Biography

Charles McNeill: editor of manuscripts

Charles McNeill: editor of manuscripts

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

An important aid for historians is access to published original documents or knowing where to find unpublished manuscripts. The people who tirelessly work away reading old handwriting in dusty old documents to provide this source material for historians are the unsung heroes of history writing. One of these men who devoted his life to gathering and publishing original documents was Charles McNeill.

Birth and family

Charles McNeill was born on 26th April 1862 at Glenarm in County Antrim.[1] He was one of a large family born to Archibald McNeill, a Roman Catholic working class “baker, sailor and merchant”, and his wife, Rosetta (née McAuley) McNeill.[2] His younger brother, John MacNeill (he later used the first name of Eoin) was a founding member of the Gaelic League, President of the Irish Volunteers, Professor of Early and Medieval history at University College, Dublin, Minister of Education and first Chairman of the Irish Manuscripts Commission. Another brother, James McNeill was second Governor-General of the Irish Free State. The wife of James McNeill, Josephine Ahearne, was a first cousin of my grandfather.

Education

The McNeill family had aspirations for Charles McNeill beyond a life in the Glens of Antrim. Thus he was sent south and was educated at Belvedere College before moving on to becoming a scholar at the Catholic University of Ireland in 1880 shortly before it was renamed the University College, Dublin. At University he was educated by Father William Delany and Father Edmund Hogan among others. When Father Hogan produced his Onomasticon Goidelicum in 1910 Charles McNeill was mentioned for thanks among a small group of former students.[3]

Employment

On 20th December 1880 Charles McNeill entered the Irish Civil Service for a very brief career – he was still at University at the time. He got a job as a clerk in the Collector General of Rates for Dublin City. But Charles McNeill had no desire to be a pin pusher all his life – he had another mission. When the office was dissolved in 1893, Charles McNeill quickly acquired a right to the first of two Civil Service pensions. With this slender source of income Charles McNeill gave up recognised employment and devoted his life to the study and transcription of unpublished Irish manuscripts, particularly those relating to medieval history.[4]

1901 census

In 1901 Charles McNeill was living at Hazelbrook in Malahide with his mother, Rosetta; his aunt Marianne Spenser; and younger brother John MacNeill, then secretary of the Gaelic League and his wife Agnes MacNeill. In the return Charles gives his occupation as “Pensioner Collector General Office”.[5] In the census return the family spelt their name as McNeill but John would later use the surname of MacNeill. In the house and building return Charles McNeill was listed as head of the household while in the household return his mother Rosetta was head of the household. The house was rented from Mary Gaffney.[6] It was the McNeill home from 1893 to 1908.[7]

Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Two institutions formed an important part of Charles McNeill’s life, the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland and the Irish Manuscripts Commission. In 1890 Charles McNeill became a member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. The Society was founded in Kilkenny in 1854 as the Kilkenny Archaeological Society. Over the following years it changed its name a few times before moving to Dublin in 1890 and calling itself the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland.

On 27th January 1914 Charles McNeill attended the Annual General Meeting of the Royal Society of Antiquaries at the Society’s rooms at number 6 St. Stephen’s Green. Also attending as a fellow of the Society was R.A.S. Macalister, later member of the Irish Manuscripts Commission and editor of a number of works. Macalister was President of the Society from 1925 to 1928 and President of the Royal Irish Academy from 1925 to 1931. During the A.G.M. Charles McNeill, then of 19 Warrington Place, Dublin, was elected a fellow of the Society along with eight others. Charles McNeill was proposed by Robert Cochrane, a past President of the Society. Charles McNeill was in 1914 a member of the Council of the Society and attended five of the eleven meetings held that year.[8]

On 31st March 1914 Charles McNeill attended the Council meeting of the Society in St. Stephen’s Green. He was due to present his paper on ‘The Secular Jurisdiction of the Early Archbishops of Dublin’ but due to the lateness of the hour it was postponed the following meeting.[9] The paper was later published in the Society’s Journal in 1915 (Series 6, Vol. V, pp. 81-108, 1915).

During 1914 Charles McNeill became one of the two honorary general secretaries of the Society.[10] He would hold the position until 1920 and again for a short period in 1937 to meet a special emergency.[11]

By 1920 Charles McNeill was one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society representing the Ulster province. During 1920 Charles McNeill attended just three Council meetings out of fifteen held. This was not as bad as it seems as some other Vice-Presidents only attended one meeting. During that time Charles McNeill had been reducing his work load in the Society as he had stepped down as Honorary General Secretary. His successor, H.J. Leask, found the position too much and resigned in July 1920 to be replaced by W.G. Strickland. Charles McNeill was busy at that time processing the work he had done in Malta.

In 1921 Charles McNeill was able to give more time to the Society and attended a number of meetings. On 27th January 1921 Charles McNeill was one of the attendees the A.G.M. of the Society at 63 Merrion Square. On 5th July 1921 and on 13th December 1921 Charles McNeill was one of the attendees at the Quarterly General Meeting of the Society and took the chair for the Quarterly General Meeting held on 20th September 1921.[12]

Over the following years Charles McNeill continued to give time to the Royal Society of Antiquaries through publishing papers and attending meetings. Even when he was overseas Charles McNeill found time for the Society on his return. In 1931 he attended four out of ten meetings of the Council. This was the time when he was doing his major work at the Bodleian Library in Oxford. At that time Charles McNeill was still one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society – representing Leinster.[13] In 1951 the Society elected Charles McNeill as an Honorary Life Fellow for his service over sixty years and he in turn was ‘singularly gratified’ when the Society published his Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register.[14]

Early work on editing manuscripts

In the years between 1893 and 1914 Charles McNeill visited many libraries and archives in which he studied and transcribed some manuscripts. In this regard he was a self-taught scholar with no scientific and technical training but with a natural talent for the game he went on to search for the sources of Irish history. One of the manuscripts that he found was the Black Book of Dublin, more commonly known as Archbishop Alen’s Register. But his very elaborate calendar lay unpublished for nearly fifty years until in 1950 when the Royal Society of Antiquaries published the work as a public gratitude for all the help Charles McNeill gave the Society over the years.[15]

img_0003

 

For Charles McNeill it was a delight to see the work finally published but also a time of sadness because others who helped so much with it didn’t life to see the day. When Charles McNeill first applied to Most Reverend Dr. Peacock, then Archbishop of Dublin, to edit the manuscript the archbishop was delighted and readily gave permission. Charles McNeill regretted that the Archbishop didn’t live to receive a copy of the finished work. The death of the Diocesan Registrar, W.H. Robinson, was also one of regret to Charles for all the help he gave.[16]

During World War One Charles McNeill found time to publish his article on the secular authority of the medieval Archbishops of Dublin. In 1930 Herbert Wood described this article as a ‘valuable paper’ on the subject when Herbert edited the Court Book of the liberty of St. Sepulchre.[17] Charles McNeill also found time to help others with their work as in 1917 when he was consulted about the book on Howth castle and its owners, written by Elrington Ball.[18]

In January 1916 Charles McNeill also showed that his life was not just all about dusty old manuscripts when he read a paper on the New Gate of Dublin to the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (this was published in 1921 in the Society Journal, Sixth Series, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 152-165). The article had its origins in 1915 when Dublin Corporation knocked down an old house that extended over a narrow laneway between Corn Market and Thomas Street. The removed house exposed a circular tower which was part of the medieval New Gate and the later New Gate prison.[19] For many people the removal of an old house by the local authority would not make much difference in their lives but Charles McNeill it inspired him to explored the exposed ruins and search for its history.

Shortly after the end of World War One, Charles McNeill went to Malta. There he spent some weeks transcribing the many references to Irish houses among the records of the Knights of Malta (Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem). On returning to Ireland the work lay unpublished. Later Charles McNeill had the transcripts bound in a volume of fine leather and was one of his treasured possessions. After many years Irish Manuscripts Commission purchased the volume with the intention of having it published but it never happened. Instead the volume was deposited in the National Library where it is available for consultation.[20] In July 1958, after the death of Charles McNeill, the Irish Manuscripts Commission presented a typed copy of McNeill’s notes and abstracts from the Malta archive to the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. This was typed by Rev. Brendan Jennings and runs to over three hundred pages.[21]

The work of editing manuscripts

The job of editing a manuscript is a long and sometimes lonely endeavour that few see. The final published work is enjoyed by historians and acclaimed as a job well done by a few of these. But if an editor was less than perfect in transcribing or translating or relied too much on later copies of the manuscript for the text, a great host of people will pass a negative comment or two. Charles McNeill was very conscious of accessing the original manuscript or the earliest available copy if the original was no longer in existence.

Sometimes a copyist of a manuscript can be too quickly condemned as inaccurate, especially if the scribe says he worked from the original when in fact he merely transcribed from an early copy. The Trinity College copy of Archbishop Alen’s Register (referred to by the letter T and numbered MS 554 in the Library catalogue), was judged to be valueless by commentators like Rev. J.H. Bernard and Dr. H.J. Lawlor. But a later, seemingly valueless copy can be of use in suppling material for missing folios in the original. Charles McNeill found the scribe of the Trinity College MS (T) copy to be honest and had some merits.

In his own editing of the Archbishop Alen’s Register, Charles McNeill acknowledged the comments of earlier writers and commentators on the manuscript and its later copies. But he went back to the original manuscript, known as A1 and said that ‘allowing for its mutilations, we have all the original register, as well as additions by Alen’.[22]

Yet even Charles McNeill was liable to make errors and emissions. The difficulty of reading old handwriting where two words like numinum and immunium can only be distinguished from one another by the number of stokes makes errors unavoidable. In his work on the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis there were a number of such failings. In the 1960s, in preparation for her English translation of the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis, A.J. Otway-Ruthven made a list of these corrections and additions and had them published in Analecta Hibernica, Number 26 (1970), pages 73-87.

Work for the Irish Manuscripts Commission

The second great institution of Charles McNeill’s life was the Irish Manuscripts Commission. In the 1920s Charles McNeill’s brother, Eoin McNeill, campaigned for the establishment of the Irish Manuscripts Commission to promote public and institutional awareness of the need to preserve primary records and where possible, publish these records so that they would be available as the indispensable resource for historians. In November 1928 the Commission was founded and held its first meeting in January 1929.

In the early days of the Irish Manuscripts Commission, members of the Commission and others were invited to submit ideas on where the Commission could find Irish related manuscripts for publication. Richard Best was one of the founding members of the Irish Manuscripts Commission. While some of his colleagues favoured edited Irish language manuscripts or simply publishing pure texts, Richard Best had his eye on manuscripts relating to Ireland at the Bodleian library at Oxford. Edward Gwynn, another founding member of the Commission, also suggested a survey of Bodleian material. Charles McNeill was appointed by the Commission to examine these manuscripts.[23] In May 1930, Charles McNeill was living at Oxenford Hall, Oxford.[24] His work at Oxford produced a number of reports which appeared in a number of issues of Analecta Hibernica. The work at the Bodleian in Oxford was by far the greatest and most detailed inspection of manuscripts undertaken by the Irish Manuscripts Commission in its early years.[25]

Charles’s brother, James McNeill, was of the opinion that the work at Oxford, and also at Lambeth Palace, was too much for Charles to undertake alone and that he needed the help of a younger man who Charles could train in the work of inspection. Richard Best, on behalf of the Commission, said that an assisted, with a degree, could be got later on. James McNeill was unsatisfied with this and in 1929 enclosed £100 of his own income to help Charles McNeill to do the work at Oxford and London. As James asked Charles to take the money “in the interest of Ireland”.[26]

bodleian-librarys

Bodleian Library

In May 1929 Charles McNeill set off for Oxford with a letter of introduction to the Bodleian, a copy of the Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research dealing with editing documents and first class travelling expenses with a subsistence allowance for a first class civil servant and £30 a month remuneration. The initial stay was for two months with a later visit to Cambridge but instead the Oxford visit was extended into a three year labour of vast proportions and Cambridge never happened.[27]

The instructions given to Charles McNeill were without too many restrictions. He was given ‘considerable latitude’ and could ‘excise an independent judgement in dealing with the Manuscript collections’. He was allowed to include in his report anything new in the way of historical facts or items of unusual interest or peculiarities of spelling. It was up to the Commission to make a judgement on which documents should be printed in full or just noted in the report. For the most part the reports furnished by Charles McNeill were to in no way be regarded as ‘superseding the use of the documents themselves or as a substitute for publication at a later time’.[28] Of course as Robert Frost would say in his poem ‘Two roads diverged in a yellow wood … Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back’.[29] Charles McNeill did have the honour of seeing part of the collection mentioned in his reports making it to full publication such as the Registrum de Kilmainham (this was approved even before the first issue of Analecta Hibernica) but for the most part the reports of Charles McNeill formed the end of publishing for majority of the documents at the Bodleian.

img_0002

 

Charles McNeill began by examining the Rawlinson collection of manuscripts at the Bodleian before moving on to the Carte collection and the Fitzwilliam papers within the Carte collection. In this work Charles McNeill received some assistance from Miss Parker of Oxford with the Gerrard Papers within the Rawlinson collection. From May to October 1930 Charles McNeill examined the Fitzwilliam papers. These collections held numerous documents relating to Irish history and the reports on same filled many of the pages in the first three issues of Analecta Hibernica.[30] After the Fitzwilliam papers Charles McNeill examined other collections in the Bodleian such as the Chichester Papers, Nairne Papers and the Letter-Book of Sir John Perrot.[31]

Although Charles McNeill was kept busy with manuscripts at Oxford he could still see a world beyond the colleges and spires. Charles McNeill had ideas about examining Irish related documents on the Continent. In February 1931 he wrote to the Irish Manuscripts Commission about a survey of documents in the Vatican Archives.[32] Such a survey didn’t happen under his watch but one was later done by Leonard Boyle. The secretary of the Irish Manuscripts Commission was unimpressed with such ideas and in January 1931 pressed Charles McNeill to return his proof for publication ‘as soon as possible as Mr. Blythe (Finance minister) has got worried about our slackness in issuing publication’.[33]

Meanwhile Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 was issued containing more survey material by Charles McNeill in Oxford. The issue was well received. Charles wrote to his brother John MacNeill, Chairman of the Irish Manuscripts Commission, that the issue ‘comes out very well and has made a good impression here (England). I have heard it approved beyond the English Historical Commission’s work for its general appearance, type and paper’.[34]

Shortly afterwards the Irish Manuscripts Commission was invited by G. Wentworth Fitzwilliam to examining the Fitzwilliam Papers at Milton. Charles McNeill had seen the Fitzwilliam papers which form part of the Carte Manuscripts at the Bodleian and reported that there ‘importance for Elizabethan policy in the period leading up to Hugh O’Neill’s war becomes daily more evident’.[35] Charles McNeill was dispatched to report of the collection from 10th to 13th October 1931 and a report was published in 1932.[36] Charles McNeill continued work on the Fitzwilliam collection after 1931 and in 1936 it was questioned by the Department of Finance why he was being paid a fee by the Irish Manuscripts Commission for the work.[37]

By 1932 Charles McNeill desired to return to Ireland and in that year he examined and reported on a collection of seventeenth century documents deposited in the library of the King’s Inns, Dublin, by J.P. Prendergast. In about September 1932 Charles McNeill found time to run across town and examine the Harris Collection in the National Library, Dublin.[38] A report of the Harris Collection was published in 1934.

Editor of books published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission

In 1931 the Irish Manuscripts Commission published the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis under the editorship of Charles McNeill. Louis P. Roche collated the text and compiled the index. The Liber Primus is the most ancient record held by Kilkenny Corporation and was deposited at the Irish Manuscripts Commission office while McNeill worked on it.[39] In 1961 A.J. Otway-Ruthven edited an English translation of the Liber Primus that was based on the edited produced by Charles McNeill with some corrections and additions.[40]

img_0004

In 1932 the Irish Manuscripts Commission published another volume of work by Charles McNeill. This was the Registrum de Kilmainham and it was a product of his work in Oxford. The main source for the text was taken from the Rawlinson manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.[41] Other manuscripts that Charles McNeill saw among the Rawlinson Manuscripts at the Bodleian formed the work of later publications. These included Raw. Ms. B.498 (The Register of St. John’s without the New Gate, Dublin, edited by Eric St. John Brooks, I.M.C. 1936), Raw. Ms. B.504 (Register of Tristernagh, edited by Maud Clarke, I.M.C. 1943), and Raw. Ms. B.499 (Copinger’s Transcript of 1526, unpublished). Charles McNeill also saw material relating to Ireland from the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries within the collection known as the ‘Miscellany of Chancery’.[42]

While all this examination and publication of manuscripts was going on, Charles McNeill found time to help others. In 1932 Canon Patrick Power produced an edition of Crichad an Chaoilli with an introduction, translation and notes. In the introduction Canon Power acknowledge the help he had received from Charles McNeill among others.[43]

In 1935 and 1936, Charles McNeill was living at number 7 Pembroke Road, Dublin.[44] In early 1936 Charles McNeill was appointed to a committee consisting of Liam Price, Richard Best and Dr. Con Curran to report on the Public Record Office of Ireland. At the end of 1936 the committee reported that the government should look beyond the destruction of 1922 and see that the modern state records were properly preserved. They recommended the transfer of public documents from all Government departments to the P.R.O.I. on the basis that it was an ‘essential idea of any Public Record Office that it should be a repository of all official documents’. They recommended two departments – one to keep current documents and another for archive material of a historical nature. But the report was just filed away and nothing happened for another five decades.[45]

In the mid-1930s the Irish Manuscripts Commission looked to Spain as a possibly area for surveying and editing of Irish related material. Charles McNeill was the recommended person to go to Spain and was due to leave after the summer of 1936. But in July 1936 the Spanish civil war began and the project was scrapped. In 1939 the project was revisited and Joseph Healy, a lecturer in Spanish at U.C.C., was sent to Spain and made a short report.[46]

In the last years of the 1930s Charles McNeill was at work with a number of different projects including an edition of A Light to the Blind. This manuscript was recently acquired by the National Library from the Earl of Fingall. Sir John Gilbert had published a part of the manuscript in 1892 but the McNeill edition didn’t make it to the printing press.[47]

World War Two and receiving honours

Before 1940, Charles McNeill was at work editing the Tanner Letters along with the Dowdall/Peppard manuscripts. The advent of World War Two placed many restrictions on editors and publishers. Yet despite the restrictions of wartime the Irish Manuscripts Commission continued to publish many works including seven issues of Analecta Hibernica and twenty-one volumes of other works which included the Tanner Letters in 1943 at the height of World War Two.[48] James Hogan described the Tanner Letters as containing ‘many documents of capital importance, belonging to the reigns of Elizabeth and James 1’.[49]

The Dowdall/Peppard collection, housed at the National Library of Ireland, represented an important archive giving a history of land in Co. Louth from the thirteenth century to modern times. The War stopped this work as for safety most of the Dublin libraries and archives deposited their important collections in various places in the countryside – the memory of the Four Courts fire of 1922 was too fresh for comfort. After the War, A.J. Otway-Ruthven and Rev. Aubrey Gwynn completed the editing process of the Dowdall papers. In 1960 the Dowdall Deeds were eventually published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission.[50]

In 1946 Charles McNeill received an honorary doctorate from the National University of Ireland along with R.C. Simington, a member of the Irish Manuscripts Commission and chief editor of the Civil Survey project. The reason for giving the doctorate was for his lifelong devotion to ‘painstaking and most fruitful research in Irish history’. It was said that the I.M.C. was ‘singularly fortunate in having at its service his exceptional equipment in all branches of MSS material’.[51]

Death and legacy

On 25th January 1958 Charles McNeill died when he was nearly ninety-six years old. His legacy in over seventy years of service for Irish historians was to produce much material that would otherwise by difficult to access. An obituary for Charles McNeill was written by Aubrey Gwynn in the publications of the two organisations that had been so apart of his life, namely the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland for that Society and in Analecta Hibernica for the Irish Manuscripts Commission.[52] As for the man, this is what Aubrey Gwynn had to say about his friend – ‘Today we salute his name and his achievement, with many pleasant and grateful memories of that dry sense of humour and those half-cynical, half-serious comments which made conversation with Charles McNeill a stimulating experience even in his last years’.[53]

The Published Writings of Charles McNeill

In the obituary for Charles McNeill, written by Audrey Gwynn, a full listing of his published works was left out and just the main items were mentioned. The list below is an attempt to record the writings of Charles McNeill. It is most likely that not everything he wrote is mentioned below but ‘Rome wasn’t built in a day’ as they say.

 

1912

The affinities of Irish Romanesque architecture in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. II, pp. 140-147, 1912

1915

The secular jurisdiction of the early Archbishops of Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland , Ser. 6, Vol. V, pp. 81-108, 1915

1919

The chalices of the West Convent, Galway in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. IX, pp. 187-188, 1919

1920

Remarks on the walls and church of Athenry in Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. XI, pp. 132-141, 1920-21

1921

New Gate, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XI, pp. 152-165, 1921

1922

Monaincha, Co. Tipperary: historical notes. With architectural notes on the church by Harold G. Leask and some remarks by H. S. Crawford in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. X, pp. 19-35, 1920; Vol. XII, p. 81, 1922

Accounts of sums realised by sales of chattels of some suppressed Irish monasteries in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XII, pp. 11-37, 1922

1923

The Suppression Commission of 1539 and religious houses in Co. Louth, 1539 in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), pp. 161-165

The De Verdons and the Draycots in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), pp. 166-172

Butler’s Journal (scholia to J. Deane’s article in last year’s Journal), in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), p. 227

1924

The Hospitallers at Kilmainham and their guests in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XIV, pp. 15-30, 1924

Professor Curtis on Mediaeval Ireland: being a review of Edmund Curtis’ “Mediaeval Ireland from 1110 to 1513” in The Irish Monthly, Vol. LII, pp. 249-259, May, 1924

Some early documents relating to English Uriel and towns of Drogheda and Dundalk 1, the Draycott family; II, The grants to the Hospital of St. John, Thomas Street, Dublin, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 4 (1924), pp. 270-277

1925

The Lumbard inscription in Christ Church, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XV, pp. 1-5, 1925

Hospital of St. John Without the New Gate, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XV, pp. 58-64, 1925 [Republished in H.B. Clarke (ed.), Medieval Dublin: the living city (Blackrock, 1990), pp. 77-82]

Castletown and Roche, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume VI number 1 (1925), pp. 1-2

History of the Irish State to 1014 by Alice Stopford Green, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 55, pp. 502-505, September 1925

Vicissitudes of an Anglo-Irish family 1530-1800 by Philip H. Bagenal, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 55, pp. 505-508, September 1925

Cleanings from Irish history by William F. T. Butler reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 56, pp. 679-681, December, 1925

1926

Dolmen in Glenasmole, Co. Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XVI, pp. 122-123, 1926

The monastery of St. Mochaoi of Nendrum by H. C. Lawlor, foreword by R. A. S. Macalister; reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XV, No. 58, pp. 335-338, June, 1926

1927

Notes on the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XVII, pp. 21-38, pp. 138-149, 1927

The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921 by F. Elrington Ball, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XVI, pp. 346-347, June, 1927

A short bibliography of Irish archaeology, in the Journal of the Bibliographical Society of Ireland, Vol. 3, Issue 10, 16 pages

1928

Some Drogheda gilds and properties, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume VI number 4 (1928), pp. 239-246

1930

Publications of Irish interest published by Irish Authors on the Continent of Europe prior to the Eighteenth century, in the Journal of the Bibliographical Society of Ireland, Vol. 4 (1930), pp. 3-41

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: recent acquisitions, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 1-11

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 12-117

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class B), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 118-178

1931

Liber primus Kilkenniensis, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1931)

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class C), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 1-43

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class D), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 44-92

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Lord Chancellor Gerrard’s Notes of his Report on Ireland, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 93-291

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 3 (1931), pp. 151-21

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class D), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 219-224

1932

Registrum de Kilmainham: register of chapter acts of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem in Ireland, 1326-50, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1932)

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. 1-9

Fitzwilliam Manuscripts at Milton, England, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. 287-326

1933

“La Sculpture Irlandaise pendant les douze premiers siècles de l’Ère Chrétienne” par Françoise Henry, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XXII, pp. 499-503, September, 1933

1934

Harris: Collectanea de Rebus Hibernicis, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 6 (1934), pp. 248-450

1935

Sepulchral slab, Kilcorban Church, Co. Galway in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 7, Vol. V, p. 325, p. 327, 1935

1938

Copies of Down Survey Maps in private keeping, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 8 (1938), pp. 419-427

1940

Notes on Dublin Castle in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 7, Vol. X, pp. 194-199, 1940

1943

The Tanner Letters, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1943)

‘The Perrot papers’, Analecta Hibernica, 12 (1943), pp. 3-65

1950

Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534, edited by Charles McNeill (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1950)

1960

Dowdall Deeds, edited by Charles McNeill and A.J. Otway-Ruthven (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1960)

 

Manuscripts of unpublished material

Extracts made by Dr. C. McNeill in the 1930s from the Prendergast Papers in Kings Inns dealing with the Cromwellian, Restoration and Revolution Eras, = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Extracts and notes from the archives of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem at Valetta (Malta) concerning Irish and British members of, and connections with the Order, = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Letter of Charles McNeill to Lord Walter FitzGerald enclosing extracts re the Earl of Kildare from The Lismore Papers ed. by Alexander Grosart, also notes on Coillach, Co. = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Research notes of Charles McNeill relating to history and archaeology = Archive: Dublin: University College Dublin: Archives Department

Correspondence, notebooks and miscellaneous papers of Charles McNeill, M.R.I.A., including transcripts of manuscripts in the Bodleian Library = Archive: Maynooth: St. Patricks College Library

 

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to acknowledge the obituary of Charles McNeill that was written by Aubrey Gwynn as a framework for this article.

 

==============

 

End of post

 

==============

 

[1] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoin_MacNeill accessed on 1 October 2016

[3] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[4] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, pp. 185, 186

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003669802/ accessed on 1 October 2016

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003669800/ accessed on 1 October 2016

[7] http://digital.ucd.ie/view-media/ivrla:35427/multi#e297ee7e-c72d-4cb7-92da-161e41164ce8 accessed on 1 October 2016

[8] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, pp. 84, 86; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the Irish Manuscripts Commission (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2009), p. 170

[9] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, p. 98

[10] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, p. 100

[11] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[12] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 85, 89, 90, 100, 189, 191

[13] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 7, Vol. II, 1932, pp. 127, 135

[14] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[15] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 186

[16] Charles McNeill (ed.), Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534 (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1950), p. xii

[17] Herbert Wood (ed.), Court Book of the Liberty of St. Sepulchre within the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Dublin (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1930), p. viii, note 2

[18] http://rsai.soutron.net/Library/Catalogues/Results.aspx?RetName=2 accessed on 1 October 2016

[19] Charles McNeill, ‘New Gate, Dublin’, in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 152, 153

[20] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 186

[21] http://rsai.soutron.net/Library/Catalogues/Results.aspx?RetName=2 accessed on 1 October 2016

[22] Charles McNeill (ed.), Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534, p. x

[23] Analecta Hibernica, No. 23 (1966), p. xv; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 24

[24] https://www.ria.ie/sites/default/files/upton-catalogue-sp-list-a008.pdf accessed on 1 October 2016

[25] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 39

[26] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 40

[27] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 40

[28] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), p. vi

[29] http://www.bartleby.com/119/1.html accessed on 1 October 2016

[30] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), p. vi

[31] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 3 (1931), p. v

[32] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 22

[33] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 51

[34] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 50

[35] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[36] Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. v, 287

[37] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 70

[38] Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), p. v; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[39] Charles McNeill (ed.), Liber Primus Kilkenniensis (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1931), pp. iv, viii

[40] A.J. Otway-Ruthven (ed.), Liber Primus Kilkenniensis (Kilkenny, 1961), p. 4

[41] Charles McNeill (ed.), Register de Kilmainham (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1932), pp. title page, xvi

[42] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[43] Canon Patrick Power (ed.), Crichad an Chaoilli (Cork University Press, 1932), p. viii

[44] https://www.ria.ie/sites/default/files/upton-catalogue-sp-list-a008.pdf accessed on 1 October 2016

[45] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 75

[46] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 76

[47] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 8 (1938), p. iv

[48] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 85

[49] James Hogan, The Irish Manuscripts Commission (Cork University Press, 1954), p. 19

[50] James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 18 (1951), p. vii; James Lydon (ed.), England and Ireland in the Later Middle Ages: Essays in honour of Jocelyn Otway-Ruthven (Irish Academic Press, Blackrock, 1981), p. 258

[51] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., pp. 102, 103

[52] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185-187; Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 22, 1960, pp. xv-xvi

[53] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s