Cork history, Waterford history

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the nineteenth century the Perry family were the landlords of about 1,000 acres at Kilwatermoy in west Co. Waterford, including the village of Kilwatermoy. It is not known when the family first acquired an interest in Kilwatermoy. What follows therefore is a life story of the family from the earliest times to the turn of the twentieth century when like so many other landlords, they sold their estates to the occupying tenants and the end of an era occurred.

John Perry

The earliest ancestor of the family was John Perry of Woodrooff, Co. Tipperary who had two sons by his wife Anne, second daughter of John Neville of Newrath, Co. Wicklow.

Samuel Perry

The younger son of John Perry was Samuel Perry, who in turn had two sons and two daughters by his wife Phoebe, daughter of William Norcott. The eldest son, William Perry, inherited Woodrooff and was the ancestor of the Perry family of that place.

Richard Perry

The younger son of Samuel Perry, Richard Perry, moved to Cork City where he established a merchant business. Richard Perry got married three times. His first wife was Ellen, daughter of Alderman Lavitt who gave his name to Lavitt’s Quay in the city, in 1763. They had a son, Samuel who got married and had children.[1] We will return to Samuel Perry later.

Richard Perry secondly got married on 7th March 1769 to Mary, daughter of Adam Newman of Dromore. They had four sons and one daughter.[2] The eldest son, Adam Perry got married in 1804 to Mary Anne Sarsfield. They had at least two sons. The elder, Richard Newman Perry, was born in late 1805 or early in 1806 and entered Trinity College, Dublin in 1824.[3]

The younger son, Adam Newman Perry got married on 17th September 1848 at St. Nicholas church, Cork to Catherine, third daughter of John Drew of Rockfield, Co. Kerry by his wife, Helen, eldest daughter of John Elmore of Hollyhill, Cork.[4] Adam Newman Perry had an address in Cork City and at South Tourine, Co. Waterford in 1848.[5]

Samuel Perry

Returning to Samuel Perry of Cork we find that he was born in 1764. Samuel Perry took his first schooling under Rev. Reid before he entered Trinity College, Dublin in November 1780 as a pensioner. At that time, his father, Richard Perry, was described as an esquire rather than a merchant. Samuel Perry graduated with a B.A. in 1784.[6]

On 23 April 1790 Samuel Richard Perry, eldest son of Richard Perry, was admitted to the freedom at large of Cork City with about thirty other people.[7]

Richard Lavitt Perry

At some time later Samuel Perry got married Elizabeth Clewlow and had a son Richard Lavitt Perry. In 1819 Richard Lavitt Perry married Jane Deane.[8] It appears that Richard Lavitt Perry held an army career as he was listed as a soldier in 1843.[9]

Richard Lavitt Perry was a member of the 44th Regiment of Foot. On 20th December 1810 he was a cornet in the Regiment and on 3rd September 1812 Richard was made a Lieutenant. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars there were less soldiers need and so on 25th March 1817 Richard Lavitt Perry was put on half pay.[10]

Robert Deane Perry

One of the children of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Robert Deane Perry who was born about 1828 in Cork. Robert first began school under Dr. O’Brien which school was possibly in the Cork area. On 13th October 1843 he entered Trinity College, Dublin as a pensioner which usually equates to a middle class background. In the spring of 1848 Robert Perry got a B.A.[11]

Thomas Deane Perry

Another son of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Thomas Deane Perry. On 6th May 1842 Thomas Perry became an ensign in the 81st Regiment of Foot and on 30th July 1844 was made a Lieutenant. In 1846 the Regiment was serving in Canada.[12]

 

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View east from Kilwatermoy medieval church across the Perry estate

The 1851 estate of Robert Deane Perry

In 1851 the estate of Robert Deane Perry at Kilwatermoy was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation for the purposes of setting a Poor Law rate to support the local Lismore Poor Law Union. Thus we find that Robert Perry held Ballymoat Upper (165acres 2roots 21perches), Churchquarter (128ac 2r 4p), Close (115ac 3r 8p), Kilwatermoy (202ac 3r 20p), Kilwatermoy Mountain (206ac 3r 24p), Lyrenacarriga (275ac 2r 6p), and Shanapollagh (62ac 2r 30p).[13]

Also holding land in Kilwatermoy in 1851 was Richard Lavitt Perry (Robert’s father) at Ballymoat Lower (169ac 0r 22p) and Mrs. Robert Perry at Ballymoat Lower (15ac 1r 16p).[14]

For more on other landlords surrounding the Perry estate in 1851 see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/kilwatermoy-landlords-in-1851/

Death of Richard Lavitt Perry

In 1875 Captain Richard Lavitt Perry was living at 3 Belgrave Place, Cork.[15] Richard Lavitt Perry died on 17th December 1878 at his home at Belgrave Place, Cork. His will was proved at Cork on 13th February 1879 by the oath of Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House. Richard Perry left effects to the value of under £1,000.[16] Clyda house and townland just 2.5km south west of Mallow was the home of Robert Deane Perry since 1861 as a tenant of the Webb family of Quarterstown house.[17]

Robert Deane Perry after 1879

On 11th September 1889 Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House and Rupert Deering attended court in Cork as executors to the will of Anne Perry, spinster, of Albert Place, Cork. Anne Perry died on 17th March 1889. The proving of her will noted the value of her effects at £2,235 10s 10d.[18]

A few months later, on 23rd August, Robert’s cousin, Richard John Perry of Rocklodge, Monkstown, County Cork, died.[19] Robert Deane Perry was a colonel in the North Cork Militia.[20]

Death of Robert Deane Perry

Robert Deane Perry died on 22nd May 1897 in County Cork leaving Eliza Matilda Perry as a widow and that his effects were valued at £2,600 9s 2d. The probate of his will was granted at Cork on 11th November 1897.[21] Eliza Matilda Perry was born in Somersetshire about 1840.[22] It is not known when Robert Deane Perry married Eliza Matilda but by 1858 they had a daughter named Helena Perry while living in Cork. Around 1872 they had another daughter who they named Eliza and she was born at Mallow.[23] A third daughter Jane married Charles William Bagge of Summerville house.[24]

Within two years Robert’s only son, Robert Deane Perry, junior, had died on 14th March 1899. The administration of his will was granted to his mother on 29th June. The effects of Robert junior were valued at £1,561 1s 9d.[25]

The Perry house in 1901 census

In the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was living at Clyda House with her two unmarried daughters, Helena and Eliza. They had two servants, Hannah and Ellen Mansfield. Of all the household only Ellen Mansfield could speak Irish and English. The fact that she was born in County Waterford, a good Irish speaking area at the end of the nineteenth century, possibly aided her ability. Eliza Matilda Perry said her occupation was living off dividends. The two daughters gave their occupation as “land and houses”.[26]

The census returns record that there were fourteen rooms in Clyda House that were used by the family. Around the house there were sixteen outbuildings. These included 3 stables, a coach house and a harness room. There was also a cow house, calf house, dairy house and 4 piggeries with 1 foul house. There were a further 3 sheds to service the house and farm.[27]

At the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was not just owner of Clyda House but also had three other houses in the townland. The full townland contained just over 62 acres.[28] One of these houses was occupied by Thomas Mansfield.[29] Thomas Mansfield was born in County Waterford and possibly on the Perry estate at Kilwatermoy. Like his daughter Ellen in the “big house” Thomas could speak Irish and English. Thomas Mansfield was 48 years old and worked as the head gardener at Clyda House. His wife, Anne (born in County Cork), was the cook while their eldest son Maurice was the groom. The couple had another son James and two daughters, Elli and Lizzie.[30]

The third house at Clyda was occupied by County Cork born John Condon who was the coachman. John Condon was only 25 years old like his wife Ellen. They had a baby daughter called Eliza Mary.[31] Outside the house the Condons had a piggery and a foul house.[32]

The fourth house on the estate was occupied by 45 year old Thomas Flanagan who worked as an agricultural labourer. With that job he had to support his 29 year old wife, Mary, along with their son and three daughters. Their eldest child was just 7 years old. Like the Condons, the Flanagans had a baby daughter which gave each other mutual support.[33]

Perry family after 1901

In 1906 Eliza Perry would need support for her own comfort as two of her cousins died within two months of each other. Richard T. Perry of Albert Place, Cork died on 12th June with administration granted to James Perry, gent, of the same place. But, on 20th August 1906, James Perry died. With no immediate heirs his estate was entrusted to Graham Gould, solicitor.[34]

Perry in 1911 census

By 1911 Montague Mandeville, county engineer for the Great Southern and Western Railway was living in Clyda House.[35] By the time of the 1911 census it is not known where the Perry family were living. Helena and Eliza, two of the daughters of Robert Deane Perry, were recorded as visitors of the house of James Sugrue at Sidney Place in Cork city. They were both unmarried.[36]

By 1911 it would appear that most of the Perry estate in Kilwatermoy and the adjoining townlands had been sold to the occupying tenants under the various Land Acts.

 

Bibliography

Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004)

Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899

Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976

Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001)

Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6

Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002)

Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846)

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End of post

 

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[1] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948; Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 4, p. 257

[2] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948

[3] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001), Vol. 2, p. 664

[4] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 123

[5] Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004), p. 7

[6] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[7] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 7, p. 2122

[8] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 4, p. 257

[9] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[10] Hart, Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846), p. 380

[11] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[12] Hart, Annual Army List, 1846, p. 233

[13] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[15] Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6, p, 721

[16] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014894/005014894_00718.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[17] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 123

[18] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[19] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[20] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014910/005014910_00206.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[21] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/search/cwa/details.jsp?id=1639337193 accessed on 25 August 2013

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[24] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[25] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014911/005014911_00215.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[26] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[27] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[28] http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,553643,597499,7,7 accessed on 23 August 2013

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550872/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[30] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550875/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[31] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550876/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550877/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[34] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014914/005014914_00504.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[35] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[36] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001856949/ accessed on 24th September 2017

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