutenant. In 1902 he was serving with the Native Mountain Artillery in India.[30] On 1st February 1906 Edward Leslie Bond was made a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery.[31] In 1908 Captain Edward Leslie Bond was with the 21st Kohat Mountain Battery in India.[32]

On 26th April 1969 Major Leslie Crawford Bond of Pewsey, Wiltshire, son of Colonel Edward Leslie Bond of Castlelyons, married Penelope Margaret Alexander, daughter of Edward Currie Alexander by his wife Isabella, daughter of Major George Stoney. They had one daughter, Kristin, born in 1971.[33]

Charles Earbery Bond

Meanwhile Charles Earbery Bond left the family tradition of the artillery and instead joined the Royal Sussex Regiment. Charles Bond was born on 14th October 1877 and attended school at Wellington College.[34]

On 4th May 1898 Charles Earbery Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment and on 2nd April 1899 was promoted to lieutenant.[35] Lieutenant Charles Bond served in the South African war in 1899- 1900 with the 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria, including the engagements at Welkom Farm, Zand River, and Doorukop, the occupation of Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the engagement at Diamond Hill. He was also present in the subsequent advance into the Orange River Colony, including the operations round Bethlehem and in the Caledon Valley, the engagement at Relief’s Nek, and the surrender of the Boer forces on 1st August 1900 at Golden Gate. Lieutenant Bond was also involved in operations round Thabanchu, Winburg, and Lindley.[36]

In October 1902 Lieutenant Charles Bond was awarded the Distinguish Service Order (DSO) medal for his services in the South African War.[37] On 2nd February 1907 Charles Earbery Bond was made a Captain in the Royal Sussex Regiment.[38]

 

Charles Earbery Bond

Charles Bond and others at cricket in India, c.1910

Captain Charles Bond served in the Great War (1914-18). In September 1915 he was promoted to Major and from 24th November 1915 to 31st May 1917 was Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, first with the Worcestershire Regt., and from Dec. 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. In 1916 he was awarded the honour of C.M.G.

From June 1917 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the 51st Infantry Brigade in France until 30th May, 1918. From July 1918 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. In the War Charles Bond was five times mentioned in Despatches and acquired the Mons Medal.[39]

 

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[1] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1862), p. 171; Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1871), p. 169

[2] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1902), p. 600

[3] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 81; memorial brass plates in Church of Ireland, Fermoy; http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2890 accessed on 5th August 2017

[4] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 52

[5] Edward Garner, Massacre at Rathcormac (n.d.), p. 62

[6] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 600

[7] Francis Guy, Directory of the Province of Munster, 1893, Cork, p. 81

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572885/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572877/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572884/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927069/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[16] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462 ; http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[17] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[18] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[19] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[20] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 516

[21] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[22] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 203c

[23] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 189a

[24] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 171

[25] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[26] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[27] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31560/supplement/11749/data.pdf accessed on 5th August 2017

[28] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 376, 377

[30] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 184

[31] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 183

[32] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 503

[33] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 11

[34] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[35] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 288

[36] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 289a

[37] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[38] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), pp. 288, 289a

[39] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

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