Biography, Cork history, Dublin History

As I was going down Sackville Street in the 18th Century

As I was going down Sackville Street in the 18th Century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Sackville Street, or O’Connell Street as it is known today, was built about 1750 as part of a redevelopment of the area by Luke Gardiner who, in 1714, had acquired ownership of the St. Mary’s abbey estate from Viscount Moore, Earl of Drogheda. Luke Gardiner demolished the existing houses on the west side of Drogheda Street and widened the street by 150 feet creating a green mall down the centre known as Gardiner’s Mall.[1] The new street was named for Lionel Cranfield Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1731-37 and again in 1751-55. Fine quality houses were built on the east side for professional people and members of parliament. In 1752 Nathaniel Clements was an early investor in the Sackville Street project and built a fine town house on the street (later known as Leitrim House) on a plot he leased from Luke Gardiner. Nathaniel Clements later brought the fee simple of the property for £722 and lived in the house until 1765. Nathaniel Clements also owned two other houses in Sackville Street one of which he leased out while the other was occupied by Clement’s son, Robert Clements. In 1755 Luke Gardiner made Nathaniel Clements the sole trustee of Gardiner’s Mall. Sometime before 1754 Nathaniel Clements was offered the option of buying two houses on the east side of Sackville Street by Robert Handcock of Westmeath (the houses were designed by John Ensor), for £3,080 but declined.[2]

In the beginning Sackville Street was an enclosed rectangular street. In 1777 the Wide Streets Commission got a grant to extend the street to the River Liffey by knocking down the row of houses blocking the south end of the street. In 1782 the Commissioners got a grant of £15,000 to build Sackville Bridge (now O’Connell Bridge). The new bridge was completed in 1795 but extending Sackville Street (known as Lower Sackville Street) was still to be finished.[3] The quality of the houses in Lower Sackville Street didn’t match those of Upper Sackville Street. The army used some of these houses as a barracks but in 1802 the buildings collapsed, fortunately without loss of life.[4] The houses that occupied the site of the later GPO were so shaky that they could fall down without their residents having time to escape.[5]

The article recounts the story of some of the people who lived in Sackville Street in the eighteenth century using principally the information contained in the parish registers of St. Thomas.

The first people we find in the register of the parish of St. Thomas as living on Sackville Street were Michael and Sarah Ternan. On 28th September 1764 they presented their daughter, Jennet, for baptism in the parish church.[6]

Beatty

On 26th May 1773 Richard, son of Richard and Elizabeth Beatty of Sackville Street, was baptised in the church of St. Thomas.[7] This is the last reference to anybody living in Sackville Street in the parish of St. Thomas as the parish scribe didn’t record the address of later parishioners in the register. Over the next few years Richard and Elizabeth Beatty had other children called James, Ralph and Elizabeth but with address unknown. Like others on Sackville Street the Beatty family had possibly moved on. Their first recorded child in the register of St. Thomas in 1767 was made in Henry Street and in 1768 the family was living in Granby Row.[8] In 1799, a widow called Elizabeth Beatty of Dublin left a will.[9]

Clements

On 28th June 1769 William Thomas, son of Robert Clements of Sackville Street was baptised. Robert Clements was the son of Nathaniel Clements, MP and long term Vice-Treasurer of Ireland. In 1795 Robert Clements was made 1st Earl of Leitrim. It would appear that William Thomas Clements didn’t live long as he is not listed in the published pedigrees of Robert Clements. In 1758 William Clements (2nd son of Nathaniel Clements) had carpentry work done on the Sackville Street house. In 1807 the 2nd Earl of Leitrim let Leitrim House in Sackville Street and in 1807 sold the property to Josiah Wedgwood of Staffordshire.[10]

 

sackville street and mall by Joseph Tudor

Sackville Street by Joseph Tudor

Devenish

On 26th June 1769 the daughter of William and Ann Devonish of Sackville Street, Elizabeth, was baptised. This was possibly William Devenish, a Dublin attorney in 1765.[11]

Digby

In 1770 John Digby, son of John Digby, lived in Sackville Street. In April 1770 he was asked by his father to sit on the Navigation Board as the father was too old to attend. The Digby family had a country seat at Landestown in Kildare and were the ground landlords of the Aran Islands.[12]

French

On 9th November 1764 George French, esquire, and Martha, his wife, presented their son Robert for baptism. On 14th December 1771 George French, son of Arthur and Alicia French of Sackville Street, was baptised at the church of St. Thomas by Rev. Thomas Paul while the churchwardens Arthur Ormsby and Charles Willington looked on.[13]

Gill

On 18th March 1768 Elizier and Jane Gill of Sackville Street brought two children, Elizier and Ann, to the church of St. Thomas for baptism. Three years before (January 1765), Thomas Gill of Sackville Street was buried in the graveyard of St. Thomas. His relationship with Elizier Gill is unclear as in 1766 the Gill family were living in Cavendish Street.[14]

 

Gilmore

In October 1771 John and Marjory Gilmore lived in Sackville Street as did Charles and Elinor Craven along with Oliver and Jane McCasland.[15] In 1789, Anne Jane McCasland of Richmond, Co. Dublin left her will.[16]

Gore

In 1757 Sir Ralph Gore had a house in Sackville Street. He was the second son of Sir Ralph Gore (d.1733), Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. In 1772 Sir Ralph Gore was made 1st Earl of Ross. In 1771 Gore married Alicia, daughter of Nathaniel Clements, his first cousin.[17]

Harrick

On 31st July 1765 Joseph Harrick, son of Dudley and Jane Harrick of Sackville Street, was baptised in the parish church of St. Thomas. This Joseph Harrick must have soon died as on 1st March 1769 Dudley and Jane Harrick of Sackville Street, presented another Joseph Harrick for baptism in the church of St. Thomas.[18] In 1786 Dudley Harrick of Onagh, Co. Wicklow left his will while in 1802 Joseph Harrick of Ballybow, Co. Wexford left his will.[19] It is very possible that these are the same people that were in Sackville Street.

Hyde

In November 1767 John and Sarah Hyde lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, Anne. By December 1772 the Hyde family had moved to nearby Earl Street.[20] John Hyde’s country house was Castlehyde, near Fermoy, Co. Cork (in 2014 home of the celebrated Irish dancer, Michael Flatley). John Hyde was the third son of Arthur Hyde and Anne, daughter and heiress of Richard Price of Ardmayle, Co. Tipperary. In 1763 John Hyde married Sarah, daughter of Rt. Hon. Benjamin Burton of Burton Hall, Co. Carlow. In 1772 John Hyde succeeded his brother in ownership of Castlehyde. The Anne Hyde, baptised in 1767, married Col. William Stewart, 89th Regt., second son of Sir Annesley Stewart of Ramelton, Co. Donegal. The first President of Ireland, Douglas Hyde, descended from the second wife of John Hyde’s grandfather, Arthur Hyde, while John was descended from the first wife. The Hyde family came from Berkshire and settled in Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth.[21]

Jurgens

In January 1770 Charles and Elizabeth Jurgens lived on Sackville Street. When Charles Jurgens and Elizabeth Darley were married in March 1769 their address was given as Mecklenburg Street. In January 1766 a woman called Elizabeth Jurgens of Sackville Street died at age sixty. This Elizabeth may have been the mother of Charles but this is still to be established. By August 1771 Charles and Elizabeth Jurgens were living on The Strand. One year later the family was living on Batchelor’s Walk. Over the next few years the family faced joy and sadness. A son called Charles Jurgens was baptised in July 1773 but was dead by September 1773. Another son, Charles Henry Jurgens was baptised in July 1775 but again was dead by September of the same year. In September 1788 Charles Jurgens died at the age of sixty-nine years.[22]

Loftus

In 1766 Edward Loftus of Sackville Street made a lease to George Roth of Dublin of lands at Powerstown (254 acres) in County Kilkenny for three lives at £21 per year. Edward Loftus had a county seat at Richfield in County Wexford where he was appointed High Sherriff in 1784. Edward Loftus was the husband of Anne Loftus and father of Nicholas Loftus of Loftus Hall, Co. Wexford.[23]

Madden

In January 1771 Malachy and Rebecca Madden lived in Sackville Street with their new daughter, Elizabeth as did John and Mary Reade was their new son, Richard.[24] In 1791 and 1799 wills were proven for John and Mary Reade of Dublin, respectively.[25]

Murray

On 18th June 1769 John, son of Francis and Margaret Murray of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas church.[26] In 1790 Margaret Murray, a widow, of Rainsford Street, Dublin, left her will.[27]

Newenham

In May 1766 Sir Edward Newenham and his wife, Lady Grace lived on Sackville Street with their new son, William Thomas. By September 1767 the family had moved to Henry Street where they were joined by their new son, Charles Burton.[28] Over the full length of their marriage the Newenham family had eighteen children one of whom was Robert O’Callaghan Newenham, editor of Sketches of Ireland. Sir Edward Newenham was the third son of William Newenham of Coolmore, Co. Cork and Dorothy Worth, daughter and heiress of Edward Worth of Rathfarnham Castle, Co. Dublin.

Edward Newenham was born on 5th November 1734. He served as M.P. for Dublin in the Irish Parliament and in February 1764 was knighted. On 4th February 1754 Edward Newenham married Grace Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Burton, 1st Bt., of Pollacton, Co. Carlow. Sir Edward Newenham died in 1814.[29]

O’Malley (Mealy)

In 1772 Michael Mealy lived in Sackville Street where he was one of the deponents for Sir Lucius O’Brien and his family in a law suit against Poole Hickman.[30]

Ormsby

In September 1770 Arthur and Elizabeth Ormsby lived in Sackville Street. Arthur Ormsby was a church warden at St. Thomas Parish. In 1809 Arthur Ormsby, late of Dublin, died at Bath. In 1761 Sarah Donnellan, nee Ormsby, had a house in Sackville Street and landed property in Co. Limerick and Westmeath.[31]

Pery

On 20th November 1764 Edmund Sexton Pery, esquire, and his wife Elizabeth presented their baby girl, Diana Jane, for baptism.[32] Edmund Pery and family didn’t stay long in Sackville Street as by April 1766 they were living in Abbey Street. Edmund Sexton Pery was MP for Limerick and Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. He was the uncle of Edmond Henry Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick.[33]

Badham Thornhill

Later, on 27th May 1768, Edward Badham Thornhill and Mary, his wife, of Sackville Street presented their daughter, Barbara for baptism. By May 1772 Edward Badham Thornhill was living in Drogheda Street. Edward Badham Thornhill held an number of properties around Kanturk. His country seat was at Castle Kevin near Killavullen, Co. Cork.[34]

Power Trench

In May 1766 William Keating Power Trench and his wife Ann lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, also called Ann (married 1789 William Gregory). Ann Trench was formerly Ann Gardiner and sister of Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and daughter of Charles Gardiner. William Trench was the son of Richard Trench, MP of Garbally, Co. Galway. William Trench, MP for Galway (1768-97), was made 1st Viscount Dunlo (1801) and later 1st earl of Clancarty (1803). In June 1767 a son, Richard Power joined the Trench family on Sackville Street. In 1805 Richard Power became 2nd Earl of Clancarty.[35]

Younghusband

On 26th October 1765 two couples from Sackville Street presented their children for baptism at St. Thomas’ church. Joseph and Elizabeth Younghusband had their daughter, Sarah while William and Mary Evatt had their son, William, baptised. By June 1768 Joseph Younghusband and family had moved to Montgomery Street.[36] Later the Younghusband family would be recommended to move again as Montgomery Street became the centre of Dublin’s “red light district”. Between 1800 and 1925 Montgomery Street (Monto) was one of the most notorious areas for prostitution in Europe.[37] It would seem that the family did have ideas of the future for by November 1769 Joseph Younghusband was back living in Sackville Street.[38] A person called Joseph Younghusband of Whitehaven, Cumberland, mariner, left his will in 1796 but it is unclear if he was the same man as that in Sackville Street.[39]

Other people in Sackville Street

On 22nd May 1765 William Wilde, esquire, of Sackville Street and Ann, his wife, presented their new boy, Charles, for baptism at the parish church of St. Thomas.[40] On 18th August 1765 George and Jane Raferty of Sackville Street had their son, Thomas Sexton, baptised in St. Thomas’ church.[41]

On 26th April 1766 Jane Gallagher, daughter of John and Catherine Gallagher of Sackville Street, was baptised in the parish church of St. Thomas which was located on Marlborough Street.[42] On 4th May 1766 James Fortescue, esquire, and his wife, Mary Henrietta of Sackville Street presented their new daughter, Charlotte for baptism.[43] On 7th October 1766 Benjamin Paget, son of Benjamin and Ann Paget of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas’ church.[44]

On 26th April 1767 Ann Cathery, daughter of Charles and Ann Cathery of Sackville Street, was baptised.[45] In June 1767 John and Elizabeth Eyre lived on Sackville Street with their new son, Thomas.[46] On 27th September 1767 Henry Thomas, son of Lewis and Mary Thomas of Sackville Street, was baptised in St. Thomas’ church. On 23rd April 1769 another son of Lewis Thomas called Francis Edward was baptised.[47] On 23rd December 1767 Robert Creamer and his wife, Elizabeth Carter, presented their daughter Elizabeth for baptism in the church of St. Thomas.[48]

In February 1768 Abraham and Elinor Smyth lived on Sackville Street with their daughter, Mary.[49] In April 1768 William and Elizabeth Noble lived on Sackville Street with their son, Joseph.[50] On 22nd May 1768 Bernard and Jane Donelson of Sackville Street had their daughter, Jane, baptised on St. Thomas’ church.[51] On 5th June 1768 James and Henrietta Hunt of Sackville Street had their son, James, baptised in St. Thomas’ church by the Rev. Lewis Burroughs while P.H. Talbot and John Smyth, churchwardens looked on.[52] In September 1768 Nevil and Catherine Forth lived in Sackville Street with their daughter Catherine Matilda. Further along Sackville Street in November 1768 lived Francis and Margaret Ryan as did William and Elizabeth Donkin.[53]

In February 1769 Peter and Rebacca Murphy along with Henry Westenra and his wife, Harriot, lived in Sackville Street.[54] In March 1769 Walter and Hesther Taylor along with William and Ann Hawkins lived in Sackville Street.[55] On 8th August 1769 William, son of John and Ann Catherine Warburton, was baptised at the church of St. Thomas.[56] In December 1769 John and Lydia Semple lived on Sackville Street with their new daughter, Martha.[57]

In September 1770 Michael and Mary Coglan lived in Sackville Street.[58] In November 1770 Simon and Frances Vierpyl lived in Sackville Street. In 1765 they were living on the Strand.[59]

In June 1772 Daniel and Ann Heatly lived in Sackville Street with their new daughter, Everina Ann.[60] In October 1772 John and Mary Walsh along with Stephen and Frances Fitzgerald lived in Sackville Street.[61]

In 1793 Elizabeth Poole, widow, gave her share in a house on Sackville Street to her son John Poole. The house was lately occupied by Mrs. Teresa Gleadore.[62]

Later Sackville Street

At first Sackville Street was mostly a residential street. The extension to the river and the bridge over the Liffey turned it into a through street. In 1808-9 Nelson’s Pillar (134 feet tall) was built in the centre of Lower Sackville Street.[63] In 1814-8 the General Post Office (by Francis Johnson) was built on the middle of the west side. At 200 feet long by 56 feet wide it dominated Sackville Street.[64] Other businesses and hotels followed such that by the end of the nineteenth century Sackville Street was a commercial street. During the 1916 Rebellion and later in the Civil War (1922-3) much of Sackville Street was destroyed. In the twentieth century, the Street, now renamed O’Connell Street, continued to change with fast food outlets in the 1960s all but eliminating the eighteenth century grandeur. Today only number 42 Upper O’Connell Street (built in 1752) survives in near original condition.[65]

 

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[1] Bennett, D., Encyclopaedia of Dublin (Dublin, 1994), p. 56

[2] Malcomson, A.P.W., Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75 (Dublin, 2005), pp. 203, 380, 414; Malcomson, A.P.W. (ed.), The Clements Archive (Dublin, 2010), pp. 24, 266

[3] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 184

[4] Malcomson, A.P.W. (ed.), The Clements Archive (Dublin, 2010), p. xxxiv

[5] Ferguson, S., The GPO 20 years of history (Cork, 2014), p. 25

[6] Refaussé, R. (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791 (Dublin, 1994), p. 31

[7] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 58

[8] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 43, 61, 64, 65

[9] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 28

[10] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46; http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/leitrim1795.htm [accessed on 8th December 2018]; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, pp. lii, 24, 193, 863

[11] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46; Keane, Ed., & Phair, P.B., & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 130

[12] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), nos. 682, 695; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 227

[13] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 31, 54

[14] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 36, 41, 79

[15] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 53, 54

[16] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 300

[17] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), no. 554; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Gore,_1st_Earl_of_Ross [accessed on 8th December 2018]; Malcomson, Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75, p. 464

[18] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 33, 44

[19] Vicars, Sir A., Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810 (Dublin, 1897), p. 218

[20] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 57, 58

[21] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 2007, pp. 617, 618, 619

[22] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 48, 53, 59, 62, 80, 90, 93, 98, 109, 123

[23] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), ‘Survey of Documents in Private Keeping, third series’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25 (1967), nos. 158, 165, 168

[24] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 51

[25] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 393

[26] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 45

[27] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 343

[28] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 35, 39

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 2007, p. 881

[30] Ainsworth, J. (ed.), The Inchiquin Manuscripts (Dublin, 1961), no. 1468; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 227

[31] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 50; Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 238; Eustace, P.B. (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of Wills, Vol. II, 1746-85 (Dublin, 1954), no. 271

[32] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 31

[33] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 34, 35; Malcomson, Nathaniel Clements: Government and the Governing Elite in Ireland, 1725-75, p. 197; Malcomson (ed.), The Clements Archive, p. 863

[34] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 42, 55, 56; Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, Co. Clare, 2002), pp. 105, 249, 314

[35] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 35, 38; Debrett’s Peerage, 1901, p. 181; http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/clancarty1803.htm [accessed on 7th December 2018]

[36] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 33, 42

[37] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 139

[38] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 47

[39] Vicars, Index to Prerogative Wills of Ireland 1536-1810, p. 503

[40] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 32

[41] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 33

[42] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 8, 35

[43] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 35

[44] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 36

[45] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 38

[46] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 38

[47] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 39, 45

[48] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 40

[49] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 40

[50] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 41

[51] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 41

[52] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 42

[53] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 43

[54] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 44

[55] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 45

[56] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 46

[57] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 47

[58] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 50

[59] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, pp. 31, 51

[60] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 56

[61] Refaussé (ed.), Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791, p. 57

[62] Ellis, E., & Eustace, P.B. (eds.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Dublin, 1984), no. 221

[63] Ferguson, S., The GPO 20 years of history (Cork, 2014), p. 27

[64] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, p. 83

[65] Bennett, Encyclopaedia of Dublin, pp. 184, 185

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