Cork history

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

For much of the eighteenth century the Forward family owned the site of the modern town of Fermoy, Co. Cork and the surrounding countryside. But in the history of Fermoy the family are passed over with only a few brief references as historians concentrate on the history of Fermoy after it was totally rebuilt by John Anderson. This article aims to add some more facts and flesh to the Forward family.

Christopher Forward senior

The earliest member of the family was Christopher Forward senior who was a merchant in Cork city around 1700. Many years before that, in 1682, Christopher Forward was assigned seat number 47 along with John Potts.[1] On 24th July 1705 Christopher Forward acquired an interest in the Fermoy estate, its lands and mills by indenture. These lands were got in trust for William Cockerell, merchant of Cork, for 1,000 years.[2] In 1690 William Cockerell had married Barbara Forward, sister of Christopher Forward.[3] Yet other sources say it was Henry Luther who purchased Fermoy on behalf of William Cockerill.[4]

The Fermoy estate was previously owned the Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, as part of his great estate across Counties Cork and Waterford. Fermoy was given to one of his sons, Robert Boyle, the famous scientist. When Robert Boyle died in 1698 the Fermoy estate was taken over by trustees on behalf of the 3rd Earl of Cork and sold in 1705 to William Cockerell.[5] But as we saw previously Christopher Forward was as much involved in the Fermoy estate as his brother-in-law, William Cockerell. Perhaps Christopher Forward provided some of the purchase money.

 

fermoy_king_street_vcbq

King Street (MacCurtain Street), Fermoy

The Cockerell family were prominent in Cork city politics at the turn of the eighteenth century. In 1700 Francis Cockerell was sheriff of Cork city and in 1705 he was mayor. In the same year of 1705 William Cockerell was city sheriff. In 1717 Charles Cockerell was the city sheriff.[6] In 1704 William Cockerill was one of the vestrymen of the church of St. Maria at Shandon.[7] Christopher Forward was also involved in the same church. In April 1711 Christopher Forward was church warden of the parish church of St. Maria of Shandon with Francis Gray. In that year £20 was laid out on the fabric of the church.[8] Elsewhere about the year 1709 Christopher Forward was a witness to a number of property deeds in and around Cork city with Samuel Hodder.[9]

Sadly William Cockerell didn’t enjoy his new estate at Fermoy for long as he died in 1707 and Fermoy was inherited by his wife.[10] His widow, Barbara Cockerill, later remarried to Thomas Hodder.[11]

Christopher Forward junior

It is not clear if the Christopher Forward who was brother-in-law of William Cockerill was known as Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior. Just five years after the purchase of Fermoy a merchant named Christopher Forward junior was very much part of the business world of the early eighteenth century.

By 1710 Joshua Savery, merchant of Mallow, was indebted to Christopher Forward junior, merchant of Cork, to the amount of £375. To help pay the debt on 13th July 1710 Joshua Savery gave Christopher Forward three leases he had on lands around Mallow (Killetra) and other property in the Baronies of Duhallow (Gortnagross) and Fermoy. Christopher Forward was allowed to hold these lands until redeemed by Joshua Savery.[12]

On 31st March 1727 Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Richard Lloyd (rector of Rathcormac 1742 to his death April 1775). They had four sons and two daughters of which the eldest was Richard Lloyd of Tullygreen House who married Jane, daughter of Thomas Austen and left issue. Christopher the second son married Elizabeth Bateman and left issue. William the third son died in 1736 aged two while the fourth son, Samuel married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Austen. The two daughters of Elizabeth Forward were; Elizabeth (died 1734 aged one year) and Barbara who married Lt. Stephen Sandys, Royal Navy. Elizabeth Forward died on 26th November 1778.[13]

In 1728 Barbara Forward married Richard Gaggin.[14] It is not known if she was a daughter of Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior.

In 1708 Christopher Forward married Elizabeth Austen.[15] Christopher Forward died sometime between 1727 and 1758. In early January 1758, Elizabeth Forward, the widow of Christopher Forward, died at Fermoy.[16] This was possibly Christopher Forward junior

William Forward

By her will, dated 20th February 1724 Barbara Cockerill gave the Fermoy estate to her nephew William Forward.[17]

At some date William Forward married Margaret Hely, daughter of Francis Hely of Gortroe, Co. Cork and his wife, Prudence Earbery (married 1719), daughter of Matthias Earbery of Ballincollig (son of Nicholas Earbery) and his wife Margaret Vowell.[18] It appears that the early members of the Earbery family in Ireland were Quakers. In July 1687 Elizabeth Earbery, a widow of Cork city, wished to be buried in the Quaker burial ground.[19] The Earbery family married into the Hendley family of Araglin and later of Mount Rivers, near Fermoy. In February 1760 Mrs. Hendley, widow of Roger Hendley, and sister of Christopher Earbery of Shandangan, died at Araglin near Kilworth.[20] William Forward’s sister Frances would later married James Hendley of Fermoy. Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers in the 1840s no doubt took his first name from his ancestor, Matthias Earbery.

Francis Hely had two other daughters, Prudence who married Thomas Spraight and another daughter who married Mr. Duquery, along with a son, John Hely. In 1751 John Hely married Christiana, daughter of Lorenzo Nixon of Co. Wicklow and niece and heir of Richard Hutchinson of Knocklofty, Co. Tipperary and took the name of John Hely Hutchinson. In 1783 Christiana was made Baroness Donoughmore (Matthias Earbery held land at Donoughmore in the barony of Muskerry, Co. Cork in early 18th century) and in 1800 her son Richard was made Earl of Donoughmore. In 1761 John Hely Hutchinson was elected M.P. for Cork city which he represented until his death in 1795.[21]

Fermoy in the Eighteenth century has often been described as a poor place of little activity, yet the records show some activity in the area. In 1755 William Crow operated an inn in Fermoy. In 1757 Owen Keeffe of Fermoy advertised that he had 1,000 apple trees for sale.[22]

The election of his brother-in-law in 1761 must have given William Forward bright hopes for the future but within four years a series of deaths would change everything. In the 1764 will of William Forward, he named his wife, Margaret, and eldest daughter, Barbara. Yet this must be the eldest surviving daughter as in May 1761 William Forward’s eldest daughter died at Mallow.[23] This sorrowful death was followed in 1762 by a more significant death. On Tuesday, 21st December 1762 at Fermoy, Francis Forward, the only son of William Forward, died.[24]

In the face of these deaths William Forward prepared for his own death by making his will. On 26th August 1764 William Forward of Fermoy made his will in which he made his wife Margaret and brother-in-law John Hely Hutchinson as his executors. He only made his will just in time as he died in the last week of September 1764 at Fermoy.[25] The will was proved on 5th January 1765. The witnesses to the will were James Hendley, Richard Page and Mathew Hendley.[26]

Also mentioned in William’s will was his niece Elizabeth Hendley and nephews James Hendley and William Hendley. These were the children of Francis Forward, William’s sister and her husband James Hendley of Fermoy.[27] This Hendley family could possibly be connected with that of Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers who between 1836 and 1847 was the agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Birkenbog, Scotland.[28]

It is said that it was John Anderson was the first to build Fermoy house on the north bank of the River Blackwater about 1800. The central block was a two storey five bay house with a three bay wing on each side terminated by a high pitched one bay end. The house was still standing in the 1960s but has since been demolished.[29] Yet with so many members of the Forward family dying at Fermoy it is unlikely that they lived in a mud house or a room in the ‘Carman’s Inn’. Somewhere under the modern town or in the grounds of the present Fermoy house must have been a house built by the Forward family as their residence.

 

fermoy house main section

Fermoy house as built by John Anderson

William Forward left six daughters (Barbara, Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca, Margaret and Christina) who each got an equal share of the Fermoy estate.[30] But it is uncertain if the estate was indeed divide into six parts as the eldest daughter had died in 1761 and so there was only five daughters living by the time William Forward died. The estate should then have only being divided into five parts and not six – clearly there is some work to do to solve that issue. In 1774 the heirs of William Forward were the impropriators of the extra parochial parish of Fermoy. Later in 1774 they sold the right of impropriator to John Nason. The right of impropriator was later acquired by John Anderson.[31]

By 1791 two of the daughters (Christina and Elizabeth – see below) of William Forward had married and acquired their sixth shares.[32] A third daughter, Rebecca, had also got married but seems not to have secure her sixth share or fifth share depending on how many heirs there truly were (see below).

In September 1765 Joshua Poultney died at Fermoy. He was a member of the King’s Bench and one of the oldest freemen of Cork city.[33]

Fermoy at the end of the eighteenth century was described as a small village of poor cabins surrounding the ruins of the medieval abbey. The one substantial building was a two story house described as a ‘carman’s inn’. The village did have three fair days; on 21st June, 20th August and 7th November, which provided some commercial benefits. The biggest asset of the town was thirteen arch stone bridge across the River Blackwater which was built in 1687 at a cost of £7,500.[34]

 

hodges_fermoybridge

Fermoy bridge in olden days 

Purchase of Fermoy by John Anderson

In 1791, John Anderson, a merchant and mail coach operator, purchased four parts of the Fermoy estate for £40,000 along with the associated tithes. By 1791 one unmarried daughter of William Forward was owner of four sixths of Fermoy but was interested in selling and John Anderson purchased the estate from her through the Court of Chancery.[35]

As the Fermoy historian J.R. O’Flanagan wrote ‘Learning Miss Forward was willing to dispose of her property at Fermoy, Anderson resolved to buy it and deal with the government. Not being possessed of sufficient means, he made tempting offers which enabled him to procure a loan of £40,000 from the Douglas family and become the proprietor of Fermoy’.[36]

The purchase of Fermoy has always being assumed to be the four parts held by four of the six daughters of William Forward. Yet other sources say that John Anderson purchased Fermoy for £50,000 in 1797 from William Forward, M.P. and Privy Councillor.[37]

John Anderson was originally from Scotland and founded a merchant business in Cork city. In 1789 John Anderson established Ireland’s first mail coach business with routes across Ireland. John Anderson borrowed the money from Sir William Douglas of Carlingwark, near Anderson’s home place in Scotland. Some this loan was still unpaid in 1830 when Sir William died.[38]

John Anderson had previous knowledge of Fermoy as he had established a coach-building and repair yard there as part of his mail coach business. The medieval Cistercian abbey ruins were still there in 1792 where the attached graveyard was frequented by pigs and other farm animals. Almost immediately after purchasing the estate, John Anderson demolished the abbey ruins and the hamlet around it and within a few years had built a totally new town with fine squares and straight streets.[39]

Mary Forward and Margaret Forward

Mary and Margaret Forward were two of the six daughters of William Forward of Fermoy. It would seem that one of them was possibly the eldest daughter of William Forward that died at Mallow in 1761.[40] The surviving sister or possibly Barbara was the unmarried heiress who by 1797 held fourth sixths of the Fermoy estate which was purchased by John Anderson.

Barbara Forward

Barbara was alive in 1764 when she was mentioned in her father’s will as the eldest daughter.[41] Yet this must be the eldest ‘surviving’ daughter as the eldest daughter was said to have died at Mallow in 1761.[42]

Rebecca Forward

Rebecca Forward was born about 1740. In 1778 (marriage licence 10th August) Rebecca Forward, daughter of William Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Wensley Bond, son of Rev. James Bond of Carbery, Co. Longford.[43] Rev. Wensley Bond was Dean of Ross (1773-1813), Treasurer of Ferns (1776-1820) and Rector of St. John’s, Sligo (1775-1820). They had two sons and four daughters.[44] One of the sons, Rev. James forward Bond married (21st May 1825) his cousin Christiana, daughter of Rev. Lorenzo Hely-Hutchinson.[45] It is not clear why Rebecca Forward did not get any share of the Fermoy estate when her two other married sisters did secure a sixth of the property each.

Elizabeth Forward

Elizabeth Forward married Garret Atty Nagle of Knockanevin. But this was no ordinary marriage as it is said that Garret Nagle abducted Elizabeth Forward and then married her. Elizabeth Forward received a sixth share of the Fermoy estate from her father and this share was centred on Grange West. In 1772 their son Garrett Nagle was born. In 1784 Garret Atty Nagle died. Elizabeth Forward died on the 9th November 1817 aged 75 years (born c.1742).[46]

On 16th March 1786 blackwater 7/1409

Garret Nagle fell into bad company without his father. He began drinking heavily and was involved in robberies. In 1798 Garret Nagle was a co-accused at the trail on Mon Roche. When Garret Nagle married Ellen Croker it was hoped that he would improve but instead Garret Nagle got the name of being a bad husband.

Christina Forward

Christina Forward got Grange East as her sixth part share of the Fermoy estate from her father. In 1788 Christina Forward was living in St. Ann’s Parish, Dublin, when she married William Tynte Austin of Dublin.[47] In 1837 their son, William Forward Austin of Grange Hill was mentioned as one of the principal gentlemen in the Fermoy area.[48] In 1839 William Forward Austin was elected among the first Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union. But his election was a close run affair. Matthias Hendley, agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, wrote to his boss that:

“The priests made very exertion to return a member of their own creed instead of Mr. Austin, who only succeeded by a majority of 221-220; but in the other Districts with the exception of 2, nominees of the priests were returned. We could not have a better Guardian than Mr. Austin; he owns a sixth of what was originally the Fermoy estate; and will I am convinced be an active member of the Board”.[49]

William Forward Austin was often mentioned in the newspapers during the Great Famine (1845-1850). In 1850 William Forward Austin was appointed one of the ex-officio members of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[50]

Conclusion

The grandchildren of William Forward of Fermoy are of a different generation and form a different to the Forward family in eighteenth century Fermoy. This article is no definite history of the family. As noted in many places above the source evidence for various events and people are conflicting. What this article does do is bring the family out of the shadows of the dark eighteenth century and put some fresh and blood behind the names. It is hoped in a future time to sort out the conflicting evidence and maybe add some new details – a task for another day.

 

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[1] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 267

[2] Tenison, C.M., ‘Barrymore archives’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 5 (1896), pp. 178-9

[3] Index of the Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[4] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[5] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 26

[6] Charles Smith, ‘The ancient and present state of the County and City of Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. II (1893), pp. 403, 404

[7] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at p. 268

[8] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 269

[9] Some Cork Lawyers from 1199

[10] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[11] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[12] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 1995

[13] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 412; Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 872

[14] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[15] Index to Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[16] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2606, quoting the Cork Evening Post of 19th January 1758

[17] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[18] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969; Mosley, C. (ed.), Burke’s Peerage, Baronage and Knightage (3 vols. Wilmington, 2003), Vol. 1, p. 1162; https://www.myheritage.com/names/prudence_earbery accessed on 16th August 2017

[19] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 744

[20] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2526

[21] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969

[22] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, pp. 2593, 2604

[23] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[24] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2546

[25] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559, quoting Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 6th October 1764

[26] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[27] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[28] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 67

[29] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 14, 21, 33

[30] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[31] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 834

[32] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[33] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2563

[34] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 8, 10

[35] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[36] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[37] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[38] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), pp. 44, 350

[39] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44

[40] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[41] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[42] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[43] Brady, W.M., Clerical and Parochial Records of Cork, Cloyne and Ross (Dublin, 1863), Vol. II, p. 430

[44] Rev. James B. Leslie, Ferns Clergy and Parishes (author, 1936), p. 47

[45] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/ireland/81186/ accessed on 18th August 2017

[46] Freeman’s Journal, 18th November 1817

[47] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Dublin

[48] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 66

[49] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 72

[50] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

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Cork history, Waterford history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

 

In the second half of the nineteenth century the Orpin family were the landlords of the Marston estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork. The first of the family we know of is Robert Orpin esq. who lived in Dublin in the early 1700’s. Anna–Maria Hajba in Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 says that this family of Orpin was a branch of the Kerry Orpen’s, but the listing for the Kerry Orpen’s in Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958 does not mention Robert Orpin.[1]

 

This is not to say that he was of a junior branch of that family as a good few of the early Orpen’s had Robert as a first name. John Orpen of Forleigh, Somerset, had a son Robert born 1553 who had a son Robert of Shaston, Dorset, a merchant who died of plague in 1645 and who had a son Robert Orpen of Killorglin, Co. Kerry where he lived in 1661 and had 3 sons the second of whom was another Robert Orpen, born in 1644, married in 1669 and died in 1699.[2]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin

 

But we do know that the first Robert Orpin of the later Marshtown family was descendent through his wife with the Kerry Orpen’s. She was Johanna Mansfield, daughter of William Mansfield, and Mary-Johanna Gandrum. Mary-Johanna was the daughter of Augustus Gandrum by his wife Margaret Bowen, daughter of William Bowen and granddaughter of Robert Bowen, Robert’s wife was Margaret Orpen daughter of Robert Orpen of Killorglin above.[3]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin had two sons by Johanna Gandrum, called Benjamin and Abel. Benjamin Orpin got married and had a son but we know little more about him. Abel Orpin got married twice and by his second wife Lucy Duant, had children. Abel Orpin became a cleric in the Church of Ireland. He was for a time curate in Drishane parish in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe.

 

Rev. Abel Orpin

 

Rev. Abel had at least three sons by his second wife. Basil Orpin also became a cleric in the Church of Ireland, married, had children and died in 1842. John Orpin lived in Cork City had a wife Mary and died in 1823. The third son, another Abel Orpin, is little known other than he was mentioned in the will of his brother John Orpin.[4]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin

 

As noted above the first son, Basil Orpin became a clergyman. He was ordained on 29th September 1786 and served in various curacies in the Cloyne Diocese. He got the curates job in Clonmeen and Roskeen parish in 1786 while still a deacon. Later Basil Orpin moved to Ballyhooly, and was curare to the rector William Berkeley, a nephew of Bishop Berkeley of Cloyne. There was a population of 60 Protestants in Ballyhooly in 1785 shortly before Basil Orpin came. There was one church, no glebe house and the curate had a salary of £50.[5]

 

Ballyhooly church

Ballyhooly church by Mike Searle

This was a nice income compared to other people of that time. A land steward in Tipperary working for 300 days got £12. Ten pence was given for one days mowing of hay and three pence for threshing a barrel of oats in 1779.[6]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin served at Ballyhooly until 1804 when for the next four years he was vicar at Tullilease parish while acting and living in Aghinagh parish as curate.  But his house must have been modest as no glebe house was built until 1862.[7]

 

In 1808 Rev. Basil Orpin was made vicar of Ballyvourney, a position he held until his death on 2nd November 1842. At Ballyvourney he also held the job of Rector, the highest church position he attained. In the early year Rev. Basil Orpin had little clerical duties to perform as in 1805 there were no Protestant families in the parish. By 1830 there were 30 people of that faith while the census of 1860 also recording 30 Protestant people. Rev. Basil Orpin made improvements in 1824 by building a church to seat 200 people as the old church was long in ruins.[8]

 

On the personnel front Rev. Basil Orpin was also making improvements.  He married Ellen Newce but it is unknown if she was his first wife or second.  In the will of his brother John Orpin in 1823, Benjamin Orpin was listed as son of Basil’s first marriage while the children Richard, Mary and Joanne were by other marriage.  Rev. Basil Orpin had other children, namely; John Orpin who married a Miss Manden and had two sons and Basil Orpin who later settled at Marshtown, along with two more daughters, Isabella and Charlotte. It is not known were these children from the first or second marriage or was there the possibility of a third marriage.[9]

 

Nothing further is known of Basil’s children except of Benjamin Orpin who was sometimes referred to Abel Orpin. He lived at Passage West and had a wife Lucinda who died on 1st May 1841. Ben Orpin died on 26th March 1880.[10]

 

Meanwhile it was not just religious matters and family life concerned Rev. Basil Orpin. He was sometimes asked to act in a legal capacity for people. Pierce Power asked Rev. Basil Orpin to be one of 6 executors of his will in 1819. By the time the will was sworn in 1838 only Rev. Basil Orpin was alive to see it implemented.  Richard Foot of Millfort Co. Cork was the beneficiary and got three townlands in the Barony of Duhallow.[11]

 

Basil Orpin

 

Rev. Basil Orpin died in 1842 and was buried in Millstreet, Drishane parish. The earliest reference we have to Basil Orpin, son of Rev. Basil Orpin is from 1834. In that year he acted as solicitor to a marriage settlement with an address of Lower Mount Street in Dublin. The married couple were George and Elizabeth Crofts. They gave Matthew and John Purcell £1,384 12s 3d for certain lands in the Barony of Fermoy, and in the Barony of Duhallow at Woodpark for 500 years. Basil Orpin was trustee to this agreement in 24th January 1834.[12]

 

Later in 1854 the Crofts had gone into bankrupacy and by order of the court of Chancery their lands were to be sold. Rev. Thomas Hamblin Porter gave Basil Orpin £695 12s 10d for the Duhallow lands along with other lands in Counties Cork, Kerry and Limerick. Anne Purcell gave consent for the sale but with a right of recovery of on payment of the £695 plus 5% interest. This was because the Purcell’s owned the ground title and had only given the land to the Croft’s on a long lease.[13]

 

Basil Orpin also did other land transactions for the Purcell’s. On 22nd of August 1848 he was solicitor to an agreement where by John Purcell gave Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers, Fermoy, lands in Counties Cork, Limerick and Tipperary in trust for money lent to John by Matthias.[14]

 

On the 14th of August 1854 Basil Orpin again was solicitor for a deed of conveyance from Edmond Boyle, 8th Earl of Cork and Orrery, to Ann Purcell, Burton Park, of Carrigacashell townland in Duhallow.[15] During the time of the last transaction Basil Orpin was also conducting legal business for the Earls cousin William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire. There is in the Lismore Castle papers housed in the National Library of Ireland where legal letters from Basil Orpin to the Duke cover the years from 1852 to 1857.[16] While in the papers in Lismore Castle there are legal letters covering from 1860 to 1882 when Basil died.[17]

 

Basil Orpin and the troubled Kerry lands

 

Meanwhile in 1850 Basil Orpin and his son John Orpin got legal papers of their own which were not nice. These papers were an ejectment notice served at their offices in Dublin, by Anthony Lynch of Dublin, acting for Sir William D. Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry.[18] The notice was for lands at Knockagurrane parish of Kilcolman in Kerry in order that Sir William could recover the rent arrears on the land that was owed by the Orpins. Their cousin Anne Orpin of Killarney who had a share in the land also got an ejectment notice. None of the Orpins contested the notice and Sir William got back his land.

 

The story of Knockagurrane is a long one. It began on 11th June 1798 when John Orpin, son of Rev. Abel Orpin, took out a 31 year lease on the 88 acres of Knockagurrane from John Godfrey of Bushfield Co. Kerry for 17 shillings per acre.  John Orpin was living at Temple Villa Co. Cork at the time. The lease was renewed on 17th August 1804, 10th September 1817, 24th September 1822 and 9th May 1823.[19]

 

John Orpin died on 10th September 1823 and passed his interest in Knockagurrane to his niece Ann Orpin, possibly the daughter of his brother Abel Orpin.[20] Basil Orpin, the solicitor, became a partner with Ann Orpin for the property. Further deeds on 20th August 1835, 10th April 1839 and 5th November 1840 changed the interest of various parties to the property.

 

By December 1847 instructions for ejectment of Ann Orpin were prepared by Stokes and Creagh, solicitors of Dublin for Sir William Duncan Godfrey. Ann had accumulated rent arrears of two years amounting to £98 6s 8d. Stokes and Creagh didn’t proceed with ejectment (eviction in the common language of the day) but consulted George Blake Hickson of South Great George’s Street who on examining the case said it was a very peculiar case and so full of difficulties that he advised against ejectment and to recover the arrears by other means.[21]

 

Whatever the other ways of getting the money Sir William Godfrey employed, it had no positive outcome. The rent arrears had risen to £180 2s 10d by January 1st 1850 when Sir William called it a day and brought ejectment proceeds in the Court of Queens Beach against Ann Orpin and her tenants.  Basil Orpin got the ejectment notice on the 10th. It was the 13th of July when the Court gave judgement in favour of Sir William with costs.

 

But it was a short-lived victory for Sir William Godfrey. In January 1856 Sir William Godfrey lost Knockagurrane with a number of other townlands because of a petition to the Encumbered Estates Court by Charles Sugrue of Cork for debts totalling £32,471 7s 11d.[22]

 

DSC05869

Former gates into the Marston estate –

now at St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore

Basil Orpin acquires Marshtown

 

About this time in the 1850s that Basil Orpin purchased the Marston Estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork from the trustees of Richard Henry Gumbleton and those lands of Georgina Gumbleton (Richard’s Sister-in-law) north of the river Blackwater. By 1870 Basil Orpin owned 406 acres in Co. Cork and 2,188 acres in Co. Waterford valued at £370 and £690 respectively.[23] But happiness was not to last long as his wife Mary Carthew died on the 11th of March 1866 and was buried at Mocollop. Basil Orpin was buried beside her after his death on 4th January 1882.[24]

 

Before his death notices of ejectment were again served but this time by Basil Orpin on a number of tenants at Mocollop.  It was decided to hold a huge protest meeting.  The local magistrates wanted to ban the meeting in the interest of public order.  Mr Redmond, the resident magistrate from Dungarvan, refused and the meeting proceeded without incident. This occurred in May 1881 during the Land War. It’s not recorded if the evictions went ahead.[25]

 

John Orpin

 

The son of Basil Orpin was John Orpin who was born in 1826 and died on 23rd March 1904 and was buried at Mocollop. Also buried there was his wife, Susan Lilias, born in 1832 and died on 26th April 1903.[26]

 

John Orpin, like his father, was a solicitor and is recorded living at Marston in 1886.[27] Also like his father, there are letters from John Orpin among the Lismore Castle papers in Lismore. These date from 1880 to 1889.[28]

 

Basil Orpin

 

John Orpin had at least two sons. The eldest, Basil Orpin, succeeded to the Marston Estate. He was born in 1860 and died on 31st July 1922 and is also buried at Mocollop.[29] Like his father and grandfather there are letters from Basil Orpin in Lismore Castle from 1900 to 1921 as the Orpin’s (of Orpen’s as Basil signed his name) were solicitors to the Castle for many decades.[30] Upon his headstone at Mocollop it says Basil Orpin of Marston also lived at 47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, where he could have carried on his legal practice.

 

47-49_St_Stephens_Green_v2-min-800x533

47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin – the door on the right

Cecil Orpin

 

His brother Cecil Orpin succeeded to Marston, where he lived in the gate lodge as the big house had burnt down in about 1908.  He was there until at least 1932 as he is listed as an occupier in that year.[31] The estate was divided soon after.

 

Cecil Orpin was a medical doctor and lived for many years in Youghal.  In the 1901 census he lived at No. 3 Marina Terrace. There was nobody else with him in the house on the night of the census.[32] By the time of the next census in 1911 Cecil Orpin had moved to No. 1 Marina Terrace with the Christian Brothers now in No. 3. With him in the house were his wife Ethel and daughters Lilias, Ruth and Susan. There also was five servants, Mabel Marque, Mary Courtney, Hannah Sherlocke, Mary O’ Connell and Catherine Scully.[33]  In the 1960s and 1970s a member of the Orpin family served as a news announcer on RTE television. This then is a brief outline of the history of the Orpin family as is presently known from their origins as Dublin merchants to church clerics and solicitors to estate landlords and medical doctors to television presenters.

 

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[1] Hajba, A., Historical genealogical architectural notes on some houses of Cork (Whitegate, 2002), Vol. 1, North Cork, p. 259; Burkes landed Gentry, 1958, pp. 556-560

[2] Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958, p. 556

[3] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 6, p. 1422

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol.6, p. 802

[5] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 6, p. 801

[6] Lambe, M., A Tipperary landed estate: Castle Otway, 1750-1853 (Dublin, 1998), p. 24

[7] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 870

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802; Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[10] Records of Old Cork Newspapers

[11] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2303

[12] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2182

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2184

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 15, p. 2182

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 1783

[16] Lismore Castle Paper, N.L.I., Ms. 7187

[17] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole C and D to K and C/2/20 room 4 the tower

[18] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at p. 48

[19] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at pp. 40-41

[20] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[21] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at p. 53

[22] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol, 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at pp. 61-62

[23] Owners of land of one acre and upwards, 1870 with information extracted for Counties Cork and Waterford

[24] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[25] Power, P.C., History of Waterford City and County (Cork, 1990), p. 201

[26] Headstone inscriptions in Mocollop church graveyard

[27] Guys Postal directory,1886

[28] Lismore Castle papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole M-R

[29] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[30] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/ pigeon hole (U-X)

[31] Hajba, Houses of Co. Cork, Vol. 1, p. 259

[32] Farrell, N., Youghal Family Roots: exploring family origins in Youghal (Longford, 2001), p. 8

[33] Farrell, Youghal Family Roots, p. 24.

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Cork history

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On Tuesday, 18th November 1766 the wedding took place in Cork city of Ranigius Fallon of St. Kitts, merchant, to Miss Ann Sullivan, daughter of the eminent Cork bookseller, Cornelius Sullivan.[1] The Freeman Journal (2nd December 1766) gave the groom’s name as Redmond Fallon of St. Kitts.[2] Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 1766 also reported on the wedding and said that Mr. Fallen was a West-India merchant while Miss Sullivan had a considerable fortune.[3] This fortune was given in the Cork Constitution as about £1,000.[4] A woman with money was often mentioned in the newspapers accompanying marriage notices such as that of Miss Jackson of Co. Limerick in 1770, who was described as ‘a young lady endowed with every accomplishment that can render the marriage state truly happy, with a large fortune’.[5]

Cork’s trade with the West Indies was growing throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as the number of colonies grew. Cork’s chief export to the West Indies, to places like St. Kitts, was in the form of provisions such as beef, butter, pork, herrings, candles and sometimes linen.[6]

There were people called Fallon (such as Daniel Fallon) living on St. Kitts in the 1630s, then known as St. Christopher.[7] The first English colony on St. Kitts was established in 1623 and the French established their colony there in 1625. The island changed many times between French and English control in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.[8] St. Kitts was a major sugar growing colony and slaves played a vital role in the business. It is very possible that Redmond Fallon was some way involved in the save trade and sugar growing. It is possible that Redmond Fallon made the voyage to Cork from St. Kitts on a number of occasions, bringing sugar and returning with provisions and possibly some books from the Brown Street premises of Cornelius Sullivan.

 

CommProp17Dec14paulst_large

No. 14 Brown St. is the three story building in mid picture –

near where Cornelius Sullivan had his shop

 

Cornelius Sullivan

It is not known when Cornelius Sullivan first established his bookselling business in Cork. With a name like Sullivan he or his ancestors possibly came from south-west Cork around the coasts of Bantry and the Beare Peninsula.

So far, 1738, provides the earliest notice of Cornelius Sullivan as a bookseller. In May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan was operating a book shop under the Exchange Coffee House on Exchange Street. By that early date he must have been a successful bookseller for in May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan placed an advert in Harvey’s Jocular Medley that he was the letting agent for the inn called the Blew Bell in Cove Lane near the South Gate. it is not clear if he actually was the owner of the Blew Bell (J.C.H.A.S., vol. LXII, 1957, p. 95).

In 1741 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, was a subscriber to The Genuine Works of F. Josephus: Translated from the Original Greek by Flavius Josephus and edited by William Whiston of Cambridge University. The book was printed in Dublin by George Ewing.

In 1747 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, subscribed for four sets of The Life and Exploits of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel Cervantes de Saavedra and translated from Spanish by Charles Jarvis. The book was printed by Peter Wilson of Dame Street, Dublin.

In 1748 a person called Cornelius Sullivan, operated a bookselling business in Newry, subscribed for eight sets of A New History of the Holy Bible by the Rev. Thomas Stackhouse. It is not beyond the bounds of possibility that this Cornelius Sullivan of Newry and Cornelius Sullivan of Cork was one and the same person, but further research is needed to prove or disprove this case.

In the Corke Journal of 15th February 1754 Cornelius Sullivan was operating out of Castle Street in Cork city. In the Corke Journal (11/7/1754) and (15/8/1754) Cornelius Sullivan advertised his bookselling business on Castle Street. Castle Street in the mid eighteenth century was a good location for a bookselling business. The Exchange was built on that street c.1705-1710 by the city merchants to conduct business and exchange news. Therefore people with money were coming past the bookshop every day and it seems Cornelius Sullivan captured a good share of their custom.

exchange_castlestreet

Castle Street (now Exchange Street) –

one of these houses could have been the bookshop

Unlike George Bagnell (died March 1768) of Cork city who was both a printer and a bookseller in Cork city, Cornelius Sullivan stayed as a bookseller.[9] If he did print books as well as selling them he could have commanded more customers as they would have to come to him to get any book he printed and which would be unavailable at any other bookseller. Yet it seems that Cornelius Sullivan did acquire a sizeable clientele to his shop and became wealthy enough to give his daughter £1,000 as a dowry and purchase property.

In 1760 Cornelius Sullivan was listed among the tradesmen of Cork as a bookseller. In the same Cork Journal Cornelius Sullivan also gave notice that he had a house and slaughter-house in Blarney Lane to let. In 1770 a person called Sullivan died in Blarney Lane but it is unknown if he was any relation to the bookseller.[10] It is presumed Cornelius Sullivan had acquired that slaughter-house as an investment opportunity from his bookselling business.

In 1762 Cornelius Sullivan was listed amongst other Catholic inhabitants of Cork who were prepared to offer a reward for the capture of any Whiteboys or Levelers.[11] The business of the Cork booksellers was mainly among the select country customers with the biggest trade period around the social occasions in the city like the assizes time.[12] The Whiteboys and Levelers were challenging these country customers for control of the countryside and so were a threat to the business of Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1767 Cornelius Sullivan advertised his business as bookseller and stationer in Brown Street.[13] Brown Street no longer exists as it was demolished in the 1970s to make way for the Paul Street shopping centre and multi-story car park. The last independent bookseller on Brown Street, Connolly’s, closed in 2014 and their address was number 14 Brown Street. It is not known where on Brown Street Cornelius Sullivan had his premises.

 

BrownStreetCork1830s

Brown Street is marked in yellow on this old Cork map

In 1768 a person called Cornelius Sullivan of Cork died and left a will.[14] It is not known for certain but it is very possible that this was Cornelius Sullivan the bookseller as he appears in no later documents.

In 1787 a person called Bartholomew Sullivan operated a paper-making business in Hoar’s Lane while Jeremiah Sullivan was a bookseller and lottery agent in North Main Street.[15] This Jeremiah Sullivan went on to become an eminent printer and bookseller. He died in November 1824 at Sarsfield Court.[16] It is not known if they were any relation to Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1787 there were just eight booksellers in Cork city but this had grown to eighteen by 1824.[17] It is interesting to speculate that Cornelius Sullivan was at the vanguard to this expansion in the Cork bookselling trade.

Ann Sullivan Fallon

It is possible that Ann Sullivan returned to St. Kitts were her new husband, Redmond Fallon and reared a family. Yet she could have returned to Ireland in later years. In 1806 a person called Ann Fallon died at Hanover Street in Dublin and left a will.[18] Investigation into that story is sometime for a visit to St. Kitts and for another day. For the moment it is to take down a book from the book-shelve and have a good read while remembering Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork city, who in another time could have sold us that book.

 

Bibliography

Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Cork Evening Post, 1767

Corke Journal, 1760

Cork Trade Directory, 1787

Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005)

Limerick General Advertiser, 1824

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277

Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42

O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937)

Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897)

 

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[1] Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[2] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568. The Cork Journal 20th November 1766 also mentioned the wedding.

[3] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42, at p. 33, no. 4131

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[5] Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 214

[6] O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937), p. 148

[7] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/soc.genealogy.west-indies/iBx7TO6B1nc accessed on 9th August 2017

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Kitts accessed on 9th August 2017

[9] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277, at p. 258

[10] Cork Journal, 1760; Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 221

[11] Cork Journal, 1762

[12] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 413

[13] Cork Evening Post, 6th April 1767

[14] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 444

[15] Cork Trade Directory, 1787

[16] Limerick General Advertiser, 24th November 1824

[17] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830, p. 413

[18] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 161

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Cork history

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons: A Great War casualty

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons:

A Great War casualty

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Among the dead of the Great War, otherwise known as World War One, was Brevet Colonel Henry Hendley Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. He died in a Dublin hospital on 10th November 1919 and even though his death was after the end of the Great War he is included among the dead of that War. He was buried at Kill St. Anne cemetery beside his home at Castlelyons and his name is inscribed on a memorial within the Church of Ireland church in Fermoy. This article sets out some information on the life and times of this soldier of the Royal Artillery.

Henry Bond

Henry Hendley Bond was the son of Major General Henry Bond and Mary Earbery Hendley Bond. Henry Bond senior was born in County Longford in about 1837. Shortly after leaving school he joined the Royal Artillery to see the world and find employment. On 7th April 1856 Henry Bond was made a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.[1] Thereafter he made a steady rise up the ranks. On 1st August 1866 he was made a Captain.[2] It was at this stage of his life that Captain Henry Bond met Mary Earbery Hendley of Mountrivers near Fermoy, Co. Cork. In 1868 they got married.

Mary Earbery Hendley and family

Mary Earbery Hendley was the daughter of Matthias Christopher Hendley of Mountrivers by his wife, Clementina (d 29th July 1867). Matthias and Clementina had one son, Matthias Christopher Hendley (d 22nd March 1885) and six daughters. One of these daughters, Mary Earbery Hendley (d 24th April 1931) it was who married Henry Bond.[3]

Matthias Christopher Hendley was the son of Matthias Hendley (1771-1847) of Mountrivers near Fermoy who was agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby. Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, had purchased the Fermoy estate in 1835 for £70,000. It was said that Abercromby was owed £10,000 from the Anderson family, the previous owners of Fermoy.[4] Matthias Hendley left at least two sons; Matthias Christopher Hendley (1813-1901) and John Leslie Hendley. John Leslie Hendley married, 15th August 1847, Marianne Ryder, daughter of Archdeacon William Ryder and left at least one son, John Leslie Hendley who went to live in New Zealand. John Leslie Hendley, senior, was killed while hunting in India.[5]

Henry Bond in the Royal Artillery

After his marriage Captain Henry Bond continued his career in the Roya Artillery. On 16th January 1875 he was promoted to Major. On 16th January 1882 Henry Bond was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and on 16th January 1886 was made a full Colonel in the Royal Artillery. On 1st November 1887 he was promoted to the rank of Major General.[6]

The Bond family in 1893

After many postings in India (1872), Ireland (1873), the East Indies and England (1880-85) Major General Henry Bond returned to Ireland to settle down. In 1893 Major General Henry Bond was living at the Manor, Castlelyons with his family.[7]

The Bond family in 1901

In 1901 Henry Bond (aged 64, born Co. Longford) lived at the Manor, Kill St Ann, near Castlelyons. By 1901 Henry Bond was a retired from the Royal Artillery. With him at the Manor was his wife, Mary Earbery Bond (aged 53, born Co. Cork) and their three daughters. The daughters were Edith Frances Bond (aged 29, born in India), Mary Kathleen Bond (aged 25, born in England) and Charlotte Emily Bond (aged 21, born in England), all single. The family was attended by two servants, Bridget Casey (aged 29, born Co. Cork, cook) and Mary Sullivan (aged 23, born Co. Cork, housemaid).[8]

In 1901 the Manor was classified as a first class house with 19 rooms, 7 windows at the front of the house and 7 outbuildings in the grounds.[9] These outbuildings consisted of two stables, one coach house, one harness room, two fowl houses and one shed.[10]

Also in the grounds of the Manor was situated another house held by Henry Bond. This house was lived in by Patrick Allen.[11] Patrick Allen (aged 25, born Co. Tipperary) worked as a coachman for the Bond family while his wife, Kate Allen (aged 24, born Co. Cork) worked as a house keeper. They had two sons, William aged two and John aged one.[12]

 

Phone photos February 2017 102

Entrance to the Manor, Castlelyons

The Bond family in 1911

Major General Henry Bond died sometime between 1901 and 1911. His widow, Mary Earbury Bond was head of the household at the Manor in the 1911 census. With her on the census night were her three daughters, all single, and her son, Henry Hendly Bond along with two servants; Annie Frances Stuart (aged 23, born Co. Cork, parlour maid, Church of Ireland), and Margaret Mahony (aged 19, born Co. Cork, cook, Roman Catholic).[13]

In 1911 the Manor had 16 rooms and 6 outbuildings while Patrick Allen and family still lived in the second house.[14] Henry Hendley Bond was aged 37 in 1911 and was born in Co. Longford. In 1911 he was a Major in the Royal Field Artillery and was on the active service list.[15]

Henry Hendley Bond

Henry Hendley Bond He was born at Ballymahon, Co. Longford on 13th June 1873 although some sources say it was at Ahmedabad in Gujarat in India. In the 1911 census Henry Hendley Bond said he was born in Co. Longford.[16]

Like any army family, the Bond family moved around a lot. They lived initially in Moigh, Ballymahon, before moving to the East Indies and later England (Solihull), before settling at the Manor, near Castlelyons, Co. Cork.[17]

Henry Hendley Bond attended Wellington College and as a teenager joined the Royal Horse Artillery and Field Artillery at Woolwich.[18] On 22nd July 1892 Henry Hendley Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. On 22nd July 1895 he was promoted to lieutenant and 6th April 1900 was made a Captain.[19]

In 1898-1900 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was posted to India. While there he became a noted cricket player. Between August 1898 and September 1900 he played five matches for the Europeans against the Indians.[20]

By 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 136 Battery at Woolwich under the command of Major Elton.[21] In that same year of 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond served in the closing stages of the South African War.[22]

By 1908 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 15th Battery at Dundalk.[23] At that time he was attached to the Sierra Leone Battalion.[24] In 1911 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was at home at Castlelyons for the census of that year.

After World War One started Captain Henry Hendley Bond saw action in a number of places including at Salonika.[25] On 4th June 1917 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).[26]

So after this occasion the health of Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond began to deteriorate. For the next eighteen months he suffered from degenerative neurological disease. On 10th November 1919 Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond died aged 46 years with the rank of Brevet Colonel and temporary title of Brigadier General.[27] He died at Hampstead, Glasnevin in north Dublin.[28] Henry Hendley Bond was buried in the graveyard at Kill-St-Ann, Castlelyons, near his old home.

The Bond family after 1919

After the death of Henry Hendley Bond in 1919 his family continued to live at the Manor near Castlelyons. In April 1931 his mother, Mary Earbery Hendley Bond, died. On 10th September 1945 Charlotte Emily (died 16th April 1960), daughter of Major General Henry Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons married Venerable Samuel Hobart Dorman, Rector of Knockmourne Union and Archdeacon of Cloyne, sixth son of Rev. Thomas Dorman of Richmond House, Cork.[29]

Other members of the Bond family of Castlelyons included Edward Leslie Bond and Charles Earbery Bond, both of whom joined the army.

Edward Leslie Bond

Edward Leslie Bond joined the Royal Garrison Artillery to keep the gunning tradition in the family. On 4th March 1899 Edward Leslie Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and on 16th February 1901 was promoted to lieutenant. In 1902 he was serving with the Native Mountain Artillery in India.[30] On 1st February 1906 Edward Leslie Bond was made a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery.[31] In 1908 Captain Edward Leslie Bond was with the 21st Kohat Mountain Battery in India.[32]

On 26th April 1969 Major Leslie Crawford Bond of Pewsey, Wiltshire, son of Colonel Edward Leslie Bond of Castlelyons, married Penelope Margaret Alexander, daughter of Edward Currie Alexander by his wife Isabella, daughter of Major George Stoney. They had one daughter, Kristin, born in 1971.[33]

Charles Earbery Bond

Meanwhile Charles Earbery Bond left the family tradition of the artillery and instead joined the Royal Sussex Regiment. Charles Bond was born on 14th October 1877 and attended school at Wellington College.[34]

On 4th May 1898 Charles Earbery Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment and on 2nd April 1899 was promoted to lieutenant.[35] Lieutenant Charles Bond served in the South African war in 1899- 1900 with the 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria, including the engagements at Welkom Farm, Zand River, and Doorukop, the occupation of Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the engagement at Diamond Hill. He was also present in the subsequent advance into the Orange River Colony, including the operations round Bethlehem and in the Caledon Valley, the engagement at Relief’s Nek, and the surrender of the Boer forces on 1st August 1900 at Golden Gate. Lieutenant Bond was also involved in operations round Thabanchu, Winburg, and Lindley.[36]

In October 1902 Lieutenant Charles Bond was awarded the Distinguish Service Order (DSO) medal for his services in the South African War.[37] On 2nd February 1907 Charles Earbery Bond was made a Captain in the Royal Sussex Regiment.[38]

 

Charles Earbery Bond

Charles Bond and others at cricket in India, c.1910

Captain Charles Bond served in the Great War (1914-18). In September 1915 he was promoted to Major and from 24th November 1915 to 31st May 1917 was Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, first with the Worcestershire Regt., and from Dec. 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. In 1916 he was awarded the honour of C.M.G.

From June 1917 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the 51st Infantry Brigade in France until 30th May, 1918. From July 1918 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. In the War Charles Bond was five times mentioned in Despatches and acquired the Mons Medal.[39]

 

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[1] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1862), p. 171; Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1871), p. 169

[2] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1902), p. 600

[3] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 81; memorial brass plates in Church of Ireland, Fermoy; http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2890 accessed on 5th August 2017

[4] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 52

[5] Edward Garner, Massacre at Rathcormac (n.d.), p. 62

[6] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 600

[7] Francis Guy, Directory of the Province of Munster, 1893, Cork, p. 81

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572885/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572877/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572884/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927069/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[16] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462 ; http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[17] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[18] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[19] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[20] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 516

[21] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[22] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 203c

[23] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 189a

[24] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 171

[25] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[26] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[27] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31560/supplement/11749/data.pdf accessed on 5th August 2017

[28] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 376, 377

[30] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 184

[31] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 183

[32] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 503

[33] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 11

[34] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[35] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 288

[36] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 289a

[37] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[38] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), pp. 288, 289a

[39] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

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Carlow History, Cork history

Deane Tanner family: some biographical notes

Deane Tanner family: some biographical notes

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

The following information relating to the Deane-Tanner family of Carlow and Cork was gathered in April 2011 to assist another historian who was researching Ireland’s early exploration into cinema production.

William Desmond Taylor, a film director in the United States was born William Cunningham Deane-Tanner in County Carlow. For more on his life and career see = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Desmond_Taylor

 

William_desmond_taylor_1921_topofNY

William D. Taylor directing a 1921 film

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Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, page 1172 = will statement = William Kearns Tanner: 1881; effects £12,934-19-5; February 14; The will & codicil of WK Tanner, late Lapp’s Quay, Cork, esquire, M.D., deceased died 22 December 1882 at same place, was proved at Cork by James Deane of Queenstown, Thomas Babington and Eliza Tanner, widow, both of Cork, executors.

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, page 1689 = will statement = Eliza Tanner; effects £249-5-2; March 27th; will … late Lapp’s Quay, Cork, widow, deceased 11th October 1897 at same place, was proved at Cork by Charles Kearns Deane Tanner, of same place, esquire, M.D.; M.P.; one of the executors.

For more on the life and career of Charles Kearns Deane-Tanner see = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Kearns_Deane_Tanner

 

Charles_Kearns_Deane_Tanner,_Vanity_Fair,_1888-08-04

Charles K. Deane-Tanner as in Vanity Fair, 1888

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 15, page 1770 = abstract of deeds = Deane/Tanner, 1839/15/81, barony East Muskerry, 5/8/1833; indented deed of marriage settlement. John Conlon Deane, Dundanion Castle, Blackrock, Cork City, eldest son of Thomas Deane, Dundanion; Catherine Creighton, spinster, only daughter of George Wright Creighton, Dublin city, B.L.; William Kearns Tanner, Dublin city, M.D.; John Croker Creighton, Dublin city, B.L.; J.C. Deane in consideration of his intended marriage with Catherine Creighton and to make provision for her and for any children of said marriage assigned onto William K Tanner and John C Creighton in their actual possession the lands of Ummarie, Tomerade, East Knockvally, Gadrony, and West Knockvally, barony of Muskerry upon trust and should said Catherine survive said John; she should have an annuity of £150 and £2,000 should be charged on said lands for children. Witnesses: Joseph Francis Spearing & Edward Brewster Creighton; sworn 2/8/1839; Assistant registar Walter Glascock

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 15, page 1769 = Deane/Savage = 1844/1/75 = barony East Muskerry; 6/1/1844 = mentions Kearns Deane, Cork city, as getting £10 in mortgage from Osborne Savage in 1844 = others names are Sir Thomas Deane, Dundanion castle (got mortgage of £1,450 in the same deal) & John Conlon Deane, Dublin

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 15, page 1770 = Deane/Sullivan 1836/5/264 barony East Muskerry = 3/4/1821 = says Thomas Deane, Cork city and Catherine Deane nee Conlon, his wife

Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 15, page 1769 = Deane/O’Sullivan 1835/6/133 barony of West Muskerry = 24/3/1835 = Sir Thomas Deane, Cork city, executor of last will of John Conlon, deceased

 

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Edward Walford (ed.), The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, Robert Hardwick, 1860)

 

Edward Walford (ed.), The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, Robert Hardwick, 1860), p. 170 = Sir Thomas Deane, Knt. (cr. 1839), was the son of Alexander Deane, architect of Cork. Sir Thomas was born 1792 and marry firstly in 1809 to Catherine, daughter of E. Coulon [Conlon?] and married secondly in 1827 to Eliza, daughter of Robert O’Callaghan Newenham. Sir Thomas’s third marriage was in 1853 to Harriet, daughter of the late Major Williams.

Sir Thomas Deane was an eminent architect and was High Sheriff of Cork 1839 and 1851. In 1860 he lived at Dundanion Castle, near Cork.

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Tim Cadogan & Jeremiah Falvey, A biographical dictionary of Cork (Four Courts Press, 2006)

Tim Cadogan & Jeremiah Falvey, A biographical dictionary of Cork (Four Courts Press, 2006), p. 78 = Alexander Deane, a prominent Cork builder – father of Sir Thomas Deane (1792-1871), Dundanion castle – architect – establish firm of Deane & Woodward with Benjamin Woodward (1816-1861) – father of Sir Thomas N. Deane (1828-1899), Dundanion castle – architect – father of eldest son Sir Thomas M. Deane (1851-1933) – architect

Tim Cadogan & Jeremiah Falvey, A biographical dictionary of Cork (Four Courts Press, 2006), p. 219 = Robert O’Callaghan Newenham (1770-1849) prominent landscape and topographical draughtsman – son of Sir Edward Newenham (1732-1814) M.P. in Irish parliament – son of William Newenham

Page 220 = Thomas Newenham (1762-1831) Irish parliament M.P.; nephew of Sir Edward Newenham – Thomas opposed Act of Union – supported Catholic Emancipation – unsuccessful attempts to unite Catholic & Protestant churches in Ireland

 

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The above is only a brief gathering of information on the Deane-Tanner family. More can be got from other book sources and from online databases and information sources.

 

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End of post

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Biography, Cork history

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

The Peard family were substantial landlords in the area of north-east County Cork for near 300 years. There were numerous branches of the family who lived in a number of great houses. Yet today none remain and some of their former homes are in ruins or totally destroyed. The family does not appear in any genealogical publication of note and so this article is an attempt to reconstruct their lives from the pages of the past.

This article is in no way the final finished product but a working document in progress with changes expected as new information comes to hand.

Peard surname in Devon

The ancient records of Devonshire give reference to a number of people with the Peard surname. In 1332 Richard Peard of the parish of Hatherleigh paid 2s in the lay subsidy tax of that year. [Audrey M. Erskine (ed.), The Devonshire Lay Subsidy of 1332 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 14, 1969), p. 66]

Later records in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries make reference to people with the Peard surname. In 1701 Henry Peard, merchant and apprentice of Malachi Pyne, was made a freeman of Exeter. In 1722 another Henry Peard, hotpressman and apprentice of Samuel Wardell, was made a freeman. In 1754 Thomas Peard, fuller and apprentice of Henry Peard, was made a freeman. In 1757 Henry Peard, tailor, became a freeman in succession of his father, Henry Peard. In 1767 Abraham Peard, fuller and apprentice of Joseph Stephens, was made a freeman of Exeter. [Margery M. Rowe & Andrew M. Jackson (eds.), Exeter Freemen 1266-1967 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, Extra Series, No. 1, 1973), pp. 206, 232, 281, 282, 293]

In 1733 when Oliver Peard of Tiverton was a clothier and merchant with insured property worth £1,900 (this increased to £6,100 by 1744). [Stanley D. Chapman (ed.), The Devon cloth industry in the Eighteenth Century (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 23, 1978), pp. 122, 138]

In about 1693 to 1707 Oliver Peard of Barnstaple was co-pastor of the United Brethren Assembly with John Hanmer. In 1698 and later years William Peard was a member of the United Brethren Assembly at Exeter. He was the son of Oliver Peard of Barnstaple and succeeded John Hanmer as moderator in 1707 at Barnstaple where he was not the most favoured of ministers. William Peard died in 1716. [Allan Brockett (ed.), The Exeter Assembly: The minutes of the Assemblies of the United Brethren of Devon and Cornwall, 1691-1717 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 6, 1963), pp. 14, 39, 60, 61, 140, 144]

Early Peard family of Cork in Devon

[101] George Peard (b. 1505, d. 1578)

He was the great grand father of Richard Peard [104] (the first of the family to come to Ireland). [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[102] John Peard (b. 1525, d. 1574)

He was Chamberlain of Barnstaple in Devon and father of John Peard [103] of Upcott, Devon. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[103] John Peard (b. 1559, d. 1632)

John was the father of Richard Peard [104] who came to Ireland. He has a monument in Burnum Church. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[104] Richard Peard (b. 1595; d. 1683)

Listed for Coole as a husbandman in the 1641 depositions – married a miss Cole and had three sons; Richard [105], Henry [106] and William [107].

Richard Peard is listed as one of 7 tituladoes for Castlelyons town [Seamus Pender (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin), p. 237].

In this tomb, erected at the charges of William [107] and Henry [106] Peard, it says here lieth the body of Ensign Richard Peard of Castlelyons, who departed this life February the 28 day anno Dom 1683 aged 88 years and (who) came from Upcott in the parish of Welcombe in Devonshire in England. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription]

It is interesting to note that in the parish register for Welcombe there is no person by the name of Peard at that time but there were a good number of people with the surname of Beard. The two surnames are very near each other – only a slip of the pen in the difference.

peard-tomb

Peard tomb at Kill-St-Anne

[105] Richard Peard (b. 1620, d. 1684)

Here lieth, also, the body of Richard Peard of Coole, gent, eldest son of Ensign Richard [104] Peard, who departed this life November the sixth 1684 aged 54 years. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription] His will was proved in 1689 and from Coole. [Guide to Genealogical Office, p. 241] He married and had one son, William [129] and three daughters. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[107] William Peard

He could be the William Peard of Castlelyons who married Miss Wrixon of Cork in October 1762 at Glinfield, the home of Henry Wrixon. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2544] William wrote a series of letters to Francis Price in Wales from 1739 to 1750 about various aspects of life in Castlelyons and across Cork. These are now in the Puleston Papers at the National Library of Wales MS 3577C and MS 3579D. [There are copies on Microfilm at the National Library of Ireland Mic. P. 3,262 and P. 3,263] William Peard is mentioned as a cousin of Redmond Barry of Rathcormac in the latter’s will which was proved on 22 November 1750. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 642]

William Peard had three sons; Henry [133], Richard [134] and Thomas [135].

[106] Henry Cole Peard of Coole (b. 1661; d. 1731)

Henry Cole Peard was a former army captain and in 1698 he lately held the abbey lands of Castlelyons with the impropriator of its rector. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore Papers, MS 6146]

Henry is mentioned as trustee and overseer to the will of his brother-in-law of Christopher Vowell of Ballyorane in 1724. John Harrison of Castlelyons is also mentioned for the same job and is also referred to as brother-in-law of Christopher. Both gentlemen were also to be executors of his will if his wife, Elizabeth, remarried. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 678]

His will was proved in 1738 and he is a gent from Coole. [Guide to genealogical office, p. 241] The will was made on 6 August 1729 with his wife and two sons as executors. He asked to be buried in Castlelyons. The will also mentions his two daughters; Dorcas and Priscilla along with his nephew, Thomas Peard. The guardians appointed by him were; his brothers-in-law, John and Henry Harrison of Castlelyons, Samuel Harrison of Carrigabrick, his cousin Daniel Keeffe of Ballinglinhane and his friend Andrew Crotty. The latter was for many years the Irish land agent for the earl of Cork and lived for sometime at Modeligo House. E. William Troke, Richard Thorne and John Bryan were witnesses to the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 677]

He married Priscilla Harrison in 1701 and had two sons; John [108] and Richard [109] along with a daughter Priscilla [110].

[108] John Peard (d. November 1780)

He lived at Ballyclogh House and his will is dated 1785. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] John was trustee with Rev. William Vowell to the lands of Shanakill and that part of Glenatore called Carrow Towreen by will of his brother in 1772. John was trustee, with Richard Moore (heir-at-law of Rev. Vowell), of the marriage of his nephew, John and Margaret Mitchell. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81] He died in 1780 without any issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[110] Priscilla Peard

She was a daughter of Henry Cole Peard [106] of Coole.

[109] Richard Peard (d. 1773)

He married Elizabeth, sister of Rev. William Vowell, vicar of Aghern in 1731. He had issue by her of; Henry [111], Christopher [112] John [113] and Peard Harrison [114] and another eight children. [Conna in History and Tradition, p.194; J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179 for order of sons] He lived at Carrigeen. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] His will was dated 10 May 1772 with his wife and his brother, John, as executors. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179]

In 1771, his daughter Ellen married Henry Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork and their daughter and co-heiress Mary Broderick married in June 1795 Grice Smyth of Ballinatray. She married secondly Captain John Irvine, the 7th son of Col William Irvine of Castle Irvine Co. Fermanagh (see Burke 1912). [Burke’s Irish Family records p. 1040] His other daughters were: Elizabeth married William Spread, Ballycannon in the liberties of Cork, at Mogeely church in May 1763 with a dowry of £2,000; [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2550] Dorcas, wife of Westropp Watkins, late of Old Court, Co. Cork and Priscilla who married Charles Widenham, esq., and attorney-at-law on 20 April 1776 at Carrigeen. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29] see also [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[111] Henry Peard of Coole (d. 1797)

Henry was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Mary Gumbleton in 1764 at Lismore. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559 and Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 15/9/1764]

He built Coole Abbey with David Duckert around 1765 – he planted 10,000 trees at Coole in 1794. Henry died before 1773. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He left six children including; Richard [115] and John [116] [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

Henry had a daughter, Charlotte, who in 1807 married Rev. John Lord. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 919]

[115] Richard Peard of Coole Abbey (d. 1830)

Richard Peard is mentioned with reminder to Carrigeen and part of Glenatore from his grandfather in a legal petition of his aunt-in-law in 1791. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179] He attended the John Anderson creditors meeting on 19 June 1816. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 51] In 1801 he married Elizabeth Hart and had a son; Henry Hawke Peard [117] and a daughter, Henrietta Maria Peard [118]. Richard had two other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[118] Henrietta Maria Peard

She married on 2 September 1837, Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park as his second wife. They had five sons and two daughters. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

[117] Henry Hawke Peard (b. 1804; d. 1858)

He married Elizabeth Cathrow in 1826 and had a son; Richard [119]. Henry Peard had eleven other children included Francis [120]. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

dsc03300

Coole Abbey

In 1836 Henry H. Peard reported to the Poor Law enquiry that no more than a dozen labourers left the Coole area for the U.S.A. he went on to say that ‘fifty-nine labourers [who] reside in this parish (Coole), all in constant work, besides many more from adjoining parishes’. Henry Peard said that the ordinary diet of the people was ‘potatoes with milk in summer, which is very cheap and in winter those that can afford it, the addition of bacon, salt fish etc., while the article of clothing is beyond belief improved’. Henry Peard further said that since 1815 the ‘condition of the poor is much improved in clothing particularly, you now never see a person without shoes and stockings, which used to be the case, clothing is much cheaper, they are also improved in cleanliness of the house, diet perhaps also improved. The population is about the same’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 66, 68, 71]

As for the wages of the labouring class in Coole, Henry Peard said that ‘including the sale of a couple of fat pigs, fowl, etc., together with constant work, a man can earn about £15 per year’. But the devoutness of many Catholic labourers prevents them from earning more money as they observe too many church holidays and ‘attending stations to confess, [which] take a good deal from what a labourer could earn, there are 11 holidays kept’. Henry Peard estimated that the cost of living ‘as the labourer does, he can procure a full supply of potatoes and milk for about £7 per year, many live on £5’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 69]

Henry Peard went on to tell the Poor Law enquiry that “the number employed on roads is very difficult to determine, they being almost in every case, belonging to other parishes, the resident labourers, as I before stated, having constant work. I know they are paid in money”. [Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 82 – 83]

On the houses of the Coole labourers Henry Hawke Peard said that those who owned cabins ‘with the exception of a few tradesmen such as carpenters, blacksmiths etc., they are the labourers of the different farmers in the parish’. The usual rent was ‘with a small patch of garden … from £1 10s to £2’. The conditions of the cabins were better than those at Aghern and were mostly ‘composed of mud walls, thatched [and] in almost all you will find good bed and bedding’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 71]

in 1837 Henry Hawke Peard was a subscriber to the large folio volumes of Samuel Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland.

In September 1845 Henry Hawke Peard backed a proposal for a railway between Cork and Fermoy at a meeting in Fermoy courthouse which was attended by many of the great and the good of the district. The proposed Cork and Fermoy Direct Railway Company was to have a share capital of £250,000 in 12,500 shares of £20 each. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 3]

On 16th March 1846 Henry Peard attended a meeting at Fermoy Courthouse, under the chairman of the Earl of Mountcashell, to appoint a relief committee for the Fermoy Poor Law Union. The potato blight which started in 1845 to rot the crops was now causing much distress in the area.

Henry Peard proposed that an estimate of the funds needed until 10th August be made and that the landlords would pay a rational proportion according to the value of their estates. Michael Mackey of Ballyroberts seconded the motion but the Earl of Mountcashel would not put it to a vote. Father Fitzpatrick then proposed a motion of a levy of one shilling in the pound according to the Poor Law Valuation (Griffith’s Valuation) of each rate payer and the money be deducted from the rent.

Both motions caused division, uproar and laughter and the Earl of Mountcashell stood down as chair with Hon. Gen Annesley of Annesgrove taking it. Subsequently both motions were denied a vote. Instead the meeting divided the area into 11 relief districts and left the issue of funding undecided. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 29]

At relief committee was established in Castlelyons at the end of March 1846 but no names of those attending were published. On 1st April 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the weekly meeting of the Fermoy Board of Guardian. There were 739 people in the workhouse and the Board had £705 5s 7d in the bank. The Board unanimously resolved to assist everyone within the Poor Law Union. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

On 28th August 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the presentment session for the Barony of Barrymore at Watergrasshill. The meeting resolved to employ labourers on the proposed Cork to Waterford railway which would pass through two parts of the Barony. They would further employ people on road maintenance and improvement after a new Government Act was passed to allow for such employment. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 52]

On 26th December 1846 R.G. Campion of Bushy Park attended the Kinnatalloon presentment session at Aghern schoolhouse as agent for Henry Hawke Peard. Mr. Campion reported that the tenants at Coole had their land at a fair rent from Henry Peard and there were no small tenants. Eugene Byrne contradicted this claim by saying that when Henry Peard was at home up to 40 people were employed but when he was away there was much unemployment and that the rent was too dear.

Mr. Campion said the rent was cheap while Byrne replied that the tenants were leaving fast. Campion responded with denial and the meeting fell into confusion and disorder. After order was restored Mr. Campion got £180 to drain 35 acres at Coole. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 69]

On 27th March 1851 Henry’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth married Francis Drew Campion, second son of Robert (or Richard) Gifford Campion of Bushy Park, Co. Cork, at Castlelyons. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

In 1850 Henry Hawke Peard rented Coole Upper and Coole Lower from James H. Smith Barry. Henry farmed 157 acres directly in Coole Lower of a total of 606 acres and rented out the remained. At Coole Upper, where Coole Abbey was situated (total buildings worth £36) Henry farmed directly 449 acres of a total of 545 acres. [Griffith’s Valuation, Coole, parish Coole, barony of Barrymore]

[119] Richard McCulloch Peard (b. 1829; d. 22 March 1880)

He lived at Coole Abbey. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 135] He married Ann Corban in 1858 and had a son Henry William [121] [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 78] There was also another unnamed child. Richard died in 1880 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

It is unclear if this was the Richard Peard who was in 1850 landlord of the townland of Kilmagner (637 acres of 765 acres – remained held by Michael Cagney in perpetuity).  [Griffith’s Valuation, Kilmagner, parish Castlelyons, barony of Condons and Clangibbon]

[121] Henry William Peard (b. 1860 – d. 1936)

He lived in Buenos Aires and married Flora Agusta Sewell in 1893 and she died in 1960 aged 86. Henry was a physician and surgeon. Before 1901 he sold Coole Abbey to Orr McCausland. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), pp. 78, 126]

[120] Francis Peard (d. 31 January 1864)

This Francis Peard died in 1864 at 84 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[116] John Peard (b. 1775, d. 1847)

John Peard lived at Towermore. He married Bridget Woodley in 1810 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and had two sons; Henry [122] and John [123] and one daughter Elizabeth [124].

In 1863 John’s widow, Bridget Peard otherwise Woodley late of Rathcormac died. Letters of administration of her estate (valued under £100) were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, widow and the administratrix of the son of the deceased [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 897]

towermore-house

Towermore house as seen from gate lodge

This John Peard of Towermore was possibly the same John Peard of Castlelyons who in 1847 was a member of the Fermoy Board of Guardians. In that year John complained to the rector about the cost of graves at 18d each at Beechfield. Plans were then in place for a new cemetery beside the workhouse. John Peard proposed an extra story to the fever hospital then under construction to accommodate 30 more patients and this was accepted. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 101] John Peard died in 1847 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

In 1850 Maria Oliver was the immediate landlord of the two townlands of Towermore Upper (Frederick C. Hayes was chief tenant) and Towermore Lower (John Fouhy was chief tenant). [Griffith’s Valuation, Towermore, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

In 1911 associates of John Peard lived at Knocknahorgan in Rathcooney, Co. Cork. They were John Richard Peard (28, bank official) and his brother Francis Woodley Peard (24, bank official) and their two sisters, Ethel Woodley Peard (34 years) and Maud Josephine Peard (29 years) – all unmarried. [http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001913770/]

[122] Henry Harrison Peard (b. 1810; d. 1918)

He lived at Towermore and died in 1918. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[123] John Peard (d. 1876)

It is unclear if this John Peard was the John Peard of Coole mentioned in 1850 as a member of the Board of Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 105], or is there confusion with John Peard [116] above.

In 1850 John Peard was the immediate landlord of Ballyrobert (169 acres), parish of Castlelyons with Michael Mackey as sole tenant. [Griffith’s Valuation, Ballyrobert, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

John Peard left a will under £3,000 at his death on 11th January 1876. On 21st March 1876 letters of administration per estate of John Peard, late of Brideville, Rathcormac, esq., deceased, was granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard also of Brideville, the widow of the said deceased. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 898]

[124] Elizabeth Peard (d. 1867)

Elizabeth Peard died on 23rd June 1867, late of Rathcormac, spinster leaving an estate valued at under £300. On 1st May 1867 letters of administration of per estate were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, Rathcormac, widow and the administratrix  of John Peard, brother of the deceased [Upper Blackwater, vol 14, p. 897]

[111] Christopher Peard (d. 1775)

Christopher was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Ann Cooke of Tallow and lived at Glantore where his house is marked on the Taylor and Skinner map and where he was a J.P. Christopher died intestate in 1775. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He had two sons and one daughter; William [125], Richard [126] and Mary [127].

Anne Peard filed two draft briefs in 1791 concerning her right to a legacy on various lands at Barranstown, Tallow and Curryglass. [Cork Archive Institute, U290; see J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81 for info on this petition]

[125] William Peard

He lived at Peardmount and is listed in the 1804 tithe books. Mary Boles of Killbree married William Peard of Peardmount. She was the daughter of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles of Ballinacurra and the latter was born in 1646 [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland 1899, p. 44 Bowles of Aghern]

He was possibly the William Peard, who transmitted a letter from Jane ____ to Mrs Henrietta Smyth in November 1827 from Dublin to Ballinatray. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 1, folder (7), 1827-8, Bill Fitzgerald to Mrs Henrietta Smyth, 21 November 1827]

On 7th August 1809 Walter Croker Poole of Ballyanchor, Co. Waterford made his will and it was witnessed by William Peard and Richard Peard. A cordicil made on 4th January 1810 was witnessed by Ann Peard and William Peard. It is unclear if the William Peard of the Poole will was the William Peard of Peardmount. [Eilish Ellis & P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds Dublin, Abstract of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 502]

In 1814 William Peard was still living at Peardmount, Co. Cork with Tallow, Co. Waterford as the postal town. [Ambrose Leet, Directory of market towns, villages and gentleman’s seats (Dublin, 1814), p. 318] In 1815 Peardmount was mentioned as a seat of the Peard family in the Barony of Kinnatalloon along with Carrigeen and Coole. [Horace Towsend, Statistical survey of County Cork (1815), p. 73]

[126] Richard Peard

It is unclear if this is the Richard Peard of Peardmount mention about 1799 as one of the many commissioners for building a road between Cork city and the bounds of County Tipperary north of Kilworth. [Anon, Statutes passed in the Parlaiments held in Ireland 1799-1800 (Dublin, 1801), p. 46]

[127] Mary Peard

[113] John Peard (d. June 1784)

John Peard married Margaret Mitchell in July 1776 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and lived at Peardmount. Margaret was the daughter and only child of Henry Mitchell and Mary Shears of Mitchellsfort. She remarried in September 1784 to Odell Spread. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29; J.C.H.A.S. vol 52 (1947), p. 180; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] By deed made on 10 July 1776, previous to her marriage with John Peard, Margaret became entitled to the charge of £1,500 on Barranstown and other lands of her father. By the will of his father, Richard Peard, John vested a charge of £80 on Glenatore and Shanakill as a jointure for Margaret.

John was obliged, by his father’s will, to pay his brother, Christopher £200 but though he possessed property valued at £300, John was in a poor financial state and despite repeated promises, never paid the amount. John died intestate in 1784 leaving his widow Margaret and very little else as P.H. Peard sold his effects for £130. Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[114] Peard Harrison Peard (d. 1798)

In 23 October 1784, he married Arabella Drew, daughter of Francis Drew of Mocollop by his wife, Arabella Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 159] In the same year, his brother, John died and Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He was the Captain Commandant of the Curryglass Volunteers infantry unit in April 1779. His lieutenant was Stephen Rollston with James Graham as secretary. [Robert Day, ‘Reprint of the Munster Volunteer Registry, 1782’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. III (1894), p. 326] Vicar’s index of wills gives his death for 1799 and an esq. from Carrigeen. [Vicar’s index, p. 370] He had two sons; Henry [128] and Richard Frederick [129] and two daughters along with two other unnamed children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[128] Henry Peard (b. 1791; d. 1832)

He lived at Carrigeen Hall and married Charity Jane Greene (she died 26 March 1841 at 41 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann), and had a son; Henry [130] along with three other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

carrigeen-hall

Entrance to Carrigeen Hall – old house no longer standing

In a court case at Carlow, Henry Peard was “disguised beyond redemption by his exposure of his attempts to deprive his poor dependent younger brother of the ___ of renewal of a small farm”. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

Henry Peard died in September of 1832 and letters of administration were written on 28 March 1833 at under £300. His wife as executrix of his will should have received the letter but she didn’t. Instead his son Henry got the letter of administration. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[130] Henry Peard (d. pre 1854)

Henry Peard was living at George Street in Cork city in 1833/34. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He lived at Carrigeen and farm 147 acres there in 1850

In December 1845 Henry Peard gave notice that his farm at Carrigeen Hall was for lease from 1st May 1846. The house, offices and land of 180 acres had a coach house, stables, and walled gardens and was well stocked. The gate keeper at the lower lodge was available to allow people see the property. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 17]

In February 1847 Henry Peard of Carrigeen was named as one of the local landed gentry who did not contribute money to the Kinnatalloon relief fund. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 78]

Henry Peard is said to have married in 1849 to Jane Roch of Woodbine Hill, Waterford, and daughter of George Butler Roch. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 392] Yet as daughter was said to marry in 1854 there may have been an earlier marriage or confusion between the different Henry Peards. His second daughter, Arabella, married at Kinsalebeg in 1854, Rev Mellanus Spread Campion, the second son of Rev Thomas Spread Campion of Knockmourne. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

In 1850 Henry Peard was landlord in fee of Carrigeen East (320 acres) and of 30 acres at Carrigeen Hill where he rented out the remaining 320 acres. Henry Peard was also landlord of Castleview where Richard Gumbleton was the chief tenant. Henry Peard was also landlord of Glantore Lower (139 acres) and Glantore Upper (173 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Carrigeen, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Henry Peard was landlord of Shanakill Lower (244 acres) and Shanakill Upper (244 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

For more on Shankill townland see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/shanakill-townland-in-the-barony-of-kinnatalloon-county-cork-2/

[129] Richard Frederick Peard

Richard Frederick Peard lived at Belvedere House and died in the 1840s. He planted 31,640 trees between 1815 and 1817. In various land deeds, Richard is mentioned as an attorney and solicitor, while one of the deeds was registered by a Francis Peard. [See appendix I, no. (I), (III) and (IV) for land deeds involving Richard Peard in 1828, 1833 and 1842] Richard Peard handled the Heathcote land sale of 1826 with his first cousin, Charles Maunsell, solicitor of Dublin. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth papers, PC 904, box 2, folder (6), 1826, letters to Richard Smyth]

belverdere-house-from-mogeely-bridge

Belverdere house from Mogeely Bridge

In 1831, he went to court in Carlow because his brother Henry Peard would not renew a lease on a small farm and Richard Peard was dependent on Henry for his livelihood. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

He married Maria Maunsell, the daughter of Charles Maunsell of Roseville, Tallow by Grace, daughter of John Green. Charles was great, great, great, grandson of Thomas Maunsell of Berkshire and later of Derryville, Co. Cork, who’s first son was Colonel Thomas Maunsell of Mocollop, who defended it against Cromwell’s forces in 1649. [Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 800-801, 803] The couple were married before 1822 and had two children, a son; John Maunsell [130] and a daughter; Grace. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), p. 78]

In 1850 Mrs. Maria Peard held Belvidere (171 acres) from Henry Peard of Carrigeen. She farmed 74 acres where the buildings were worth £15 12s and rented out the remainder. Maria Peard also had 5 acres at Castleview which was rented by Richard Gumbleton. At Glantore Lower Maria Peard rented the townland from Henry Peard and in turn rented the land out to other tenants. At Glantore Upper Maria Peard rented 19 acres from Richard Gumbleton and rented the remaining land (154 acres) from Henry Peard. This land she in turn rented out to others. [Griffith’s Valuation, Belvidere, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Maria Peard was the immediate landlord of Blackpool townland (38 acres) where the representatives of Lord Lisle appear to be the senior landlord. Maris Peard was also landlord of about 15 houses in Rosybower and a garden which she rented from the representatives of Lord Lisle. [Griffith’s Valuation, Blackpool, Rosybower, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

See appendix one below for some lands deeds involving Richard Frederick Peard.

[130] John Maunsell Peard

He lived at Belvedere House. He occupied Vinepark House near Curriglass in 1855. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 356] On 27 November 1855 his wife had a son at Vinepark. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29 – Faulkner’s Journal] But the child didn’t live to adulthood as John Peard died without issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[132] William Peard

He was the son of Richard Peard [105] and did not marry. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[133] Henry Peard (d. 19 July 1797)

He was the son of William Peard of Castlelyons and is mentioned as one of the three lives in a lease deed of 1750 between James, earl of Barrymore and John Nason of Newtown for property about Castlelyons. Henry Peard was still alive in 1777, but in poor health by 1791 and died 19 July 1797. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 183-4]

[134] Richard Peard (d. pre 1729)

He was the son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons. In the will of his uncle, Henry Peard [106] of Coole, dated 1729, it is mentioned that Richard was deceased. He may be that Richard Peard who made land deeds with a Mr. Croker between 1709 and 1729. [Registry of deeds = 0522803 2 320 481]

Richard Peard married Diana Mitchell in 1709. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101] There is a will dated 1716 for a Richard Peard of Castlelyons and this could be the same person. [Guide to Genealogical office, p. 241; Vicar’s index, p. 370]

[135] Thomas Peard

He was the second son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons and was mentioned in the will of his uncle, Henry Peard of Coole in 1729.

Twenty-first century Peard members

Darrell W. Peard

He restored the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann in September-December 2002 at a cost of €9,000. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 5]

Delphine Adele Peard

She died on 5 July 1909 at 75 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann.

[Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

029

Peard mausoleum

Eric W.E. Peard

Eric Peard and his brother-in-law Eric Balt entered the Peard mausoleum in 1985 following damaged by a falling tree. There they saw about 15 to 20 broken coffins with of the name plates having rusted away. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Francis Peard

He lived in South Africa where his daughter Gitta Brill passed on the family coat-of-arms to Noel Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Frank W. Peard

He wrote a short history on the Peard family in Ireland entitled Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003).

Noel P. Peard

Noel inherited a plaque with the Peard coat-of-arms from Gitta Brill, daughter of Francis Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

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Apart from the Peard family of north-east Cork outlined above, there were other people by the name of Peard living in north Cork in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. These people maybe cousins of the Peard family above but no clear line of connection has been made yet. Information on these, as yet, unconnected Peard people is recorded below.

Peard of Allworth

John Peard of Allworth

John Peard was married to Ellen and they had a son, William Peard who was baptised 4 December 1836. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Joseph Peard of Allworth

On 16th February 1839 Joseph Peard and his wife Ellen had a son, Matthew Peard baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Thomas Peard of Allworth

Denis son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, baptised 28 July 1812 and died on 12th November 1812. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 319]

On 24th April 1813 —– Peard daughter of Thomas Peard of Allworth, died and on 4th October 1813 Henry Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 29th November 1818 Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised while on 15th April 1821 their son Matthew Peard was baptised. On 21st January 1827 Richard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 4th April 1828 —- Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 319, 298, 299, 300, 303, 319, 322]

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Peard family of Glountane

[PG110] Henry Peard of Glountane

On 11th October 1838 Thomas Peard [PG111], son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane was baptised. On 12th April 1842 Thomas Peard, son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 306, 325]

On 17th February 1840 Robert Peard [PG112], son of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 307]

On 1st April 1842 Frances Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 26th July 1846 Elizabeth Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 5th April 1846 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

On 11th March 1848 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to George Dormer in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

John Peard of Glountane

On 7th August 1845 John Peard lived at Glountane and married Mary Phillpott of Newmarket by licence. John Peard was 25 years old and a farmer. He was son of Thomas Peard who was also a farmer. Mary was 28 in 1845 and daughter of Robert Philpot of Glantane (farmer). The witnesses were Thomas Peard and Robert Philpot with M. Becker as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, pp. 20, 340]

Thomas Peard of Glantane

On 4th November 1832 Robert Peard, son of Thomas and Frances of Glountane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304]

John Peard, the son of Thomas Peard, got married on 7 August 1845. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20 and see above under John of Glantane]

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Peard family of Knockanesweeny

[PK108] Thomas Peard of Knockanesweeny

He married Katherine Callaghan and they had a daughter Katherine baptised on 28 November 1761. Thomas Peard died on 27 August 1786. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1728; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 316]

[PK110] Henry Peard of Knockanesweeny

He and his wife Catherine had a daughter Jane baptised on 27 December 1789. On 4th December 1791 they had a son Thomas Peard [AK111] baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1736]

Henry Peard died on 6 September 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 317]

Richard Peard of Knockanesweeny

On 23rd October 1810 Richard Peard and his wife Mary had a daughter baptised. On 27th December 1812 their son, Denis Peard was baptised and in December 1815 another son called Thomas Peard was baptised. On 12th April 1818 a third son, Richard Peard was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 298, 299]

Matthew Peard

He lived at Knockanesweeny and died 13 January 1839 at 68 years. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 324]

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Peard family of Knocknemony

[AKP110] Henry Peard of Knocknemony

He and his wife Katherine had a daughter Elizabeth baptised on 22 June 1794. They had a son John Peard [AKP111] baptised on 2 April 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1737, 1738]

[AKP111] John Peard of Knocknamoney

His wife Ellen had a daughter Elizabeth Peard who was baptised on 6 March 1835. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 305]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamony

On 25th October 1778 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter, Jane, baptised and on 8th October 1779 they had a son Thomas Peard baptised on 8 October 1779. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1732, 1733]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamoney

Thomas was a shoemaker in Knocknamonee. His daughter, Elizabeth (spinster) was a servant and married in Kilshannig parish on 14 February 1854 to Isaac Jones (servant) of Rockforest and son of Thomas Jones (steward). Thomas Peard and Thomas Peard junior were the two witnesses and H. Swanson was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 25]

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Peard family of Lombardstown

Catherine Peard of Lombardstown

She lived at Lombardstown and died a widow on 21 October 1836 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 323]

[PL110] John Peard of Lombardstown

On 2nd November 1825 John Peard and his wife Ellen had a daughter, Catherine Peard baptised. On 6th April 1828 they had a son, Henry Peard [PL111] baptised. On 7th September 1830 they had a daughter, Ellen baptised and on 29th July 1832 another daughter, Jane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 302, 303, 304]

John Peard was a yeoman and his son Denis Peard [PL112] got married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

[PL112] Denis Peard of Lombardstown

Denis Peard was the son of John Peard of Lombardstown. He was a wood-ranger and married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish to Bridget Boyle (spinster) of Duclayne and daughter of James Boyle (yeoman). The witnesses were James Berry and Richard Berry with H. Swanson as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

Denis Peard and his wife Bridget had a son called Henry Peard baptised 28 September 1851. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 310]

Thomas Peard of Lombardstown

In February 1820 Thomas Peard and his wife, Elizabeth had a son, Henry Peard baptised. On 11th January 1822 they had a daughter, Catherine baptised in Kilshannig church. On 14th May 1826 Thomas and Elizabeth Peard had a son, Denis Peard baptised and on 23rd November 1828 another son, Thomas Peard was baptised. On 23rd October 1831 their daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 300, 302, 303, 304]

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Peard family of Scarragh

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a son John baptised on 20 November 1763 (he died on 18th December 1763) and a daughter Mary was baptised on 25th August 1773. They had a daughter Mary baptised on 25 August 1773. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1728, 1731; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 314]

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

On 19th August 1824 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a daughter, Celia baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 301]

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Unassigned Peards

In additional to the above a number of people with the Peard surname have appeared for which it is as yet not possible to connect them with any of the Peard families above.

Alice Peard

She married Hercules Jones in 1814. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anna Maria Peard

She married Joseph Busteed in 1820. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anne Peard

She married Thomas Williamson in 1811. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Annie Peard

Mrs Annie Peard lived at 4 College View Terrace, Western Road, Cork in 1881. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78] She was a widow in 1897 and got letters of administration to the estate of her sister, Sarah Land who died 19 December 1897. Both lived at Woodview, Glanmire. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2105]

Catherine Peard

She lived in Fermoy and married, in 1832, Rev. Robert Spread Nash. Rev. Nash was a grandson of Rev. William Nash and died in November 1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 922]

Diana Peard

Diana Peard married John Mowbay in 1717. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Elinor Jane Peard

She married 24 October 1854 her second cousin, Richard Gifford Campion son of Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park by his wife, Lucinda Catherine Drew. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard was a witness to a marriage in Kilshannig parish on 7 July 1796 and also a witness to another marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Thomas Peard. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 334, 335]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard married Thomas O’Grady of Aghamarta castle and had four sons and one daughter – Louise who in 1891 married George Foott of Carrigacunna castle, Co. Cork. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 345]

Frances Peard

She left a will under £1,500 after her death on 31 January 1864 at Fermoy, Co. Cork. She died a spinster and John Thomas Sherlock, solicitor, Fermoy proved the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1517]

Francis Peard

See under Richard Frederick Peard – also Ellen Peard, full age spinster from Curryglass, daughter of Francis Peard, married 9 December 1847, James Wynne, full age bachelor of Curryglass and land steward (son of Richard Wynne, steward) in Mogeely Church by Rev. M.S. Campion. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2669]

Henry Peard (d. 1773)

From near Castlelyons [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

Henry Pearde

He married Hannah Dickenson in 1837. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] She died on 16 October 1868 at Dunkerreen, Bandon, Co. Cork. Letters of administration were granted to her husband and only next of kin. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1626]

Henry Peard of Kilshannig

His daughter Mary died 22 January 1847. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 326]

Henry Peard

He lived a Millview, Fermoy Co. Cork and was party to a number of deeds with the Nash family around 1843 to 1853 and with Catherine Peard, a possible daughter who was wife of Robert Spread Nash of Fermoy, Co. Cork. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2179]

Henry Peard

He was a witness to the will of Jonathan Tanner of Bandon, which was proved on 17 May 1776. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 703]

Henry Peard of Mountpleasant

His will is dated 1805 at Mountpleasant. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Jane Peard

She married William Berry in 1834. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard

She married James Crothers in 1807. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 11th October 1814 Jane Peard married John Farmer of Kilshannig parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, p. 335]

Jane Peard of Youghal

She lived at number 14 Knockaverry, Youghal in the 1901 census with Margaret O’Reilly. [Youghal family roots, p. 7]

John Peard

In 1698, John Peard along with Henry Ellin lately held Coole with its two ploughlands. He shared a fine of £2,000 with Ellin from Charles, earl of Burlington in consideration of their interest there on 4 August 1698 because Charles wished to sell the property to financiers. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore papers, MS 6146]

John Peard

John married Mary Seward in 1732. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

John Holmer Harrison Peard

He lived on Western Road, Cork in 1881 and had a veterinary practice at 28½ Princess Street. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78]

On 25th June 1922 Henry Holmer Peard, son of John Holmer Harrison Peard of Ashtown House, Castleknock, Co. Dublin, married Fanny McClintock (born 8th May 1902), third daughter of Frederick Foster McClintock of Termonfeckin, Co. Louth. Henry Holmer Peard died on 12th September 1950. [Burke’s Irish Family Record, 1976, p. 753]

John Peard of St. Finbarry

He left a will dated 1782 with an address in St. Finbarry. [‘Index testamentorum olim in Registro Corcagle’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 390]

Mary Peard

In 1774 Mary Peard married John Bennet. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Mary Peard

In 1787 Mary Peard married William Dobbyn. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

He married Catherine Ring in 1810. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

Witness the marriage of Elizabeth Peard of Brittas to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas at Kilshannig in April 1846. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

Nicholas Peard

He was a witness to the will of John Williams of Cork which was proved on 22 January 1662. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1452]

Rebecca Peard

Rebecca married Thomas Connaway in 1704. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Richard Peard of Kilshannig

On 25th February 1810 Richard Peard married Mary Lynch. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 335]

Richard Peard of Mallow

His son Richard Peard died 30th July 1820 and on 19th June 1828 his son Matthew Peard died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 321, 322]

Richard Peard (living c.1846)

In March 1846 Richard Peard reported on the state of the poor and the condition of the potato crop in the area of Ballyclough, Kilmagner and Knockdromaclough to the Fermoy Relief Committee. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

Richard William Peard

He lived at Butlerstown, barony of Barrymore, Co. Cork and Elizabeth Phair was his wife. He was party to a Phair family deed of 13/8/1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2170]

Robert Peard of Roscommon

His will is dated 1794 at the Cottage, Roscommon and a gent. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Rosanna Peard

In 1772 Rosanna Peard married George Ward. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Sarah Peard

In 1764 Sarah Peard married George Pearse. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Thomas Peard of Brittas

In April 1846 Thomas Peard of Brittas, farmer, saw his daughter Elizabeth marry at Kilshannig to Laurence O’Connor, a smither of Brittas. Elizabeth was twenty five years old at the time. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

In 1848 Thomas Peard was a farmer and his daughter Elizabeth O’Connor (a widow) married in Kilshannig parish on 11 March 1848 to George Dormer (constable), the son of Richard Dormer (weaver). Henry Peard and John Vanston were the witnesses and F. Brady was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

Thomas Peard of Dromore

William Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Dromore was baptised on 6 March 1831.

Later in 1835 Thomas Peard was witness to Murphy/Buckley land deed of 16/3/1835 in the barony of Duhallow. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304; Ibid, vol. 15, p. 2202]

Thomas Peard of Keal

On 21st January 1765 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter Elizabeth baptised. They had a son Henry Peard baptised on 28 June 1767. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1729, 1730]

Thomas Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 24th August 1783 Thomas Peard and his wife June had a son Richard Peard baptised. He was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Elizabeth Peard and also on 14 November 1804. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1734; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 335]

On 20th February 1810 Thomas Peard married Frances Lynch of Kilshannig parish by licence. On 23rd November 1810 Thomas Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 296, 335]

On 1st September 1815 Thomas Peard of Kilshannig married Elizabeth Lynch of same parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

On 7th January 1823 Thomas Peard was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

In April 1850 Thomas Peard was a witness to a marriage at Mourne Abbey church. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2495]

Robert Henry Peard was baptised on 2 September 1855 to Thomas and Elizabeth Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 311]

Thomas Peard of Newberry

On 22nd September 1816 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a son, John Peard, baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 299]

William Peard

He was brother-in-law of John Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork who died 16th March 1755 and had his will proved on 2nd April 1755 and executor to the will. Among the witnesses were Thomas Browne, John Barry and Henry Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 729]

William Harrison Peard (b. 9 May 1822)

He was born at St. Helier in Jersey and married in 1875 Maude Anna King Palmer. She was born about 1851 and died in 1891. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003)]

The will of Maude Palmer Peard was proved on 27th October 1892 with an address of Riverstown, Co. Cork. The registrar of the will stated that she died 19 September 1891 at the same place. Letters of administration for her will was granted at Cork to William Harrison Peard of same place, gent, and described as farmer and the husband. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1797]

William Love Peard

Major William L. Peard of Rathbarry sent 29 letters, via his solicitor, G.W. Shannon, to Henry Dennehy, agent of Villiers Stuart, about the lease of a field near Youghal in 1844-48. A legal case resulted which was entitled Peard v Lord Stuart. [P.R.O.N.I. Villiers Stuart papers, T. 3131/G/16/1-29]

Major William Love Peard was chief tenant of Rathbarry (47 acres) which he rented from Rev. R. Gumbleton. [Griffith’s Valuation, Rathbarry, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

W. Peard

In 1881 W. Peard lived at Richmond Lodge, Riverstown. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

W. Peard

He wrote a book entitled “A Year of Liberty-Salmon Angling in Ireland, 1867”. [Hamilton Osbourne King, House sale at Ileclash House, Fermoy, Co. Cork, 26 May 1998, lot 389]

William Peard

In 1881 William Peard lived at Skahabeg on the Old Douglas Road. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

William Peard

His will was proved in Cork by John Harris, solicitor, Sullivan’s Quay as one of his executors. William died 14 August 1885 at Duhallow, gent. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1568]

William Pearde

Ellen Pearde … effects £2,340 … July 7 … letters of admin … will annexed … per est … late of Kilbrogan Hill, Bandon and wife of William Pearde, died 9 October 1889 at same place and left unadmin by Frances Anne Beamish, sole executor, were granted at Cork to Ellen W. Beamish of Neelin House, Bandon, spinster, attorney of one of the resident legatees [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1844]

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Appendix I

Some land deeds involving members of the Peard family

(I)        CROKER/HANNA (869/432/578432); barony of east Muskerry; 7/3/1828; indented deed – Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork, Francis Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, merchant;

Walter Croker made over to Francis Hanna the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; Witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard and John O’Brien, writing clerk; sworn 19/5/1828; registered by Francis Peard. [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 1752]

(II)       PEARD/WESTROPP (866/56/576556) Barony west Muskerry 27/5/1830 – indented deed – Richard Peard. Coole, Co. Cork (eldest son & exec, of last will and testament of Henry Peard), Edward Morgan, Birdstown, co. Cork, Maria Morgan (nee Spread) his wife, Eliza Albina Spread, Ballincollig Co. Cork (spinster – exec of last will & testament of Rev Thomas Westropp, Richard Spread, Ballincollig, Co. Cork, Mountiford Westropp, Westmount, Co. Cork.

In consideration of the marriage of Wm Spread & Elizabeth Peard; Richard Peard, Ed Morgan, Maria his wife & Eliza A. Spread made over to Mountiford Westropp, in trust for Richard Spread, the lands at Ballycannon & Kilbeg – Barony Barretts – Upper and Lower Coolnageragh – Barony Muskerry lands of Behina, Knockaroghery, Lansvaghy, and Carrigatow & £142/17 part of a trust of £1,000. Witnesses; John Lysaght, Richard Pope Hackett (gent); sworn 24/11/1830; reg. Richard Foot [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2160]

(III)     HANNA/CROKER (1833/15/1911); barony of east Muskerry – 28/5/1833 – indented deed of reassignment by William Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, (?) and Elizabeth O’Hea (widow), Co. Waterford (both administrators and executors of the will of Francis Hanna, deceased merchant) to Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork

William Hanna and Elizabeth O’Hea reassigned and made over to Walter Croker the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard (attorney) and John O’Brien (writing clerk); sworn; 8/10/1833 and registered by Francis Peard

(IV)     BOWLES/WOODLEY (1842/21/282); barony of East Muskerry – 7/10/1842 – indenture of removal; Catherine Jones Bowles, Mount Prospect, Co. Cork, widow and administrator of George Bowles; Ellen Harman Woodley, Tallow, Co. Waterford, widow and devises of Joseph Woodley and Francis George Woodley, Leads, Co. Cork. Catherine Bowles and Ellen Woodley demised and let unto Francis Woodley, in his actual possession, the lands of Leads East (401 acres), Leads West (354 acres) and Ballyvougane (877 acres) in the barony of Muskerry for life at yearly rent of £110 0s 5d together with 11d per (hereceives) fees, also 1 fat hog at Christmas. Witnessed by William Woodley and Richard Frederick Peard, solicitor; sworn 12/10/1842 and registered by John Cranitch

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Standard
Cork history

Modeligo House, County Cork and its servants

Modeligo House, County Cork and its servants

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the Cork Constitution newspaper of 21st March 1921, Miss Braddell of Modeligo House placed an advert. The advert said “Wanted for country place, cook-general: small family: please send references and state age and wages [to] Miss Braddell, Modeligo, Fermoy.” It is not known if Miss Braddell got her cook. This article attempts to gather the names and particulars of servants who did work at Modeligo House.

Modeligo House

Modeligo House stands in the townland of Moydilliga in the Barony of Condons and Clangibbon in north-eat County Cork. The original structure was built in the 1780s with many additions over the years including a major addition in the 1877.[1] The estate was part of the Condon territory in medieval times and was acquired by Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, in the seventeenth century.

John Armstead acquired Modeligo from Sir William Heathcote of Hampshire, England sometime after the latter purchased it from the third Earl of Burlington in 1737. John was partner in the Cork bank of Harper and Armstead and the bank acted as Irish land agents for Heathcote.[2] Mary, one of the three daughters of John Armstead, married Matthew Braddell of Mallow, son of John Braddell of Ballyshane, Clonmore in County Carlow and brought Modeligo into the Braddell family. The Braddell family originally settled in County Wexford in the seventeenth century.

1901 census

The earliest records on servants working at Modeligo House comes from the 1901 census. In the 1901 census Modeligo House was described as having ten windows in the front of the house and thirty-five rooms within. Around the house were sixteen outbuildings.[3] The composition of these outbuildings in 1901 is unknown as the surviving B2 form has not been published.

Inside the house on census night, 9th April 1901, were six people, three members of the Braddell family and three servants. The three Braddell members were Henry Braddell (head of the house, aged 65, born Co. Cork, married), his wife Minnie Braddell (aged 55, born in Italy, married) and their daughter, Emily Braddell (aged 30, born Co. Cork, single). All three were members of the Church of Ireland and could read & write.[4]

The three servants in Modeligo House on census night in 1901 were Michael Fuail (aged 20, born Co. Cork, agricultural labourer/servant), Bridget Caplep (aged 25, domestic cook) and Jane Shaw (aged 24, domestic servant/parlour maid). All three servants were Roman Catholic, single and could read & write.[5] The Surname of Michael Fuail is difficult to establish. The name “Fuail” appears to be a misspelling of something else. The surname of Bridget Caplep is odd and the correct spelling is more likely to be Caples as there were a number of people of that name in the townland of Moydilliga in 1901 and members of the family still live locally in 2016. There were seventy-one people in County Cork in 1901 with the Shaw surname and many of them were Roman Catholic but it is difficult to determine which family Jane was a member of. Because two of the servants are women and the third has a misspelt surname it is not possible to find these people in the 1911 census.

Around the outside of Modeligo House a number of additional servants can be identified such as Owen Geary (aged 38, gardener/domestic servant, born Co. Waterford).[6]

In the wider area of Moydilliga townland in 1901 there were 113 people of whom the following were in the servant class John Hartigan (farm servant), Michael Stapleton (agricultural labourer), Margaret Dowling (unemployed cook), Edward Gayer (farm servant), William Norris (farm servant), James Stapleton (agricultural labourer), William Caples (farm servant), William Hartigan (farm servant), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), John Hennessy (farm servant), Michael Revins (agricultural labourer), Michael Gayer (agricultural labourer), Michael Caples (agricultural labourer), Patrick Gayer (agricultural labourer), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer) and Thomas Maher (agricultural labourer).[7] All these people may not have worked on the Modeligo estate but some could have.

As well as finding work locally servants also travelled far distances as they followed the work. Sometimes these journeys were to get new jobs on ne estates but also could be on related properties. In this regard relations of these Modeligo servants were in the employment of Henry Armstead Braddell of Newhill, Two Mile Borris, Co. Tipperary, a son of Henry Braddell of Modeligo. These servants were Ellen Prendergast (aged 25, born co. Cork, house maid/domestic servant) and Edmond Guair (aged 27, born Co. Cork, coachman/domestic servant).[8]

Later records say that Michael Gayer (Gear) died 26th August 1901 as a labourer.[9]

Between 1901 and 1911 census

In the years between the publish census records of 1901 and 1911 other sources provide the names of labourers and servants in Moydilliga townland. Labourers often moved from place to place, staying for a few years or maybe just for a season before moving on to find work elsewhere. On 9th August 1905 Richard Mellerick of Modeligo died as a bachelor and labourer. On 26th June 1907 Patrick Hogan, labourer, died in Moydilliga townland.[10]

1911 census

The 1911 census found three members of the Braddell family living in Modeligo House on census night. They were Henry Braddell (aged 70, a magistrate for Co. Cork), Laura Noeme Braddell (aged 60, wife, born Co. Cork) and Emily Braddell (daughter, aged 30 and single). All were members of the Church of Ireland. Henry and Laura Braddell were married forty-four years and had three children who were all living in 1911.

The 1911 information contains some questionable differences from the 1901 information. Henry Braddell only aged five years in ten years while Emily was thirty in 1901 and 1911. When Henry Braddell died two years later, on 9th March 1913, his aged was given as eighty-seven (that’s aging 17 years in 2 years!).[11] Laura Braddell is called Minnie in 1901 and born in Italy but she was born in Co. Cork for the later return.[12] When Laura Braddell died in July 1915 her age was given as eighty-two, an advance of twenty-two years in four years![13]

Modeligo House in 1911

The structure of Modeligo House is different in 1911 compared to 1901. In 1911 there were eight windows in front of the house compared to ten in 1901. The number of rooms had drastically reduced since 1901 from 35 rooms to 12 rooms. The number of outhouses in 1901 was sixteen and in 1911 had increased to eighteen. It seems that some of the dwelling house was converted into outhouses between the census returns.[14] The description list of the outhouses in 1911 give us one stable, one coach house, one harness house, two cow houses, one calf house, one dairy, two piggery houses, one fowl house, one barn, one potato house, one workshop and two sheds along with three store houses.[15] Unfortunately we don’t have the descriptive listing for 1901 to compare the different houses. The big fall in the number of rooms is a subject for future investigation.

photo-2

Modeligo House

1911 servants

Meanwhile there were four servants in Modeligo House on census night 1911. These were Ellen Corcoran (aged 50, born Co. Cork, house maid/domestic servant), James Barry (aged 26, born Co. Waterford, laundress/domestic servant), Norah Hugh (aged 25, born Co. Cork, cook/domestic servant), and Ellen Coughlan (aged 20, born Co. Cork, kitchen maid/domestic servant).[16] Ellen Corcoran was the daughter of Daniel Corcoran of Ballinscourlogue in the parish of Ballynoe. Her father, Daniel Corcoran was a widower and farmer. In Griffiths Valuation of about 1850 Daniel Corcoran rented a house, offices and garden from John Nason.[17] Ellen Coughlan was born on the Modeligo estate. In the 1901 census she was recorded as the daughter of William and Hannah Coughlan.[18] It was not possible to find 1901 records for James Barry and Norah Hugh. It is possible that Norah Hugh was related to the McHugh family of Castlelyons.

The small numbers of house servants at Modeligo are in keeping with attending a small landlord family. By 1901 the Braddell family had sold much of their estate to their tenants as most of the houses were owned by the occupiers. When the Braddell family sold Modeligo in 1950 the estate was about 400 acres and possibly was slightly bigger in about 1900. We cannot say if the number of servants was greater around 1850 when the estate was about fifteen hundred acres.[19]

Servants in Moydilliga townland

The 1911 census recorded 105 people in Moydilliga townland of whom the following were listed among the servants; Patrick Gair (coachman), John Coughlan (agricultural labourer), Michael Caples (farm keeper), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), Edmond Gair (agricultural labourer), John Hynes (agricultural labourer), Batt Murphy (agricultural labourer), Richard Gair (agricultural labourer), Ellen Cahill (general domestic servant), John Hartigan (agricultural labourer), William Coughlan (agricultural labourer), John Hynes (agricultural labourer), and John McGrath (farm servant).[20] Some of these people worked on the Modeligo estate like Patrick Gair the coachman.

After 1911

Later records tell us that on 31st January 1930 Edmond Gair died and was described as a labourer. His wife Bridget died on 20th February 1936.[21] In the 1911 census Edmond and Bridget couldn’t read but they could speak Irish and English whereas their children could read and write but only speak English.[22] Many labourers and servants had literacy difficulties especially if they came from poor backgrounds. In the 1850s Thomas Gear rented a house and no land in Moydilliga townland from Thomas Morrissey.[23] This would suggest that Thomas Gear was a labourer and many of his descendants had the same occupation.

On 27th September 1955 Michael Caples died as a retired labourer. He was then eighty-five years old and so desired some retirement.[24] In the years following 1955 mechanisation of farming made many labourers redundant. Domestically, rural electrification allowed electric dishwasher, clothes washers and electric cookers to enter people’s homes and make domestic servants a thing of the past, even in big houses like Modeligo.

Conclusion

In this study we can say that many of the servants at Modeligo House came from the surrounding estate. When people had to walk to work they didn’t travel far. The furthest servants came from a six mile radius as far as can be determined. If we had earlier census returns before 1901, or estate papers, a better study could be done, but it is likely that most of the servants would still come from the surrounding estate. As for the 1921 advert for a cook, we can’t say if Miss Braddell was successful in her endeavours.

 

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[1] http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=CO&regno=20903705 accessed on 9 September 2016

[2] David Dickson, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 594, note 9

[3] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572544/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[4] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572565/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572565/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572569/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[7] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1901 townland=moydilliga  accessed on 9 September 2016

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001167517/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[9] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 275

[10] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), pp. 276, 277

[11] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 281

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926423/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[13] Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 246

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926405/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926407/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[16] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926423/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[17] Griffith’s Valuation, Ballinscourlogue, Ballynoe parish, Kinnatalloon barony, Co. Cork

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572564/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[19] Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 246

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_year=1911 townland=moydilliga  accessed on 9 September 2016

[21] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), pp. 290, 293

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001926431/ accessed on 9 September 2016

[23] Griffith’s Valuation, Moydilliga, Knockmourne parish, Condons & Clangibbon barony, Co. Cork

[24] Conna parish death records (Conna Community Council, 2005), p. 301

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