Waterford history

Villierstown Chapel and Chaplains

Villierstown Chapel and Chaplains

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

At the centre of Villierstown today stands the chapel which is now (2015) the local community centre. A survey map of the Dromana estate in 1751 placed the chapel further up the hill and nearer to the entrance gates to the Dromana demesne. The map also placed the chapel of the west side of the street as opposed to the east side that it is currently on.[1] This map was not an actual representation of existing structures in 1751 but a vision of how the full Dromana demesne would look when all the improvements had been made.

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Front elevation of Villierstown chapel

Villierstown chapel

In 1746 there were just sixteen churches in repair in the Diocese of Lismore. This low number had to do with the political and religious landscape after the 16th century Reformation. In England the local landlord and the local community were of one religion after the Reformation. The local landlord would fund the repair of the medieval parish church or help build a new one. In Ireland the landlord and the local community were of different religions. This situation, along with other issues, contributed to the lack of church building or refurbishment in the 18th century.[2]

But there were a few exceptions to this situation. In the 1750s the religious landscape on the Dromana estate had recently changed. At the new village of Villierstown the landlord and the new Protestant community, recently arrived from Ulster to work the linen industry, were of the same religion. In an age where religion was still important, John, Earl Grandison, decided to fund a new church building on a site where no previous church existed to support the religious life of the new community. For more on the linen industry and the Ulster settlers see the article about same at   https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2015/03/09/villierstown-and-the-linen-industry/

The chapel building dates from 1748 or 1760 depending on which source you read. The chaplaincy appears for the first time in the Visitation Books of 1784.[3] Among the Villiers-Stuart papers are a number of letters from the 1750s which give more certain information. On 22nd June 1755 Christopher Musgrave of Tourin (agent of Earl Grandison) wrote to an unidentified recipient that “My Lord has not yet determined whether he will remove the well at the east end of the church, but says he will if he find it necessary. They have laid the foundations and the piers, and are settling the walk round the church”.[4]

Late in 1755 the interior fittings of the chapel appear to have been installed. In about December 1755 Christopher Musgrave wrote that “My Lord still resolves to have the seats, pulpit and altarpiece, etc. all painted the same oak colour”.[5] This interior woodwork was the most notable feature of Villierstown chapel. The finished chapel could accommodate about 400 people.[6] Another delightful feature of the chapel is the three stain glass windows. The clock over the front door was erected in 1910 by Mary Villiers Stuart for the benefit of the people of Villierstown.

It was also hoped to finish the outside of the chapel towards the end of 1755 but it was impossible to get labourers to settle the earth directly around the chapel. Christopher Musgrave wrote that the usual labourers were “digging out potatoes [where] most people gave them 6½d or 7d (d = pence) a day, and their breakfast and dinner besides, which made it impracticable to get them as my Lord had none of his own to command. The others will naturally go where they are best paid”.[7]

On April 1757 Earl Grandison wrote to Aland Mason about the recent bad weather but hopes that the weather “will not prevent my appearing at church with my weavers” on the following day.[8] This would suggest that work on building the chapel was complete and normal divine services could be held.

The chapel was endowed by John Fitzgerald Villiers, 1st Earl Grandison, in his will of 25th June 1763. The then personal chaplain of Earl Grandison, Rev. Francis Green, became first Chaplain of Villierstown. There was no district assigned to the chaplain and the village of Villierstown remained part of the civil parish of Aglish. Instead the chaplain was to give “divine service” and catechize.[9] In the 1840s we learn that there was an average congregation every Sunday, whatever average is supposed to mean.[10]

It is not known who performed the services in the chapel between c.1757 and 1763 when Rev. Francis Green is recorded as chaplain. As the chapel was within the parish of Aglish and always remained as part of Aglish it is likely that the vicar of Aglish did the business until 1763. The vicar of Aglish at the time is not known for certain. In 1662 the position of vicar at Aglish was united to Affane parish. Henry Gervais was vicar of Affane in 1738 and so also vicar of Aglish but it is unknown if he was still in position in about 1760. Henry Bagge was curate of Affane and Aglish in 1757 and became vicar of Affane in 1769.[11] It is likely that Henry Bagge performed the initial services at Villierstown until 1763.

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North elevation of the chapel

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Chaplains of Villierstown

Francis Green (1763-1768): This person was possibly the Francis Green who entered Trinity College, Dublin on 26th May 1742 and graduated in 1746 with a B.A.[12] Rev. Francis Green was curate at Kilsheelan and Carrick until 1761. It is not known when he took up this position. In 1762 Rev. Francis Green became a member of the Vicar Choral in Lismore which he held until his death. Around this time Rev. Francis Green became personal chaplain to John, Earl Grandison. It was this personal connection that ensured that in 1763 Rev. Francis Green became first chaplain of Villierstown which he served until his death. In 1767 Rev. Francis Green became vicar of Tallow but he didn’t hold the position for long.[13] In February 1768 Rev. Francis Green died.[14]

Years of no chaplain

From 1768 to 1781 there is no record of a chaplain in office.[15]

Michael Greene (1781): Michael Greene first appears in the records of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore in 1778 as curate in Dungarvan. In 1781 he appears as chaplain of Villierstown. It is not clear for how long he served as chaplain as Harris Oldfield was in office in 1796 and so was appointed chaplain before 1796. In 1793 Michael Greene was rector of Outrath which he served for one year until 1794.[16] For a few years before 1782 Michael Green was curate at Dungarvan. Others details of the life of Michael Greene are as yet unknown.[17]

Harris Oldfield (in office 1796): Rev. Harris Oldfield is first noted in the records as curate in 1781 at Whitechurch and Kilronan. By 1796 he was chaplain at Villierstown.[18] It is not known when Rev. Harris Oldfield was appointed to Villierstown or when he left. From 1796 to 1818 Rev. Harris Oldfield was vicar at Seskinan. It appears he died around 1818 as his will is dated to that year. Rev. Harris Oldfield was married to Ann Greatrakes from Affane as her second husband. Ann was previously married to Thomas Fudge of Ballyclanane, Co. Waterford. It may be this local marriage that help his appointment to Villierstown. Rev. Harris Oldfield and Ann Greatrakes had one son (Rev. John Oldfield) and four daughters. One of these daughters, Charlotte married the next incumbent at Villierstown, Rev. Thomas Sandiford. Another daughter, Margaret, married Mr. MacArdell and went first to Newfoundland and then to Tasmania where she left descendants.[19]

Thomas Sandiford (1818): Thomas Sandiford was born in Drogheda as the son of James Sandiford, merchant of that town. He was first educated by Rev. Norris before entering Trinity College Dublin on 8th February 1759. He graduated in 1763 with a B.A.[20]

In 1763 Thomas Sandiford became an Usher at Kilkenny College. In about 1765 he was made curate of Lisgenan and Templemichael in the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore. In 1773 Rev. Thomas Sandiford became rector of Outeragh.[21] In 1785 Rev. Thomas Sandiford became vicar of Whitechurch, which he held until his death, and vicar of Kilronan. In 1786 Rev. Thomas Sandiford became vicar of Modeligo and Kilgobinet which parishes he held until his death in 1820.

In 1818 he became chaplain of Villierstown and in the following year became curate at Seskinan. Rev. Thomas Sandiford succeeded his father-in-law, Rev. Harris Oldfield, in both positions. Rev. Thomas Sandiford was dead by 1833 leaving his wife Charlotte Oldfield and at least two children. One daughter, Ann, married Rev. Samuel Sandiford who was son of Rev. James Sandiford and grandson of Rev. Henry Sandiford, brother of Rev. Thomas Sandiford, and she is buried at Farahy, Co. Cork.[22]

Of all the parishes held by Rev. Thomas Sandiford, it was his position as vicar of Whitechurch which was recognised the most. The memorial tablet in St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore, which records the burial of the father and mother and other members of the Sandiford family, mentions Thomas Sandiford as the vicar of Whitechurch for many years.

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Sandiford memorial 

Philip Homan (1822): It is said that Philp Homan was born about 1799. In 1822 he was made a deacon in the Diocese of Cloyne. In the same year he became chaplain at Villierstown. This appointment seems to be the only clerical job that Philip Homan had in his life before his death on 29th November 1846 from fever contacted while serving his people.[23] His death was as an early victim of the Great Famine. He was buried inside Villierstown chapel near the altar.

The appointment of Philip Homan to Villierstown was due to a family connection.  On 13th June 1797 Sir William Jackson Homan married Lady Charlotte Stuart, third daughter of John Stuart, 1st Marquess of Bute. Lady Charlotte’s brother, Lord Henry Stuart, married on 1st July 1802 Lady Gertrude Emilia Villiers, only child of George, last Earl of Grandison and heiress to the Dromana estate in County Waterford which included the Villierstown chapel.[24]

Sir William Jackson Homan was the second son of Rev. Philip Homan of Shurock House, Co. Westmeath (son of George Homan of Westmeath) by his wife, Mary Ann Thomas, daughter of George Thomas of Rathfarnham of Co. Dublin. Sir William Homan was created a baronet in August 1801.[25] In the 1802 Sir William Homan had a son called Philip and in the 1830s Sir William lived at Clifton, Youghal.[26]

On 16th November 1826 Rev. Philip Homan married, in Lismore Cathedral, the daughter of Colonel Cameron of the 9th Regiment of Foot and his wife, Eliza Covett. From this marriage Rev. Philip Homan had six children.[27] One of the children was Frances Helena who in 1873 married Laurence Patrick Duke of Newpark, Co. Sligo and left issue. This reference to Frances said her father, Rev. Philip Homan was a student of Trinity College, Dublin and had an M.A. and lived at Ballylanigan, Co. Tipperary.[28]

The records of Trinity College Dublin have four students called Philip Homan. The first Philip Homan (b.1748) was the son of George Homan of Westmeath and got an M.A. in 1771. This person became Rev. Philip Homan, the father of Sir William Jackson Homan. The second Philip Homan at Trinity was the son of Isaac Homan, solicitor of Dublin and he got a B.A. in 1820. The other two people called Philip Homan are too late in time to be the chaplain of Villierstown. This would suggest that the Philip Homan of Villierstown chapel was this second Philip Homan. Further records show that Isaac Homan was the son of William Homan, merchant of Dublin.[29] There is a need for further investigation to establish what family connection there was between Rev. Philip Homan of Villierstown and Sir William Jackson Homan.

Other records show Rev. Philip Homan holding two townlands in the parish of Kilvemnon, in the Barony of Slieveardagh, Co. Tipperary in Griffith’s Valuation. The entries in Griffith’s describes Philip Homan was deceased as the property is held by his representatives. This would suggest that Rev. Philip Homan of Villierstown was the owner of these two townlands of Cappoge and Kilvemonon.[30]

Meanwhile back in Villierstown we learn that in the 1840s Rev. Philip Homan was “equally beloved by his Protestant and Catholic parishioners”.[31] His memorial tablet in St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore, also records this respect from both sides. The tablet further records that Philip Homan was a fine religious scholar and a great benefactor of the poor in times of distress.

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Memorial to Rev. Philip Homan in St. Carthage’s Cathedral

Hans Butler (1847): Hans Butler was the son of Francis Butler of Rathmoyle House, Co. Laois. He was first educated by Mr. Martin and entered Trinity College Dublin in October 1824 at sixteen. Hans Butler got a B.A. in Easter term 1831.[32] Hans Butler got married on 12th September 1837 to Mary, daughter of Abraham Baker of Balhealy House, Co. Dublin by his wife Sophia, daughter of Sir John Blunden and granddaughter of 1st Baron Desert. Mary Butler died on 2nd February 1860 after having two sons; Francis Butler, a doctor in Surrey, and Henry Butler, a solicitor, along with a daughter, Jeannette Butler who became the first wife of Frederick Kennedy, solicitor. Another daughter, Mary Letitia, lived for ten years before dying in July 1857. A memorial tablet for Mary Letitia Butler was erected within St. Carthage’s Cathedral, Lismore and names Rev. Hans Butler as chaplain of Villierstown.

Sir Barry Drew of Flowerhill near Ballyduff, Co. Waterford married Jane Baker, a niece of Mary and this family connection provided Hans Butler with his first job. Hans Butler was ordained deacon in 1831and priest in 1832 with Mocollop as his first curacy. He served on the Vicar Choral in Lismore from 1839 to 1891 and became chaplain of Villierstown in 1847 until 1886.[33] In 1871 Rev. Hans Butler had a gross income at Villierstown of £102 and a net income of £101.[34] In about 1894 the stipend was worth £130.[35] It is unclear how this increase had arisen. Rev. Hans Butler died on 7th January 1891 at his residence at 12 Ranelagh Road, Dublin.[36]

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Memorial to the daughter of Rev. Hans Butler

Richard Bartlett Langbridge (1886): Rev. Richard Langbridge was born about 1844 in England. In 1866 he got a B.A. from Trinity College Dublin and in 1870 got an M.A. In 1867 he was made a deacon and in 1869 became a priest. Richard Langbridge’s first job was as curate in 1867 at St. James, Handworth. In 1868 he became curate at Mar and at Dartford which latter place he held until 1870. In 1870 Richard Langbridge became headmaster of the Dartford Grammar School. He remained headmaster until 1876 when he left to become curate at Dukinfield.

But Rev. Richard Langbridge was only a short time at Dukinfield before he left overseas to become curate at Missy in Chile. Rev. Richard Langbridge stayed in Chile until 1882 when he moved to Uruguay. In that year he became consular chaplain in Montevideo. In 1885 Rev. Richard Langbridge returned to Ireland where in 1886 he became chaplain at Villierstown. In 1887 Rev. Richard Langbridge left Villierstown to become perpetual curate at Mocollop.

In 1892 Rev. Richard Langbridge moved again to become vicar of Tubrid.[37] In 1901 Rev. Richard Langbridge was living at Tubrid, Co. Tipperary with his wife, Emily Ada (aged 49) and their daughter, Winifred (aged 20).[38] Rev. Richard Langbridge held the Tubrid living until 1903.

George Gillington (1887): George Gillington was born in 1824 as the son of George Gillington, a smith in Dublin who died when George junior was young. After some education with a private tutor George Gillington entered Trinity College, Dublin on 6th November 1843. He graduated in 1850 with a B.A.[39]

In 1852 George Gillington became a deacon and in 1853 was ordained a priest. He first served as curate of Larne in 1855 followed in 1857-62 as curate in Carrickfergus. While there he met and fell in love with Mabel, second daughter of Hill Wilson of Carrickfergus. On 25th January 1860 they were married at St. Mary’s, Dublin. In 1862 George Gillington was made curate at Ballymena (a position later occupied by John George Disney, see below) and served until 1864 when he became curate of Ramoan and there served until 1877. In 1880 George Gillington became curate of Urney in the Diocese of Derry and served there until 1883. After a break in his career George Gillington became chaplain at Villierstown in 1887 where he served until his death on 21st December 1899.[40]

Arthur Wellesley Chapman (1899): Rev. Arthur Wellesley Chapman was born in England in about 1853. Following some time in England Arthur Chapman went to the United States to further his education. He attended Trinity College Cambridge, Massachusetts and later in Harvard University with a B.D. in 1880. He was made a deacon in 1881 at Huron and a priest in 1882 in Massachusetts. Arthur Chapman was rector of Amesbury in Massachusetts, 1881-82 and curate in charge of Hamstead 1885-87. Arthur Chapman took up a position in the Irish church in 1888 as curate of Cashel and Rathcline. In 1891 he became curate of St. Michael’s parish in Limerick for one year.  After a few years outside the records Arthur Chapman reappears in 1898 as Organisational Secretary of the Irish Society in Liverpool until 1899 when he became chaplain at Villierstown and moved to west Waterford.[41]

In the 1901 census Arthur Chapman was living in Villierstown with his wife, Elizabeth Mary (aged 37 & from Dublin) and four daughters and one son. The four daughters were Lillian (aged 11), Gwendoline (aged 10), Kathleen (aged 8) and Dorothy (aged 7). The one son was Arthur Wellesley Coates Chapman (aged 5). Lillian, Gwendoline and Dorothy were all born in Co. Wicklow while Kathleen was born in Co. Limerick and Arthur junior was born in Co. Dublin.[42]

After leaving Villierstown in 1901 Arthur Chapman moved to a place called Crockford where he was last recorded in 1909.[43]

John George Disney (1901): Rev. John George Disney was born in County Wicklow in about 1867. He entered Trinity College, Dublin where he graduated in 1890 with a B.A. In 1889 John Disney became a deacon and in 1890 became a priest. His first posting was in 1889 as curate of Ballymena in the Diocese of Connor which he served until 1893. In 1893 John Disney became curate of Eighton Banks in Durham which he served until 1898.[44] In 1898 he returned to Ireland as curate of Clonegam until 1901 when he moved to Villierstown. Rev. John Disney held Villierstown and the curate position at Cappoquin until 1904.[45]

John Disney was married to Elizabeth Sarah Clarke from Northumberland in England (born c.1866). They were married in 1899. In the 1901 census they had one daughter, Marion Longridge Disney who was one year old and born in County Waterford.[46]

In 1904 he was elevated from the rank of curate to become rector of Tubrid which he held until 1919. In 1912 he served one year as rural dean of Cahir.[47] In 1911 Rev. John George Disney was living at Tubbrid, Co. Tipperary with his wife and three children. These children were Marion Disney (born 1900), Gervase Atkinson Clarke Disney (born c.1904) and Kathleen Crawford Disney (born c.1905).[48]

In 1919 Rev. John Disney became vicar of Tullameelan. On 30th July 1933 Rev. John Disney died and was buried at Tullameelan.[49]

William Henry Rennison (1904): Rev. William Henry Rennison studied at Trinity College Dublin where he got a B.A. In 1899 he was ordained and in 1900 became curate in Clashmore. In the same year he became curate in charge at Templemichael. In 1901 Rev. William Rennison got married and in 1902 became curate at Kinsalebeg. In 1904 Rev. William Rennison became curate at Cappoquin and chaplain at Villierstown. His predecessor, Rev. John Disney, also held the two positions at the same time. In 1914 Rev. William Rennison was appointed rector of Ardmore.[50]

While in Ardmore he lived in the rectory with his wife Mary Edith Rennison and their daughter Elizabeth Mary (Mollie). Mollie died in 1918 aged 8 years and II months. In 1919, the Rennison’s second child Louisa was born. Her parents called her Elma from the first two letters of Elizabeth and Mary. Elma Rennison says her father was ‘a kind man, a good father, and liked animals’.

Rev. William Rennison was a keen historian and is best remembered as the author of “Succession List of the Bishops, Cathedral and Parochial Clergy of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore” (1920) – an invaluable source book for present day local historians and in the writing of this article. Rev. William Rennison also published a series of articles in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society on his transcript of Joshua Boyle’s “Accompt of the Temporalities of the Bishoprics of Waterford” which was taken from the original in the Public Record Office, Dublin before it was destroyed in 1922. This account by Joshua Boyle gives valuable information on the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore in the first half of the seventeenth century. Rev. Rennison was also a family historian and created a scrap book of all newspaper cuttings related to the family.

In 1921 Rev. William Rennison was transferred to Portlaw and according to the Preachers Book (Ref 6) he took service at St. Paul’s for the last time on Sunday 6th November, 1921. On leaving Ardmore, the parishioners showed their appreciation of his ministry by presenting him with an Address and cheque part of which they desired to be spent on fees for the M.A. Degree at T.C.D. This he subsequently did.

Rev. William Rennison died on 12th October 1937 aged 52 years. The death actually took place in Annestown near Tramore where the family were taking a late summer holiday. He was buried in Ardmore graveyard beside his daughter Mollie. His wife died in 1946 in London where Louisa Rennison now lives.[51]

Charles Geoffrey Nason Stanley (1914): Rev. Charles Stanley was born in County Cork in about 1884. His parents were Charles Henry Stanley and Belinda Mary Stanley of Monoloo, Kilcronet, Co. Cork. Rev. Charles Stanley had a younger brother, Frederick (born c.1888) and a younger sister, Edith (born c.1892).[52] By the time of the 1911 census Rev. Charles had another younger brother, William Henry, born about 1905.

In the same 1911 census the Stanley family had moved to Youghal, Co. Cork and slightly down in the economic scale. Whereas in 1901 Charles Henry Stanley lived off the income from investments, by 1911 he was listed as a fisherman and agent.[53]

Rev. Charles Stanley followed the usual clergy course in education by entering Trinity College Dublin where he graduated with a B.A. In 1904 he was appointed curate of Tramore and in 1907 he was made a deacon.[54] In 1911 Rev. Charles Stanley lived as a curate at Summer Hill, Tramore, Co. Waterford.[55] Rev. Charles Stanley stayed in Tramore until 1914 when he was appointed to the two positions of chaplain at Villierstown and curate at Cappoquin.

In 1916 Rev. Charles Stanley was appointed rector of Kilrossanty which living he held until 1934. In 1934 Rev. Charles Stanley was elevated to the senior church position in the Diocese of Lismore when he became dean of Lismore Cathedral. In 1955 he accepted responsibility for the care of the parish of Cappoquin while remaining as dean at Lismore. In 1957 his duties were increased when he became rural dean for Waterford. Rev. Charles Stanley held all these positions until his retirement in 1960. In February 1977 Rev. Charles Stanley died leaving two sons as clergymen among other issue.[56] One of the sons, Rev. Jeffrey Stanley was in the Royal Navy during World War Two on a mineweeper.[57]

020

Clock over the front door of the chapel 

William J. Skuse (1916-1919): Rev. William Skuse was born in King’s County (Offaly) on 17th December 1886.[58] He was the son of Rev. Richard D. Skuse and Sarah Kate Budd. In 1901 William Skuse lived with his parents at Sranure, Clonygown, King’s County where his father was the incumbent clergyman. William’s father was born in co. Cork while his mother was born in Co. Waterford. William Skuse had a younger brother, James H. Skuse (born c.1887).[59] In 1911 James Skuse worked as a bank clerk in Templemore, Co. Tipperary.[60]

William Skuse became a student in Trinity College Dublin and in 1909 graduated with a B.A. In 1910 he was made a deacon and appointed curate in Kenmare, Co. Kerry.[61] In the 1911 census William Skuse was listed as a boarder in a house on Shelbourne Road, Kenmare. In 1911 William Skuse was single and gave his occupation as Church of Ireland deacon.[62] Later in 1911 he was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Limerick.

In 1912 Rev. William Skuse became curate of Ematris in the Diocese of Clogher but in 1915 returned to Kerry as curate in Dingle for one year. His return to Kerry also had personal reasons as in 1915 he married Mary Elizabeth, 4th daughter of Dr. Maybury of Riversdale, Kenmare. They had two sons. In 1916 he took up the two positions of chaplain at Villierstown and curate at Cappoquin. Rev. William Skuse held both positions until 1919 when he became rector of Kiltallagh in the Diocese of Limerick.[63] The spiritual and administrative activities relating to Villierstown remained united with that of Cappoquin long after the chaplain position ceased to exist at Villierstown.[64]

In 1922 Rev. William Skuse became curate in charge at Kilflyn which position he held until 1932. In 1932 he became rector of Grean and Caherconlish in the Diocese of Emly and held this living until 1951 when he became Diocesan curate in Cashel until 1956.[65]

The end of the Villierstown chaplain position

This position of chaplain at Villierstown ended in 1919 and the chapel needs were overseen by the clergy in Lismore Cathedral.[66] The 1941 Church of Ireland Diocesan report recorded the realisation of £1,070 5s 3d from the sale of the glebe land attached to Villierstown chapel. This money was included in the Diocesan endowment fund to provide an annual income on the interest for the needs of the Diocese.[67] The 1945 Diocesan report recorded the amount raised as £1,070 5s 8d but then who is going to argue about five pence?[68] Another parcel of land near Villierstown was granted to the Diocesan endowment fund for the support of parish clergy by the Villiers Stuart family. This endowment was worth £1,002 16s 6d.[69] In 1955 the chapel ceased to operation as a house of worship. It remained idle for many years before given to the local people in Villierstown to become the community centre at the heart of the community. In 1974 President Erskine Childers visited the chapel and dedicated it for ecumenical use.

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Acknowledgements

I would like to acknowledge the help of Julian Walton, Rachael McDouall and the late Robin Bush in the preparation of this article.

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Dromana 800 crest

This article is part of the Dromana 800 celebrations of July 2015. For more information see their website at www.dromana800.com

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End of post

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[1] Hugh Maguire (ed.), An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Waterford (Government of Ireland, 2004), p. 14

[2] R.B. MacCarthy, The diocese of Lismore, 1801-69 (Four Courts Press, Dublin, 2008), p. 42

[3] Hugh Maguire (ed.), An Intro to the Architectural Heritage of County Waterford, p. 14; Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 221

[4] P.R.O.N.I., Villiers-Stuart papers, T.3131/B/7/36, 22nd June 1755, Christopher Musgrave, Tourin to [Aland Mason?]

[5] P.R.O.N.I., Villiers-Stuart papers, T.3131/B/7/36, c. December 1754, Christopher Musgrave, Tourin to [Aland Mason?]

[6] R.B. MacCarthy, The diocese of Lismore, 1801-69, p. 44

[7] P.R.O.N.I., Villiers-Stuart papers, T.3131/B/7/36, c. December 1755, Christopher Musgrave, Tourin to [Aland Mason?]

[8] P.R.O.N.I., Villiers-Stuart papers, T.3131/B/7/37, 30th April 1757, Earl Grandison, Dromana to Aland Mason, Dublin

[9] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Bishop, Cathedral & Parochial Clergy of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore (Dublin, 1920), pp. 220, 221

[10] J.R. O’Flanagan, The Blackwater in Munster (Jeremiah Hon, London, 1844), p. 40

[11] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, pp. 138, 139

[12] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (Thoemmes, Bristol, 2001), vol. 2, p. 343

[13] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists (Ulster Historical Foundation, 2008), p. 268

[14] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 221

[15] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 221

[16] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 269

[17] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 163

[18] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 349

[19] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, pp. 207, 221; Llewellyn Jewitt & others (eds.), The Reliquary (John Smith, London, 1865), volume 5 (1864-5), p. 102; Information supplied by Rachael McDouall, descendant of Rev. Thomas Sandiford

[20] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 732

[21] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 133

[22] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 379; Information supplied by Rachael McDouall, descendant of Rev. Thomas Sandiford

[23] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 287

[24] Edmund Lodge, The Peerage of the British Empire (Saunders & Otley, London, 1843), p. 91

[25] http://www.abandonedireland.com/Shurock.html accessed on 1 May 2015

[26] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=3368 accessed on 1 May 2015

[27] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 287

[28] Burke’s The Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, pp. xvii, 125

[29] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 408

[30] http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation accessed on 1 May 2015

[31] J.R. O’Flanagan, The Blackwater in Munster (), p. 40

[32] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 122

[33] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 204

[34] Joseph Hansard, History of Waterford, edited by Donald Brady (Waterford County Council, ND), p. 286

[35] P. Egan, History guide and directory of the county and city of Waterford (Dublin, 1894), p. 425

[36] Memorial in St. Carthage Cathedral, Lismore

[37] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 305

[38] Census 1901 return for house number 5 at Tubbrid, Co. Tipperary

[39] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas U. Sadlier (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 327

[40] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 264

[41] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 212

[42] Census 1901 return for house number 1 at Villierstown, Co. Waterford

[43] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 212

[44] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 241

[45] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 241

[46] Census 1901 return for house number 10 in Coollin, Kilmeaden, Co. Waterford

[47] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 241

[48] Census 1911 return for house number 6 at Tubbrid, Co. Tipperary

[49] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 241

[50] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, pp. 378, 379

[51] http://www.waterfordmuseum.ie/exhibit/web/Display/article/331/14/The_Ardmore_Journal_Rectors_Of_St_Pauls_Ardmore.html accessed on 27 January 2015

[52] Census 1901 return for house number 1 at Monoloo, Kilcronet, Co. Cork

[53] Census 1911 return for house number 1 at Springfield, Youghal, Co. Cork

[54] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 388

[55] Census 1911 return for house number 9.2 Summer Hill, Tramore, Co. Waterford

[56] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 388

[57] Conna in History and Tradition, p. 340

[58] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 383

[59] Census 1901 return for Sranure, Clonygown, King’s County

[60] Census 1911 return for house number 68 on Main Street, Templemore, Co. Tipperary

[61] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 383

[62] Census 1911 return for house number 8 on Shelbourne Road, Kenmare, Co. Kerry

[63] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 383

[64] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report to the Diocesan Council, 1941, p. 23

[65] Rev. Iain Knox (ed.), Clergy of Waterford, Lismore and Ferns: Biographical Succession Lists, p. 383

[66] Rev. W. Rennison, Succession list of the Dioceses of Waterford and Lismore, p. 221

[67] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report to the Diocesan Council, 1941, p. 13

[68] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report to the Diocesan Council, 1945, pp. 11, 12

[69] Church of Ireland, Diocese of Waterford and Lismore, Report to the Diocesan Council, 1941, p. 13

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