Confederate War

Colonel Matthew Appleyard

Colonel Matthew Appleyard

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

 

On 18th March 1642 Sir Richard Osborne wrote to Sir Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, to recount that he had received ten musketeers from the garrison of Youghal by the appointment of Serjeant-Major Matthew Appleyard, who was, said Osborne, “a gentleman [of] whom I have no acquaintance”.[1] In outline Sir Mathew Appleyard was a military commander in the Civil Wars in England and Ireland in the 1640s. After the Restoration (1660) Sir Matthew Appleyard served for a number of years a Member of Parliament at London and Dublin but what more can be said of his life? This article will add some detail to the life of Matthew Appleyard and makes us all more acquainted with his life.

Background

In 1606 Matthew Appleyard was born as the son of Thomas Appleyard of Yorkshire. The family of Appleyard were for several generations residents at Burstwick Hall Garth in the East Riding of Yorkshire.[2] In 1652 a person called Thomas Appleyard lived at Burstwick Hall Garth.[3]

Although Matthew Appleyard was associated very much with Yorkshire, the family name of Appleyard and its associated name of Applegard can be found elsewhere in England. A family of Appleyard lived for a number of generations in medieval Norwich while John Appleyard lived in London in the 1530s.[4]

Ireland

In October 1641 rebellion broke out in Ireland as the Irish decided to take advantage of divisions in England to get a better measure of freedom in Ireland. The standing army in Ireland had previously been reduced as part of the fraction between King Charles and the English Parliament and was thus inadequate to deal with the rapidly deteriorating situation. Within a few weeks much of Ireland was in rebel hands. Troops had to be sent over from England before it was too late. It would appear that Matthew Appleyard was one of few soldiers already in Ireland before the rebellion or he arrived very shortly after.

The main relief force entered Munster in the spring of 1642 under Sir Charles Vavasour but Sergeant-Major Matthew Appleyard was a military officer in the defence of Youghal in December 1641 with Sir Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork.[5]

On 16th January 1642, William St. Leger, Lord President of Munster, wrote a letter to Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, in response to the latter’s concerns about the lack of military forces in and around Youghal. The Lord President told the Earl that the present military force in the town was not there to defend the place against an attacking army but to “maintain it [the town] from any revolt or treachery within & to preserve a port open”. If such an attacking army did materialise the Lord President expected to be forewarned of such and would come to Youghal with extra forces. The Lord President couldn’t send extra forces to Youghal in January 1642 because he had very limited numbers of troops to defend the Province of Munster and certainly had none to spare. Instead the Lord President told the Earl to remove two pieces of canon from the quay side and place them in the Earl’s garden by St. Mary’s church as directed by Serjeant-Major Matthew Appleyard. These two canons could command and batter the whole town in an attack situation. The two companies and numerous English settlers would provide a sufficient military presence in the town.[6]

DSC03966

The Earl’s garden with the town walls in the background where the canons were placed

In the same January of 1642, William St. Leger, Lord President of Munster, appointed Richard Boyle, Lord Dungarvan, to be governor of Youghal, Co. Cork. Lord Dungarvan was to manage all military affairs in the town, like ensuring that proper defences were in place, appointing guards and soldiers of the watch with the additional authority to impose martial law if needed. Lord Dungarvan was also concerned with the broader defence of the English controlled areas of Munster and didn’t have time to manage the minute details of Youghal’s defence. Consequentially on 20th January 1642 he appointed a vice-governor or deputy-governor for Youghal and named Sergeant-Major Matthew Appleyard for the position. Sergeant-Major Matthew Appleyard was to have full powers on military matters and to execute martial law and punish offenders.[7] On 1st February 1642 the Lord President informed the Earl of Cork that he had given Serjeant-Major Appleyard a commission to impose martial law if needed.[8]

As part of his military assessment of the town’s defences, Sergeant-Major Appleyard decided that some houses within the town could help an attacking army. In May he ordered ten thatched cottages near the walls, belonging to Jasper Collins, to be pulled down. These cottages provided Jasper Collins with £20 per year income and were his chef source of income. For the rest of the summer of 1642 Jasper Collins and his family lived off the assistance of his father-in-law but this was insufficient for his upkeep. In November 1642 Jasper Collins got permission for him and his family to move to a small estate near Ballymaloe.[9] It doesn’t appear that Sergeant-Major Appleyard made any compensation to Jasper Collins for the ten cottages.

Serjeant-Major Matthew Appleyard did not always stay in garrison duties at Youghal. In May 1642 Appleyard and his troops were called out by Lord President St. Leger to form a mobile army force to defend the Province. The Earl of Cork complained that he was not informed that Serjeant-Major Appleyard had left Youghal and felt slighted. Lord President St. Leger counted that he had the right to redeploy the government forces in Munster whenever he felt the need without the obligation to inform local lords.[10] The absence from Youghal was felt not just by the Earl of Cork but also by the town’s people and this was shown to all by the indiscipline of the remaining garrison.

By June 1642 the town’s people of Youghal had become weary of war and some of the inhabitants didn’t always turn up to do watch duty on the town’s walls. On 29th June 1642 the mayor, James Gallwan and Sergeant-Major Appleyard issued a notice that all the inhabitants in each quarter were to give their personal attendance in the watch when their turn of duty came round. The inhabitants were to attend the watch with a good sword and an able musket or serviceable pike. The inhabitants were also not to send unfit men to take their place. The town constables were to enter the house of any offending person and take materials to pay for the town’s defence.[11]

By July 1642 Lord Dungarvan was completely consumed with military affairs in other parts of Munster that he had little time for Youghal. Therefore on 26th July 1642 the Lord President of Munster promoted Sergeant-Major Appleyard to become full governor of Youghal. In addition to managing the military affairs of the town and conducting martial law, Governor Appleyard was also in charge of any troops temporarally garrisoned in the town as they passed in and out of the port. At the September 1642 town council meeting Governor Appleyard was sworn a freeman of Youghal.[12]

In October 1642 Matthew Appleyard was a member of the Council of War in Munster. The Council included twenty three people such as Lord Inchiquin, Lord Dungarvan, Rowland St. Leger, William Jephson and Agmondisham Muschamp. On 15th October 1642 the Council wrote to the Speaker of the English House of Commons who acted as the political head of the Parliamentary side. The Council told the Speaker that the rebels were growing in number and were receiving military supplies from overseas, the want of which had heretofore restricted the rebel’s war effort.

The Council asked for supplies as bread and cheese were insufficient for fighting men and the men had nothing to drink but water from the river. The Council also asked for a regiment of dragoons to provide mobile defence and for military supplies. Without such help the rebels could attack all the English garrisons in Munster all at once and wipe out the Munster colony.[13]

View_Youghal

View of the waterfront at Youghal with St. Mary’s church in the centre

Provisions were also in short supply within Youghal. On 10th March 1643, Governor Matthew Appleyard directed that the rate-payers supply forty butts of secke at seventeen pounds per butt to supply the army for one month.[14]

By July 1643 the strain of war was hitting the ordinary people in Youghal. The town had small pre-war facilities for billeting soldiers but these were inadequate for the increased numbers of soldiers billeted in the town for garrison duty along with the many soldiers passing through the town. Added to this there were many refugees in the town. Most of County Waterford was in the hands of the Irish rebels and many English settlers had left or were forced from their homes. These settlers became refugees in English controlled Youghal.

The extra soldiers were accommodated in private houses at the charge of the occupant. Some inhabitants of Youghal had worked out that if they left the town they would be free of the charge of billeting soldiers. After the owners left the soldiers also had to move to another house placing more strain on decreasing resources and facilities. On 6th July 1643 Governor Matthew Appleyard issued an order that if the these inhabitants did not return in three days their goods and chattels would be found and sold to pay for the army.[15]

How successful was this order is difficult to establish. Within two months the situation had changed dramatically. On 15th September 1643 at Gigginstown a treaty of cessation of fighting was made between the Marquis of Ormond, Lieutenant-General of the King’s Army in Ireland and representatives of the Irish Confederate Council. All armies were to cease fighting for one year and existing battle lines were to stay as they were on 15th September.

Even though the English armies in Munster favoured the Parliament side in the English civil war they respected the Royalist army in Ireland as allies and both sides fought the common enemy of the Irish Confederates. The cessation of hostilities may have ended the fighting but the problems of billeting soldiers on a tax burdened population and of providing the army with wages and supplies continued to occupy the concerns of English army commanders in Munster.

To help the supply issue Lieutenant-Colonel Appleyard at some stage seized a gun on a ship belonging to Robert Smally. Following the truce Robert Smally petitioned Lord Inchiquin, the English commander in Munster, for the return of the gun and for the release of his ship which was impounded as a troop transporter/supply ship. On 30th September 1643 Lord Inchiquin ordered the return of the gun but kept the vessel as a troop transporter.[16]

The truce in Ireland allowed King Charles to bring over soldiers from Ireland to increase his own army in England. Robert Smally’s ship was possibly used to transport some of these soldiers. The English Parliament and a number of people on the King’s side were hostile to Irish soldiers coming over to England, even if many of these soldiers were English or Anglo-Irish. Matthew Appleyard was one of these soldiers who came over. He was replaced as deputy-governor of Youghal by Sir William Fenton.[17]

Marriage

Sir Matthew Appleyard married Frances, second daughter of the third Sir William Pelham (died 1st August 1644) of Brocklesby, Lincolnshire.[18] The father and grandfather of Sir William Pelham were firm Royalists and Sir William followed their example and was a military commander for the Royalist in the Civil War. William’s brother, Henry Pelham, broke ranks and supported Parliament in the Civil War.[19]

Sir Matthew Appleyard had a son called Matthew Appleyard, born about 1659.[20]

Battle of Cheriton, 29th March 1644

During the month of March 1644 the Royalist forces under Sir Ralph Hopton had tried to bring the Parliamentary army under Sir William Waller to battle without success. On the 28th March 1644 the Royalist forces occupied the north ridge overlooking Cheriton while the Parliamentarians occupied the ridge south of the village. General Hopton suspected that the Parliamentarians might withdraw overnight and move on again to threaten Winchester.[21]

But the Parliamentarians didn’t withdraw. Instead after a diverted discussion among his officers the Parliamentary commander, Sir William Waller decided to fight it out. On the morning of 29th March General Hopton realised that Cheriton Wood raised a potential threat to his left wing and the Royalist hold on the northern ridge. About 11 a.m. General Hopton sent foot soldiers to take the wood. But by then the Parliamentarians under Colonel Leighton had already occupied the wood and, with their musket shot, repelled the foot soldiers.

General Hopton then ordered Colonel Matthew Appleyard to take the wood. Colonel Appleyard took about 1,000 musketeers, divided into four parties and assaulted the wood but was repulsed. General Hopton appraised the situation and sent Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Hopton, commander of one of Colonel Appleyard’s assault parties and sent him round the back side of the wood. Lt-Col Hopton was supported by the Royalist canon and screened by a cross hedge so that he got up close with the Parliamentarians and with the fire of one volley sent the enemy into disorder.

Colonel Appleyard renewed his assault with the other three parties and cleared the wood, even taking a colour from a cavalry unit of Leighton. The chief Royalist commander Lord Forth ordered General Hopton to hold his strong defensive position and let the Parliamentarians attack. But some junior officers on the Royalist right disobeyed orders and began to attack. Sir William Waller sent 300 Horse under Sir Arthur Hesilrige, to attack the Royalist Foot and they were totally successful. Sir William Balfour then took the Parliament right wing to attack the Royalist Foot on their left. The Royalist cavalry made one attack on Balfour and then retired.

The Royalist Horse on the right then attacked Hesilrige’s Horse and the Foot of both sides got involved. The fighting was most hot at the base of Cheriton Wood with the Royalists coming off the worst. Colonel Appleyard’s musketeers were by now on the ridge on the Royalist right. The Parliamentarians now advanced up the east and west sides of the ridge. Colonel Appleyard and the Royalist canon made stout resistance to the enemies attack but were under pressure. In the heat of the action Colonel Appleyard was shot and wounded. By the approach of evening the Royalist army was on the verge of collapse and a general retreat was ordered.

General Hopton and Lord Forth managed to extract their Horse to Basing House and onto Reading. The Royalist Foot made their retreat as best they could. Indiscipline and a failure to exploit Colonel Appleyard’s capture of Cheriton Wood against a strong and disciplined Parliamentary side were cited for the Royalist defeat. The defeat at Cheriton forced the Royalists to later abandon Reading and withdraw from the south coast. On 30th March 1644 the Parliamentarians took Winchester.[22]

Ireland again

After the battle of Cheriton, Colonel Matthew Appleyard retreated with the Royalist army to a safe place. There he spent some time recovering from his injuries. By the end of 1644 Matthew Appleyard was sufficiently recovered to return to active service. He was sent to Ireland to take up his old position as governor of Youghal but with the reduced rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. In January 1645 Lieutenant-Colonel Appleyard approved Dominick Trant for town constable instead of Nicholas Dalton.[23]

Leicester

Lieutenant-Colonel Appleyard did not stay long in Ireland. By May 1645 he was back in England in the Royalist army. In May 1645 Prince Rupert led a Royalist force to take the Parliamentary town of Leicester or at least to draw off some of the troops of Colonel Fairfax that were besieging the Royalist capital at Oxford. On 29th May Prince Rupert encircled the town but failed in two attempts to storm Leicester. On 31st May a party of horse under Colonel Page attacked the undefended side of the town and the town fell. The Royalists then ‘miserably sacked the place without distinction of person or place’.[24] After the taking of Leicester on 31st May 1645, King Charles ‘presently made Sir Matthew Appleyard, a soldier of known courage and experience, his lieutenant governor’.[25]

On 29th September 1645 the English House of Commons ordered that the estate of Sir Matthew Appleyard, lately seized by the Committee of the Yorkshire East Riding be restored to Sir Matthew less £180.[26]

Member of Parliament for Hedon

In 1661 Sir Matthew Appleyard was elected Member of Parliament for Hedon in the English House of Commons and held the seat until his death.[27] Sir Matthew Appleyard’s time in Parliament was of mixed fortune. On 14th May 1661 Sir Matthew Appleyard was appointed to a committee to examine a number of public bills and judge if they collated with existing legislation. Some of these bills concerned the Act of Pardon, the Act confirming Judicial Proceedings, the Act for taking away the Court of Wards and several acts touching the king’s revenue.[28] On 22nd June 1661 Sir Matthew Appleyard was placed on the committee to examine the bill containing limits to the level of anclone.[29]

On 27th June 1661 Sir Matthew Appleayrd was on a committee to examine the bill for the naturalization of Anne Ferrers. This committee failed to settle the issue and the committee was reassembled on 29th June 1661 with extra members joining the existing membership which included Sir Matthew.[30] On 29th June 1661 Sir Matthew Appleyard was on a committee to examine the bill to divide the church of Trinity Church in Kingston-Upon-Hull.[31] On 22nd July 1661 Sir Matthew Appleyard, M.P., was given leave of absence from the House of Commons to travel out into the country.[32]

On 10th January 1662 Sir Matthew Appleyard was appointed to a Parliamentary committee to examine the bill for the execution of the regicides. These regicides were accused of high treason for the murder of King Charles I in 1649 and the bill particularly cited any who were on the scaffold the day king was killed.[33]

Old London Reconstructed: The Palace of Westminster about 1530

Old Westminster Palace in Tudor times

On 19th February 1662 Sir Matthew Appleyard was appointed to a Parliamentary committee assembled to examine petitions relating to a duty on iron.[34] On 8th March 1662 Sir Matthew Appleyard was appointed to a large committee to examine the Parliamentary bill concerning the estate of Sir Thomas Lee, Baronet, who wanted to exchange lands settled on his wife and needed a Parliamentary bill to change the legal title to the land.[35] In May 1663 he was cited by Mr. Cooke on a matter of breach of privilege. Matthew Appleyard was committed to the custody of the serjeant at arms until examination at the next sitting. It appears that Appleyard took to trial a tenant of Mr. Cooke M.P. for payment of tithes after Cooke gave notice that he had claim to the tithes.[36]

On 31st March 1664 Sir Matthew Appleyard was appointed to a committee assembled to examine what amount of £60,000 was paid to loyal Commission Officers and what money was still unpaid.[37]

On 6th April 1664 Sir Matthew Appleyard was given leave of absence from the House of Commons to travel to Ireland.[38] This absence was because Sir Matthew Appleyard was now captain of a Foot Company in Ireland and his presence was needed. The activities of this Foot Company are more fully explored below.

By January 1667 Sir Matthew Appleyard had retired from the army in Ireland yet it appears he did not readily return to the London Parliament. On 17th February 1667 a number of Members of Parliament were cited for not attendance and fined forty pounds each. Nine of these Members attended the House and were discharged of the fines. Two others, one of whom was Sir Matthew Appleyard, were discharged in absence because they were too sick to attend in person.[39]

With the army in Ireland under Charles II

Sometime between August 1662 and September 1663 Sir Matthew Appleyard took command of a Foot Company in the King’s Army in Ireland. A Foot Company consisted of a captain, a lieutenant, an ensign, one or two sergeants, one or two corporals, two drummers and about 86 soldiers.[40]

On 23rd September 1663 a meeting of the Council of War in Ireland resolved to settle various army units to winter quarters. Three companies were assigned to Kilkenny under Captain Thomas Stewart, Captain Cecil and Sir Matthew Appleyard with one of the three officers acing as the local commander.[41]

It would seem that Sir Mathew Appleyard had difficulties managing his company. Sometime in October Thomas Wilson, late sergeant to Appleyard, petitioned the Duke of Ormond for arrears of pay. The Duke passed on the petition to the Muster-Master-General of the army. It is assumed that Thomas Wilson was not satisfied in his pay.[42] Sir Matthew Appleyard was not alone in his difficulties. Many other commanders had trouble paying their troops. The carry-over from the civil war between King and Parliament in the 1640s meant Charles II and his government were restricted in their ability to raise taxation and Parliament refused to give more taxation. The bulk of the army was sent to Ireland so as to be in the pay of the Irish Exchequer and so ease Parliament’s concerns about the King’s power in England. But the Irish economy was not able to help pay this increased burden and arrears of pay occurred.

By 1st June 1664 Sir Matthew Appleyard and his Foot Company had moved from Kilkenny to Youghal, Co. Cork. The company stayed at Youghal until the autumn when the company moved to Charlemont where they appeared on the army list on 26th November 1664. The Foot Company of Captain William Rosse were also quartered at Youghal and Charlemont with Appleyard’s company. The other six companies at Youghal in June 1664 were sent to winter quarters elsewhere by November 1664.[43] Sir Matthew Appleyard had previous connections with Charlemont which are outlined below.

In November 1664 a list of commissioned officers in Ireland provides some names in Appleyard’s company. Sir Matthew Appleyard was captain of the company, Sir John Hall was the lieutenant and Francis Hutton was the ensign.[44] Sir John Hall was appointed lieutenant to Sir Matthew Appleyard’s Foot Company on 20th August 1664.[45]

On 17th June 1665 Sir Mathew Appleyard wrote to the Duke of Ormond on the Charlemont garrison and the needs of the garrison.[46] The details of these needs are not known to this author but lack of equipment and regular pay would have figured highly. The army payroll was a big issue as the bill accounted for about 85 per cent of government expenditure. The faultering economy during the 1660s only increased the government budget deficit and the amount of arrears. Reductions in the number of soldiers were only partly affected due to threats of a French invasion and plots against the government by Presbyterians and Catholics alike.[47]

On 14th August 1666 Sir Matthew Appleyard was given leave of absence from the Charlemont garrison.[48] By January 1667 Sir Matthew Appleyard had retired from the Irish army. On 27th January 1667 Conway Hill was appointed captain of the Foot Company lately commanded by Appleyard.[49]

Member of Parliament for Charlemont

In March 1661 William, Lord Caulfield Brown of Charlemont, was constable of the castle of Charlemont (appointed January 1661) with a garrison of fifteen soldiers.[50] On 8th September 1662 Sir Matthew Appleyard was directed by James Butler, Duke of Ormond and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, to carry out a survey of the fort of Charlemont.[51]

In May 1664 Sir Matthew Appleyard was given four hundred pounds to be employed on construction of the fortifications of Charlemont fort and repair of existence facilities. Sir Matthew Appleyard was also allowed to buy timber from the king’s forests in Ulster. At that time Appleyard was Governor of Charlemont.[52] It is not known when he was so appointed. His Foot Company was based in Kilkenny and Youghal during the winter of 1663-4 and spring of 1664 and only appears at Charlemont in the autumn of 1664 as noted above.

In 1665 Sir Matthew Appleyard was elected Member of Parliament for Charlemont in the Irish House of Commons. He held the seat for only one year.[53] While at Charlemont on 28th April 1666 Sir Matthew Appleyard wrote a letter to James Butler, Duke of Ormond and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Appleyard wrote that following a quiet period an Englishman and his family were robbed of money and clothes in the parish of Clogher. The attackers numbered thirteen men and were led by Neill McTurlough McShane Oge O’Neill who had killed a man at Caledon fair in 1665. Afterwards Neill’s father came to Mr. Golborne and asked for protection for six weeks and a pardon. Appleyard recommended the pardon to the Duke of Ormond because the O’Neill’s were so numerous in the area that no other option was possible without causing serious unrest.[54]

The port of Hull

Shortly after the Restoration, Sir Nicholas Appleyard was appointed customer of the port of Hull along with his son, Sir Matthew Appleyard.[55] On 4th July 1643 the House of Commons passed by resolution that Lieutenant-Colonel Appleyard should return to Hull and resume his former employment.[56] After Sir Matthew Appleyard died in 1670 his office of customer at Hull port passed to his son Matthew Appleyard. But as young Matthew was only eleven years old Thomas Meriton was appointed to hold the position until young Matthew came of age. Meriton got a salary of £100 and £30 for a clerk. When Meriton died his successor, Robert Mason, only got £30 for a clerk and no salary. When young Matthew Appleyard came of age he succeeded to the office of customer with Thomas Lysons. In June 1681 Robert Mason petitioned the Treasury for an increase in his fee from £30 to £50 as clerks in other ports usually received the higher amount.[57]

Death

Sir Mathew Appleyard died on 20th February 1669-70 after a lifetime as a firm supporter of church and state.[58]

Later people called Appleyard in Ireland

About the year 1820 a banker called John Appleyard lived in Ireland. He was the son of Thomas Appleyard and grandson of John Appleyard of Athlunkard, Co. Clare. It is claimed that John Appleyard was possibly a descendent of Sir Matthew Appleyard but I have yet to establish any solid link apart from having the same surname.[59]

Another reference to this Appleyard family comes from 1806 when Walter Joyce of Merview and Galway married as his second wife Helen Appleyard, daughter of Thomas Appleyard of Galway, merchant (died 20 August 1814). This Thomas Appleyard was son of John Appleyard of Athlunkard, Co. Clare and Helen Kelly.[60]

Elsewhere we find in 1830 that John Appleyard of Drogheda entered Trinity College, Dublin. This John was the son of James Appleyard of Drogheda.[61] While Henry Appleyard held a house and yard at number 9 Charleville Mall in the Mountjoy ward of Dublin. Henry also had a shop, parlour and basement at number 38 Sackville Street Lower, two doors south from the General Post Office.[62]

Postscript

It was my desire for many years to write a biography on Sir Matthew Appleyard. Although this article contains along of information on the life of Matthew Appleyard it is not beyond improvement. May be some day additional information will be found in new sources not available to me at this time. For the present this is Sir Matthew Appleyard.

 

===========

End of post

===========

 

[1] Rev. Alexander Grosart (ed.), The Lismore Papers, second series, volume five (author, 1888), p. 62

[2] Augustus Samuel Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, edited by Sir Leslie Stephen & Sir Sidney Lee (19 vols. Oxford University Press, 1917), Vol. 1, p. 522

[3] Mary Anne Everett Green (ed.), Calendar of the Committee of Compounding (1892), Vol. 4

[4] http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78155&strquery=Appleyard accessed on 6 June 2014; http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22621&strquery=Appleyard accessed on 6 June 2014

[5] Rev. Samuel Hayman, The hand-book for Youghal (Field, Youghal, 1973), p. 32

[6] Rev. Alexander Grosart (ed.), The Lismore Papers, second series, volume four (author, 1888), p. 249

[7] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal (Guildford, 1878), p. 217

[8] Rev. Alexander Grosart (ed.), The Lismore Papers, second series, volume four, p. 262

[9] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, pp. 224-5

[10] Rev. Alexander Grosart (ed.), The Lismore Papers, second series, volume five, p. 73

[11] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 221

[12] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 222

[13] James Hogan (ed.), Letters and papers relating to the Irish Rebellion between 1642-46 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1936), pp. 156-7

[14] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 227

[15] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 227

[16] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 308

[17] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 550

[18] Sir Egerton Brydges (ed.), Collin’s peerage of England (London, 1812), p. 391; Augustus S. Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 1, p. 522

[19] http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/WilliamPelhamofBrocklesby2.htm accessed 5 June 2014

[20] William Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books (1916), Vol. 7 (1681-85), p. 172

[21] Peter Young & Richard Holmes, The English Civil War (Wordsworth, Ware, 2000), pp. 166, 167

[22] Charles Chadwyck Healey (ed.), Hopton’s narrative of his campaign in the West (1642-1644) and other papers (Somerset Record Society, Vol.18, 1902), pp. 81, 82, 101, 103; Peter Young & Richard Holmes, The English Civil War, pp. 169-71; Wilfrid Emberton, The English Civil War day by day (Sutton Publishing, Stroud, 1997), p. 103

[23] Richard Caulfield (ed.), Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal, p. 253

[24] Wilfrid Emberton, The English Civil War day by day, p. 153

[25] Augustus S. Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 1, p. 522

[26] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 4 (1644-46), p. 389

[27] Augustus S. Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 1, p. 522

[28] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 249

[29] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 257

[30] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), pp. 281, 284

[31] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 284

[32] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 307

[33] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 343

[34] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 369

[35] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 381

[36] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), pp. 477, 478

[37] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 540

[38] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 8 (1660-67), p. 545

[39] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 9 (1667-87), p. 52

[40] John T. Gilbert and Rosa Gilbert (eds.), Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormond at Kilkenny Castle (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Vol. 2, 1899), p. 178

[41] John and Rosa Gilbert (eds.), Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormond, p. 185

[42] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 159, folio 92v, Petition of Thomas Wilson to the Duke of Ormond, c. 18 October 1663; Ibid, MS. Carte 159, folio 92v, Reference of this petition to the Muster-Master-General, 21 October 1663

[43] John and Rosa Gilbert (eds.), Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormond, p. 188

[44] John and Rosa Gilbert (eds.), Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormond, pp. 190-2; In April 167 Francis Hutton was made a lieutenant in Colonel Humphrey Sydenham’s Regiment of Foot = Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 163, folio 29, commission to Francis Hutton to be lieutenant, 3 April 1667

[45]Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 145, folio 31v, commission to Sir John Hall to be lieutenant, 20 August 1664; By October 1666 John Hall was with the king’s Regiment of Guards = Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 154, folio 100, petition of Francis Vangamon to Duke of Ormond, October 1666

[46] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 34, folio 259, Sir Matthew Appleyard to Duke of Ormond, 17 June 1665

[47] David Dickson, New Foundations: Ireland 1600-1800 (Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 2000), pp. 9, 10

[48] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 163, folio 7, leave of absence to Sir Matthew Appleyard, 14 August 1666

[49] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 163, folio 27v, commission by the Duke of Ormond to Conway Hill to become captain of Appleyard’s Foot Company, 27 January 1667

[50] Bodleian Library, Oxford, Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 41, folio 701, The King to the Lords Justices of Ireland, 29 January 1661; Ibid, MS. Carte 158, p. 65, warrant by the Lords Justices of Ireland, 26 March 1661

[51] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 165, folio 20v, commission to Sir Matthew Appleyard issued by the Duke of Ormond, 8 September 1662

[52] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 165, folio 192v, warrant by the Duke of Ormond to Sir Matthew Appleyard, 26 May 1664

[53] Augustus S. Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 1, p. 522

[54] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormond at Kilkenny Castle (Historical Manuscripts Commission, New Series, Vol. 3, 1904), p. 219

[55] William Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books (1916), Vol. 7 (1681-85), p. 172

[56] Anon, Journal of the House of Commons (1802), Vol. 3 (1643-44), p. 154

[57] William Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books (1916), Vol. 7 (1681-85), p. 172

[58] Augustus S. Bolton, ‘Appleyard, Sir Mathew’, in The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 1, p. 522

[59] C.M. Tenison, M.R.I.A., ‘The Private Bankers of Ireland’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. II (1893), p. 206

[60] Gordon St. George Mark, ‘The Joyces of Merview’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 8, No. 3 (1992), p. 385

[61] George Dames Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 16

[62] http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml?action=doNameSearch&Submit.x=26&Submit.y=15&Submit=Submit&familyname=Appleyard = accessed 5 September 2014

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s