Waterford history

Ballynadigue or Bellevue House, Co. Waterford

Ballynadigue or Bellevue House, Co. Waterford

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Ballynadigue House stands at the southern end of Monaman Lower townland in the civil parish of Lismore and Mocollop in west County Waterford. Before 1900 the house was known as Bellevue House. Ballynadigue House is situated on the road between Lismore and Cappoquin on the north bank of the River Blackwater. In 1870 Joseph Hansard described this road as ‘This neighbourhood is highly improved, and, for romantic scenery, may bear a comparison with the most celebrated places’.[1]

Origins of Bellevue House

Joseph Hansard in his book, History of Waterford, records the principle gentry of Lismore and Cappoquin in about 1820.[2] In those lists no person is mentioned for Bellevue House. By the time of the first Ordnance Survey map in 1840 the house was built and named Bellevue.

Bellevue House 1850

In about 1850 Paul Shewcraft lived at Bellevue House as Ballynadigue House was then known. The house and outbuildings were worth £19 10s. Around the house was 17 acres of land. Paul Shewcraft rented Bellevue House from the Duke of Devonshire. There were two gate lodges into the estate, both worth 15s. One of the gate lodges was vacant while the other was occupied by Denis O’Brien.[3]

In 1805 a person called Paul Shewcraft was mayor of Bombay and was in the Bombay artillery. In 1806 Paul Shewcraft was made a Lieutenant in the Bombay Volunteer Association.[4] Paul Shewcraft was in India since before 1794 and by 1816 he had left India and was living at Fitzroy Street in London. In 1816 he was a witness in the case of bigamy against Captain Harrower, late of the East India Company.[5] In April 1828, Lucinda, the wife of Paul Shewcraft, died at Fitzroy Street in London.[6]

Between 1850 and 1900

In 1881 Mrs. Hewson was living at Bellevue House, then written as Bellview.[7] In 1893 the Cotton sisters were living at Ballynadigue House which was written as Ballinadigue.[8] Richard Chearnley of Salterbridge House, just to the east of Ballynadigue House, had married Mary, daughter of Rev. Henry Cotton, archdeacon of Cashel.[9]

Ballynadigue House 1901

In 1901 Emma E. Cotton lived at Ballynadigue House with two servants. Emma Cotton was aged 50 in 1901 and was born in King’s County (Offaly). She was unmarried and a member of the Church of Ireland or the Irish Church as she called it. Emma Cotton gave her occupation as “interest in money”![10]

The two servants at Ballynadigue in 1901 were Kate Kingston and Sarah McCoy. Kate Kingston was aged 34 years and was born in Co. Cork. She worked as a cook/domestic servant. Sarah McCoy was aged 27 years and was born in Co. Wexford. She worked as housemaid/domestic servant. Both servants were unmarried and members of the Church of Ireland.[11]

In 1901 Ballynadigue house had twelve windows in front of the house and sixteen rooms within. To the north-west of the house were nine outhouses.[12] Unfortunately the form recording what function these outhouses had has not survived.

 

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The gate lodge and entrance to Ballynadigue House

Ballynadigue gate lodge 1901

As in 1850 Bellevue/Ballynadigue House had two gate lodges in 1901. The back gate lodge was vacant and the front gate lodge was occupied by John Gibson and he rented the building from Emma Cotton. The gate lodge had four windows in front of the house and five rooms within.[13] John Gibson worked for Emma Cotton as a coachman/domestic servant. He was aged 41 years, a Roman Catholic, and was born in Co. Westmeath. John Gibson lived in the gate lodge with his wife, Bridget (aged 32 years, Roman Catholic, born Co. Westmeath).[14]

By 1911 John Gibson had left Ballynadigue House and was living at Coolfin in King’s County (Offaly) where he work as a coachman for Arthur Burdett of Coolfin House. John Gibson lived in the gate lodge of Coolfin House with his wife, Bridget Gibson and records show that they were married twenty-two years (c.1889) and had no children.[15]

Ballynadigue House 1901-10

In 1909-10 Sir Joseph Cotter was a Justice of the Peace and lived at Ballynadigue House in the townland of Monaman Lower.[16] It is not possible to find him in the 1901 and 1911 census returns and he may have been out of the country at those times.

Ballynadigue House 1911

In 1911 Joseph Crowley was living at Ballynadigue House with his wife Alice and three servants. Joseph Crowley was aged 54 years and was born in Co. Cork. He gave his occupation as a retired Inspector General and retired medical practitioner. Alice Crowley, Joseph’s wife of nineteen years, was aged 50 in 1911 and was born in England. They had no children. Joseph and Alice Crowley were both Roman Catholics.[17]

The three servants at Ballynadigue in 1911 were Agnes O’Shea (aged 30 years, cook/domestic servant), Mary Power (aged 27 years, housemaid/domestic servant) and Anastasia McGrath (aged 25 years, parlour maid/domestic servant). All three servants were born in Co. Waterford and were Roman Catholics.[18]

In 1911 Ballynadigue House was described as having six windows (1901 = 12 windows) in the front of the house and nine rooms within (1901 = 16 rooms). Outside the house there were fifteen outbuildings (1901 = 9 buildings).[19] In all three counts – windows, rooms and outbuildings – great changes had occurred to Ballynadigue House in the ten years since the 1901 census. The fifteen outbuildings were described as 3 stables, 1 coach house, 1 harness house, 2 fowl houses and one each of a dairy house, cow house, calf house, piggery, boiling house, barn, potato house and store house.[20]

Ballynadigue gate lodge 1911

The front gate lodge in 1911 was occupied by William Moynihan. The house had two windows in the front and three rooms within with one outhouse.[21] William Moynihan worked as a gardener and was aged 29 years. He was born in County Waterford and was a Roman Catholic. William Moynihan was married to Mary Moynihan for just three years and they had two sons, Maurice and Edmond. Mary Moynihan was 27 years old and was born in County Waterford and was a Roman Catholic. William Moynihan could speak Irish and English but Mary could only speak English.[22]

In 1901 William Moynihan had worked as an agricultural labourer for Miss. Ellen O’Donnell at Ballygalane, the next townland to the west of Ballynadigue House.[23]

After 1911

After 1911 Ballynadigue House enters the realm of modern history and we’ll leave it for future historians to record that story.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Joseph Hansard, History of Waterford (edited by Donal Brady, Waterford County Council), p. 246

[2] Joseph Hansard, History of Waterford (edited by Donal Brady, Waterford County Council), pp. 246, 247

[3] Griffith’s Valuation, Monaman Lower townland, Lismore and Mocollop parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[4] Lawrence D. Campbell (ed.) The Asiatic Annual Register or a View of the History of Hindustan (London, 1809), pp. 95, 173

[5] http://www.hainings.net/10966.htm accessed on 6 November 2016

[6] The Gentleman’s Magazine, Volume 98, Part 1 (1828), p. 475

[7] Slater’s Commercial Directory of Ireland, 1881, Munster section, p. 107

[8] Guy’s Postal Directory, 1893, Waterford section, p. 49

[9] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 68

[10] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227922/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227922/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227920/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227920/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227923/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002640075/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[16] Thom’s Directory, 1909-10, p. 229

[17] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491449/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491449/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[19] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491445/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491447/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[21] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491445/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003491451/ accessed on 6 November 2016

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001227706/ accessed on 6 November 2016

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