Biography, Cork history

Rev. Henry Harrison of Castlelyons

Rev. Henry Harrison of Castlelyons

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

In Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (facsimile edition 2007) page 294 Rev. Henry Harrison is described as rector of Rathcormac parish in the diocese of Cloyne in the early decades of the eighteenth century. Church records show this not to be the case. Instead Rev. Henry Harrison held a number of parishes in the neighbourhood of Rathcormac and some livings in other dioceses. From 1671 to 1677 he held the vicarages of Skerke, Clarage and Dungarvan in the diocese of Ossory. In 1677 Rev. Henry Harrison was the rector and vicar of Nathalash; vicar of Kildorrery, vicar of Castlelyons, vicar of Clondulane, and the rector of Britway, all in the diocese of Cloyne. He held these livings until his death in 1747.[1] The Clondulane vicarage was joined to the vicarage of Castlelyons from 1661 to 1759.[2] The vicarage of Kildorrery was held with Nathalash from 1661 to 1863. [3] In 1727 William Spratt of Mitchelstown became curate at Castlelyons and in February 1748 succeeded Henry Harrison in the vicarage at Castlelyons. In 1685 Rev. Henry Harrison became vicar of Ahern and Ballynoe which he held until 1747.[4] In 1747 the rectory of Britway was joined to the vicarage of Ahern.[5]

Castlelyons church

Rev. Henry Harrison had two brothers, John Harrison of Castlelyons and Samuel Harrison of Carrigabrick.[6] In 1736 Mary, daughter of Samuel Harrison, was the prospectus bride of John Peard of Castlelyons. As part of the marriage settlement John Harrison gave the lands of Ballyhamshire to Samuel and Rev. Henry Harrison for life while retaining the rents and after his death, John Peard would receive the rent.[7] Rev. Harrison’s sister, Priscilla Harrison, married Henry Peard of Coole Abbey and left issue including Priscilla Peard.[8] In 1731 John Harrison was a trustee for Priscilla Peard in the lands of Coole, Brown’s Land, Grange and Francistown. The other trustee was Daniel Keeffe of Ballyglisane.[9] Another sister, Mary, married William Nason. In May 1715 Henry Harrison was a witness to the grant of land and a dwelling house at Bowling Green Marsh in Cork City for 993 years between Richard Harrison, carpenter of Cork City and John Harrison of Castlelyons.[10] In June 1716 Rev. Henry Harrison was a witness to the lease of land at Maharry between Francis Price of Castlelyons and John Harrison of Castlelyons.[11]

In May 1681 Rev. Henry Harrison was one of four witnesses to the will of Richard Vowell of Castlelyons.[12] In 1719 Rev. Henry Harrison was one of the witnesses to the marriage settlement made between Edward Norcott (son of John Norcott, Ballygarret, Co. Cork) and Mary Vowell (second daughter of Christopher Vowell of Ballyovane, Co. Cork). John Harrison of Castlelyons was a trustee of the marriage settlement.[13] In 1733 Mary Vowell married Hawnby Longfield, merchant of Cork City.[14] In 1724 the will of Christopher Vowell of Ballyoran in the parish of Castlelyons described himself as brother-in-law of Henry Peard of Coole and John Harrison of Castlelyons.[15]

In 1736 Rev. Henry Harrison was the lessor of various unspecified lands around Lismore, Co. Waterford.[16] In September 1737 Standish and David Barry of Leamlara, Co. Cork, gave unspecified lands to Rev. Henry Harrison.[17] In December 1737 Thomas Grant of Kilmurry, Co. Cork, gave a lease to Rev. Henry Harrison of various lands in County Waterford.[18] In October 1748 the executors of Rev. Henry Harrison released the lands of Inchinleamy for £1,000 to Stephen Bernard of Prospect Hall, Co. Waterford. These lands were previously released to Rev. Harrison by Thomas Grant of Kilmurry for £1,000 subject to redemption.[19]

Rev. Henry Harrison got married and had a son called Henry Harrison (born c.1681). Henry Harrison junior entered Trinity College Dublin in May 1698 and was a scholar in 1702. In July 1705 Henry Harrison junior was prebend of St. Michael’s parish in the diocese of Cork.[20] Henry Harrison junior died in 1711 without issue.[21] In 1716 William Nason of Killavullen married Mary, the sister and heiress of Rev. Henry Harrison. Their son, John Nason inherited his uncle’s property at Newtown near Ballynoe.[22] By his marriage to Elizabeth Keeffe, John Nason had a son John Nason who inherited Newtown which remained in the Nason family until the early twentieth century.

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[1]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 812

[2]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 6, p. 819

[3]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 6, p. 844

[4]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 6, p. 812

[5]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 6, p. 805

[6]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 677

[7]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 132, Page 385, Memorial 89676

[8]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 677

[9]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 108, Page 12, Memorial 74266

[10]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 31, Page 75, Memorial 18242

[11]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 29, Page 440, Memorial 18245

[12]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 635

[13] Registry of Deeds, Vol. 47, Page 537, Memorial 31783

[14]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 75, Page 209, Memorial 52608

[15]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 678

[16]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 91, Page 474, Memorial 64899

[17]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 87, Page 349, Memorial 62028

[18]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 89, Page 158, Memorial 62637

[19]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 132, Page 385, Memorial 89673

[20]Casey &O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 6, p. 812

[21]Cork Past and Present, Vol. 1, p. 291

[22]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (facsimile edition 2007) p. 294

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Biography, Cork history

Nason of Mellefontstown

Nason of Mellefontstown

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Mellefontstown is a townland in the parish of Gortroe, Co. Cork. It is a Latin place-name meaning homestead of the fountain of honey. In 1641 the townland of 176 acres 2 roots and 16 perches was held by Teige and Katherine Cartaine. As Irish Catholics their property was seized by the government. On 22nd May 1667 it was granted, with neighbouring townlands to James Stuart, the Duke of York.[1] In the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century it was held by Robert Rogers of Luctamore (Lotamore). Robert was the son of Francis Rogers a merchant of Cork City in the 1650s/1660s and brother of George Rogers of Ashgrove. Robert Rogers married Elizabeth Dunscombe of Mount Desart and had four sons and one daughter. Robert Rogers made his will in March 1717.[2] Robert’s will was proved in 1718.[3] It was possibly Francis Rogers who first purchased Mellefontstown.

The road by Mellefontstown

William Nason: this William Nason was born circa 1681 and died on 3rd February 1726. He was buried at Gortroe cemetery.

Richard Nason of Mellefontstown: in 1686 Richard Nason married Catherine Woodley.[4] Around this time Richard Nason leased Mellefontstown from Robert Rogers and it became the home of his descendants for several generations.On 23rd July 1706 Richard made his will in which he named his three sons (William, Andrew and John) and his daughter, Catherine. The witnesses were; John Enness, Michael Bourke and Thomas Dougan.[5] In February 1724 Richard Nason and his son, William, were among the witnesses to the last will of Barbara Hodder of Ballinterry.[6] Richard Nason died on 24th April 1727 and was buried at Gortroe, leaving a son, John Nason. Richard’s will was proved on 12th September 1727 in which he appointed his son as executor.[7]

  1. John Nason of Mellefontstown: John Nason inherited Mellefontstown from his father in 1727. He married Sarah, daughter of William Lapp of Bandon. Together they had a number of children.[8] In 1731 John was a witness to the lease between George Rogers of Ashgrove and John Nason of Rahenity of the lands of Rahenity which John Nason gave to his son William Nason and to William Nason, merchant of Cork, for their lives.[9] In 1740 John Nason was named as executor to the will of his brother, William Nason.[10] John Nason died in 1743 but Sarah lived on at Mellfontstown until her death in 1780.[11] On 6th February 1780 Sarah Nason made her will which was witnessed by Dennis Keeffe, John Keating and Stephen Scannell. In the will she named her three sons, Richard, John and Lancaster and appointed Lancaster as executor.[12]
    1. Richard Nason of Mellefontstown: in 1743 Richard Nason inherited Mellefontstown from his father, John Nason. In 1754 Richard married Dorcas Bengers and had a number of children by her. In 1759 Richard Nason received land in Ballynoe from Arthur Chapman of Ballynoe to be held with his sister, Mary Nason.[13]
      1. Elder Nason of Mellefontstown:
      2. Richard Nason of Bettyville: Richard Nason was the second son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown. As his elder brother inherited Mellefontstown, Richard junior had to find a new home and settled at Bettyville, near Clondulane, a few miles east of Fermoy. In 1787 Richard Nason married Catherine Sherlock and had seven daughters.[14] On 10th June 1809 Richard Nason was a witness to the lease of land at Ballynafana between the Carey family of Careysville and Thomas Dennehy of Bellview with Mathew Glissan of Brook Lodge.[15] On 19th June 1816 Richard Nason attended the creditors meeting in Fermoy that followed the bankruptcy of John Anderson.
        1. Elizabeth Nason of Bettyville: Elizabeth inherited Bettyville from her father as his eldest daughter. In 1808 she married her kinsman, John Nason of Newtown, Ballynoe, Co. Cork. Together they had two sons; Rev. William Henry Nason and Richard Nason, along with a daughter, Katheine Nason (wife of John Bellis).[16]
        2. Dorcas Nason: in 1818 Dorcas Nason married John Gaggin from Midleton, Co. Cork, and had a number of children by him. One of their daughters, Catherine Elizabeth, married in 1840, her first cousin, Rev. William Henry Nason, as his first wife. They had four sons (John, William, Charles and George) and three daughters (Elizabeth, Dorcas and Mary).[17] Dorcas Nason Gaggin died in 1867.
        3. Alicia Nason: Alicia Nason was born in 1795 and died in 1867. In 1824 she married Christopher Crofts (died 17th March 1861) of Ballyhoura Lodge, near Buttevant, Co. Cork. They had two sons (Christopher, 1826-1913 and Richard Nason, 1834-1905) and one daughter (Catherine, 1825-1904). On 22nd October 1868 Richard Nason Crofts married his cousin, Elizabeth Nason, daughter of Rev. William Henry Nason. They had two sons (Christopher Nason Crofts of Ballyhoura Lodge, 1877-1947, left a daughter, and Richard Nason Crofts, 1882-1924, died unmarried) and twounmarried daughters (Alicia Nason Crofts, 1870-1925 and Maud Nason Crofts, 1879-1943).[18]
        4. Ann Nason: in 1826 Ann Nason married John Sherlock of Sandbrook who was a son of Richard Sherlock of Woodville, near Buttevant, Co. Cork.[19]
        5. Catherine Nason:
        6. Margaret Nason:
        7. Mary Nason: in 1842 Mary Nason married Nelson Kearney Cotter (1806-1869), MD, fourth son of Sir James Laurence Cotter, 2nd Baronet, and had three daughters by him including Isabella Mary Cotter (died 30th June 1925). Nelson Cotter died on 18th July 1869.[20]
      3. Mary Nason: in 1759 Mary Nason was named as the sister of Richard Nason of Mellfontstown.[21]
    2. John Nason: in 1780 John Nason was mentioned in the will of his mother, Sarah Nason of Mellefontstown.[22]
    3. Lancaster Nason: in 1780 Lancaster Nason was mentioned in the will of his mother, Sarah Nason of Mellefontstown. Lancaster was appointed as executor of the will which was made in February 1780.[23] In 1774 Lancaster Nason was living at Coolconan, Co. Cork when the land became subject to a marriage settlement between John Croker of Cahergal and Jane Andrews of Cahergal, daughter of John Andrews of Cork City.[24]
    4. William Henry Nason: another son of John and Sarah Nason is said to be William Henry Nason who died in 1820.
  2. Andrew Nason of Whitewell (Whitehall): Andrew Nason, the second son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, settled at Whitewell (Whitehall) where he got married and had children.[25]
  3. William Nason of Cork: William Nason, the third son of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, became a merchant in Cork City. In 1724 William Nason and his father, Richard, were witnesses to the last will of Barbara Hodder of Ballinterry.[26] In 1727 he married Huldah Claver and had children by her.[27] In 1735 William Nason was living in the North Suburbs of Cork when he was named as executor to the will of his cousin, William Nason of Rahinity, Barony of Barrymore, husband of Jane Nason, and son of John Nason (then living). The will was proved on 11th June 1736. The witnesses were Joe Deyos and Richard Kinefick.[28] William Nason made his own will on 31st March 1740 and this was proved on 30th June 1740. The witnesses were Joe Deyos, Richard Kinefick and William Cumins. William named his wife, Huldah, and his brother, John Nason, as executors.[29] William Cummins was a cooper in Cork City while Richard Kinetick was a merchant of the city.[30]
    1. William Nason:William Nason of Cork was the son of William Nason the merchant.[31]
  4. Catherine Nason: in 1720, Catherine Nason, daughter of Richard Nason of Mellefontstown, married Thomas Carey.[32]

It would appear that the Nason family ceased to hold Mellefontstown by the early nineteenth century. In 1837 Pierce Cotter took out a lease on Mellefontstown house and 210 acres for 200 years from Thomas Wise at a rent of 19 shillings 5 pence per acre on 182 acres and 20s 10d on 28 acres.[33] A number of other tenants of Thomas Wise held leases of 31 to 50 years. In June 1846 Pierce Cotter held Mellefontstown house (worth £10) which measured 58.6 feet long by 21 feet wide by 21 feet high with an extension measuring 38 feet by 21 feet by 21 feet. His outbuildings included a boiler house, fowl house, coach house, stable, two car houses, dairy, two cider houses (one derelict), a barn and a cow house,[34] In about 1850 Pierce Cotter held Mellefontstown house (worth £19 including outbuildings) along with 197 acres of land (169 acres around the house and another 28 acres in the townland). The landlord of the whole townland (containing 566 acres) was Thomas Wise.[35] Thomas Wise held some of the townland in fee while other parts were by a lease for lives renewable forever. Thomas Wise of North Mall, Cork, died on 7th September 1852 leaving effects worth £404 the administration of which was granted to Joseph Gubbins.[36] In the 1860s John Cotter was proprietor and a well-known local athlete. By 1871 the property passed to John Barry who was the owner of 242 acres 2 root and 10 perches at Mellefontstown.[37] In the early twentieth century it passed to a different Barry family. The house was destroyed by fire in the early 1990s and demolished.[38]

Old wall beside Mellefontstown

In the 1901 census Richard and Ellen Nason lived in house number 3 in Melfontstown townland. Richard was 69 years old, a Roman Catholic, born in Co. Cork. He was a farmer who could speak Irish and English but couldn’t read. Ellen Nason was 52 years old, a Roman Catholic from Co. Cork and she could read as well as speak both languages. They rented the one room cottage from Hanora Scannell.[39] After 1901 Richard and Ellen Nason moved to Ballinure near Bartlemy. On 11th May 1908 Richard Nason died leaving effects worth £60. His will was proved at Dublin on 10th June 1908.[40] By 1911 Ellen Nason was living on her own, at a house in Bride’s Bridge near Castlelyons, now aged 76 years to qualify for the newly introduced state pension.[41] In 1901 John Barry lived in Mellefontstown house with its eleven rooms and thirteen windows in the front elevation along with eleven outbuildings. John Barry held two other cottages; one occupied by Cornelius Cashman and the other unoccupied. John Barry was 46 years old, a Roman Catholic and a farmer who could only speak English. He could read and write as could his wife and eldest daughter. Margaret Barry was 44 years old and also from Co. Cork. They had two daughters (Margaret, aged 9 and Bridget, aged 7) and three sons (Thomas, aged 6, James, aged 5 and William, aged 4). They had two servants, James and Bridget Condon, both unmarried.[42] By 1911 Mellefontstown house was still owned by John Barry but unoccupied as the family had moved to Kill St. Anne townland in the parish of Castlelyons with James and Bridget Condon as their servants.[43]

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[1]Waters, A. ‘A Distribution of Forfeited Land in the County of Cork, Returned by the Downe Survey’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XXXVII (1932), pp. 83-89, at p. 84

[2]Ffolliott, R., ‘Rogers of Lota and Ashgrove’, in theJournal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXII (1967), pp. 75-80, at p. 75

[3] Eustace, P. Beryl, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 252

[4]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[5]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[6]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 44, Page 352, Memorial 29738, dated 20th February 1724

[7]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[8]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[9]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 73, Page 54, Memorial 49717, dated 13th January 1731

[10]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[11]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[12]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[13]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 248, Page 103, Memorial 159056, dated 7th September 1759

[14]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[15]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 615, Page 117, Memorial 419629

[16]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[17]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 294, 295

[18]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[19]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[20]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[21]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 248, Page 103, Memorial 159056, dated 7th September 1759

[22]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[23]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1453

[24]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 306, Page 58, Memorial 202478, dated 12th July 1774

[25]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[26]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 44, Page 352, Memorial 29738, dated 20th February 1724

[27]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[28]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[29]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[30]Registry of Deeds, Vol. 73, Page 54, Memorial 49717, dated 13th January 1731

[31]Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 772

[32]Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 294

[33]Tenure Valuation Books, 1848, Valuation Office of Ireland, now in National Archives of Ireland

[34]House Valuation Books, 1846, Valuation Office of Ireland, now in National Archives of Ireland

[35]Griffith’s Valuation, Mellefontstown, Gortroe Parish, Barrymore Barony, Co. Cork

[36]National Archives of Ireland, Wills and Administration, Wise

[37]Owners of one acre and upwards, 1871, province of Munster, County Cork, p. 117

[38]Hajba, Anna-Maria, Historical, Genealogical, Architectural notes on some Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 261

[39]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1901 returns, Melfontstown

[40]National Archives of Ireland, Wills and Administration, Nason

[41]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1911 returns, Bridebridge

[42]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1901 returns, Melfontstown

[43]National Archives of Ireland, Census 1911 returns, Kill St. Anne

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Biography, Cork history

Roger Brettridge of Duhallow and his descendants

Roger Brettridge of Duhallow and his descendants

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Roger Brettridge came from the West Country in England and at first settled on the Brook estate in Co. Donegal in the early 1650s. Towards the end of the 1650s he became involved with the Munster army and in the 1660s received lands in the Barony of Duhallow in North West County Cork. These lands were centred on the manor of Castle Magner which Roger renamed as Castle Brettridge. Roger’s brother Samuel Brettridge received a smaller estate in Duhallow which he gave to Roger. In his will of 1683 Roger Brettridge left the townland of East Drumcummer (now called Drumcummer More), to found an alms house for ex-soldiers in the Shandon area of Cork City. In the parish re[1]gister of Whaddon, Gloucester, it is recorded that Roger Brettridge, gent, was buried there on 4th October 1683 having died at Tuffley.[2]

Roger Brettridge was the son of Francis Brettridge. Roger Brettridge married Joan Brettridge (maiden name Hawnby) and sister of William Hawnby of Rasheen. John Hall, rector of Ardstragh, Co. Tyrone was a nephew of William Hawnby. The said William Hawnby had two daughters, Mary (mother of Robert Longfield) and Elizabeth (mother of Bartholomew Purdon).[3] Roger and Joan had three daughters; Mary (wife of Francis Hartstonge), Elizabeth (wife of Robert Deane) and Jane (wife of Thomas Badham). In 1683 Roger’s estate consisted of Castle Brettridge, Cappabrack, Cappagh, Killebraher, Knocknesheling, Knockneineater, East Drumcummer, Rathmahiry, Rossendry, Knockballymartin, Ardagh, Ballyheene, Killballyheen, Clashbale, Kilrush (also called Kilbrash), West Drumcummer and Horse Island, plus a house in Millstreet town.

Roger Brettridge gave some property to his nephew Roger Brettridge, namely West Drumcummer and Horse Island which he had previously received from Samuel Brettridge. Roger Brettridge, the nephew, had a son also called Roger Brettridge the third.[4] In 1758 Roger Brettridge the third married Abigall Sandys.[5] But the couple had no children and his property reverted to Elizabeth Badham Deane.

The castle of Castlemagner = photographer unknown

Mary Brettridge Hartstonge

Mary Brettridge, the eldest daughter, received the lands of Castle Brettridge, with its manorial rights, along with Cappabrack. But these lands were first entrusted to Joan Brettridge for life. A third townland, Cappagh, was granted to Mary’s son, Arthur Hartstonge.[6] Mary married Francis Hartstonge and was the mother of Arthur and Standish. Arthur Hartstonge had no children and Cappagh passed to Price Hartstonge, son of Standish. Price Hartstonge had a son called Henry Hartstonge. In 1751, Henry Hartstonge married Lucy, daughter of Rev Stackpole Pery. She was a sister of Edmond Sexton Pery, speaker of the Irish House of Commons. The couple had no children and much of the Hartstonge estate including Castle Magner and Cappagh passed to the speaker’s son, Edmond Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick. The 1st Earl had married in January 1793 Mary Alice, only daughter and heir of Henry Ormsby by Mary, sister and heir of Sir Henry Hartstone.[7] His grandson, William Henry, 2nd Earl was the owner at Griffith’s Valuation (circa 1850) by which time Cappagh had become Kippagh and was divided into three parts. The 2nd Earl of Limerick died in 1866 and the property was sold to Sir Henry Wrixon-Beecher of Ballygiblin. The present (2021) holder of the title as 7th Earl of Limerick is Edmund Christopher Pery.

Jane Brettridge Badham

Jane Brettridge, the second daughter received as her inheritance the lands of Ballyheene, Killballyheen, Clashbale and Kilbrash. In addition Jane Brettridge also got the lands of Killebraher, Knocknesheling, Knockneineater and Rathmahiry with its mill which property had been grant to her mother Joan for life.[8] Joan married Thomas Badham and had two sons, one of whom was called Brettridge Badham, M.P. for Rathcormac. In 1744 Brettridge Badham was living at Rockfield, Co. Cork at the time of his death.[9] Rockfield was formerly known as Ballyheene and came from the Roger Brettridge inheritance. Brettridge Badham married Sophia, daughter of John King, 3rd Lord Kingston, and had two sons who died young and two daughters Sophia, born in 1720 and, Martha. Sophia Badham inherited Rockfield and her Brettridge lands which she passed to the family of her first husband.

Sophia Badham married Richard Thornhill (1707-1747), M.P., son of Edward Thornhill by Ann, daughter of Rev. Francis Quayle of Brigown, and grandson of William Thornhill (husband of Elizabeth Newenham), and great grandson of William Thornhill from Derbyshire who acquired Castle Kevin and other Irish property as reward for his service in the Parliamentary army of the 1640s civil war. Richard Thornhill took his wife’s surname for his children and the family became known as Badham-Thornhill. Sophia Badham-Thornhill had a number of children including Anne (died unmarried 1790), Sophia (wife of Major-General John Stratton), Major James Badham-Thornhill who died in 1796. Major James married Elizabeth and was the father of Anne (second wife of Richard Tonson-Rye of Rye Court) and Sophia (wife of Samuel Godsell, possible relation of Amos Godsell of Moorestown, Co. Limerick, whose will was, dated 1714).[10] Richard Tonson-Rye and Anne Badham-Thornhill were the parents of John Tonson-Rye (born 1797) who in 1818 married his cousin Mary Godsell, daughter of Samuel Godsell. John Tonson-Rye left one son and five daughters with many descendants as documented in Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), page 1004.

The eldest son of Sophia Badham and Richard Thornhill was Edward Badham-Thornhill (1730-1798) who married Mary Marsh, daughter of Henry Marsh of Moyally, King’s County (Offaly), by his wife Barbarra, daughter of Jonathan Gerard of Dublin and Mary Mason. Edward Badham-Thornhill had three sons (Henry, Gerrard and Richard) and seven daughters (Mary, Charolette, Harriot, Barbarra, Alicia, Louisa and Juliet). Henry Badham-Thornhill (1771-1821) married Catherine Odell as her first husband (she later married Francis Roche and had a son), daughter of Thomas Odell and Sarah Westropp. Henry Badham-Thornhill had three daughters; Sarah, wife of William Beamish Ware; Mary who in 1820 married Rev. Benjamin Burton Johnson and they had three children with many descendants in Australia and Canada; and Catherine who married William Maitland. Henry Badham-Thornhill had five sons (Edward, John Thomas, John, James and Henry R.I.C. officer). The eldest son, Edward Badham-Thornhill (1808-1889) sold Castle Kevin in 1851 to Dorothea Reeves because of debts accrued during the Great Famine. Edward Badham-Thornhill married Elizabeth, daughter of Lawrence O’Donovan of Dublin and had two sons, Henry and Lawrence.[11]

Sophia Badham married secondly, on 2nd September 1752, to John Cuffe, 2nd Lord Desart. John Cuufe was the third but first surviving son of John Cuffe, 1st Baron of Desart by his second wife Dorothea Gorges, daughter of Lt. Gen. Richard Gorges of Kilbrew, Co. Meath. John Cuffe died on 25th November 1767 without any children when the barony passed to his brother Otway Cuffe, 3rd Lord Desart, who left issue. Sophia Badham died on 2nd August 1768 at Merrion Street in Dublin.[12]  

Martha Badham, second daughter of Brettridge Badham and Sophia King, married Rev. Thomas Ryder, rector of Brigown and great grandson of John Ryder, bishop of Killaloe. Some records say that Martha was the sister of Brettridge Badham.[13] I think she was the daughter of Brettridge. Thomas and Martha Ryder were the parents of four sons (Henry, Badham, St. George, and John) and one daughter Jane (wife of Rev. James Graves and grandparents of Rev. Richard Hastings Graves, rector of Brigown). Badham and John Ryder appear to have left no descendants. Henry Ryder was the father of Abraham St. George Ryder who married (1777) Frances, daughter of William Harrington. Abraham had a number of children including Captain William Ryder of Riverstown House, Co. Kildare (husband of Anne Dickson) who was the father of William Ryder, genealogist. Local folklore said the Ryder family tried to block up the nearby St. Brigid’s Holy Well but the well fought back and won. In the 20th century Riverstown House had a number of owners, and after empty for a number of years, it was sold again in 2016.

The other sons of Abraham Ryder were Harrington Ryder (husband of Elizabeth Gore, daughter of Arthur Gore) and St. George Ryder (husband of Annabella Pennicuick). Abraham Ryder was the father of Emma, wife of James Cassidy of Bray. Harrington Ryder of the Abbey, Co. Tipperary, was the father of Rev. Arthur Gore Ryder who was the headmaster of Carrickmacross School and later rector of Donnybrook, Co. Dublin. Rev. Arthur married twice (1st to Anne Gore (d.1863), daughter of William Gore of Tramore, and 2nd to Nina MacMahon, daughter of Sir Beresford MacMahon). His eldest son, Harrington Dudley Ryder died in 1858 and his second son, St. George Ryder died in 1859 and Arthur Gore Ryder of Riverstown House (husband of Caroline Grogan) died 1906 by his first marriage. The second marriage produced Nina Beryll Ryder, Ralph Ryder and Beresford Burton MacMahon Ryder (husband of Eleanor Curle).[14]  

Meanwhile St. George Ryder of Mitchelstown, Co. Cork, married Margaret, daughter of William Murphy of Mitchelstown, and was the father of Martha Ryder (d.1846 and wife of Charles Venters), St. George Ryder, barrister (husband of Abigail Rothwell) and John Ryder (d.1819 and chancellor of Cloyne). John Ryder married Margaret, daughter of Rev. Joshua Brown (husband of Margaret, daughter of Llewellyn Nash), and was the father of three sons (St. George, Rev. Joshua and Rev. William) and two daughters (Dorothy and Margaret). St. George Ryder left no issue while Rev. Joshua Ryder married his cousin Lucinda Wood, daughter of Michael Wood, merchant of Cork, by his wife Margaret, daughter of Rev. William Nash, son of Llewellyn Nash. Rev. Joshua Ryder, rector of Castlelyons, was the father of Michael wood Ryder (d.1847) and Lucinda Ryder (d.1875). Rev. William Ryder, archdeacon of Cloyne, married Ann, daughter of Rev. John Ross. Rev. William Ryder (d.1862) was the father of John Ross Ryder and William Ryder (1856). Rev. William Ryder was the father of a number of daughters including Margaret (wife of George Browne), Marianne (wife of John Hendley and later James Murray, leaving descendants presently living by Hendley), Eleanor (wife of Walter Fitzsimon), Isabella and Annie (wife of Walter Browne).

Elizabeth Brettridge Deane

Elizabeth Brettridge, the third daughter, received the lands of Rossanarny (owned by Pierce Purcell of Altamira by the 1840’s), Ardagh and Knockballymartin. After the death of her mother, Elizabeth also got a house in Millstreet.[15] Elizabeth married c.1679 to Robert Deane (d.1714) of Springfield Castle, Co. Limerick, 2nd Baronet, and son of Sir Matthew Deane created 1st Baronet in 1709 and died in 1710.[16] They were the parents of Sir Matthew Deane (c.1680-1747), 3rd Baronet and M.P. for Charleville and later for Co. Cork in the Irish parliament. Sir Mathew Deane married Jane Sharpe, only daughter of Rev. William Sharpe, and was the father of three sons and three daughters. In 1781 Sir Robert Deane, the 6th Baronet, was raised in the peerage to Baron Muskerry. The present (2021) 9th Baron Muskerry lives in South Africa. The Deane family did continue the Brettridge blood line but little of the estate as in 1883 the family held only 28 acres in Co. Cork.[17]

Conclusion

In 1683 Roger Brettridge, army officer and grantee of forfeited estates in north-west County Cork, died in Gloucestershire without any male heirs to continue his name. Yet his three daughters, Mary, Jane and Elizabeth, have continued his blood line over the next 250 years to the present-day.     

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[1] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 650

[2] Extracted from web site – www.glosgen.co.uk/whadreg.htm, in November 2005

[3] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 650

[4] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 14

[5] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 5, p. 112

[6] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[7] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. VII, p. 663

[8] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[9] P. Beryl Eustace, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 97

[10] P. Beryl Eustace, ‘Index of Will Abstracts in the Genealogical Office, Dublin’, in The Genealogical Office, Dublin (Dublin, 1998), pp. 79-282, at p. 186

[11] Jane Hills, ‘’, in the Mallow Field Club Journal, No. 20 (2002), pp. 144-153

[12] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. IV, p. 228

[13] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 641

[14] Alison-Stewart blogspot entitled DubStewartMania with the article title of ‘Rev. John Grogan and Lizzie Bourne, Balrothery and Clyde Road’, posted on 16th August 2013

[15] Niall O’Brien, ‘Roger Brettridge: and the 1662 Act of Settlement and Duhallow Affairs at the Court of Claims’, in Seanchas Dúthalla, Vol. XV (2011), pp. 11-17, p. 12

[16] Debrett’s Illustrated Peerage, 1901, p. 590

[17] George E. Cokaye, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. IX, p. 443

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Biography, Dublin History

De Valera in the Irish Census Records, 1901 & 1911

De Valera in the Irish Census Records, 1901 & 1911

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Éamon de Valera recorded his name into the history of twentieth century Ireland. But how did history record him in the years before 1916. History before 1916 didn’t know anybody called Éamon de Valera. Instead the documents knew him as Edward de Valera from County Limerick. On 1st April 1901 Edward de Valera was a boarder at a school in Williamstown Avenue in Blackrock, Co. Dublin. There were twenty-eight students in the school as recorded by headmaster, John Murphy. Edward de Valera was 18 years old and gave his place of birth as Co. Limerick. He could read and write but didn’t say what languages he could speak. 

Eamon and Jane (Sinead) de Valera

In 1901 Jane O’Flanagan (aged 22) was a national teacher who could speak Irish and English. Jane’s first teaching position was in Edenderry but by 1901 she was teaching in Dorset Street in Dublin. Her sister Brigid (aged 16) was also a national teacher at moniterse class. Brigid could also speak Irish and English as could their father, Laurence O’Flanagan, (aged 62) a carpenter from Co. Kildare. Laurence’s eldest daughter, Mary (aged 30), was born in New York and was a dress maker. His son, Laurence junior was a tailor. Laurence’s wife was Margaret O’Flanagan, nee Byrne (aged 58), was from County Dublin. In 1901 they lived at number 6 Richmond Cottages in the Mountjoy area of Dublin. Laurence and Margaret moved to New York before 1871 but returned to Ireland and Balbiggin, Co. Dublin in 1873.   

By 1911 Jane O’Flanagan had changed her name to the Irish form and thus became known as Sinéad O’Flanagan. On 8th January 1910 she married Edward de Valera of County Limerick and formerly of New York. Edward was then a math professor in Dublin. It would be awhile before Edward de Valera adopted the Irish form of his name and become the Éamon de Valera of fact and legend. On Sunday, 2nd April 1911 Sinéad de Valera filled up the census form and signed her name in the place reserved for the signature of the enumerator. Subsequently Patrick Lynch, the said enumerator, crossed out Sinéad’s name and wrote his own name above hers and filled in Edward de Valera in the place reserved for the signature of the head of the household. In 1911 the de Valera family were living at number 33 Morehampton Terrace, in the West Pembroke area of Dublin. Sinéad said that Edward de Valera was 28 years old, a Catholic, could read and write. Edward de Valera’s occupation was BA Dip in Education, Math Professor. Sinéad said that Edward could speak English and Irish while she wrote that she could speak Irish and English. They were married one year (8th January 1910) and had one son called Vivian de Valera, aged 3 months, who couldn’t read. Sinéad de Valera was 32 years old in 1911 and a Catholic and born in County Dublin. Sinéad said that Edward was born in New York. They had a female general domestic servant named Mary Coffey, aged 25 from County Dublin who couldn’t read. The house had nine rooms and three windows in the front elevation with no outbuildings.   

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Biography, Cork history

Stephen Mills of Cork, merchant and banker

Stephen Mills of Cork, merchant and banker

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

In 1892 C.M. Tenison, writing about the private banks of Cork and the south of Ireland mentioned Stephen Mills as a partner in the baking firm of Falkiner and Mills but that Tenison didn’t know much about Stephen Mills.[1] This article seeks to put some fresh on the life of Stephen Mills, merchant and banker in Cork City in the mid decades of the eighteenth century. It is not known when Stephen Mills was born or who were his parents?

Crawford Art Gallery, Cork near Falkiner and Mills Bank

Possible ancestors of Stephen Mills

He could have been related to Stawell Mills who held property in Cork City and County in the early years of the eighteenth century. Sometime before September 1713 Stawell Mills held property in Cork City, houses in the north liberties of Cork City and land in the barony of Orrery and Kilmore. In September 1713 Joseph Damer of Dublin granted a mortgage of £1,200 to William Ford of Limerick City, subject to the properties once held by Stawell Mills who was then deceased.[2] Elsewhere it is said that Stawell Mills lived at Ballybeg House near Buttevant, later occupied by Hugh Lawton.[3] Thomas Mills (will January 1700), father of Stawell Mills, held Ballybeg House in the 1690s and a sister of Thomas married John Glover of Mount Glover (later called Mount Corbett), Co. Cork.[4] In 1657 Randel, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Mills of St. Peter’s Parish was baptised in Holy Trinity Cork.[5] In 1667 Thomas Mills was sheriff of the city with George Wright. In 1673 Thomas Mills was mayor of Cork while James Mills was one of the two city sheriffs.[6]

Stephen Mills early years

In about 1744 Stephen Mills began his apprenticeship under Riggs Falkiner to learn the trade of being a merchant allowing seven years for the apprenticeship as Stephen ended his term by 1751.[7] Over the next quarter century Stephen Mills would have many interactions with Riggs Falkiner via social activity, property investments and partners in their own bank. The first direct reference to Stephen Mills appears in 1747 when he was at least twenty years old as he was a witness to a marriage deed. In March 1747 Stephen Mills was a witnessed to the marriage settlement between John Lapp of Cork and Ann Falkiner, daughter of Caleb Falkiner, deceased. William Conner of Connerville and Riggs Falkiner, merchant, were trustees of the marriage settlement.[8] Stephen Mills continued his association with the Falkiner family over the following two decades becoming a partner in the 1760s in the banking firm established by Riggs Falkiner. On 4th May 1747, Robert Warren of Kilbarry, Cork, gave a lease to Catherine, wife of John Allen, clothier of Cork, of a house in Cove Lane, Cork City, for the life of Catherine, her husband John and Stephen Mills.[9]  

In 1751 Stephen Mills had completed his merchant apprenticeship with Riggs Falkiner, merchant.[10] On 18th May 1751 Stephen Mills was described as a merchant when he was admitted to the freedom at large of Cork.[11] It is not known what kind of merchant trade he was involved in but considering that he later became a senior partner in a banking firm, the trade must have been profitable. In December 1751 Stephen Mills, merchant of Cork City, married Mary Taylor of Dublin. Mary was the daughter of Francis Taylor, merchant of Dublin, deceased, and Phoebe Taylor, executor of her husband. Stephen Mills promised, as part of the marriage settlement, to give to Mary Taylor one third of his estate in his will or one half if he left no children by Mary. The settlement was witnessed by James North of Drumanhane, Co. Tipperary, along with Daniel Rogers and William Groon, both from Dublin City.[12] In 1723 Francis Taylor had married Phoebe Edwards through the Prerogative Court.[13] Francis Taylor, merchant of Dublin, died in 1751 shortly before the marriage of his daughter to Stephen Mills.[14]

In 1762, Stephen Mills, merchant, joined up with Abraham Devonshire, Riggs Falkiner, Christopher Carlton and Robert Gordon to fill in some 210 feet of the River Lee on its north bank to make a quay from French Quay eastward to a quay by a small house. The property was leased to the partners for 999 years at one shilling per year rent. The partnership was to make a public quay 36 feet wide along the length of the property.[15] On 4th January 1766 Stephen Mills, merchant of Cork City, was a witness, with Anthony Ivors of Waterford, to the lease by Viscount Mountmorris, Shapland Carew and Edward Woodcock of Ballygunner castle, Ballygunnermore, Elaghan, Kilbrickham and Little Island, Waterford to William Finch, merchant of Cork City.[16] In 1767 Stephen Mills, merchant, was mentioned among a host of city freemen who were allowed to benefit from the provision of piped water as part of a parliamentary grant.[17]

Falkiner and Mills bank

In about 1760 Riggs Falkiner, merchant of Cork and son of Caleb Falkiner by Ruth, daughter of Edward Riggs, merchant of Cork, established a bank in the city, possibly wishing to follow the example of his uncle, Daniel Falkiner who was a partner in the Dublin banking firm of Burton’s Bank. By 1767 Riggs Falkiner had acquired a new partner in Stephen Mills to become the firm of Falkiner & Mills.[18] On 28th July 1768 the bank of Falkiner and Mills placed an advertisement in the Cork Evening Post saying that a number of banknotes were lost on the road between Cork and Killcreaght. One of the notes was for £50 and dated 15th April 1765 with a serial number of 884 produced by Falkiner and Mills. A reward of five guineas was offered for the return of the banknotes but we don’t know if a successful recovery was made.[19]

The bank of Falkiner and Mills was situated near the Old Custom House in a street called Falkiner’s Lane, now called Opera Lane.[20] The bank was a friend and creditor of the Earl of Shannon and in 1769 Riggs Falkiner became an M.P. for one of Shannon’s borough constituencies, Clonakilty.[21] In 1778 Riggs Falkiner was made a baronet. After Stephen Mills died in 1770, Riggs Falkiner continued the business on his own until 1776 when he went into partnership with John Leslie and Richard Kellett.[22]

Banks established in Cork in the first half of the eighteenth century were partnered by merchants who used their surplus cash from overseas trade to provide bill discounting, remittance services and make short term loans. In 1756 an act of parliament prevented merchants involved in foreign trade to describe themselves as bankers. The firm of Falkiner & Mills kept their merchant associations but also acquired new partners in the landed gentry and professional sectors of Cork city and county.[23] Among the county gentry, Sir James Cotter, baronet, and Sir Richard Kellet became a partners in the 1780s and 1790s[24] In the 1780s, before his death on 20th January 1786, Doctor Bayly Rogers, doctor of physics, was a partner in the bank which was briefly renamed Falkiner, Rogers, Leslie & Kellet.[25] Bayly Rogers of Floraville came from a strong medical family as he was the eldest son of Joseph Rogers, M.D., of Cork by Margaret, daughter of John Bayly, and in turn Bayly was the father of Joseph Rogers, M.D., of Seaview in Cork.[26]

Falkiner’s bank survived the financial crisis of 1793 when other Cork banks closed their doors. After the death of Riggs Falkiner in 1799 the bank continued under the new name of Cotter & Kellets with some £131,630 banknotes in circulation.[27] Over the next ten years the bank increased its money supply to £447,000 which was £27,000 more than its assets and in June 1809 the bank closed its doors.[28] It would appear that the bank was struggling for a few years as it temporary closed in 1807.[29] The liquidation process continued until 1826 even with an act of parliament in 1820 with creditors only getting about ten shillings in the pound while the lawyers clocked up over £60,000 in fees.[30]   

The family of Stephen Mills

On 4th June 1770 Stephen Mills, a banker of Cork City, died.[31] In 1770 the will of Stephen Mills of Cork was registered.[32] In his marriage settlement with Mary Taylor, Stephen said he would give half his estate to Mary if he died without children.[33] In 1770 Mary received a third of the estate as Stephen had at least two children with Mary. In July 1788, Stephen Mills, aged 18, son of Stephen Mills of Cork, deceased, was admitted into Trinity College Dublin. He was previously taught by Mr. Cary.[34] In 1832 Stephen Mills married Elizabeth Murphy.[35] In 1849 a person called Stephen Mills was living in Lamb Street, Clonakilty.[36] In 1850 Stephen was renting the house and small garden from John Fitzpatrick worth just one pound.[37] No further details are yet available concerning Stephen Mills.

In 1779 Mary, daughter of Stephen Mills, banker of Cork, married William Sankey M.P., 3rd or 5th or 6th son of Matthew Sankey of Coolmore, Co. Tipperary by Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of George Villiers of Waterford, of Harcourt Street, Dublin.[38] Elsewhere William Sankey’s mother was described as Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of John Villiers of Hanbury Hall, Co. Stafford.[39] William Sankey (b.c.1745-7, d. 25th November 1813) was M.P. for Philipstown (1790-1797).[40] William Sankey and Mary Mills were the parents of Matthew Sankey, barrister, of Bawnmore, Co. Cork and Modeshill, Co. Tipperary.[41] On 23rd March 1832 Matthew Sankey died at Clydaville near Mallow and was the husband of Eleanor O’Hara by who he was the father of eight children.

Bawnmore in the parish of Kilbrin, barony of Duhallow, appears to have been part of the estate of Stephen Mills left to his family in 1770. During the 1780s Mary Mills and Falkiner’s bank had a number of property deeds with the townland. On 22nd/23rd May 1780 Sir Riggs Falkiner, baronet, of Ann Mount, Co. Cork, and Mary Mills, widow of Stephen Mills of Cork City, made a lease of the town and lands of Bawnmore (otherwise known as Rathanane) to Bayly Rogers of Cork City for £777 8s with the proceeds to benefit, Sir Riggs Falkiner, Bayly Rogers, Richard Kellett and Charles Leslie.[42] On 24th/25th February 1782, by an instrument of a deed of lease and release (registered 12th March 1784), Bayly Rogers sold a third part of Bawnmore to Francis Woodley of Cork city on the direction of William Sankey (husband of Mary Mills junior), barrister-at-law in Dublin city, which property formerly belonged to Mary Mills. This was witnessed by Michael Fulham and Jonas Lander, both from Cork city.[43] In 1817 a person called Mary Mills died in Dublin.[44] She could possibly have been the widow of Stephen Mills but as her will was destroyed in the destruction of the Public Record Office in 1922 we cannot be certain.

Conclusion

In 1892 C.M. Tension could add little information about Stephen Mills apart from the fact he was a partner in the bank of Falkiner and Mills and died before 1772. In this article we have added extra information about the life of Stephen Mills. He came from a successful merchant family who occasionally got involved in city politics. In the early 1740s he became apprentice to Riggs Falkiner, merchant, beginning a quarter century relationship. He was witness to the wedding of Riggs sister and was successful in his own merchant business to buy corporation property with Riggs Falkiner and in the mid-1760s become a senior partner in the bank of Falkiner and Mills. In 1751 Stephen Mills married into a Dublin merchant family and had at least two children before his death in June 1770. Through the Sankey family of south Tipperary the blood line of Stephen Mills continued on to the present day. It is possible that further information on Stephen Mills may be discovered but for the moment we shall leave him rest two hundred and fifty years after his passing.

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[1] Tenison, C.M., ‘The Private Bankers of Cork and the South of Ireland’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Volume I (1892), pp. 221-224, at p. 224

[2] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 13, Page 38, Memorial 4811, dated 28th September 1713

[3] The Dublin Weekly Journal, 8th January 1726, p. 166

[4] Notes & Queries, 1930, vol. 158, issue 2, p. 23

[5] Hood, Susan (ed.), Register of the parish of Holy Trinity (Christ Church), Cork, 1643-1669 (Dublin, 1998), p. 69

[6] Caulfield, Richard, The Council Book of the Corporation of Cork (Guildford, 1876), p. 1174

[7] Caulfield, The Council Book of the Corporation of Cork, p. 661

[8] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 126, Page 430, Memorial 88201, dated 4th March 1747

[9] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 125, Page 525, Memorial 85994, dated 14th May 1747

[10] Caulfield, The Council Book of the Corporation of Cork, p. 661

[11] Cork City and County Archives, 2007, List of Freemen of Cork City, 1710-1841, p. 121

[12] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 153, Page 515, Memorial 103541, dated 19th December 1751

[13] National Archives of Ireland, Diocesan and Prerogative Marriage Licence Bonds, 1623-1866

[14] National Archives of Ireland, Index to Prerogative Wills, 1536-1810

[15] Caulfield, The Council Book of the Corporation of Cork, pp. 763, 764

[16] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 246, Page 465, Memorial 158766, dated 4th January 1766

[17] Caulfield, The Council Book of the Corporation of Cork, p. 817

[18] Tenison, ‘The Private Bankers of Cork and the South of Ireland’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Volume I (1892), pp. 221-224, at p. 224

[19] Lenihan, Michael, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors (Cork, 2010), p. 165

[20] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, p. 165

[21] Dickson, David, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster, 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 166

[22] Tenison, ‘The Private Bankers of Cork and the South of Ireland’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Volume I (1892), pp. 221-224, at p. 224

[23] Dickson, Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster, 1630-1830, pp. 163, 164

[24] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, p. 165

[25] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, p. 166

[26] Ffolliott, Rosemary, ‘Rogers of Lota and Ashgrove’, in the Journal of Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXII (1967), pp. 75-80, at pp. 78, 79

[27] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, p. 166

[28] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, p. 167

[29] O’Sullivan, William, The economic history of Cork City from the earliest times to the Act of Union (Cork, 1937), p. 203

[30] Lenihan, Hidden Cork: Charmers, Chancers & Cute Hoors, pp. 167, 168

[31] The Gentleman’s and London Magazine or Monthly Chronologer, 1741-1794, 1770, p. 390

[32] Anon, ‘Original Documents: Index Testamentorium olim in Registro Corcagie (1600-1802)’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Volume III, Second Series (1897), pp. 194-200, at p. 197

[33] Registry of Deeds, Dublin, Volume 153, Page 515, Memorial 103541, dated 19th December 1751

[34] Burtchaell, G.D., & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinesses (Bristol, 2001), p. 579

[35] National Archives of Ireland, Diocesan and Prerogative Marriage Licence Bonds, 1623-1866, Cork & Ross marriage licence bonds

[36] National Archives of Ireland, Valuation Office books, 1824-1856, House Book, 1849

[37] Griffith’s Valuation, parish of Kilgarriff, townland of Youghals

[38] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1912, p. 625; Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1846, p. 1189; National Archives of Ireland, Diocesan and Prerogative Marriage Licence Bonds, 1623-1866, Cork & Ross marriage licence bonds

[39] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1846, p. 1189

[40] Johnston-Lik, Edith, MPs in Dublin: companion to the History of the Irish Parliament 1692-1800 (Belfast, 2006), p. 121

[41] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1912, p. 625

[42] Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, Th. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1284

[43] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, vol. 11, p. 1284

[44] National Archives of Ireland, Diocesan and Prerogative Wills, 1595-1858

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Biography

Hugh Jackson Lawlor: historian, academic, cleric

Hugh Jackson Lawlor: historian, academic, cleric

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Hugh Jackson Lawlor was born on 11th December 1860 in Ballymena, Co. Antrim. He was the third son of John Hillard Lawlor, the manager of the local Provisional Bank and Kate Lawlor (daughter of Lt. Col. John Oairnes).[1] When it came to education Hugh Lawlor left Ulster and first attended the Drogheda Grammar School and later moved on to the Rathmines School in Dublin. From there he went the few miles to Trinity College, Dublin where in 1882 he graduated with BA in mathematics, and achieved his MA in 1885. It seemed for a while that Hugh Lawlor had ideas of a career in mathematics as in the 1880s, he was an examiner in mathematics for the Intermediate Board of Education.

Church career

But soon a career in the church beckoned. From 1885 to 1893 Hugh Lawlor was a curate at Christ Church, Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire). After Dun Laoghaire Hugh Lawlor became a senior chaplain at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Edinburgh until 1898. But church affairs and mathematics seem not to have commanded Hugh’s full vision although he didn’t totally abandon the former.

Academic career

At the same time as he served as a curate he became an assistant to Archbishop King’s Lecturer in Divinity at the University of Dublin. In 1898 Hugh Jackson Lawlor was made Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Dublin, a post he held until 1933.[2] From 1866 to the early twentieth century the quality of the members of the Trinity College Divinity School were of the first magnitude in what was termed the Golden Age of the School.[3] Hugh Lawlor had entered academic life with a long of expectation. He concentrated his studies on the medieval church from its early days of St. Patrick to the Protestant Reformation.

Marriage and Residences

In 1901 Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor was living at number 2 Killarney Road in Bray, Co. Wicklow with his wife Leila Mary Lawlor. Leila Lawlor was born in Glenageary, Co. Dublin in about 1864 and was a member of the Church of Ireland like her husband. The Lawlors employed Annie Humphries (aged 27), a local Roman Catholic, born in Bray.[4] The house was one of four on the street but only two were occupied in 1901. Both houses had nine rooms within and six windows at the front of the house.[5] Both houses had a stable and a coach house.[6] In 1914 Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor was living at 64 Palmerston Road in Dublin.[7]

 

9781164030133

 

Publishing history

From the 1890s until the 1930s Hugh Lawlor wrote and published many articles and some books to show the fruits of his education and advance knowledge (a list of his writings is printed below). Some of his articles appeared in the journals of the Royal Irish Academy, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland and the Henry Bradshaw Society. In 1920 Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor published his English translation of the Life of St. Malachy of Armagh by St. Bernard of Clairvaux. The book received wide acclaim and the introduction alone ran to over fifty pages. But the book also had a few points of contention as a fellow Antrim man, Charles McNeill pointed out that territorial bishops were not unknown in Ireland before the eleventh century.[8] In 1907 Hugh Lawlor became editor of the Irish Church Quarterly.

Helping other historians

During his academic career Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor helped a number of other historians by searching sources and passing on information. The obituary to Hugh Lawlor Dean in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 1939, p. 138 also ended its appraisal by noting Hugh Lawlor’s ‘ready help and encouragement of those embarking on the studies … which he was a master’. In 1920 when Rev. W.H. Rennison published his work on the Succession list of the Bishop, Cathedral and Parochial Clergy of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore (Dublin, 1920) he thanked Rev. Lawlor for gathering information at the British Museum library, now part of the British Library and supplying information from the original patent rolls in the Public Record Office of Ireland.[9]

Historical societies

In 1891 Hugh Lawlor joined the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. On 27th January 1921, at the Annual General Meeting of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor, D.D., Litt.D., was elected a member of the governing council (serving until 1928) with others such as William F. Butler and David A. Chart. He was already a fellow of the Society.[10]

In 1923 Rev. Hugh Jackson Lawlor was one of a number of noted Irish historians who gave evidence to the Seanad Committee on Irish Manuscripts. The committee’s report of 1924 recommended editing and publishing Irish manuscripts under the control of the Royal Irish Academy. The country was then in the midst of reconstruction after the War of Independence and Civil War and the report gathered dust. Later in 1928 an independent body, the Irish Manuscripts Commission, was establish to edit and publish manuscripts relating to Irish history.[11]

Dean St. Patrick’s and death

Even with his academic career Hugh Lawlor continued to hold positions in the Church. in 1900 he became the precentor of Trinity College and in 1902 he became the precentor at St. Patrick’s cathedral, Dublin. In 1906 Hugh Lawlor became a chaplain to the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. From 1924 until his retirement in 1933 he served as the (Church of Ireland) Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin. On 26th December 1938 Hugh Jackson Lawlor died after a life well spent in many different endeavours.

 

chapters-on-the-book-of-mulling-lawlor-hugh-jackson-1860-1938-w58dyc.jpg

 

Publications

 

1896-1901

‘The Kilcormick Missal – a manuscript in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin’, in Transactions Royal Irish Academy, xxxi (1896-1901), pp. 393-430

 

1897

Chapters on the Book of Mulling

 

1899

The Rossyln missal: an Irish manuscript in the Advocates Library, Edinburgh (London, 1899)

 

1900

‘Two notes on Eusebius’ in Hermathena: a Dublin University review, Vol. XI, No. XXVI, pp. 10-49

 

1903

‘Diary of William King, D.D., Archbishop of Dublin, during His Imprisonment in Dublin Castle’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Fifth Series, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 119-152

‘Notes on Lactantius’, in Hermathena: a Dublin University review, Vol. XII, No. XXIX, pp. 447-469

 

1908

‘The Chronology of Eusebius’ Martyrs of Palestine’, in Hermathena: a Dublin University review, Vol. XV, No. XXXIV, pp. 177-201

‘A calendar of the Liber Niger and Liber Albus of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin’, in Proceedings R.I.A., Vol. 27 (1908/1909), pp. 1-93

 

‘Calendar of the Liber Ruber of the diocese of Ossory’, in Proceedings R.I.A., Vol. 27 (1908/1909), pp. 159-208

 

1911

‘A Calendar of the Register of Archbishop Sweteman’, in Proceedings R.I.A., volume 29 (1910-11), C, No. 8, pp. 213-310

 

1912/1913

‘A Calendar of the Register of Archbishop Fleming’, in Proceedings R.I.A., volume 30 (1912-13), C, No. 5, pp. 94-190

 

Eusebiana: Essays on the Ecclesiastical History of Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea (1912)

 

1914/1916

‘A Charter of Cristin, Bishop of Louth’, in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Vol. 32 (1914-1916), pp. 28-40

‘A Charter of Donatus, Prior of Louth’, in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Vol. 32 (1914-1916), pp. 313-323

 

1916

‘The Cathach of St. Columba’, with E.C.R. Armstrong and W.M. Lindsay in Proceedings R.I.A., volume 33, pp. 241-443

 

1917

‘The Genesis of the Diocese of Clogher, With a note on the possessions of the Priory of St. Mary’ in Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society, Vol. IV, No. 2, pp. 129-153

‘The monuments of the Pre-Reformation Archbishops of Dublin’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Sixth Series, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 109-138

 

1918

‘Fragments of the lost register of Clogher’, in Louth Arch Society Journal, Vol. IV, No. 3, pp. 226-257

Lawlor, H.J. & Best, R.I., ‘The Ancient List of the Coarbs of Armagh’, in Proceedings R.I.A., volume 35

 

1920

St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh (1920)

 

1922

‘Eusebius on Papias’, in Hermathena: a Dublin University review, Vol. XIX, No. XLIII, pp. 167-222

 

1923

‘The chapel of Dublin Castle’, with M.S. Dudley Westropp in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Sixth Series, Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 34-73

 

1924

‘A Fresh Authority for the Synod of Kells, 1152’, in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Vol. 36 (1921 – 1924), pp. 16-22

‘The Biblical Text in Tundal’s Vision’, in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Vol. 36 (1921 – 1924), pp. 351-375

 

1926

‘Note of the Church of St. Michan, Dublin’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Sixth Series, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 11-21

‘The foundation of St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Sixth Series, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 22-28

 

1930

Fasti of St. Patrick’s (Dundalk, 1930)

 

1931

‘Booter Park’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Seventh Series, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 151-155

 

1932

The Reformation and the Irish Episcopate (London, 1932)

‘The deaneries of St. Patrick’s’, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Seventh Series, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 103-113

 

Other publications

The Psalter and Martyrology of Ricemarch, Vol. 1

The Ancient List of the Coarbs of Patrick (with Richard Irvine Best)

The ecclesiastical history (Ancient Greek Edition) H.J. Lawlor with John Ernest Leonard Oulton and Kirsopp Lake

 

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[1] https://prabook.com/web/rev_hugh_jackson.lawlor/750625 [accessed on 2nd September 2019]

[2] Maxwell, C., A History of Trinity College Dublin, 1591-1892 (Dublin, 1946), p. 202

[3] Maxwell, C., A History of Trinity College Dublin, 1591-1892 (Dublin, 1946), p. 202

[4] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001310006/ [accessed on 2nd September 2019]

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001310003/ [accessed on 2nd September 2019]]

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001310004/ [accessed on 2nd September 2019]

[7] Power, Rev. P. (ed.), Life of St. Declan of Ardmore and Life of St. Mochuda of Lismore (Irish Texts Society, Vol. XVI, 1914), p. 16, list of members

[8] Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Vol. X, Sixth Series, 1921, pp. 187, 188

[9] Rennison, Rev. W., Succession list of the Bishop, Cathedral and Parochial Clergy of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore (Dublin, 1920), pp. v, vii

[10] Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Vol. X, Sixth Series, 1921, pp. 86, 91

[11] Kennedy, M., & McMahon, D., Reconstructing Ireland’s Past: A history of the Irish Manuscripts Commission (Dublin, 2009), p. 4

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Biography, Monaghan History, Poems

Irish Writers: the 1911 neighbours of Patrick Kavanagh

Irish Writers: the 1911 neighbours of Patrick Kavanagh

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Introduction

This article recounts some of the boyhood neighbours of the Irish poet, Patrick Kavanagh, as they appeared in the 1911 census. In the 1911 census the future poet, Patrick Kavanagh was recorded in the house of his father in the townland of Mucker, in the civil parish of Donaghmoyne (Roman Catholic parish of Inniskeen), Co. Monaghan. Patrick Kavanagh was then aged seven years, the only son of James (aged 56) and Bridget Kavanagh (aged 38). James and Bridget Kavanagh had six daughters: Anne (aged 13), Mary (aged 11), Bridget (aged 8), Lucy (aged 4), Teresa (aged 3) and Margaret (just recently born). They had seven children in total and no recorded deaths. Also in the Kavanagh house on census night was Patrick Callan (63, widower) a journeyman shoemaker born in County Monaghan.[1] In the 1901 census Bridget Kavanagh said she was born in County Louth. Also in the 1901 census a general labourer called Michael Callan lived in the Kavanagh house which was still in Mucker townland.[2]

Both parents of Patrick Kavanagh were born in Co. Monaghan. James Kavanagh recorded his occupation as a shoemaker. Interestingly with just sixteen acres of land, James Kavanagh didn’t consider himself a famer. In 1911 James Kavanagh could read and write while also been able to speak Irish and English. His wife Bridget Kavanagh (they were married about 1897) could read and write but it is unknown if she could speak both languages.[3] The Kavanagh house had four rooms and four windows at the front of the house.[4] Outside house number two the Kavanaghs had three outhouses; a cow house (built between 1901 and 1910), a fowl house and a piggery.[5]

Mucker neighbours in 1911

In 1911 there were 51 people recorded in the census as living or visiting the townland of Mucker. This was a substantial increase on the 29 people living there in 1901. In 1911 there were seven dwelling houses in the townland of which five of the houses were owner occupied. House number one was lived in by Thomas Lennon (aged 43, farmer, could speak Irish and English and read and write) and seven other members of the Lennon family. They were joined on census night by Edward Gilligan, nephew of Thomas Lennon, and by Mathew Rooney (servant).[6] There were eight outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, one calf house, two piggeries, one fowl house, one barn and one shed.[7] In 1901 Thomas had just four outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.[8]

House number two in Mucker belonged to James Kavanagh. House number three was occupied by Alice Cassidy, renting from John Cassidy. Alice Cassidy was 95 years old and a widow. She spoke Irish and English but could only read.[9] Her house had just one room and no outbuildings.

House number four was occupied by John Cassidy (47, farmer) and his wife Margaret (45) and their four sons and two daughters. All the family were Roman Catholics born in County Monaghan.[10] The Cassidy house had three rooms and two windows at the front of the house.[11] There were six outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, two piggeries, one fowl house and one barn.[12]

House number five was occupied by Terence Lennon (48, farmer, couldn’t read) and his wife Rose (42) and their three sons and three daughters. Terence Lennon and his eldest son peter Lennon could both speak Irish and English. All the family were Roman Catholics born in County Monaghan.[13] The family house had two rooms and two windows at the front of the house. There were seven outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, two piggeries, one fowl house, one barn and one shed.[14] This was an increase from four outbuildings in 1901 with an extra piggery, fowl house and shed.[15]

House number six was occupied by Stephen Duffy (35, railway plate layer) and his wife Rose (30, couldn’t read) and their four sons and three daughters. All the family were Roman Catholics born in County Monaghan.[16] The house had three rooms and two windows at the front of the house and was rented from the Great Northern Railway Company.[17] There were two outbuildings; one piggery and one fowl house.[18]

House number seven was occupied by Charles McElroy (43, farmer) and his wife Jane (34) and their three sons and one servant, Michael Mullholland (20, single). All were Roman Catholics and born in County Monaghan except Michael Mullholland who was born in County Armagh. Charles McElroy was the only person to speak both Irish and English.[19] The dwelling house had four windows in the front of the house and four rooms within. There were twelve outbuildings; two stables, a cow house, two calf houses, one dairy, three piggeries, one barn and two sheds.[20] In 1901 Judith McElroy operated the farm with six outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, piggery, fowl house, barn and workshop.[21]

The interesting element of life in Mucker townland between 1901 and 1911 was the increase in the number of outbuildings owned by some of the residents while the dwelling houses were often left untouched. This was the period when many tenant farmers were able to buy the land they worked and there was a strong impulse to make improvements to their newly acquired property. The increase in the number of piggeries in Mucker helped keep the name of the townland alive as Mucker or Mucair means place where pigs were feed.[22]

 

Poet_Patrick_Kavanagh

Patrick Kavanagh at Mucker in 1963 (N.L.I. photo)

 

Mucker in previous times

In 1576 Mucker passed from McMahon owners to Walter Devereaux, 1sr Earl of Essex. The barony of Farney was later divided between the heirs of the 3rd earl of Essex, namely; the Earl of Hertford and Sir Robert Shirley. Mucker appears to have been part of the Devereaux/Shirley estate from 1607 when it was known as Muckhoure. The Shirley estate of over 26,000 was one of the largest in County Monaghan and covered much of the barony of Farney. In 1692 the estate was divided between the heirs of the 2nd earl of Essex, namely the Shirley family and the 1st Viscount Weymouth, later Marquess of Bath.[23]

In the 1850s the townland of Mucker (101 acres 3 roots 15 perches and worth £89 10s) was owned by Joseph Plunkett and had thirteen tenants living in eleven houses (two of the tenants only held land in Mucker and lived elsewhere). Among the tenants were Thomas Lennon (29 acres), Peter Cassidy (33 acres), and John McElroy (5 acres); surnames which were still at Mucker in 1911. The other substantial landholder was the joint tenancy of Edward and Michael Feighan with 14 acres rented from Joseph Plunkett. The same Joseph Plunkett was the landlord of a number of other townlands in Donaghmoyne parish including Coolnagrattan (162 acres), Shacoduff (126 acres) and Oghill (91 acres).[24]

In 1841 there were 70 people living in Mucker townland in 12 houses and this had decreased to 33 by 1851 (in 8 houses) but by 1861 the population had increased to 47 people (23 male & 24 female) living in 11 houses. Even with this improvement the Poor Law Valuation decreased from £93 in 1851 to £89 in 1861.[25] In 1871 there were 11 dwelling houses in Mucker and this decreased to 8 houses in 1881 and 7 houses in 1891 with a total of 18 outbuildings. The population over that time was 36 in 1871 and 20 in 1881 with a slight increase to 22 people in 1891 (9 male and 13 female). The Poor Law Valuation had decreased slightly to £88 by 1891. Thus in the fifty years between 1841 and 1891 the population of Mucker had decreased and increased and decreased again to increase slightly but overall 50 people were lost and 5 houses had fallen into ruins as rural Ireland adjusted to the Great Famine, emigration and trying to find a living on small farms in the stoney grey soils of Monaghan that Patrick Kavanagh often wrote about in his poetry.

 

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[1] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103862/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[2] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001137381/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[3] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Monaghan/Kiltybegs/Mucker/799100/ [accessed 15 June 2015]

[4] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103856/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103860/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[7] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001137376/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103864/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103866/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103856/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103868/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001137376/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[16] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103870/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[17] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103856/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[19] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103872/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003103858/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[21] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001137376/ [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[22] https://www.logainm.ie/en/39566?s=Mucker [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[23] http://www.irishidentity.com/stories/shirley.htm [accessed on 22 December 2018]

[24] Griffith’s Valuation, Monaghan, Farney barony, Donaghmoyne parish, Mucker townland,

[25] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14545/page/376729 [accessed on 22 December 2018]

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Biography, Waterford history

Power family of Ballygarran in Seventeenth Century

Power family of Ballygarran in Seventeenth Century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the seventeenth century Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, dominated the landed estate landscape of west Waterford – he owned many of those estates including the land of Ballygarran. Today (2018) the castle and townland of Ballygarran is not on any map. Instead the castle is usually referred to as Glencairn Abbey and the townland as Castlerichard. The seventeenth century Ballygarran extended from Glencairn Abbey and the River Blackwater south to the main road between Tallow and Lismore. For much of the seventeen the century the tenant of Ballygarran was the Power family.

Ballygarran

At the start of the seventeenth century (in 1602-3) Ballygarran is listed among the lands in the manor of Lisfinny containing one carucate of land.[1] The manor of Lisfinny was owned by the Fitzgerald family, Earls of Desmond, from about 1215 until 1583 when it was seized along with much of the vast earldom at the end of the Second Desmond Rebellion. In 1586 Lisfinny and Ballygarran passed to Sir Walter Raleigh as part of his grant by the government of 42,000 acres in west Waterford and east Cork. In 1602 Sir Walter Raleigh sold his Irish estates to Sir Richard Boyle. On 26th December 1595 Sir Walter Raleigh leased Ballygarran to Roger Suyvener, merchant, with other unnamed lands.[2] At some unknown time after 1595 Pierce Power acquired the lease on Ballygarran.

Pierce Power

In about 1600 Pierce Power married Elizabeth Boyle, sister of Sir Richard Boyle (later first Earl of Cork 1620).[3] In 1604 Lieutenant Pierce Power of Lismore apprehended three notorious malefactors in Co. Waterford, Callaghan McOwen, Daragh McOwen, his brother and Cormock McOwen. As a reward for the arrest, Pierce Power got ten pounds per head (£30 in total) which prize money was to be raise equally among the inhabitants of County Waterford.[4] As part of the Munster Plantation each grantee of land was to provide a military force to maintain order and assemble together in a larger force under the President of Munster if needed. On 30th August 1611 Pierce Power was in Tallow for the muster of Sir Richard Boyle’s tenants and the inhabitants of the surrounding area before Sir Richard Morrison, Vice-President of Munster. On the day Pierce Power was a lieutenant in the foot company of pikemen.[5]

Pierce Power and his brother-in-law, Sir Richard Boyle had a number of recorded transactions over the years. In February 1613 Sir Richard Boyle paid Pierce Power £40 for the use of Lady Honora.[6] While this show of trust was good, on a personal level Pierce Power was experiencing financial trouble. In March 1613 Sir Richard Boyle demanded Pierce Power to repay the money advanced by Boyle to clear Power’s debts. Yet this didn’t prevent Boyle from using Power in the former’s land dealings. In May 1613 Pierce Power gained possession of Jinnyshkeen from Garret Fitzjames Barry on behalf of Sir Richard Boyle.[7] In August 1614 Pierce Power got authority from Sir Richard Boyle to let the latter’s lands in the barony of Kinnatalloon for one year.[8] In October 1619 Sir Richard Boyle lent Pierce Power money to pay his bills.[9]

As previously said, it is not known when Pierce Power acquired the lease on Ballygarran. In June 1620 Pierce Power refused to renew the old lease on Ballygarran which was for life at £20 per year.[10] It is not known what were the terms of the new lease but as the Power family continued to live at Ballygarran then thy must have sign some lease agreement. It is possible that Pierce Power built a castle at Ballygarran but he could have also just redecorated an existing castle. In April 1617 Pierce Power got a ton of iron from Sir Richard Boyle for construction work on Ballygarran castle. at the same time Lieutenant Dowling got ten barrels of iron from Boyle for Ballysaggart house.[11]

 

Glencairn abbey

Glencairn Abbey – built on or near Ballygarran castle

(Niall O Brien photo)

From at least 1612 Pierce Power seems to have acted as a rent collector for Sir Richard Boyle in the manors of Lisfinny and Tallow. In October 1614 Pierce Power paid £10 to Thomas Fitzjohn Fitzgerald for the lease of Tallow on behalf of Sir Richard Boyle.[12] In April 1612, June 1614 and July 1616 Pierce Power collected rent for Sir Richard Boyle on part of the manor of Lisfinny.[13] In May 1615 Pierce Power collected £95 for Sir Richard Boyle as part of rent for lands in the manors of Lisfinny and Tallow and paid another £94 in November 1617.[14] In June 1618 Pierce Power paid £70 of the rents of Lisfinny and Tallow to Mitchel.[15] In April 1617 Pierce Power gave Sir Richard Boyle a velvet satin coat to cover money he was to pay the inhabitants of Tallow for some unknown purpose. Later in the month Sir Richard Boyle purchased provisions for his table from Pierce Power.[16]

Meanwhile on the Ballygarran estate Pierce Power breed cattle and was involved in the timber trade. In July 1617 Pierce Power sent 20 beeves (beef) to St. Leger’s ship.[17] In the 1620s Pierce Power got involved in the pipe staves trade. In March 1620 Pierce Power purchased 10,000 hogheads of pipe staves from Sir Richard Boyle.[18] The pipe staves trade was a big industry in the lower Blackwater region. Between 1616 and 1628 Sir Richard Boyle exported four million staves for £24,000 pounds.[19]

Elizabeth Power

It is not known when Pierce Power died but his wife, Elizabeth Boyle was a widow by 1634. On 20 October 1634 Mrs. Elizabeth Power, widow of Ballygarran, made her will. In it she asked to be buried in Youghal parish church (St. Mary collegiate church), as near as may be to her late husband Pierce Power. Her bequests included £5 to the poor of Lismore, 50 shillings to the poor of Youghal and 50 shillings to the poor of Ardmore. Elizabeth’s grandson, Pierce Power (son of Roger Power) was to get £100 while the residue of her estate went to her son and executor, Roger Power. The witnesses included Robert Naylor (dean of Lismore and cousin of Sir Richard Boyle), Aphra Maunsell, and Anne Begg. The will was proved on 28 November 1634.[20]

Roger Power

Roger Power succeeded his father Pierce Power before 1634 and succeeded to his mother’s estate in November 1634.[21]  In the same month of November 1634 Roger Power signed a new lease on Ballygarran for £50 per year and one fat bore. Also in November 1634 Roger Power travelled from Lismore to Dublin to deliver £2,660 on behalf of his uncle, Sir Richard Boyle.[22] In the first half of 1635 William Wiseman of Bandon died. In his will Wiseman mentioned his cousins, Sir Robert Travers, Sir Peter Smyth and Roger Power of Ballygarran.[23] The wife of William Wiseman was Alice Smyth, third daughter of Sir Richard Smyth of Ballynatray.[24] Alice’s aunt was Elizabeth Boyle, wife of Pierce Power of Ballygarran.

In February 1637 Roger Power acted with Sir Richard Boyle in securing the mortgage of Robert Stephenson for the latter’s house and lands in Dungarvan which he had mortgaged to John Fitzmathew Hore.[25] Before 1641 Roger Power held half of burgessmchenry outside Lismore (containing 20 arable acres worth £7). By 1654 this land was held by his son, Pierce Power.[26] At the start of the Confederate War in 1641 Roger Power served as a major in the army of King Charles I.[27] He was granted lands in Co. Wicklow for his services to the royalist cause.[28] In 1641 Catherine Power, a Protestant widow, held Ballygarran with its one ploughland of 320 acres of which 300 acres was arable (worth £24) and 10 acres of meadow (worth £5) with 10 acres of a coppice wood (worth £1). The property had a small castle and was held of Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork.[29] A good proportion of Ballygarran is still today (2018) devoted to tillage production.

Pierce Power

Pierce Power was the son and heir of Major Roger Power. In 1660 there were 3 English families living at Ballygarran and 33 Irish families.[30] In 1662 Pierce Power had goods valued at £7 10s upon which he paid £1 in tax. This was the usual tax rate for medium size landholders in Lismore parish at that time but not on the scale of the big landlords like George Knollys of Ballygally (the neighbouring townland o the west of Ballygarran) who had goods worth £18 15s.[31] On 11 May 1687 he secured an exchequer decree against Bethel Vaughan and others for lands granted to his father in Co. Wicklow. The decree was granted.[32]

Roger Power

In February 1687 Richard Cox informed the dowager Countess of Orrery that he was moving to England to live and as such would be retiring as guardian of the estate of Lady Mary Boyle (daughter of the 2nd Earl of Orrery). Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork and Burlington, recommended Mr. Roche (a lawyer) or Roger Power as the most suitable people to succeeded Cox.[33] On 12th August 1698 a mortgage was made by William Oldfield of Abbeyside, Co. Waterford to Roger Power of Lismore for £70 10s 1d on the lands of Nugents Burgery, Knockoulehane, Ardrmone, and Robertstown plus an unnamed location in the Barony of Decies, Co. Waterford. This was signed and sealed by Roger Power. The two witnesses to the mortgage were Benjamin Gumbleton and Michael Bagge.[34]

By 1708 the townland of Ardemone was back within the Oldfield family as Thomas Oldfield gave it in lese for five years to John Meagher of Ballykeroge, Co. Waterford. The rent was £11 for the first year, £12 for the next two years and £13 for the last two years.[35] If Roger Power was able to earn £11 from each of the five townlands in the 1698 mortgage then he could recoup his money within two years. His kinsman, the first Earl of Cork, would arrange it so the mortgage could not be repaid and the Earl would acquire more land.

Richard Power

On 19th September 1684 Richard Power of Carrigline made his will. In it Richard mentioned his son, Francis Power, to whom he left his interest in the lands of Carrigline and Ballygarran. Richard Power left £600 to his eldest daughter, Ann Power and £500 to each of his younger daughters, Catherine and Hanna Power. Richard Power left £5 to the poor of Carrigline and his watch and signet to his brother Robert Power (he had another brother called Pierce Power). Richard Power appointed his son Francis Power as executor and William Babington and his brother Robert Power as overseers and guardians of Francis during his minority. The witnessed to the will were Arthur Pomeroy, John Archdeacon and Robert Power. On 13th November 1684 Robert Power and William Babington took out administration of Richard’s estate. On 4th June 1695 Francis Power was of age and proved the will in the Prerogative Court.[36] But by 1695 the Power family had surrendered or loss the lease on Ballygarran from the 2nd Earl of Cork and 1st Earl of Burlington.

Richard Gumbleton

In 1695 Richard Gumbleton of Curraglass near Tallow acquired the lands of Ballygarran and Ralph, amounting to 542 and 79 acres respectively. In about 1720 Richard Gumbleton took out a fee farm grant on Ballygarran and on 9th June 1739 purchased the fee farm lease for £2,354 16s with a chief rent of £5 to Lord Burlington.[37] The descendants of Richard Gumbleton continued ownership of Ballygarran until the early twentieth century when the property was sold to the Cistercian Order and is today (2018) home to a house of Cistercian nuns called Glencairn Abbey.

 

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[1] Hayman, Rev. S., The hand-book for Youghal (Youghal, 1896, reprinted 1973), pp. 17, 20

[2] Hayman, The hand-book for Youghal, p. 18

[3] Kelly, Sr. V.G., OCSO, Glimpses of Glencairn (St. Mary’s Abbey, Glencairn, 2005), p. 2

[4] Clayton, M.C. (ed.), The Council Book for the Province of Munster, c.1599-1649 (Dublin, 2008), pp. 53, 54

[5] Brewer, J.S., & Bullen, W. (eds.), Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal library at Lambeth (6 vols. London, 1873, reprint Liechtenstein, 1974), vol. 6 (1603-1614), p. 89

[6] Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 6, p. 344

[7] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 344

[8] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 345

[9] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 379

[10] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 382

[11] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 378

[12] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 349

[13] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 340, 348, 360

[14] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 353, 369

[15] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 372

[16] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, pp. 377, 378

[17] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 367

[18] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 6, p. 381

[19] O’Brien, N., Blackwater and Bride: Navigation and Trade, 7000 BC to 2007 (Ballyduff, 2008), p. 39

[20] Ainsworth, J.F. (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 177

[21] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 177

[22] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 8, p. 496

[23] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 14, p. 731

[24] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 1039

[25] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 8, p. 500

[26] Simington, R. (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 County of Waterford vol. VI with appendices: Muskerry barony, Co. Cork: Kilkenny city and liberties (part) also valuations, circa 1663-64 for Waterford and Cork cities (Dublin, 1942), p. 15

[27] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200 accessed on 18th February 2016

[28] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200

[29] Simington (ed.), The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656 County of Waterford, p. 8

[30] Pender, S. (ed.), A census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661 (Dublin, 2002), p. 338

[31] Walton, J., ‘The subsidy roll of County Waterford, 1662’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 30 (1982), pp. 49-96, at p. 62

[32] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 200

[33] MacLysaght, E. (ed.), Calendar of the Orrery Papers (Dublin, 1941), pp. 324, 325

[34] Ainsworth, J.F. & MacLysaght, E. (eds.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power O’Shee Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 20 (1958), p. 243

[35] Ainsworth & MacLysaght (eds.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power O’Shee Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 20 (1958), p. 244

[36] Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping – Power Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), no. 197

[37] Kelly, OCSO, Glimpses of Glencairn, pp. 3, 5

Standard
Biography, Cork history, Dublin History

As I was going down Sackville Street in the 18th Century

As I was going down Sackville Street in the 18th Century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Sackville Street, or O’Connell Street as it is known today, was built about 1750 as part of a redevelopment of the area by Luke Gardiner who, in 1714, had acquired ownership of the St. Mary’s abbey estate from Viscount Moore, Earl of Drogheda. Luke Gardiner demolished the existing houses on the west side of Drogheda Street and widened the street by 150 feet creating a green mall down the centre known as Gardiner’s Mall.[1] The new street was named for Lionel Cranfield Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1731-37 and again in 1751-55. Fine quality houses were built on the east side for professional people and members of parliament. In 1752 Nathaniel Clements was an early investor in the Sackville Street project and built a fine town house on the street (later known as Leitrim House) on a plot he leased from Luke Gardiner. Nathaniel Clements later brought the fee simple of the property for £722 and lived in the house until 1765. Nathaniel Clements also owned two other houses in Sackville Street one of which he leased out while the other was occupied by Clement’s son, Robert Clements. In 1755 Luke Gardiner made Nathaniel Clements the sole trustee of Gardiner’s Mall. Sometime before 1754 Nathaniel Clements was offered the option of buying two houses on the east side of Sackville Street by Robert Handcock of Westmeath (the houses were designed by John Ensor), for £3,080 but declined.[2]

In the beginning Sackville Street was an enclosed rectangular street. In 1777 the Wide Streets Commission got a grant to extend the street to the River Liffey by knocking down the row of houses blocking the south end of the street. In 1782 the Commissioners got a grant of £15,000 to build Sackville Bridge (now O’Connell Bridge). The new bridge was completed in 1795 but extending Sackville Street (known as Lower Sackville Street) was still to be finished.[3] The quality of the houses in Lower Sackville Street didn’t match those of Upper Sackville Street. The army used some of these houses as a barracks but in 1802 the buildings collapsed, fortunately without loss of life.[4] The houses that occupied the site of the later GPO were so shaky that they could fall down without their residents having time to escape.[5]

The article recounts the story of some of the people who lived in Sackville Street in the eighteenth century using principally the information contained in the parish registers of St. Thomas.

The first people we find in the register of the parish of St. Thomas as living on Sackville Street were Michael and Sarah Ternan. On 28th September 1764 they presented their daughter, Jennet, for baptism in the parish church.[6]

Beatty

On 26th May 1773 Richard, son of Richard and Elizabeth Beatty of Sackville Street, was baptised in the church of St. Thomas.[7] This is the last reference to anybody living in Sackville Street in the parish of St. Thomas as the parish scribe didn’t record the address of later parishioners in the register. Over the next few years Richard and Elizabeth Beatty had other children called James, Ralph and Elizabeth but with address unknown. Like others on Sackville Street the Beatty family had possibly moved on. Their first recorded child in the register of St. Thomas in 1767 was made in Henry Street and in 1768 the family was living in Granby Row.[8] In 1799, a widow called Elizabeth Beatty of Dublin left a will.[9]

Clements

On 28th June 1769 William Thomas, son of Robert Clements of Sackville Street was baptised. Robert Clements was the son of Nathaniel Clements, MP and long term Vice-Treasurer of Ireland. In 1795 Robert Clements was made 1st Earl of Leitrim. It would appear that William Thomas Clements didn’t live long as he is not listed in the published pedigrees of Robert Clements. In 1758 William Clements (2nd son of Nathaniel Clements) had carpentry work done on the Sackville Street house. In 1807 the 2nd Earl of Leitrim let Leitrim House in Sackville Street and in 1807 sold the property to Josiah Wedgwood of Staffordshire.[10]

 

sackville street and mall by Joseph Tudor

Sackville Street by Joseph Tudor

Devenish

On 26th June 1769 the daughter of William and Ann Devonish of Sackville Street, Elizabeth, was baptised. This was possibly William Devenish, a Dublin attorney in 1765.[11]

Digby

In 1770 John Digby, son of John Digby, lived in Sackville Street. In April 1770 he was asked by his father to sit on the Navigation Board as the father was too old to attend. The Digby family had a country seat at Landestown in Kildare and were the ground landlords of the Aran Islands.[12]

French

On 9th November 1764 George French, esquire, and Martha, his wife, presented their son Robert for baptism. On 14th December 1771 George French, son of Arthur and Alicia French of Sackville Street, was baptised at the church of St. Thomas by Rev. Thomas Paul while the churchwardens Arthur Ormsby and Charles Willington looked on.[13]

Gill

On 18th March 1768 Elizier and Jane Gill of Sackville Street brought two children, Elizier and Ann, to the church of St. Thomas for baptism. Three years before (January 1765), Thomas Gill of Sackville Street was buried in the graveyard of St. Thomas. His relationship with Elizier Gill is unclear as in 1766 the Gill family were living in Cavendish Street.[14]

 

Gilmore

In October 1771 John and Marjory Gilmore lived in Sackville Street as did Charles and Elinor Craven along with Oliver and Jane McCasland.[15] In 1789, Anne Jane McCasland of Richmond, Co. Dublin left her will.[16]

Gore

In 1757 Sir Ralph Gore had a house in Sackville Street. He was the second son of Sir Ralph Gore (d.1733), Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. In 1772 Sir Ralph Gore was made 1st Earl of Ross. In 1771 Gore married Alicia, daughter of Nathaniel Clements, his first cousin.[17]

Harrick

On 31st July 1765 Joseph Harrick, son of Dudley and Jane Harrick of Sackville Street, was baptised in the parish church of St. Thomas. This Joseph Harrick must have soon died as on 1st March 1769 Dudley and Jane Harrick of Sackville Street, presented another Joseph Harrick for baptism in the church of St. Thomas.[18] In 1786 Dudley Harrick of Onagh, Co. Wicklow left his will while in 1802 Joseph Harrick of Ballybow, Co. Wexford left his will.[19] It is very possible that these are the same people that were in Sackville Street.

Hyde

In November 1767 John and Sarah Hyde lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, Anne. By December 1772 the Hyde family had moved to nearby Earl Street.[20] John Hyde’s country house was Castlehyde, near Fermoy, Co. Cork (in 2014 home of the celebrated Irish dancer, Michael Flatley). John Hyde was the third son of Arthur Hyde and Anne, daughter and heiress of Richard Price of Ardmayle, Co. Tipperary. In 1763 John Hyde married Sarah, daughter of Rt. Hon. Benjamin Burton of Burton Hall, Co. Carlow. In 1772 John Hyde succeeded his brother in ownership of Castlehyde. The Anne Hyde, baptised in 1767, married Col. William Stewart, 89th Regt., second son of Sir Annesley Stewart of Ramelton, Co. Donegal. The first President of Ireland, Douglas Hyde, descended from the second wife of John Hyde’s grandfather, Arthur Hyde, while John was descended from the first wife. The Hyde family came from Berkshire and settled in Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth.[21]

Jurgens

In January 1770 Charles and Elizabeth Jurgens lived on Sackville Street. When Charles Jurgens and Elizabeth Darley were married in March 1769 their address was given as Mecklenburg Street. In January 1766 a woman called Elizabeth Jurgens of Sackville Street died at age sixty. This Elizabeth may have been the mother of Charles but this is still to be established. By August 1771 Charles and Elizabeth Jurgens were living on The Strand. One year later the family was living on Batchelor’s Walk. Over the next few years the family faced joy and sadness. A son called Charles Jurgens was baptised in July 1773 but was dead by September 1773. Another son, Charles Henry Jurgens was baptised in July 1775 but again was dead by September of the same year. In September 1788 Charles Jurgens died at the age of sixty-nine years.[22]

Loftus

In 1766 Edward Loftus of Sackville Street made a lease to George Roth of Dublin of lands at Powerstown (254 acres) in County Kilkenny for three lives at £21 per year. Edward Loftus had a county seat at Richfield in County Wexford where he was appointed High Sherriff in 1784. Edward Loftus was the husband of Anne Loftus and father of Nicholas Loftus of Loftus Hall, Co. Wexford.[23]

Madden

In January 1771 Malachy and Rebecca Madden lived in Sackville Street with their new daughter, Elizabeth as did John and Mary Reade was their new son, Richard.[24] In 1791 and 1799 wills were proven for John and Mary Reade of Dublin, respectively.[25]

Murray

On 18th June 1769 John, son of Francis and Margaret Murray of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas church.[26] In 1790 Margaret Murray, a widow, of Rainsford Street, Dublin, left her will.[27]

Newenham

In May 1766 Sir Edward Newenham and his wife, Lady Grace lived on Sackville Street with their new son, William Thomas. By September 1767 the family had moved to Henry Street where they were joined by their new son, Charles Burton.[28] Over the full length of their marriage the Newenham family had eighteen children one of whom was Robert O’Callaghan Newenham, editor of Sketches of Ireland. Sir Edward Newenham was the third son of William Newenham of Coolmore, Co. Cork and Dorothy Worth, daughter and heiress of Edward Worth of Rathfarnham Castle, Co. Dublin.

Edward Newenham was born on 5th November 1734. He served as M.P. for Dublin in the Irish Parliament and in February 1764 was knighted. On 4th February 1754 Edward Newenham married Grace Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Burton, 1st Bt., of Pollacton, Co. Carlow. Sir Edward Newenham died in 1814.[29]

O’Malley (Mealy)

In 1772 Michael Mealy lived in Sackville Street where he was one of the deponents for Sir Lucius O’Brien and his family in a law suit against Poole Hickman.[30]

Ormsby

In September 1770 Arthur and Elizabeth Ormsby lived in Sackville Street. Arthur Ormsby was a church warden at St. Thomas Parish. In 1809 Arthur Ormsby, late of Dublin, died at Bath. In 1761 Sarah Donnellan, nee Ormsby, had a house in Sackville Street and landed property in Co. Limerick and Westmeath.[31]

Pery

On 20th November 1764 Edmund Sexton Pery, esquire, and his wife Elizabeth presented their baby girl, Diana Jane, for baptism.[32] Edmund Pery and family didn’t stay long in Sackville Street as by April 1766 they were living in Abbey Street. Edmund Sexton Pery was MP for Limerick and Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. He was the uncle of Edmond Henry Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick.[33]

Badham Thornhill

Later, on 27th May 1768, Edward Badham Thornhill and Mary, his wife, of Sackville Street presented their daughter, Barbara for baptism. By May 1772 Edward Badham Thornhill was living in Drogheda Street. Edward Badham Thornhill held an number of properties around Kanturk. His country seat was at Castle Kevin near Killavullen, Co. Cork.[34]

Power Trench

In May 1766 William Keating Power Trench and his wife Ann lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, also called Ann (married 1789 William Gregory). Ann Trench was formerly Ann Gardiner and sister of Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and daughter of Charles Gardiner. William Trench was the son of Richard Trench, MP of Garbally, Co. Galway. William Trench, MP for Galway (1768-97), was made 1st Viscount Dunlo (1801) and later 1st earl of Clancarty (1803). In June 1767 a son, Richard Power joined the Trench family on Sackville Street. In 1805 Richard Power became 2nd Earl of Clancarty.[35]

Younghusband

On 26th October 1765 two couples from Sackville Street presented their children for baptism at St. Thomas’ church. Joseph and Elizabeth Younghusband had their daughter, Sarah while William and Mary Evatt had their son, William, baptised. By June 1768 Joseph Younghusband and family had moved to Montgomery Street.[36] Later the Younghusband family would be recommended to move again as Montgomery Street became the centre of Dublin’s “red light district”. Between 1800 and 1925 Montgomery Street (Monto) was one of the most notorious areas for prostitution in Europe.[37] It would seem that the family did have ideas of the future for by November 1769 Joseph Younghusband was back living in Sackville Street.[38] A person called Joseph Younghusband of Whitehaven, Cumberland, mariner, left his will in 1796 but it is unclear if he was the same man as that in Sackville Street.[39]

Other people in Sackville Street

On 22nd May 1765 William Wilde, esquire, of Sackville Street and Ann, his wife, presented their new boy, Charles, for baptism at the parish church of St. Thomas.[40] On 18th August 1765 George and Jane Raferty of Sackville Street had their son, Thomas Sexton, baptised in St. Thomas’ church.[41]

On 26th April 1766 Jane Gallagher, daughter of John and Catherine Gallagher of Sackville Street, was baptised in the parish church of St. Thomas which was located on Marlborough Street.[42] On 4th May 1766 James Fortescue, esquire, and his wife, Mary Henrietta of Sackville Street presented their new daughter, Charlotte for baptism.[43] On 7th October 1766 Benjamin Paget, son of Benjamin and Ann Paget of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas’ church.[44]

On 26th April 1767 Ann Cathery, daughter of Charles and Ann Cathery of Sackville Street, was baptised.[45] In June 1767 John and Elizabeth Eyre lived on Sackville Street with their new son, Thomas.[46] On 27th September 1767 Henry Thomas, son of Lewis and Mary Thomas of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas’ church. On 23rd April 1769 another son of Lewis Thomas called Francis Edward was baptised.[47] On 23rd December 1767 Robert Creamer and his wife, Elizabeth Carter, presented their daughter Elizabeth for baptism in the church of St. Thomas.[48]

In February 1768 Abraham and Elinor Smyth lived on Sackville Street with their daughter, Mary.[49] In April 1768 William and Elizabeth Noble lived on Sackville Street with their son, Joseph.[50] On 22nd May 1768 Bernard and Jane Donelson of Sackville Street had their daughter, Jane, baptised on St. Thomas’ church.[51] On 5th June 1768 James and Henrietta Hunt of Sackville Street had their son, James, baptised in St. Thomas’ church by the Rev. Lewis Burroughs while P.H. Talbot and John Smyth, churchwardens looked on.[52] In September 1768 Nevil and Catherine Forth lived in Sackville Street with their daughter Catherine Matilda. Further along Sackville Street in November 1768 lived Francis and Margaret Ryan as did William and Elizabeth Donkin.[53]

In February 1769 Peter and Rebacca Murphy along with Henry Westenra and his wife, Harriot, lived in Sackville Street.[54] In March 1769 Walter and Hesther Taylor along with William and Ann Hawkins lived in Sackville Street.[55] On 8th August 1769 William, son of John and Ann Catherine Warburton, was baptised at the church of St. Thomas.[56] In December 1769 John and Lydia Semple lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, Martha.[57]

In September 1770 Michael and Mary Coglan lived in Sackville Street.[58] In November 1770 Simon and Frances Vierpyl lived in Sackville Street. In 1765 they were living on the Strand.[59]

In June 1772 Daniel and Ann Heatly lived in Sackville Street with their new daughter, Everina Ann.[60] In October 1772 John and Mary Walsh along with Stephen and Frances Fitzgerald lived in Sackville Street.[61]

In 1793 Elizabeth Poole, widow, gave her share in a house on Sackville Street to her son John Poole. The house was lately occupied by Mrs. Teresa Gleadore.[62]

Later Sackville Street

At first Sackville Street was mostly a residential street. The extension to the river and the bridge over the Liffey turned it into a through street. In 1808-9 Nelson’s Pillar (134 feet tall) was built in the centre of Lower Sackville Street.[63] In 1814-8 the General Post Office (by Francis Johnson) was built on the middle of the west side. At 200 feet long by 56 feet wide it dominated Sackville Street.[64] Other businesses and hotels followed such that by the end of the nineteenth century Sackville Street was a commercial street. During the 1916 Rebellion and later in the Civil War (1922-3) much of Sackville Street was destroyed. In the twentieth century, the Street, now renamed O’Connell Street, continued to change with fast food outlets in the 1960s all but eliminating the eighteenth century grandeur. Today only number 42 Upper O’Connell Street (built in 1752) survives in near original condition.[65]

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Bennett, D., Encyclopaedia of Dublin (Dublin, 1994), p. 56

[2] Malcomson, A.P.W., Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75 (Dublin, 2005), pp. 203, 380, 414; Malcomson, A.P.W. (ed.), The Clements Archive (Dublin, 2010), pp. 24, 266

[3] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 184

[4] Malcomson, A.P.W. (ed.), The Clements Archive (Dublin, 2010), p. xxxiv

[5] Ferguson, S., The GPO 20 years of history (Cork, 2014), p. 25

[6] Refaussé, R. (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791 (Dublin, 1994), p. 31

[7] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 58

[8] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 43, 61, 64, 65

[9] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 28

[10] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46; http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/leitrim1795.htm [accessed on 8th December 2018]; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, pp. lii, 24, 193, 863

[11] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46; Keane, Ed., & Phair, P.B., & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 130

[12] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), nos. 682, 695; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 227

[13] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 31, 54

[14] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 36, 41, 79

[15] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 53, 54

[16] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 300

[17] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), no. 554; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Gore,_1st_Earl_of_Ross [accessed on 8th December 2018]; Malcomson, Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75, p. 464

[18] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 33, 44

[19] Vicars, Sir A., Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 218

[20] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 57, 58

[21] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 2007, pp. 617, 618, 619

[22] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 48, 53, 59, 62, 80, 90, 93, 98, 109, 123

[23] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping, third series’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), nos. 158, 165, 168

[24] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 51

[25] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 393

[26] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 45

[27] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 343

[28] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 35, 39

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 2007, p. 881

[30] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), no. 1468; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 227

[31] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 50; Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 238; Eustace, P.B. (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of Wills, Vol. II, 1746-85 (Dublin, 1954), no. 271

[32] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 31

[33] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 34, 35; Malcomson, Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75, p. 197; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 863

[34] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 42, 55, 56; Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2002), pp. 105, 249, 314

[35] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 35, 38; Debrett’s Peerage, 1901, p. 181; http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/clancarty1803.htm [accessed on 7th December 2018]

[36] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 33, 42

[37] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 139

[38] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 47

[39] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 503

[40] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 32

[41] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 33

[42] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 8, 35

[43] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 35

[44] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 36

[45] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 38

[46] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 38

[47] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 45

[48] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 40

[49] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 40

[50] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 41

[51] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 41

[52] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 42

[53] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 43

[54] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 44

[55] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 45

[56] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46

[57] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 47

[58] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 50

[59] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 31, 51

[60] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 56

[61] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 57

[62] Ellis, E., & Eustace, P.B. (eds.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Dublin, 1984), no. 221

[63] Ferguson, S., The GPO 20 years of history (Cork, 2014), p. 27

[64] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 83

[65] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, pp. 184, 185

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Biography, Cork history

Percival Acheson: a 1916 causality at Fermoy

Percival Acheson: a 1916 causality at Fermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In 2016 commemoration ceremonies were held throughout Ireland to remember the centenary of the 1916 Rebellion. One of the unfortunate causalities of the 1916 Rebellion who was remembered was Major Percival Acheson.[1] In the north-east section of Castlehyde cemetery is the headstone of Percival Acheson upon which it is said that he was ‘Killed Easter Week 29th April 1916’. The Easter Rising began on Monday, 24th April 1916 and ended on Saturday, 29th April 1916.[2] Most of the fighting took place in Dublin with a few engagements around the country such as at Ashbourne Co. Meath, Enniscorthy and Athenry. On 2nd May 1916 a gun battle occurred at Bawnard house outside Fermoy to the south-east in which Constable Rowe was the first causality and David Kent the second. Did Major Percival Acheson die in Dublin or at the other battles? The reality was much more unfortunate for Major Percival Acheson and his family.

Major Percival Acheson died on 29th April 1916, the last day of the Rebellion, but not at any of the major battle sites.[3] Instead Major Acheson was shot at a road checkpoint at Grange, outside Fermoy after he failed to answer a challenge from the sentry on duty.[4] Another source says that the shooting happened at one of the entrances to one of the military barracks within Fermoy town.[5] The circumstances of the death are confusing just as the event was confusing for the sentry on duty. The death was a tragic case of death from friendly fire so near Acheson’s home in a town that was his home for nearly twenty years. Major Acheson was the husband of Mrs. P.H. Acheson of Ive-le-Bawn, Fermoy. The house was located a short distance outside Fermoy on the road to Mallow. Percival Acheson was a major in the Army Service Corps.[6] His headstone at Castlehyde also records his service in the Royal Scots.

 

 

Percival Havelock Acheson was born in 1858 in the Southampton area.[7] Another source says he was born in Fermoy.[8] In 1901 Major Acheson said he was born in England and in 1911 he refined this to say that he was born in Hampshire.[9]

Major Acheson was the son of the Joseph Acheson of Ballyane House, near New Ross, County Wexford.[10] Joseph Acheson lived at Ballyanne House in 1876, 1885 and 1900. During his time major race meetings were held on the estate until a new racecourse was built near Wexford town.[11]

On 23rd October 1875 Percival Acheson joined the Leicestershire Militia infantry beginning his service as a sub lieutenant. Captain Alfred Acheson was also in the Leicestershire Militia in 1876 but it is unknown if he was a relation.[12] In 1877 Percival Acheson was still a sub lieutenant in the Militia.[13]

In 1878 Percival Acheson transferred to the Royal Scots. On 4th December 1878 Percival Acheson was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Scots.[14] On 12th September 1884 Percival Acheson was appointed to the Commissariat & Transport staff of the Army Service Corps.[15] The Army Service Corps may not have been as glamorous as the charge of the Light Brigade but was, and still is, an important part of the British army ensuring supplies reach the front line troops and return to base. The Corps also provided administration of the numerous army barracks at home and overseas.

In 1885 Lieutenant Acheson served in the Sudan Expedition sent to relieve General Gordon at Khartoum.[16] In 1881 the Mahdi revolted in Sudan against the Egyptian government which government was backed by the British. Egypt also revolted and the country had to be occupied by a British army. In 1883 the famous Victorian general, Charles Gordon, was sent to Khartoum to evacuate the British delegation there. But instead the city was surrounded by forces of the Mahdi in the spring of 1884 and General Gordon died in the final assault on the city two days before the British relief force arrived.[17] In 1885-1886 Percival Acheson served in the Nile Expedition. He saw action at Ginnis (30th December 1885) and received a bronze star for the campaign.[18] The battle of Ginnis ended the first Sudan campaign but much of Sudan still remained under Mahdi control under the large campaign of 1896-1898 which ended with the re-conquest of Sudan at the Battle of Omdurman (2nd September 1898).[19] On 11th December 1888 Percival Acheson was made a captain in the Army Service Corps.[20]

On 1st April 1889 Percival Acheson married Charlotte Elizabeth Acheson [b. 31 Jan. 1865] of Gurrane, Kilworth at Castlehyde church. She was the daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Charles Deane and Elizabeth Margaret Deane, née Grant.[21] It is said that Ive-le Bawn house was built in 1889 as a wedding present.[22] The Deane family would only jump at the opportunity to design a new house as they came from a very distinguished line of architects. Sometime before 1869 Alexander Deane, the father of Charles Deane, built Gurrane house for his son on land purchased in about 1850.[23] Alexander Deane, a prominent Cork builder, was the father of Thomas Deane (1792-1871), architect (his works include the quadrangle of University College Cork, the portico of Cork Courthouse and the Commercial Buildings, part of the Imperial Hotel) and grandfather of Thomas N. Deane (1828-1899), architect (his works include the National Library and National Museum in Dublin), and great grandfather of Thomas M. Deane (1851-1933), architect (his works include the Royal Collee of Science, Dublin, now Government Buildings and the Anthropological Museum in Oxford).[24]

Colonel Charles Deane was formerly an officer in the 3rd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers. Colonel Deane was an active supporter of local institutions. He served for 35 years as treasurer of the Sustentation Fund of Fermoy parish and was vice-chairman for a number of years of the Fermoy Board of Guardians. His funeral in June 1912 was one of the largest ever seen in the Fermoy area. He was buried in Castlehyde cemetery. Colonel Deane’s two sons Major Deane and W.J. Deane attended the funeral as did his son-in-law, Major Percival Acheson.[25]

In 1890 Percival and Charlotte Acheson had a son, Charles Deane Acheson, while based in Fermoy.[26]

On 1st April 1894 Captain Acheson was made a major in the Army Service Corps.[27] On 31sy July 1895 Major Percival Acheson retired from the army to be with his young family at Fermoy.[28]

In 1901 Percival Acheson (42) was living at Ive-le-Bawn with his wife Charlotte (39) and two unmarried servants; John O’Donaghan (40, groom/domestic servant) and Kathleen Donovan (30, general domestic servant). All could read and write while John could speak both Irish and English.[29] In 1901 Ive-le Bawn house had nine windows at the front of the house and six rooms within while Percival Acheson was the declared owner.[30] The house hd two outbuildings, a stable and a coach house.[31]

On the night of 1901 census Charles Deane Acheson (11) was staying at the house of his grandfather, Charles Deane (70, born c.1831) in the townland of Gurraumgerinagh.[32]

In 1911 Percival Acheson (52) was living with his wife Charlotte Acheson (46) at Ive-Le Bawn with one domestic servant, Anne Ryan (aged 26, a Roman Catholic).[33] At that time (1911) Ive-le-Bawn house had ten windows in the front of the house facing south over the river Blackwater and ten rooms within. This is different from that recorded in the 1901 census and suggests that some reconstruction work was done in the intervening decade. Major Acheson was recorded as the owner of the house.[34] Outside was a stable, coach house and a shed.[35]

When the Great War broke out in August 1914 Percival Acheson offered his services to the Army Service Corps and returned to active service.[36]

After his death in April 1916, his widow, Charlotte Acheson, continued to live in the Fermoy area. She died on 13th June 1924 and was buried with her husband at Castlehyde.[37] Their son, Charles Deane Acheson joined the army and served with the Royal Scots from 1910. He died at Tientsin on 17th November 1929 as a major, the same rank of his father when he died.[38]

As well as the headstone in the north-east section of Castlehyde cemetery, Major Acheson is also remembered on the War Memorial in St. Finbarr’s Cathedral, Cork.[39]

 

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End of post

 

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[1] https://www.corkcoco.ie/sites/default/files/2017-04/Heritage%20Centenary%20Sites%20.pdf [accessed on 4th December 2018]

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Rising [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[3] https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2743504/acheson,-percival-havelock/ [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[4] https://wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/view.php?uid=238175 [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[5] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Cork, 2010), p. 166

[6] http://www.everymanremembered.org/profiles/soldier/2743504/ [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[7] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[8] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Cork, 2010), p. 166

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001928324/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[10] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[11] Rowe, D., & Scallan, E., Houses of Wexford (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2004), no. 89

[12] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1876 (London, 1876), p. 720; https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[13] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1877 (London, 1877), p. 723

[14] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1880 (London, 1880), p. 234

[15] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1890 (London, 1890), p. 237

[16] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1914 (London, 1914), p. 1309

[17] Churchill, W., The River War (London, 1973), pp. 30, 39, 47, 67

[18] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1914 (London, 1914), p. 1309; https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ginnis [accessed on 4th December 2018]. The Battle of Ginnis was a British victory and the last battle in which the British army worn red coats.

[19] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ginnis [accessed on 4th December 2018].

[20] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1890 (London, 1890), p. 237

[21] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/185508060/charlotte-elizabeth-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[22] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2002), p. 208

[23] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2002), p. 190. This house is still with the extended Deane family as in 1932, Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Deane, married Travers Robert Blackley and the Blackley family still live in the house.

[24] Cadogan, T., & Falvey, J., A Biographical Dictionary of Cork (Dublin, 2006), pp. 78, 79

[25] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 137

[26] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[27] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1914 (London, 1914), p. 1252

[28] Hart, H.G., The Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Service List, 1914 (London, 1914), p. 1252; https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000573483/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[30] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000573478/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[31] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000573479/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000570874/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001928324/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[34] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001928294/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[35] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001928296/ [accessed on 3rd December 2018]

[36] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[37] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[38] https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/162007387/percival-havelock-acheson [accessed on 2nd December 2018]

[39] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Cork, 2010), p. 166

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