Cork history, Maritime History, Waterford history

Dr. Eaton William Waters of Brideweir

Dr. Eaton William Waters of Brideweir

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Dr. Eaton William Waters was born in Co. Waterford on 17th January 1865.[1] He had an older brother, George Alexander Waters born about 1863.[2] Eaton Waters was the son of another Eaton William Waters and Mary Waters of Tramore, Co. Waterford.[3] Eaton Waters senior was a physician and surgeon.[4] Eaton Waters junior had three sisters, Bessie, Anne and Helen.[5] The family grew up fast as on 14th September 1870 Dr. Eaton Waters senior died leaving Mary a widow with a young family to bring up. His personal effects were worth under £800 so the family were not poor.[6] In 1876 Marys Waters, living in Tramore, was the owner of 67 acres of land.[7] Eaton Waters junior’s grandfather was George Alexander Waters, M.D., who lived at Crobally Upper in the parish of Drmcannon, County Waterford, in the 1850s.[8] George Alexander Waters was a surgeon in the Royal Navy and was born in Cork in 1774 and died in Tramore in October 1858.[9]

Education

Eaton Waters began his education in Waterford High School before moving onto Queens College, Galway, and the Carmichael College of Medicine in Dublin. As the son of a doctor and grandson of a doctor the medical profession was in his blood. In 1886 he obtained a M.Ch. from the Royal University of Ireland and in 1887 got a M.A.O. (Hons.). After qualification he became a Demonstrator of Anatomy at Queens College, Galway before moving to England to pursue his medical career.[10]

Medical doctor

In England, Eaton Waters operated a private practice in Huddersfield and Bolton for many years before returning to Ireland in the early twentieth century.[11]

Census 1911

In the 1911 census Dr. Eaton Waters was living at Brideweir, Knocknagapple, Aghern. He was then aged 46 years and a member of the Church of Ireland. A physician and graduate of the Royal University of Ireland, Eaton Waters could read and write and was a bachelor. In the house with him on census night was Lizzie Griffin, a thirty year old general domestic servant of the Roman Catholic faith. Lizzie could read and write and was single in keeping with the usual marital status for domestic servants.[12] Lizzie was an experience domestic servant. In 1901 she worked for Rev. John Nason, curate of Mogeely, at his house in Ballynoe village where he lived with his widowed mother, Angelina Nason.[13] In 1911 Rev. John Nason was married and living in Glenville with his mother and new wife along with a single domestic servant of the Church of Ireland faith.[14]

Interest in history

Eaton Waters and his elder brother George Waters, both had a great interest in Irish history. In 1920 Eaton Waters was a subscriber to the Succession list of the Bishop, Cathedral and Parochial Clergy of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore (Dublin, 1920) by Rev. W.H. Rennison. Later Eaton Waters joined the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. In 1939 Eaton Waters was a member of the Council of the Royal Society of Antiquaries.[15] George Waters was a member of the Irish Text Society.[16] In 1939 Eaton’s son Adrian became a member of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society.[17]

 

eaton-waters.jpg

Dr. Eaton Waters (care of Conna in History and Tradition, p. 327)

Cork Historical and Archaeological Society

In 1911 Dr. Eaton Waters was elected a member of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society.[18] He took an active part in the Society, in its proceedings and welfare and was a member of the governing council for a number of years. In the Society journal and on Society outings Eaton waters enjoyed sharing his knowledge of local topography with members and entertaining members on Society tours of north-east Cork.[19] In 1931 Dr. Eaton Waters wrote a history of the Waters family in the Society journal.[20] In 1939-1941 Dr. Eaton Waters was president of the Society.[21]

The Great War

Eaton’s elder brother, George Waters also took up a medical career becoming a surgeon in the Royal Navy. At the start of the Great War in 1914 George Alexander Waters was a fleet surgeon serving aboard H.M.S. Drake at Gibraltar as part of the 5th Cruiser Squadron.[22] When the Gallipoli campaign began in early 1915 George Waters got involved as a fleet surgeon aboard H.M.S. Goliath.[23] On 13th May 1915 he was killed off Gallipoli when the ship was torpedoed.[24]

Life at Brideweir

Brideweir house was built as a vicarage in 1822 by the then vicar of Aghern and Britway, Rev. Ludlow Tonson for £923. The last vicar to live in the house died in 1899 and it was sold as a private residence to Clement Broad.[25] In 1901 Brideweir house was owned by Clement Broad but was unoccupied.[26] In 1905 Dr. Eaton Waters purchased the house and made it his home.[27] In 1911 Brideweir house had five windows in the front of the house and seventeen rooms within.[28] There were eight outhouses made up by one stable, one coach house, one harness room, one cow house, one dairy, one fowl house, one workshop and one shed.[29] In the 1930s Eaton Waters had his own electricity in the house by the use of a water wheel on the river.[30]

Away from Brideweir Dr. Eaton waters invested in the number of house properties in at Chapel Street and Barrack Street in Tallow, Co. Waterford. There he employed a Mr. Conway to collect the rent. But just like the landlords of the nineteenth century the rent was not always forthcoming and some tenants who made improvements to the houses sought to put the cost against the rent. In 1936 Michael Harty of Barrack Street sought such accosts against his rent but Eaton Waters said the costs were unauthorised and Harty was in arrears of rent and was served with an ejectment order. In court Harty’s wife promised to pay the rnet and E. Carroll, solicitor of Fermoy, acting for Eaton Waters, agreed.[31]

Marriage and family

On 11th December 1918 Dr. Eaton Waters married Annie Martin Orr from Bengal in India. They had six children: Helen (d. 18th March 1933), Christopher (d. 20th March 1936), Cicely (wife of Martin Hurley), Adrain, Ormond and Maeve.[32]

In 1919-21 the Aghern area saw action during the War of Independence. On 16th February 1920 the R.I.C. barracks in the village was attacked. One stray bullet with through a window of Brideweir and after hitting off the wall landed on the floor but thankfully the room was unoccupied at the time. After a four hour gun battle, the barracks was not captured but six weeks the police abandoned the building. Two weeks later the empty building was burnt down on a night when the wind blew from the north so as not to burn any of Dr. Waters’ trees.[33] During the War Dr. Waters treated injured soldiers from both sides.[34]

In the summer of 1921 the central arch of Aghern Bridge was blown up. After the Truce it was repaired but during the Civil War the bridge was blown up again. Some of the demolition crew had breakfast at Brideweir by their own invitation.[35]

Death

On 28th February 1945, Dr. Eaton Waters died at his residence, Brideweir, after a protracted illness.[36] He was buried in the nearby Aghern graveyard. Eaton’s son Adrian continued to live at Brideweir until 1954 when he sold the house to Dr. Kevin McCarthy who established a thriving medical practice.[37] Annie Orr Waters moved to New Zealand where she died on 30th March 1969 in Hamilton.[38]

 

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[1] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/eaton-william-waters-birth-1865-death-1945-ireland/192514554 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[2] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War (Cork, 2010), p. 479

[3] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 479

[4] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014889/005014889_00643.pdf [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[5] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/eaton-william-waters-birth-1865-death-1945-ireland/192514554 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[6] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014889/005014889_00643.pdf [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[7] Anon, Return of Owners of Land on one acres and upwards in the several Counties, Counties of cities and Counties of towns in Ireland (Dublin, 1876), p. 178

[8] Griffiths Valuation, Crobally Upper, Drumcannon parish

[9] https://www.ancientfaces.com/person/george-alexander-waters-birth-1774-death-1858/192545266 [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[10] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[11] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924742/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000571942/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001851234/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[15] Report of the Council, 1939, in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Seventh Series, Vol. 10, No. 2 (Jun. 30, 1940), pp. 103-109, at p. 103

[16] Irish Text Society, Vol. XVI (1914), p. 22

[17] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XLIX, No. 170 (July-December 1944), p. 7

[18] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. XLIX, No. 170 (July-December 1944), p. 7

[19] Holland, M., ‘Obituary, Eaton W. Waters, M.B., M.Ch., M.A.O., F.R.S.A.I.’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. L, No. 171 (January-June 1945), p. 68

[20] Martin, J., ‘Annual Report for 1931’, in the Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1931), pp. 444-449, at p. 444

[21] http://corkhist.ie/about-chas/past-presidents-of-the-society/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[22] Irish Text Society, Vol. XVI (1914), p. 22

[23] White, G., & O’Shea, B. (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War, p. 479

[24] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[25] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 277

[26] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000571710/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[27] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[28] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924720/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001924722/ [accessed on 20 May 2019]

[30] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 330

[31] Dungarvan Observer, 19 December 1936, page 3; For the purchase of Tallow town by Dr. Waters from the Duke of Devonshire (1904-1932) see Waterford County Archive, Lismore castle papers, IE/WCA/PP/LISM/512

[32] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[33] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), pp. 101, 102

[34] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 101

[35] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 102

[36] Holland, M., ‘Obituary, Eaton W. Waters, M.B., M.Ch., M.A.O., F.R.S.A.I.’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. L, No. 171 (January-June 1945), p. 68

[37] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

[38] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna, 1998), p. 278

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