Waterford history

Mocollop at the turn of the Twentieth century

Mocollop at the turn of the Twentieth century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

The townland of Mocollop is situated on the north bank of the River Blackwater in the civil parish of Lismore and Mocollop. The townland contains the ruins of a medieval castle, a nineteenth century Church of Ireland church (in ruins since 1960s) and Mocollop house, long the residence of the Drew family for near 200 years. In 1901 there were five inhabited houses in the townland, one uninhabited house and a school house.[1] In 1911 there were still five inhabited houses, one empty, a school house and the church was mentioned.[2] All the dwelling houses were owned by Henry William Drew.

DSC05253

 

view over Mocollop 

Mocollop House (house number one in 1901 & 1911)

In 1901 and 1911 Mocollop House was the residence of the Drew family, the local landlords for over 200 years. The family descended from an officer in the Irish army of Queen Elizabeth at the close of the sixteenth century. At the turn of the twentieth century Henry William Drew was the head of the family. Henry William Drew was born on 14th March 1848 at the height of the Great Famine. He was the only son of Henry Drew of Wynberg, South Africa, and his wife, Gertrude, daughter of a Mr. Albertyn and widow of a Mr. Williams.[3]

Henry Drew of Wynberg was the youngest and sixth son of Henry Drew of Mocollop and Amy, daughter of Higatt Boyd of Rosslare, Co. Wexford.[4] The eldest son of Henry and Amy Drew was called Francis (a popular name in the Drew family) and he succeeded to Mocollop Castle on the death of his father. Francis Drew married Anna Maria Ross and had a son and a daughter. The son, Francis, died unmarried in 1839 and thus his sister, Olivia Maria succeeded to Mocollop. Olivia Maria Drew married twice; first in 1841 to James Barry and following his death in 1881 she married George Edward Hillier. When Olivia Maria Drew died in 1884 she left no children by her two husbands.[5]

The succession to the Mocollop estate then reverted to the second son of Henry and Amy Drew, Tankerville Chamberlain Drew. Tankerville Drew had died on 15th June 1843, aged 48 years.[6] By his wife Jane, daughter of John Elmore, Tankerville Drew left two children; Francis and Helen.[7] The life of Francis Drew is not recorded and we don’t know when he died.

After the death of Francis and Helen the succession to Mocollop reverted to the third son of Henry and Amy Drew, John Drew and then to the fourth son, Samuel Drew and then to the fifth son, James Drew. By 1895 all these heirs had died without children and the succession passed to the sixth son, Henry Drew of Wynberg. But Henry Drew had died long before then in 1866 and thus Mocollop passed to his son, Henry William Drew.[8]

Henry William Drew was born in the Cape Colony according to the 1901 census. After some education in South Africa, Henry William Drew went to England where he qualified as a medical doctor in England. Henry William Drew then went to India where he served with the Indian Army. On 15th April 1873 he married Cherry Geraldine (also born in the Cape Colony), only daughter of Bolton S. Honeylorne. When the 1904 edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry was published the couple had six children.

These children were: Henry William Drew junior (born 26th January 1874), Francis Charles Drew (born 1st April 1875), Cecil Bolton Drew (born 12th September 1879), Desmond Drew (born 16th August 1886), Kathleen Maud Drew and Violet Mary Drew.[9] The 1911 census said that Henry William Drew and Cherry Geraldine had ten children of which five were still living. Elsewhere we learn that Cecil Bolton Drew died on 4th February 1905 at Beaufort West, South Africa. Cecil Drew must have returned to South Africa after his father inherited Mocollop. The other four deceased children possibly died early in South Africa. In the 1901 and 1911 census returns only the two daughters (Kathleen and Violet, both born in Cape Colony) of Henry William Drew and Cherry Geraldine were living with their parents at Mocollop.[10]

Servants at Mocollop House

When Henry William Drew came from South Africa in 1895 he brought with him three Zulu servants. In the 1901 census only two such servants are listed as living at Mocollop. These were Autie Drew, a female servant aged 15 and born in the Cape Colony, and Beu Bonoyd, a male servant aged 15 and born in Maleteland. Both servants were members of the Church of Ireland as were all members of the Drew family. In 1901 census also tells us that both servants could read and write. By the 1911 census this had changed and Autie Drew was listed as couldn’t read. Beu Bonoyd was not living at Mocollop in 1911 and his fate is as yet unknown.[11]

Two other servants were living in Mocollop House in 1901; Hannah Parsley and Mary Ann Sullivan, both Roman Catholics. Hannah Parsley was the cook and was aged 45 years. She was born in County Cork and could both read and write along with being able to speak Irish and English (the only member of the household to speak two languages). Hannah Parsley was also previously married but by 1901 was a widow. In 1911 Hannah Parsley was no longer at Mocollop and her job as cook was then performed by Autie Drew.

The other Irish servant of 1901 was Mary Ann Sullivan, a native of County Waterford and not married. Mary Ann Sullivan was listed as a general servant who could read and write. By 1911 Mary Ann Sullivan had left Mocollop.

In 1911 there were five servants living in Mocollop House. These were; Autie Drew, Bridget Flynn (domestic servant), Mary Latty (dairywoman), William Brown (domestic servant and house boy) and Patrick Healy (coachman).[12] In 1901 John O’Connor was the coachman but he had retired by 1911.

 

Mocollop_Castle__House__Ballyduff_Upper

Mocollop House c.1900

Structure of Mocollop House 1901 & 1911

In 1901 Mocollop House had five windows at the front of the house with twenty-four rooms within. Outside there were sixteen outbuildings.[13] By 1911 Mocollop House had fourteen windows at the front of the house and fourteen rooms within with fifteen outbuildings.[14] The 1901 return giving the purpose of each outbuilding has not survived but in 1911 these outbuildings were two stables, one coach house (inside the round tower of the medieval castle), one harness house, one dairy, two fowl houses, one boiling house and two barns along with one turf house, one laundry and three sheds.[15]

House number two in 1901 and 1911

In the 1901 and 1911 census returns there were four other dwelling houses in the townland of Mocollop. House number two in 1901 was occupied by the Bourke family with Johanna Bourke as head of the household. Johanna Bourke was aged 60 years and was a widow. She couldn’t read. Johanna Bourke listed her occupation as a housekeeper, possibly for her own house and also at Mocollop House. In 1901 she had not only to care for her own family but entertained two boarders.

These boarders were John Smith (married and aged 52) and John Davidson (unmarried and aged 27). Both were from Scotland and were temporary employed on the Mocollop estate was rabbit trappers.

The 1901 census records two sons and one daughter as living with Johanna Bourke, all three were unmarried. These children were George Bourke (aged 24), Johanna Bourke (aged 22) and Thomas Bourke (aged 20). Johanna Bourke had at least another daughter as the 1901 census records Johanna Daly, granddaughter, as in the house on census night.

In 1901 the Bourke house was described as having one window in the front elevation and three rooms within. By 1911 this had changed to two windows in front and only two rooms within. The number of outbuildings remained unchanged at two in both census returns.

House number three in 1901 and house number five in 1911

In 1901 and 1911 this house (with 2 windows in front and 3 rooms within) was occupied by John O’Connor with no outbuildings. In 1901, John O’Connor (aged 57, born Co. Cork) was the coachman for Mocollop House. He was married to Mary (aged 56, born Co. Waterford), a domestic servant. With them in the house in 1901 was their daughter Johanna (aged 24, born Co. Waterford).[16] Sadly in just over two years Johanna died (14th August 1903) and was buried in the nearby Mocollop graveyard. By 1911 John O’Connor was 74 years old and a retired coachman. Also by 1911 John was a widower and was living alone.[17] The big increase in his age was experience by many people between 1901 and 1911 as they tried to be old enough to qualify for the Old Age pension which was introduced in 1910.

House number four in 1901 and house number three in 1911

In 1901 this house (with 2 windows in front and 2 rooms within) was occupied by Patrick Enright. The Enright family had four outbuildings in 1901 and six outbuildings in 1911. These 1911 outbuildings were one each of a stable, piggery, fowl house, potato house, shed and the all-important forge.[18] In 1850 Patrick Keane operated a forge on the site and there was possibly a forge there for many decades before that.[19]

In 1901 Patrick Enright (aged 55, born Co. Cork) worked as a blacksmith along with his son, James Enright (aged 32, born Co. Cork) who was also a blacksmith. The third person in the 1901 household was Patrick’s wife, Mary Enright (aged 65, born Co. Cork) who could not read whereas her husband and son could both read and write.[20]

By 1911 James Enright was head of the household and was married seven year to Bridget Enright (aged 31, born Co. Waterford). They had five children, Richard, Daniel, James and Ellen. There was one child missing on the census night. One person who was not missing was Patrick Enright. By 1911 he was still working as a blacksmith and now 72 years old, another person like John O’Connor who had aged rapidly in the previous decade – must be something in the Mocollop air.[21]

It is also of note that the wider Enright family had the occupation of a blacksmith or engineer in their blood. In the 1911 census for Co. Cork there was Michael and Danial Enright as blacksmiths at Ringaskiddy with Thomas Enright as a boiler maker, while another Thomas and James Enright were blacksmiths at Shanbally, with a third Thomas Enright as a railway engine fitter in Cork city. Also in County Cork were Danial and Patrick Enright who were both blacksmiths at Ardra while John Enright was a fitter in a Cork city foundary.

House number five in 1901 and house number four in 1911

In 1901 this house was occupied by William O’Brien (aged 59, born Co. Cork), land steward, with his wife, Mary (aged 49, born Co. Clare) and their daughter, Mary (aged 23, born Co. Waterford).[22] In 1901 the house had three windows on the front elevation with four rooms within and two outbuildings outside.

By 1911 William O’Brien was a widower while still working as a land steward. His daughter Mary O’Brien was still living in the house.[23] The O’Brien house in 1911 still had three windows at the front and four rooms within but now had only one outbuilding, a piggery.[24]

End of one era and beginning of another

On 16th October 1918 Cherry Geraldine Drew died. On 7th June 1925 Henry William Drew died. It is said that he was buried with his gun and his dog. By that time the world around Mocollop House was changing fast. The southern counties of Ireland had broken away from the United Kingdom to form the Irish Free State. Closer to home the ancient landed estate of the Drew family was gradually passing into the ownership of the tenant farmers.[25] Over the next few decades of the twentieth century the Drew family left Mocollop, the Enright forge closed down, the nearby church went into ruins but a new Mocollop house stands at the dawn of a new century to continue the story of a rural townland forever changing.

 

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[1] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226478/ accessed 11th November 2014

[2] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488428/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[3] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[4] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[5] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[6] Grave stone inscription, Mocollop graveyard

[7] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[8] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 24, p. 6; Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[9] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[10] Census of Ireland, 1901 and 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[11] Census of Ireland, 1901 and 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[12] Census of Ireland 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226478/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488428/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[16] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226481/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[17] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488440/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[19] Griffith’s Valuation, Mocollop, parish of Lismore & Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226482/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[21] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488436/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226483/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488438/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[24] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[25] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/22658/page/638873 accessed on 20th August 2017

Standard
Cork history

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Forward family of Eighteenth Century Fermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

For much of the eighteenth century the Forward family owned the site of the modern town of Fermoy, Co. Cork and the surrounding countryside. But in the history of Fermoy the family are passed over with only a few brief references as historians concentrate on the history of Fermoy after it was totally rebuilt by John Anderson. This article aims to add some more facts and flesh to the Forward family.

Christopher Forward senior

The earliest member of the family was Christopher Forward senior who was a merchant in Cork city around 1700. Many years before that, in 1682, Christopher Forward was assigned seat number 47 along with John Potts.[1] On 24th July 1705 Christopher Forward acquired an interest in the Fermoy estate, its lands and mills by indenture. These lands were got in trust for William Cockerell, merchant of Cork, for 1,000 years.[2] In 1690 William Cockerell had married Barbara Forward, sister of Christopher Forward.[3] Yet other sources say it was Henry Luther who purchased Fermoy on behalf of William Cockerill.[4]

The Fermoy estate was previously owned the Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, as part of his great estate across Counties Cork and Waterford. Fermoy was given to one of his sons, Robert Boyle, the famous scientist. When Robert Boyle died in 1698 the Fermoy estate was taken over by trustees on behalf of the 3rd Earl of Cork and sold in 1705 to William Cockerell.[5] But as we saw previously Christopher Forward was as much involved in the Fermoy estate as his brother-in-law, William Cockerell. Perhaps Christopher Forward provided some of the purchase money.

 

fermoy_king_street_vcbq

King Street (MacCurtain Street), Fermoy

The Cockerell family were prominent in Cork city politics at the turn of the eighteenth century. In 1700 Francis Cockerell was sheriff of Cork city and in 1705 he was mayor. In the same year of 1705 William Cockerell was city sheriff. In 1717 Charles Cockerell was the city sheriff.[6] In 1704 William Cockerill was one of the vestrymen of the church of St. Maria at Shandon.[7] Christopher Forward was also involved in the same church. In April 1711 Christopher Forward was church warden of the parish church of St. Maria of Shandon with Francis Gray. In that year £20 was laid out on the fabric of the church.[8] Elsewhere about the year 1709 Christopher Forward was a witness to a number of property deeds in and around Cork city with Samuel Hodder.[9]

Sadly William Cockerell didn’t enjoy his new estate at Fermoy for long as he died in 1707 and Fermoy was inherited by his wife.[10] His widow, Barbara Cockerill, later remarried to Thomas Hodder.[11]

Christopher Forward junior

It is not clear if the Christopher Forward who was brother-in-law of William Cockerill was known as Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior. Just five years after the purchase of Fermoy a merchant named Christopher Forward junior was very much part of the business world of the early eighteenth century.

By 1710 Joshua Savery, merchant of Mallow, was indebted to Christopher Forward junior, merchant of Cork, to the amount of £375. To help pay the debt on 13th July 1710 Joshua Savery gave Christopher Forward three leases he had on lands around Mallow (Killetra) and other property in the Baronies of Duhallow (Gortnagross) and Fermoy. Christopher Forward was allowed to hold these lands until redeemed by Joshua Savery.[12]

On 31st March 1727 Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Richard Lloyd (rector of Rathcormac 1742 to his death April 1775). They had four sons and two daughters of which the eldest was Richard Lloyd of Tullygreen House who married Jane, daughter of Thomas Austen and left issue. Christopher the second son married Elizabeth Bateman and left issue. William the third son died in 1736 aged two while the fourth son, Samuel married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Austen. The two daughters of Elizabeth Forward were; Elizabeth (died 1734 aged one year) and Barbara who married Lt. Stephen Sandys, Royal Navy. Elizabeth Forward died on 26th November 1778.[13]

In 1728 Barbara Forward married Richard Gaggin.[14] It is not known if she was a daughter of Christopher Forward senior or Christopher Forward junior.

In 1708 Christopher Forward married Elizabeth Austen.[15] Christopher Forward died sometime between 1727 and 1758. In early January 1758, Elizabeth Forward, the widow of Christopher Forward, died at Fermoy.[16] This was possibly Christopher Forward junior

William Forward

By her will, dated 20th February 1724 Barbara Cockerill gave the Fermoy estate to her nephew William Forward.[17]

At some date William Forward married Margaret Hely, daughter of Francis Hely of Gortroe, Co. Cork and his wife, Prudence Earbery (married 1719), daughter of Matthias Earbery of Ballincollig (son of Nicholas Earbery) and his wife Margaret Vowell.[18] It appears that the early members of the Earbery family in Ireland were Quakers. In July 1687 Elizabeth Earbery, a widow of Cork city, wished to be buried in the Quaker burial ground.[19] The Earbery family married into the Hendley family of Araglin and later of Mount Rivers, near Fermoy. In February 1760 Mrs. Hendley, widow of Roger Hendley, and sister of Christopher Earbery of Shandangan, died at Araglin near Kilworth.[20] William Forward’s sister Frances would later married James Hendley of Fermoy. Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers in the 1840s no doubt took his first name from his ancestor, Matthias Earbery.

Francis Hely had two other daughters, Prudence who married Thomas Spraight and another daughter who married Mr. Duquery, along with a son, John Hely. In 1751 John Hely married Christiana, daughter of Lorenzo Nixon of Co. Wicklow and niece and heir of Richard Hutchinson of Knocklofty, Co. Tipperary and took the name of John Hely Hutchinson. In 1783 Christiana was made Baroness Donoughmore (Matthias Earbery held land at Donoughmore in the barony of Muskerry, Co. Cork in early 18th century) and in 1800 her son Richard was made Earl of Donoughmore. In 1761 John Hely Hutchinson was elected M.P. for Cork city which he represented until his death in 1795.[21]

Fermoy in the Eighteenth century has often been described as a poor place of little activity, yet the records show some activity in the area. In 1755 William Crow operated an inn in Fermoy. In 1757 Owen Keeffe of Fermoy advertised that he had 1,000 apple trees for sale.[22]

The election of his brother-in-law in 1761 must have given William Forward bright hopes for the future but within four years a series of deaths would change everything. In the 1764 will of William Forward, he named his wife, Margaret, and eldest daughter, Barbara. Yet this must be the eldest surviving daughter as in May 1761 William Forward’s eldest daughter died at Mallow.[23] This sorrowful death was followed in 1762 by a more significant death. On Tuesday, 21st December 1762 at Fermoy, Francis Forward, the only son of William Forward, died.[24]

In the face of these deaths William Forward prepared for his own death by making his will. On 26th August 1764 William Forward of Fermoy made his will in which he made his wife Margaret and brother-in-law John Hely Hutchinson as his executors. He only made his will just in time as he died in the last week of September 1764 at Fermoy.[25] The will was proved on 5th January 1765. The witnesses to the will were James Hendley, Richard Page and Mathew Hendley.[26]

Also mentioned in William’s will was his niece Elizabeth Hendley and nephews James Hendley and William Hendley. These were the children of Francis Forward, William’s sister and her husband James Hendley of Fermoy.[27] This Hendley family could possibly be connected with that of Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers who between 1836 and 1847 was the agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Birkenbog, Scotland.[28]

It is said that it was John Anderson was the first to build Fermoy house on the north bank of the River Blackwater about 1800. The central block was a two storey five bay house with a three bay wing on each side terminated by a high pitched one bay end. The house was still standing in the 1960s but has since been demolished.[29] Yet with so many members of the Forward family dying at Fermoy it is unlikely that they lived in a mud house or a room in the ‘Carman’s Inn’. Somewhere under the modern town or in the grounds of the present Fermoy house must have been a house built by the Forward family as their residence.

 

fermoy house main section

Fermoy house as built by John Anderson

William Forward left six daughters (Barbara, Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca, Margaret and Christina) who each got an equal share of the Fermoy estate.[30] But it is uncertain if the estate was indeed divide into six parts as the eldest daughter had died in 1761 and so there was only five daughters living by the time William Forward died. The estate should then have only being divided into five parts and not six – clearly there is some work to do to solve that issue. In 1774 the heirs of William Forward were the impropriators of the extra parochial parish of Fermoy. Later in 1774 they sold the right of impropriator to John Nason. The right of impropriator was later acquired by John Anderson.[31]

By 1791 two of the daughters (Christina and Elizabeth – see below) of William Forward had married and acquired their sixth shares.[32] A third daughter, Rebecca, had also got married but seems not to have secure her sixth share or fifth share depending on how many heirs there truly were (see below).

In September 1765 Joshua Poultney died at Fermoy. He was a member of the King’s Bench and one of the oldest freemen of Cork city.[33]

Fermoy at the end of the eighteenth century was described as a small village of poor cabins surrounding the ruins of the medieval abbey. The one substantial building was a two story house described as a ‘carman’s inn’. The village did have three fair days; on 21st June, 20th August and 7th November, which provided some commercial benefits. The biggest asset of the town was thirteen arch stone bridge across the River Blackwater which was built in 1687 at a cost of £7,500.[34]

 

hodges_fermoybridge

Fermoy bridge in olden days 

Purchase of Fermoy by John Anderson

In 1791, John Anderson, a merchant and mail coach operator, purchased four parts of the Fermoy estate for £40,000 along with the associated tithes. By 1791 one unmarried daughter of William Forward was owner of four sixths of Fermoy but was interested in selling and John Anderson purchased the estate from her through the Court of Chancery.[35]

As the Fermoy historian J.R. O’Flanagan wrote ‘Learning Miss Forward was willing to dispose of her property at Fermoy, Anderson resolved to buy it and deal with the government. Not being possessed of sufficient means, he made tempting offers which enabled him to procure a loan of £40,000 from the Douglas family and become the proprietor of Fermoy’.[36]

The purchase of Fermoy has always being assumed to be the four parts held by four of the six daughters of William Forward. Yet other sources say that John Anderson purchased Fermoy for £50,000 in 1797 from William Forward, M.P. and Privy Councillor.[37]

John Anderson was originally from Scotland and founded a merchant business in Cork city. In 1789 John Anderson established Ireland’s first mail coach business with routes across Ireland. John Anderson borrowed the money from Sir William Douglas of Carlingwark, near Anderson’s home place in Scotland. Some this loan was still unpaid in 1830 when Sir William died.[38]

John Anderson had previous knowledge of Fermoy as he had established a coach-building and repair yard there as part of his mail coach business. The medieval Cistercian abbey ruins were still there in 1792 where the attached graveyard was frequented by pigs and other farm animals. Almost immediately after purchasing the estate, John Anderson demolished the abbey ruins and the hamlet around it and within a few years had built a totally new town with fine squares and straight streets.[39]

Mary Forward and Margaret Forward

Mary and Margaret Forward were two of the six daughters of William Forward of Fermoy. It would seem that one of them was possibly the eldest daughter of William Forward that died at Mallow in 1761.[40] The surviving sister or possibly Barbara was the unmarried heiress who by 1797 held fourth sixths of the Fermoy estate which was purchased by John Anderson.

Barbara Forward

Barbara was alive in 1764 when she was mentioned in her father’s will as the eldest daughter.[41] Yet this must be the eldest ‘surviving’ daughter as the eldest daughter was said to have died at Mallow in 1761.[42]

Rebecca Forward

Rebecca Forward was born about 1740. In 1778 (marriage licence 10th August) Rebecca Forward, daughter of William Forward of Fermoy, married Rev. Wensley Bond, son of Rev. James Bond of Carbery, Co. Longford.[43] Rev. Wensley Bond was Dean of Ross (1773-1813), Treasurer of Ferns (1776-1820) and Rector of St. John’s, Sligo (1775-1820). They had two sons and four daughters.[44] One of the sons, Rev. James forward Bond married (21st May 1825) his cousin Christiana, daughter of Rev. Lorenzo Hely-Hutchinson.[45] It is not clear why Rebecca Forward did not get any share of the Fermoy estate when her two other married sisters did secure a sixth of the property each.

Elizabeth Forward

Elizabeth Forward married Garret Atty Nagle of Knockanevin. But this was no ordinary marriage as it is said that Garret Nagle abducted Elizabeth Forward and then married her. Elizabeth Forward received a sixth share of the Fermoy estate from her father and this share was centred on Grange West. In 1772 their son Garrett Nagle was born. In 1784 Garret Atty Nagle died. Elizabeth Forward died on the 9th November 1817 aged 75 years (born c.1742).[46]

On 16th March 1786 blackwater 7/1409

Garret Nagle fell into bad company without his father. He began drinking heavily and was involved in robberies. In 1798 Garret Nagle was a co-accused at the trail on Mon Roche. When Garret Nagle married Ellen Croker it was hoped that he would improve but instead Garret Nagle got the name of being a bad husband.

Christina Forward

Christina Forward got Grange East as her sixth part share of the Fermoy estate from her father. In 1788 Christina Forward was living in St. Ann’s Parish, Dublin, when she married William Tynte Austin of Dublin.[47] In 1837 their son, William Forward Austin of Grange Hill was mentioned as one of the principal gentlemen in the Fermoy area.[48] In 1839 William Forward Austin was elected among the first Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union. But his election was a close run affair. Matthias Hendley, agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, wrote to his boss that:

“The priests made very exertion to return a member of their own creed instead of Mr. Austin, who only succeeded by a majority of 221-220; but in the other Districts with the exception of 2, nominees of the priests were returned. We could not have a better Guardian than Mr. Austin; he owns a sixth of what was originally the Fermoy estate; and will I am convinced be an active member of the Board”.[49]

William Forward Austin was often mentioned in the newspapers during the Great Famine (1845-1850). In 1850 William Forward Austin was appointed one of the ex-officio members of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[50]

Conclusion

The grandchildren of William Forward of Fermoy are of a different generation and form a different to the Forward family in eighteenth century Fermoy. This article is no definite history of the family. As noted in many places above the source evidence for various events and people are conflicting. What this article does do is bring the family out of the shadows of the dark eighteenth century and put some fresh and blood behind the names. It is hoped in a future time to sort out the conflicting evidence and maybe add some new details – a task for another day.

 

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[1] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 267

[2] Tenison, C.M., ‘Barrymore archives’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 5 (1896), pp. 178-9

[3] Index of the Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[4] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[5] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 26

[6] Charles Smith, ‘The ancient and present state of the County and City of Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. II (1893), pp. 403, 404

[7] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at p. 268

[8] Dr. Caulfield’s Annals of the parish church of St. Maria de Shandon, now St. Ann’s, Shandon, Cork’, in the Journal of the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series (1904), pp. 266-278, at, p. 269

[9] Some Cork Lawyers from 1199

[10] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[11] http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[12] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 1995

[13] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 412; Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 872

[14] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[15] Index to Marriage Licence Bonds of diocese of Cork and Ross

[16] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2606, quoting the Cork Evening Post of 19th January 1758

[17] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[18] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969; Mosley, C. (ed.), Burke’s Peerage, Baronage and Knightage (3 vols. Wilmington, 2003), Vol. 1, p. 1162; https://www.myheritage.com/names/prudence_earbery accessed on 16th August 2017

[19] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 744

[20] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2526

[21] Debrett’s Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (2 vols. London, 1825), Vol. 2, p. 969

[22] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, pp. 2593, 2604

[23] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[24] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2546

[25] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559, quoting Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 6th October 1764

[26] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[27] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[28] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 67

[29] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 14, 21, 33

[30] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44; http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/history.htm accessed on 18th August 2017

[31] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 834

[32] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[33] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2563

[34] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), pp. 8, 10

[35] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[36] Bruinicardi, N., John Anderson of Fermoy (Fermoy, 2002), p. 10

[37] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 350

[38] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), pp. 44, 350

[39] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 44

[40] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[41] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1451

[42] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2536, quoting the Corke Journal of Thursday 21st May 1761

[43] Brady, W.M., Clerical and Parochial Records of Cork, Cloyne and Ross (Dublin, 1863), Vol. II, p. 430

[44] Rev. James B. Leslie, Ferns Clergy and Parishes (author, 1936), p. 47

[45] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/ireland/81186/ accessed on 18th August 2017

[46] Freeman’s Journal, 18th November 1817

[47] Index of Marriage Licence Bonds of the diocese of Dublin

[48] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 66

[49] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 72

[50] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

Standard
Cork history, Waterford history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Orpin family of Marshtown, Co. Cork: a brief history

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

 

In the second half of the nineteenth century the Orpin family were the landlords of the Marston estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork. The first of the family we know of is Robert Orpin esq. who lived in Dublin in the early 1700’s. Anna–Maria Hajba in Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 says that this family of Orpin was a branch of the Kerry Orpen’s, but the listing for the Kerry Orpen’s in Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958 does not mention Robert Orpin.[1]

 

This is not to say that he was of a junior branch of that family as a good few of the early Orpen’s had Robert as a first name. John Orpen of Forleigh, Somerset, had a son Robert born 1553 who had a son Robert of Shaston, Dorset, a merchant who died of plague in 1645 and who had a son Robert Orpen of Killorglin, Co. Kerry where he lived in 1661 and had 3 sons the second of whom was another Robert Orpen, born in 1644, married in 1669 and died in 1699.[2]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin

 

But we do know that the first Robert Orpin of the later Marshtown family was descendent through his wife with the Kerry Orpen’s. She was Johanna Mansfield, daughter of William Mansfield, and Mary-Johanna Gandrum. Mary-Johanna was the daughter of Augustus Gandrum by his wife Margaret Bowen, daughter of William Bowen and granddaughter of Robert Bowen, Robert’s wife was Margaret Orpen daughter of Robert Orpen of Killorglin above.[3]

 

Robert Orpin of Dublin had two sons by Johanna Gandrum, called Benjamin and Abel. Benjamin Orpin got married and had a son but we know little more about him. Abel Orpin got married twice and by his second wife Lucy Duant, had children. Abel Orpin became a cleric in the Church of Ireland. He was for a time curate in Drishane parish in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe.

 

Rev. Abel Orpin

 

Rev. Abel had at least three sons by his second wife. Basil Orpin also became a cleric in the Church of Ireland, married, had children and died in 1842. John Orpin lived in Cork City had a wife Mary and died in 1823. The third son, another Abel Orpin, is little known other than he was mentioned in the will of his brother John Orpin.[4]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin

 

As noted above the first son, Basil Orpin became a clergyman. He was ordained on 29th September 1786 and served in various curacies in the Cloyne Diocese. He got the curates job in Clonmeen and Roskeen parish in 1786 while still a deacon. Later Basil Orpin moved to Ballyhooly, and was curare to the rector William Berkeley, a nephew of Bishop Berkeley of Cloyne. There was a population of 60 Protestants in Ballyhooly in 1785 shortly before Basil Orpin came. There was one church, no glebe house and the curate had a salary of £50.[5]

 

Ballyhooly church

Ballyhooly church by Mike Searle

This was a nice income compared to other people of that time. A land steward in Tipperary working for 300 days got £12. Ten pence was given for one days mowing of hay and three pence for threshing a barrel of oats in 1779.[6]

 

Rev. Basil Orpin served at Ballyhooly until 1804 when for the next four years he was vicar at Tullilease parish while acting and living in Aghinagh parish as curate.  But his house must have been modest as no glebe house was built until 1862.[7]

 

In 1808 Rev. Basil Orpin was made vicar of Ballyvourney, a position he held until his death on 2nd November 1842. At Ballyvourney he also held the job of Rector, the highest church position he attained. In the early year Rev. Basil Orpin had little clerical duties to perform as in 1805 there were no Protestant families in the parish. By 1830 there were 30 people of that faith while the census of 1860 also recording 30 Protestant people. Rev. Basil Orpin made improvements in 1824 by building a church to seat 200 people as the old church was long in ruins.[8]

 

On the personnel front Rev. Basil Orpin was also making improvements.  He married Ellen Newce but it is unknown if she was his first wife or second.  In the will of his brother John Orpin in 1823, Benjamin Orpin was listed as son of Basil’s first marriage while the children Richard, Mary and Joanne were by other marriage.  Rev. Basil Orpin had other children, namely; John Orpin who married a Miss Manden and had two sons and Basil Orpin who later settled at Marshtown, along with two more daughters, Isabella and Charlotte. It is not known were these children from the first or second marriage or was there the possibility of a third marriage.[9]

 

Nothing further is known of Basil’s children except of Benjamin Orpin who was sometimes referred to Abel Orpin. He lived at Passage West and had a wife Lucinda who died on 1st May 1841. Ben Orpin died on 26th March 1880.[10]

 

Meanwhile it was not just religious matters and family life concerned Rev. Basil Orpin. He was sometimes asked to act in a legal capacity for people. Pierce Power asked Rev. Basil Orpin to be one of 6 executors of his will in 1819. By the time the will was sworn in 1838 only Rev. Basil Orpin was alive to see it implemented.  Richard Foot of Millfort Co. Cork was the beneficiary and got three townlands in the Barony of Duhallow.[11]

 

Basil Orpin

 

Rev. Basil Orpin died in 1842 and was buried in Millstreet, Drishane parish. The earliest reference we have to Basil Orpin, son of Rev. Basil Orpin is from 1834. In that year he acted as solicitor to a marriage settlement with an address of Lower Mount Street in Dublin. The married couple were George and Elizabeth Crofts. They gave Matthew and John Purcell £1,384 12s 3d for certain lands in the Barony of Fermoy, and in the Barony of Duhallow at Woodpark for 500 years. Basil Orpin was trustee to this agreement in 24th January 1834.[12]

 

Later in 1854 the Crofts had gone into bankrupacy and by order of the court of Chancery their lands were to be sold. Rev. Thomas Hamblin Porter gave Basil Orpin £695 12s 10d for the Duhallow lands along with other lands in Counties Cork, Kerry and Limerick. Anne Purcell gave consent for the sale but with a right of recovery of on payment of the £695 plus 5% interest. This was because the Purcell’s owned the ground title and had only given the land to the Croft’s on a long lease.[13]

 

Basil Orpin also did other land transactions for the Purcell’s. On 22nd of August 1848 he was solicitor to an agreement where by John Purcell gave Matthias Hendley of Mount Rivers, Fermoy, lands in Counties Cork, Limerick and Tipperary in trust for money lent to John by Matthias.[14]

 

On the 14th of August 1854 Basil Orpin again was solicitor for a deed of conveyance from Edmond Boyle, 8th Earl of Cork and Orrery, to Ann Purcell, Burton Park, of Carrigacashell townland in Duhallow.[15] During the time of the last transaction Basil Orpin was also conducting legal business for the Earls cousin William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire. There is in the Lismore Castle papers housed in the National Library of Ireland where legal letters from Basil Orpin to the Duke cover the years from 1852 to 1857.[16] While in the papers in Lismore Castle there are legal letters covering from 1860 to 1882 when Basil died.[17]

 

Basil Orpin and the troubled Kerry lands

 

Meanwhile in 1850 Basil Orpin and his son John Orpin got legal papers of their own which were not nice. These papers were an ejectment notice served at their offices in Dublin, by Anthony Lynch of Dublin, acting for Sir William D. Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry.[18] The notice was for lands at Knockagurrane parish of Kilcolman in Kerry in order that Sir William could recover the rent arrears on the land that was owed by the Orpins. Their cousin Anne Orpin of Killarney who had a share in the land also got an ejectment notice. None of the Orpins contested the notice and Sir William got back his land.

 

The story of Knockagurrane is a long one. It began on 11th June 1798 when John Orpin, son of Rev. Abel Orpin, took out a 31 year lease on the 88 acres of Knockagurrane from John Godfrey of Bushfield Co. Kerry for 17 shillings per acre.  John Orpin was living at Temple Villa Co. Cork at the time. The lease was renewed on 17th August 1804, 10th September 1817, 24th September 1822 and 9th May 1823.[19]

 

John Orpin died on 10th September 1823 and passed his interest in Knockagurrane to his niece Ann Orpin, possibly the daughter of his brother Abel Orpin.[20] Basil Orpin, the solicitor, became a partner with Ann Orpin for the property. Further deeds on 20th August 1835, 10th April 1839 and 5th November 1840 changed the interest of various parties to the property.

 

By December 1847 instructions for ejectment of Ann Orpin were prepared by Stokes and Creagh, solicitors of Dublin for Sir William Duncan Godfrey. Ann had accumulated rent arrears of two years amounting to £98 6s 8d. Stokes and Creagh didn’t proceed with ejectment (eviction in the common language of the day) but consulted George Blake Hickson of South Great George’s Street who on examining the case said it was a very peculiar case and so full of difficulties that he advised against ejectment and to recover the arrears by other means.[21]

 

Whatever the other ways of getting the money Sir William Godfrey employed, it had no positive outcome. The rent arrears had risen to £180 2s 10d by January 1st 1850 when Sir William called it a day and brought ejectment proceeds in the Court of Queens Beach against Ann Orpin and her tenants.  Basil Orpin got the ejectment notice on the 10th. It was the 13th of July when the Court gave judgement in favour of Sir William with costs.

 

But it was a short-lived victory for Sir William Godfrey. In January 1856 Sir William Godfrey lost Knockagurrane with a number of other townlands because of a petition to the Encumbered Estates Court by Charles Sugrue of Cork for debts totalling £32,471 7s 11d.[22]

 

DSC05869

Former gates into the Marston estate –

now at St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore

Basil Orpin acquires Marshtown

 

About this time in the 1850s that Basil Orpin purchased the Marston Estate at Marshtown, Co. Cork from the trustees of Richard Henry Gumbleton and those lands of Georgina Gumbleton (Richard’s Sister-in-law) north of the river Blackwater. By 1870 Basil Orpin owned 406 acres in Co. Cork and 2,188 acres in Co. Waterford valued at £370 and £690 respectively.[23] But happiness was not to last long as his wife Mary Carthew died on the 11th of March 1866 and was buried at Mocollop. Basil Orpin was buried beside her after his death on 4th January 1882.[24]

 

Before his death notices of ejectment were again served but this time by Basil Orpin on a number of tenants at Mocollop.  It was decided to hold a huge protest meeting.  The local magistrates wanted to ban the meeting in the interest of public order.  Mr Redmond, the resident magistrate from Dungarvan, refused and the meeting proceeded without incident. This occurred in May 1881 during the Land War. It’s not recorded if the evictions went ahead.[25]

 

John Orpin

 

The son of Basil Orpin was John Orpin who was born in 1826 and died on 23rd March 1904 and was buried at Mocollop. Also buried there was his wife, Susan Lilias, born in 1832 and died on 26th April 1903.[26]

 

John Orpin, like his father, was a solicitor and is recorded living at Marston in 1886.[27] Also like his father, there are letters from John Orpin among the Lismore Castle papers in Lismore. These date from 1880 to 1889.[28]

 

Basil Orpin

 

John Orpin had at least two sons. The eldest, Basil Orpin, succeeded to the Marston Estate. He was born in 1860 and died on 31st July 1922 and is also buried at Mocollop.[29] Like his father and grandfather there are letters from Basil Orpin in Lismore Castle from 1900 to 1921 as the Orpin’s (of Orpen’s as Basil signed his name) were solicitors to the Castle for many decades.[30] Upon his headstone at Mocollop it says Basil Orpin of Marston also lived at 47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin, where he could have carried on his legal practice.

 

47-49_St_Stephens_Green_v2-min-800x533

47 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin – the door on the right

Cecil Orpin

 

His brother Cecil Orpin succeeded to Marston, where he lived in the gate lodge as the big house had burnt down in about 1908.  He was there until at least 1932 as he is listed as an occupier in that year.[31] The estate was divided soon after.

 

Cecil Orpin was a medical doctor and lived for many years in Youghal.  In the 1901 census he lived at No. 3 Marina Terrace. There was nobody else with him in the house on the night of the census.[32] By the time of the next census in 1911 Cecil Orpin had moved to No. 1 Marina Terrace with the Christian Brothers now in No. 3. With him in the house were his wife Ethel and daughters Lilias, Ruth and Susan. There also was five servants, Mabel Marque, Mary Courtney, Hannah Sherlocke, Mary O’ Connell and Catherine Scully.[33]  In the 1960s and 1970s a member of the Orpin family served as a news announcer on RTE television. This then is a brief outline of the history of the Orpin family as is presently known from their origins as Dublin merchants to church clerics and solicitors to estate landlords and medical doctors to television presenters.

 

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End of post

 

===============

 

 

[1] Hajba, A., Historical genealogical architectural notes on some houses of Cork (Whitegate, 2002), Vol. 1, North Cork, p. 259; Burkes landed Gentry, 1958, pp. 556-560

[2] Burkes Landed Gentry, 1958, p. 556

[3] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 6, p. 1422

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol.6, p. 802

[5] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 6, p. 801

[6] Lambe, M., A Tipperary landed estate: Castle Otway, 1750-1853 (Dublin, 1998), p. 24

[7] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 870

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 6, p. 802; Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[10] Records of Old Cork Newspapers

[11] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2303

[12] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2182

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 2184

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol 15, p. 2182

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, Vol. 15, p. 1783

[16] Lismore Castle Paper, N.L.I., Ms. 7187

[17] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole C and D to K and C/2/20 room 4 the tower

[18] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at p. 48

[19] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at pp. 40-41

[20] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1800-1839’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 21 (1988), pp. 42-101, at p. 73

[21] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1840-1848’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol. 22 (1989), pp. 35-60, at p. 53

[22] Bray, V. & Spring, J., ‘The Godfrey Papers: Abstracts of Deeds, 1850-1858’, in the Journal Kerry Archaeological and History Society, Vol, 23 (1990), pp. 46-68, at pp. 61-62

[23] Owners of land of one acre and upwards, 1870 with information extracted for Counties Cork and Waterford

[24] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[25] Power, P.C., History of Waterford City and County (Cork, 1990), p. 201

[26] Headstone inscriptions in Mocollop church graveyard

[27] Guys Postal directory,1886

[28] Lismore Castle papers, Lismore, file C/1/pigeon hole M-R

[29] Headstone inscription in Mocollop church graveyard

[30] Lismore Castle Papers, Lismore, file C/1/ pigeon hole (U-X)

[31] Hajba, Houses of Co. Cork, Vol. 1, p. 259

[32] Farrell, N., Youghal Family Roots: exploring family origins in Youghal (Longford, 2001), p. 8

[33] Farrell, Youghal Family Roots, p. 24.

Standard
Waterford history

Ballynadigue or Bellevue House, Co. Waterford

Ballynadigue or Bellevue House, Co. Waterford

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Ballynadigue House stands at the southern end of Monaman Lower townland in the civil parish of Lismore and Mocollop in west County Waterford. Before 1900 the house was known as Bellevue House. Ballynadigue House is situated on the road between Lismore and Cappoquin on the north bank of the River Blackwater. In 1870 Joseph Hansard described this road as ‘This neighbourhood is highly improved, and, for romantic scenery, may bear a comparison with the most celebrated places’.[1]

Origins of Bellevue House

Joseph Hansard in his book, History of Waterford, records the principle gentry of Lismore and Cappoquin in about 1820.[2] In those lists no person is mentioned for Bellevue House. By the time of the first Ordnance Survey map in 1840 the house was built and named Bellevue.

Bellevue House 1850

In about 1850 Paul Shewcraft lived at Bellevue House as Ballynadigue House was then known. The house and outbuildings were worth £19 10s. Around the house was 17 acres of land. Paul Shewcraft rented Bellevue House from the Duke of Devonshire. There were two gate lodges into the estate, both worth 15s. One of the gate lodges was vacant while the other was occupied by Denis O’Brien.[3]

In 1805 a person called Paul Shewcraft was mayor of Bombay and was in the Bombay artillery. In 1806 Paul Shewcraft was made a Lieutenant in the Bombay Volunteer Association.[4] Paul Shewcraft was in India since before 1794 and by 1816 he had left India and was living at Fitzroy Street in London. In 1816 he was a witness in the case of bigamy against Captain Harrower, late of the East India Company.[5] In April 1828, Lucinda, the wife of Paul Shewcraft, died at Fitzroy Street in London.[6]

Between 1850 and 1900

In 1881 Mrs. Hewson was living at Bellevue House, then written as Bellview.[7] In 1893 the Cotton sisters were living at Ballynadigue House which was written as Ballinadigue.[8] Richard Chearnley of Salterbridge House, just to the east of Ballynadigue House, had married Mary, daughter of Rev. Henry Cotton, archdeacon of Cashel.[9]

Ballynadigue House 1901

In 1901 Emma E. Cotton lived at Ballynadigue House with two servants. Emma Cotton was aged 50 in 1901 and was born in King’s County (Offaly). She was unmarried and a member of the Church of Ireland or the Irish Church as she called it. Emma Cotton gave her occupation as “interest in money”![10]

The two servants at Ballynadigue in 1901 were Kate Kingston and Sarah McCoy. Kate Kingston was aged 34 years and was born in Co. Cork. She worked as a cook/domestic servant. Sarah McCoy was aged 27 years and was born in Co. Wexford. She worked as housemaid/domestic servant. Both servants were unmarried and members of the Church of Ireland.[11]

In 1901 Ballynadigue house had twelve windows in front of the house and sixteen rooms within. To the north-west of the house were nine outhouses.[12] Unfortunately the form recording what function these outhouses had has not survived.

 

20768142_1599057156832388_3542799215491663800_n

The gate lodge and entrance to Ballynadigue House

Ballynadigue gate lodge 1901

As in 1850 Bellevue/Ballynadigue House had two gate lodges in 1901. The back gate lodge was vacant and the front gate lodge was occupied by John Gibson and he rented the building from Emma Cotton. The gate lodge had four windows in front of the house and five rooms within.[13] John Gibson worked for Emma Cotton as a coachman/domestic servant. He was aged 41 years, a Roman Catholic, and was born in Co. Westmeath. John Gibson lived in the gate lodge with his wife, Bridget (aged 32 years, Roman Catholic, born Co. Westmeath).[14]

By 1911 John Gibson had left Ballynadigue House and was living at Coolfin in King’s County (Offaly) where he work as a coachman for Arthur Burdett of Coolfin House. John Gibson lived in the gate lodge of Coolfin House with his wife, Bridget Gibson and records show that they were married twenty-two years (c.1889) and had no children.[15]

Ballynadigue House 1901-10

In 1909-10 Sir Joseph Cotter was a Justice of the Peace and lived at Ballynadigue House in the townland of Monaman Lower.[16] It is not possible to find him in the 1901 and 1911 census returns and he may have been out of the country at those times.

Ballynadigue House 1911

In 1911 Joseph Crowley was living at Ballynadigue House with his wife Alice and three servants. Joseph Crowley was aged 54 years and was born in Co. Cork. He gave his occupation as a retired Inspector General and retired medical practitioner. Alice Crowley, Joseph’s wife of nineteen years, was aged 50 in 1911 and was born in England. They had no children. Joseph and Alice Crowley were both Roman Catholics.[17]

The three servants at Ballynadigue in 1911 were Agnes O’Shea (aged 30 years, cook/domestic servant), Mary Power (aged 27 years, housemaid/domestic servant) and Anastasia McGrath (aged 25 years, parlour maid/domestic servant). All three servants were born in Co. Waterford and were Roman Catholics.[18]

In 1911 Ballynadigue House was described as having six windows (1901 = 12 windows) in the front of the house and nine rooms within (1901 = 16 rooms). Outside the house there were fifteen outbuildings (1901 = 9 buildings).[19] In all three counts – windows, rooms and outbuildings – great changes had occurred to Ballynadigue House in the ten years since the 1901 census. The fifteen outbuildings were described as 3 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness house, 2 fowl houses and one each of a dairy house, cow house, calf house, piggery, boiling house, barn, potato house and store house.[20]

Ballynadigue gate lodge 1911

The front gate lodge in 1911 was occupied by William Moynihan. The house had two windows in the front and three rooms within with one outhouse.[21] William Moynihan worked as a gardener and was aged 29 years. He was born in County Waterford and was a Roman Catholic. William Moynihan was married to Mary Moynihan for just three years and they had two sons, Maurice and Edmond. Mary Moynihan was 27 years old and was born in County Waterford and was a Roman Catholic. William Moynihan could speak Irish and English but Mary could only speak English.[22]

In 1901 William Moynihan had worked as an agricultural labourer for Miss. Ellen O’Donnell at Ballygalane, the next townland to the west of Ballynadigue House.[23]

After 1911

After 1911 Ballynadigue House enters the realm of modern history and we’ll leave it for future historians to record that story.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Joseph Hansard, History of Waterford (edited by Donal Brady, Waterford County Council), p. 246

[2] Joseph Hansard, History of Waterford (edited by Donal Brady, Waterford County Council), pp. 246, 247

[3] Griffith’s Valuation, Monaman Lower townland, Lismore and Mocollop parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[4] Lawrence D. Campbell (ed.) The Asiatic Annual Register or a View of the History of Hindustan (London, 1809), pp. 95, 173

[5] http://www.hainings.net/10966.htm accessed on 6 November 2016

[6] The Gentleman’s Magazine, Volume 98, Part 1 (1828), p. 475

[7] Slater’s Commercial Directory of Ireland, 1881, Munster section, p. 107

[8] Guy’s Postal Directory, 1893, Waterford section, p. 49

[9] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 68

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227922/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227922/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227920/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227920/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227923/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002640075/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[16] Thom’s Directory, 1909-10, p. 229

[17] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491449/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491449/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[19] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491445/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491447/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[21] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491445/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491451/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227706/ accessed on 6 November 2016

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Cork history

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Cornelius Sullivan bookseller of Cork City

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On Tuesday, 18th November 1766 the wedding took place in Cork city of Ranigius Fallon of St. Kitts, merchant, to Miss Ann Sullivan, daughter of the eminent Cork bookseller, Cornelius Sullivan.[1] The Freeman Journal (2nd December 1766) gave the groom’s name as Redmond Fallon of St. Kitts.[2] Faulkner’s Dublin Journal of 1766 also reported on the wedding and said that Mr. Fallen was a West-India merchant while Miss Sullivan had a considerable fortune.[3] This fortune was given in the Cork Constitution as about £1,000.[4] A woman with money was often mentioned in the newspapers accompanying marriage notices such as that of Miss Jackson of Co. Limerick in 1770, who was described as ‘a young lady endowed with every accomplishment that can render the marriage state truly happy, with a large fortune’.[5]

Cork’s trade with the West Indies was growing throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as the number of colonies grew. Cork’s chief export to the West Indies, to places like St. Kitts, was in the form of provisions such as beef, butter, pork, herrings, candles and sometimes linen.[6]

There were people called Fallon (such as Daniel Fallon) living on St. Kitts in the 1630s, then known as St. Christopher.[7] The first English colony on St. Kitts was established in 1623 and the French established their colony there in 1625. The island changed many times between French and English control in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.[8] St. Kitts was a major sugar growing colony and slaves played a vital role in the business. It is very possible that Redmond Fallon was some way involved in the save trade and sugar growing. It is possible that Redmond Fallon made the voyage to Cork from St. Kitts on a number of occasions, bringing sugar and returning with provisions and possibly some books from the Brown Street premises of Cornelius Sullivan.

 

CommProp17Dec14paulst_large

No. 14 Brown St. is the three story building in mid picture –

near where Cornelius Sullivan had his shop

 

Cornelius Sullivan

It is not known when Cornelius Sullivan first established his bookselling business in Cork. With a name like Sullivan he or his ancestors possibly came from south-west Cork around the coasts of Bantry and the Beare Peninsula.

So far, 1738, provides the earliest notice of Cornelius Sullivan as a bookseller. In May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan was operating a book shop under the Exchange Coffee House on Exchange Street. By that early date he must have been a successful bookseller for in May 1738 Cornelius Sullivan placed an advert in Harvey’s Jocular Medley that he was the letting agent for the inn called the Blew Bell in Cove Lane near the South Gate. it is not clear if he actually was the owner of the Blew Bell (J.C.H.A.S., vol. LXII, 1957, p. 95).

In 1741 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, was a subscriber to The Genuine Works of F. Josephus: Translated from the Original Greek by Flavius Josephus and edited by William Whiston of Cambridge University. The book was printed in Dublin by George Ewing.

In 1747 Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork, subscribed for four sets of The Life and Exploits of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel Cervantes de Saavedra and translated from Spanish by Charles Jarvis. The book was printed by Peter Wilson of Dame Street, Dublin.

In 1748 a person called Cornelius Sullivan, operated a bookselling business in Newry, subscribed for eight sets of A New History of the Holy Bible by the Rev. Thomas Stackhouse. It is not beyond the bounds of possibility that this Cornelius Sullivan of Newry and Cornelius Sullivan of Cork was one and the same person, but further research is needed to prove or disprove this case.

In the Corke Journal of 15th February 1754 Cornelius Sullivan was operating out of Castle Street in Cork city. In the Corke Journal (11/7/1754) and (15/8/1754) Cornelius Sullivan advertised his bookselling business on Castle Street. Castle Street in the mid eighteenth century was a good location for a bookselling business. The Exchange was built on that street c.1705-1710 by the city merchants to conduct business and exchange news. Therefore people with money were coming past the bookshop every day and it seems Cornelius Sullivan captured a good share of their custom.

exchange_castlestreet

Castle Street (now Exchange Street) –

one of these houses could have been the bookshop

Unlike George Bagnell (died March 1768) of Cork city who was both a printer and a bookseller in Cork city, Cornelius Sullivan stayed as a bookseller.[9] If he did print books as well as selling them he could have commanded more customers as they would have to come to him to get any book he printed and which would be unavailable at any other bookseller. Yet it seems that Cornelius Sullivan did acquire a sizeable clientele to his shop and became wealthy enough to give his daughter £1,000 as a dowry and purchase property.

In 1760 Cornelius Sullivan was listed among the tradesmen of Cork as a bookseller. In the same Cork Journal Cornelius Sullivan also gave notice that he had a house and slaughter-house in Blarney Lane to let. In 1770 a person called Sullivan died in Blarney Lane but it is unknown if he was any relation to the bookseller.[10] It is presumed Cornelius Sullivan had acquired that slaughter-house as an investment opportunity from his bookselling business.

In 1762 Cornelius Sullivan was listed amongst other Catholic inhabitants of Cork who were prepared to offer a reward for the capture of any Whiteboys or Levelers.[11] The business of the Cork booksellers was mainly among the select country customers with the biggest trade period around the social occasions in the city like the assizes time.[12] The Whiteboys and Levelers were challenging these country customers for control of the countryside and so were a threat to the business of Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1767 Cornelius Sullivan advertised his business as bookseller and stationer in Brown Street.[13] Brown Street no longer exists as it was demolished in the 1970s to make way for the Paul Street shopping centre and multi-story car park. The last independent bookseller on Brown Street, Connolly’s, closed in 2014 and their address was number 14 Brown Street. It is not known where on Brown Street Cornelius Sullivan had his premises.

 

BrownStreetCork1830s

Brown Street is marked in yellow on this old Cork map

In 1768 a person called Cornelius Sullivan of Cork died and left a will.[14] It is not known for certain but it is very possible that this was Cornelius Sullivan the bookseller as he appears in no later documents.

In 1787 a person called Bartholomew Sullivan operated a paper-making business in Hoar’s Lane while Jeremiah Sullivan was a bookseller and lottery agent in North Main Street.[15] This Jeremiah Sullivan went on to become an eminent printer and bookseller. He died in November 1824 at Sarsfield Court.[16] It is not known if they were any relation to Cornelius Sullivan.

In 1787 there were just eight booksellers in Cork city but this had grown to eighteen by 1824.[17] It is interesting to speculate that Cornelius Sullivan was at the vanguard to this expansion in the Cork bookselling trade.

Ann Sullivan Fallon

It is possible that Ann Sullivan returned to St. Kitts were her new husband, Redmond Fallon and reared a family. Yet she could have returned to Ireland in later years. In 1806 a person called Ann Fallon died at Hanover Street in Dublin and left a will.[18] Investigation into that story is sometime for a visit to St. Kitts and for another day. For the moment it is to take down a book from the book-shelve and have a good read while remembering Cornelius Sullivan, bookseller of Cork city, who in another time could have sold us that book.

 

Bibliography

Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Cork Evening Post, 1767

Corke Journal, 1760

Cork Trade Directory, 1787

Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005)

Limerick General Advertiser, 1824

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277

Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238

Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42

O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937)

Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897)

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Casey, A.E., & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[2] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568. The Cork Journal 20th November 1766 also mentioned the wedding.

[3] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1994), pp. 14-42, at p. 33, no. 4131

[4] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 15, p. 2568 – quoting the Cork Constitution, 24th November 1766

[5] Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 214

[6] O’Sullivan, W., The Economic History of Cork City (Cork, 1937), p. 148

[7] https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/soc.genealogy.west-indies/iBx7TO6B1nc accessed on 9th August 2017

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Kitts accessed on 9th August 2017

[9] Morris, H.F., ‘Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 1766’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987), pp. 245-277, at p. 258

[10] Cork Journal, 1760; Morris, H.F., ‘Extracts from Finn’s Leinster Journal, 1770’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1991), pp. 214-238, at p. 221

[11] Cork Journal, 1762

[12] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830 (Cork, 2005), p. 413

[13] Cork Evening Post, 6th April 1767

[14] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 444

[15] Cork Trade Directory, 1787

[16] Limerick General Advertiser, 24th November 1824

[17] Dickson, D., Old World Colony: Cork and South Munster 1630-1830, p. 413

[18] Vicars, A., Index to the Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 161

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Carlow History

Ballynamire, Co. Carlow: an outline history

 Ballynamire, Co. Carlow: an outline history

 

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

The townland of Ballynamire is located in the civil parish of Fennagh, in the barony of Idrone East, County Carlow. The townland measures 38 acres 1 root and 36 perches. It is located on the west side of the road between Fennagh in the south and Hunt’s man crossroads in the north. Ballynamire in Irish is Baile na Maoir and means “Mouth of the Ford of the Stream”.[1]

Tithe Applotment 1826

Under the tithe Applotment records Thomas H. Watson held Ballynamire, then written as Ballinamire. The tithe record gives the area as 24 acres 1 root and 28 perches.[2] The additional 14 acres can be accounted by the fact that pasture land was exempted from paying tithes.

Thomas Henry Watson was the only son of Samuel Watson of Lumclone, County Carlow by his wife Anne, daughter of Samuel Brewster. Lumclone is located on the east side of the same road that Ballynamire is on but a short distance to the south of Ballynamire.

Thomas Henry Watson was born in 1790 and succeeded his father in 1830. In June 1815 Thomas Watson married Anne, only daughter of Daniel Walker of Dublin, and granddaughter of William Walker, twice Lord Mayor of Dublin. Thomas Watson served as a captain in the Carlow Regiment of Militia and died on 7th January 1853, leaving Samuel Henry Watson of Lumclone along with Rev. Thomas Watson, John Watson, Robert Lecky Watson (of Lumclone and Kilconner), Sarah Watson, Annette Watson, Emily Watson, Elizabeth Watson and Anne Watson. His wife Anne Brewster Watson died in 1859.[3]

Ballynamire in 1841

In the 1841 census there were four people living in Ballynamire (two males and two females) in one house.[4]

Ballynamire in 1840-1846

On 13th December 1840 Lawrence Brien and his wife Elizabeth Farrell had their son Daniel Brien baptised in the Dunleckney parish register. This event was witnessed by Edmond Cowley and Bridget Murphy. The Brien family gave their address as Ballenamire.[5] On 13th March 1842 Lawrence Brien and Elizabeth Farrell had their son, Pat Brien, baptised at Dunleckney. They gave their address as Ballinamaire and this was witnessed by Martin Murphy and Mary Lennon.[6] On 25th December 1843 Lawrence Brien and his wife Elizabeth Farrell had their daughter Catherine baptised. They gave their address as Ballynamaire and this was witnessed by James Farrell and Bridget Murphy.[7] On 5th April 1846 Lawrence Brien and Elizabeth Farrell still lived at Ballynamire on the occasion of the baptism of their son, Lawrence. James Dray was a witness to this event.[8]

Ballynamire in 1851

If the family of Lawrence Brien lived in Ballynamire in the 1840s by the 1851 census there should be four males (Lawrence and his 3 sons) and two females (Elizabeth and her daughter). In the 1851 census there were five people living in Ballynamire (one male and four females) in one house.[9] This is at odds with what should be there if the Brien family indeed lived at Ballynamire in the 1840s.

Of course this doesn’t mean that the Brien had left Ballynamire. Without the actual individual census returns it is difficult to know if some of these people on the 1851 census were visitors to the Brien house or servants living in or if some members of the Brien family were absent from the Ballynamire house on the census night.

 

021

View westwards over Ballynamire

Griffith’s Valuation, c.1850

By the time of Griffith’s Valuation in the 1850s the Brien family had left Ballynamire. In about 1850 James Jenkinson rented the townland of Ballynamire from Thomas H. Watson. The property contained a dwelling house called a herdman’s house with an outbuilding and the 38 acres of land. The land was worth £29 10s while the buildings were worth 5s.[10] It would seem that James Jenkinson may not always have lived in Ballynamire. Up the road in the village of Ballybrommell he held a house, outbuilding and garden (1 root 15 perches) from Samuel Watson of Lumclone. The house and outbuilding were worth 15s and the garden 5s.[11]

In 1826 William Jenkinson held land at Ballaghadereen and at Ballydarlon in Fennagh parish.[12] It is not clear what relationship he was to James Jenkinson.

Ballynamire in 1861

In the 1861 census there were eight people living in Ballynamire (five males and three females) in one house.[13]

Ballynamire in 1891

In the 1891 census there were eight people living in Ballynamire but by 1901 they had all gone and the townland had no residents.[14]

Ballynamire in 1911

In the two published census returns of 1901 and 1911 the townland of Ballynamire had no residents. The Poor Law valuation of the land and buildings in 1911 was £29 10s. These buildings must have been farm buildings as there was no dwelling house at Ballynamire by 1911.[15]

It may be possible to find other documents in archive centres in Carlow or Dublin to add to our knowledge of Ballynamire but for the present we are left with what we have. Today (2017), just like in 1901 and 1911, Ballynamire is still uninhabited.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/Carlow_placenames_01.htm accessed on 6th August 2017

[2] http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/reels/tab//004587442/004587442_00231.pdf accessed on 11th July 2017

[3] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 1191, 1192

[4] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/13270/page/340868 accessed on 11th July 2017

[5] http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/Baptism_Dunleckney_29.htm accessed on 6th August 2017

[6] http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/Baptism_Dunleckney_32.htm accessed on 6th August 2017

[7] http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/Baptism_Dunleckney_35.htm accessed on 6th August 2017

[8] http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlcar2/Baptism_Dunleckney_38.htm accessed on 6th august 2017

[9] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/13270/page/340868 accessed on 11th July 2017

[10] Griffith’s Valuation, Ballynamire, parish of Fennagh, barony of Idrone East, Carlow

[11] Griffith’s Valuation, Ballybrommell, parish of Fennagh, barony of Idrone East, Carlow

[12] http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/reels/tab//004587442/004587442_00235.pdf accessed on 11th July 2017

[13] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/14544/page/375710 accessed on 11th July 2017

[14] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/21959/page/613975 accessed on 11th July 2017

[15] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/21959/page/613975 accessed on 6th August 2017

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Cork history

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons: A Great War casualty

Henry Hendley Bond of Castlelyons:

A Great War casualty

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Among the dead of the Great War, otherwise known as World War One, was Brevet Colonel Henry Hendley Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons, Co. Cork. He died in a Dublin hospital on 10th November 1919 and even though his death was after the end of the Great War he is included among the dead of that War. He was buried at Kill St. Anne cemetery beside his home at Castlelyons and his name is inscribed on a memorial within the Church of Ireland church in Fermoy. This article sets out some information on the life and times of this soldier of the Royal Artillery.

Henry Bond

Henry Hendley Bond was the son of Major General Henry Bond and Mary Earbery Hendley Bond. Henry Bond senior was born in County Longford in about 1837. Shortly after leaving school he joined the Royal Artillery to see the world and find employment. On 7th April 1856 Henry Bond was made a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.[1] Thereafter he made a steady rise up the ranks. On 1st August 1866 he was made a Captain.[2] It was at this stage of his life that Captain Henry Bond met Mary Earbery Hendley of Mountrivers near Fermoy, Co. Cork. In 1868 they got married.

Mary Earbery Hendley and family

Mary Earbery Hendley was the daughter of Matthias Christopher Hendley of Mountrivers by his wife, Clementina (d 29th July 1867). Matthias and Clementina had one son, Matthias Christopher Hendley (d 22nd March 1885) and six daughters. One of these daughters, Mary Earbery Hendley (d 24th April 1931) it was who married Henry Bond.[3]

Matthias Christopher Hendley was the son of Matthias Hendley (1771-1847) of Mountrivers near Fermoy who was agent of the Fermoy estate for Sir Robert Abercromby. Sir Robert Abercromby of Banffshire, Scotland, had purchased the Fermoy estate in 1835 for £70,000. It was said that Abercromby was owed £10,000 from the Anderson family, the previous owners of Fermoy.[4] Matthias Hendley left at least two sons; Matthias Christopher Hendley (1813-1901) and John Leslie Hendley. John Leslie Hendley married, 15th August 1847, Marianne Ryder, daughter of Archdeacon William Ryder and left at least one son, John Leslie Hendley who went to live in New Zealand. John Leslie Hendley, senior, was killed while hunting in India.[5]

Henry Bond in the Royal Artillery

After his marriage Captain Henry Bond continued his career in the Roya Artillery. On 16th January 1875 he was promoted to Major. On 16th January 1882 Henry Bond was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and on 16th January 1886 was made a full Colonel in the Royal Artillery. On 1st November 1887 he was promoted to the rank of Major General.[6]

The Bond family in 1893

After many postings in India (1872), Ireland (1873), the East Indies and England (1880-85) Major General Henry Bond returned to Ireland to settle down. In 1893 Major General Henry Bond was living at the Manor, Castlelyons with his family.[7]

The Bond family in 1901

In 1901 Henry Bond (aged 64, born Co. Longford) lived at the Manor, Kill St Ann, near Castlelyons. By 1901 Henry Bond was a retired from the Royal Artillery. With him at the Manor was his wife, Mary Earbery Bond (aged 53, born Co. Cork) and their three daughters. The daughters were Edith Frances Bond (aged 29, born in India), Mary Kathleen Bond (aged 25, born in England) and Charlotte Emily Bond (aged 21, born in England), all single. The family was attended by two servants, Bridget Casey (aged 29, born Co. Cork, cook) and Mary Sullivan (aged 23, born Co. Cork, housemaid).[8]

In 1901 the Manor was classified as a first class house with 19 rooms, 7 windows at the front of the house and 7 outbuildings in the grounds.[9] These outbuildings consisted of two stables, one coach house, one harness room, two fowl houses and one shed.[10]

Also in the grounds of the Manor was situated another house held by Henry Bond. This house was lived in by Patrick Allen.[11] Patrick Allen (aged 25, born Co. Tipperary) worked as a coachman for the Bond family while his wife, Kate Allen (aged 24, born Co. Cork) worked as a house keeper. They had two sons, William aged two and John aged one.[12]

 

Phone photos February 2017 102

Entrance to the Manor, Castlelyons

The Bond family in 1911

Major General Henry Bond died sometime between 1901 and 1911. His widow, Mary Earbury Bond was head of the household at the Manor in the 1911 census. With her on the census night were her three daughters, all single, and her son, Henry Hendly Bond along with two servants; Annie Frances Stuart (aged 23, born Co. Cork, parlour maid, Church of Ireland), and Margaret Mahony (aged 19, born Co. Cork, cook, Roman Catholic).[13]

In 1911 the Manor had 16 rooms and 6 outbuildings while Patrick Allen and family still lived in the second house.[14] Henry Hendley Bond was aged 37 in 1911 and was born in Co. Longford. In 1911 he was a Major in the Royal Field Artillery and was on the active service list.[15]

Henry Hendley Bond

Henry Hendley Bond He was born at Ballymahon, Co. Longford on 13th June 1873 although some sources say it was at Ahmedabad in Gujarat in India. In the 1911 census Henry Hendley Bond said he was born in Co. Longford.[16]

Like any army family, the Bond family moved around a lot. They lived initially in Moigh, Ballymahon, before moving to the East Indies and later England (Solihull), before settling at the Manor, near Castlelyons, Co. Cork.[17]

Henry Hendley Bond attended Wellington College and as a teenager joined the Royal Horse Artillery and Field Artillery at Woolwich.[18] On 22nd July 1892 Henry Hendley Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery. On 22nd July 1895 he was promoted to lieutenant and 6th April 1900 was made a Captain.[19]

In 1898-1900 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was posted to India. While there he became a noted cricket player. Between August 1898 and September 1900 he played five matches for the Europeans against the Indians.[20]

By 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 136 Battery at Woolwich under the command of Major Elton.[21] In that same year of 1902 Captain Henry Hendley Bond served in the closing stages of the South African War.[22]

By 1908 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was with the 15th Battery at Dundalk.[23] At that time he was attached to the Sierra Leone Battalion.[24] In 1911 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was at home at Castlelyons for the census of that year.

After World War One started Captain Henry Hendley Bond saw action in a number of places including at Salonika.[25] On 4th June 1917 Captain Henry Hendley Bond was raised to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).[26]

So after this occasion the health of Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond began to deteriorate. For the next eighteen months he suffered from degenerative neurological disease. On 10th November 1919 Lt. Col. Henry Hendley Bond died aged 46 years with the rank of Brevet Colonel and temporary title of Brigadier General.[27] He died at Hampstead, Glasnevin in north Dublin.[28] Henry Hendley Bond was buried in the graveyard at Kill-St-Ann, Castlelyons, near his old home.

The Bond family after 1919

After the death of Henry Hendley Bond in 1919 his family continued to live at the Manor near Castlelyons. In April 1931 his mother, Mary Earbery Hendley Bond, died. On 10th September 1945 Charlotte Emily (died 16th April 1960), daughter of Major General Henry Bond of the Manor, Castlelyons married Venerable Samuel Hobart Dorman, Rector of Knockmourne Union and Archdeacon of Cloyne, sixth son of Rev. Thomas Dorman of Richmond House, Cork.[29]

Other members of the Bond family of Castlelyons included Edward Leslie Bond and Charles Earbery Bond, both of whom joined the army.

Edward Leslie Bond

Edward Leslie Bond joined the Royal Garrison Artillery to keep the gunning tradition in the family. On 4th March 1899 Edward Leslie Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and on 16th February 1901 was promoted to lieutenant. In 1902 he was serving with the Native Mountain Artillery in India.[30] On 1st February 1906 Edward Leslie Bond was made a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery.[31] In 1908 Captain Edward Leslie Bond was with the 21st Kohat Mountain Battery in India.[32]

On 26th April 1969 Major Leslie Crawford Bond of Pewsey, Wiltshire, son of Colonel Edward Leslie Bond of Castlelyons, married Penelope Margaret Alexander, daughter of Edward Currie Alexander by his wife Isabella, daughter of Major George Stoney. They had one daughter, Kristin, born in 1971.[33]

Charles Earbery Bond

Meanwhile Charles Earbery Bond left the family tradition of the artillery and instead joined the Royal Sussex Regiment. Charles Bond was born on 14th October 1877 and attended school at Wellington College.[34]

On 4th May 1898 Charles Earbery Bond was made a second lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment and on 2nd April 1899 was promoted to lieutenant.[35] Lieutenant Charles Bond served in the South African war in 1899- 1900 with the 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria, including the engagements at Welkom Farm, Zand River, and Doorukop, the occupation of Johannesburg and Pretoria, and the engagement at Diamond Hill. He was also present in the subsequent advance into the Orange River Colony, including the operations round Bethlehem and in the Caledon Valley, the engagement at Relief’s Nek, and the surrender of the Boer forces on 1st August 1900 at Golden Gate. Lieutenant Bond was also involved in operations round Thabanchu, Winburg, and Lindley.[36]

In October 1902 Lieutenant Charles Bond was awarded the Distinguish Service Order (DSO) medal for his services in the South African War.[37] On 2nd February 1907 Charles Earbery Bond was made a Captain in the Royal Sussex Regiment.[38]

 

Charles Earbery Bond

Charles Bond and others at cricket in India, c.1910

Captain Charles Bond served in the Great War (1914-18). In September 1915 he was promoted to Major and from 24th November 1915 to 31st May 1917 was Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, first with the Worcestershire Regt., and from Dec. 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. In 1916 he was awarded the honour of C.M.G.

From June 1917 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the 51st Infantry Brigade in France until 30th May, 1918. From July 1918 Charles Bond was Brigade Commander of the Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. In the War Charles Bond was five times mentioned in Despatches and acquired the Mons Medal.[39]

 

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[1] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1862), p. 171; Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1871), p. 169

[2] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1902), p. 600

[3] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 81; memorial brass plates in Church of Ireland, Fermoy; http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2890 accessed on 5th August 2017

[4] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 52

[5] Edward Garner, Massacre at Rathcormac (n.d.), p. 62

[6] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 600

[7] Francis Guy, Directory of the Province of Munster, 1893, Cork, p. 81

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572885/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572877/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572875/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000572884/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927069/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[16] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462 ; http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001927089/ accessed on 5th August 2017

[17] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[18] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[19] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[20] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 516

[21] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), pp. 172, 189a

[22] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 203c

[23] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 189a

[24] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 171

[25] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[26] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; Andrew Renshaw, Wisden on the Great War: The Lives of Cricket’s Fallen 1914-1918 (London, 2014), p. 462

[27] Gerry White and Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork Servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 500; https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31560/supplement/11749/data.pdf accessed on 5th August 2017

[28] http://www.longfordatwar.ie/soldiers/16 accessed on 5th August 2017

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 376, 377

[30] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 184

[31] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 183

[32] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), p. 503

[33] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 11

[34] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[35] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 288

[36] Hart, Annual Army List (1902), p. 289a

[37] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

[38] Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Yeomanry Cavalry List (London, 1908), pp. 288, 289a

[39] http://lib.militaryarchive.co.uk/library/Biographical/library/The-VC-and-DSO-Volume-II/files/assets/basic-html/page309.html accessed on 5th August 2017

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