Cork history

Grant family of Kilmurry, Co. Cork

 

 

Grant family of Kilmurry, Co. Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Overlooking the River Blackwater, on the north bank, between Fermoy and Ballyduff stands Kilmurry House or at least the ruins of the house. So-called New Age Travellers illegally occupied the house during the 1990s and took everything but the four walls. For about 250 years Kilmurry was the home of the Grant family. This article gives a short account of this family.

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Kilmurry House in recent years

Origins of the Grant family

In Ireland people bearing the surname of Grant usually come from two main places of origin. North of a line from Dublin to Galway most Grant families are of Scottish origin. South of that line most Grant families are of Norman origin.[1]

Early medieval documents show members of the Le Graunte family living in South Kilkenny in the decades after the Norman invasion of 1169. The chief Le Graunte family were descendent from Milo Fitz David, a knight of the Norman Conquest and son of David Fitz Gerald, Bishop of St. David’s, Wales, 1148-1176.[2] After the death of Dermot MacMurrough in 1176 Milo Fitz David received the Barony of Overk in South Kilkenny which included the modern Baronies of Iverk, Ida and part of Knocktopher (about 100,000 acres).[3]

Milo Fitz David was succeeded by his son, David Fitz Milo le Graunte, the first of his family to use the name of le Graunte. The name means ‘strong’ and was later changed to the modern form of Grant.[4] David Fitz Milo le Graunte richly endowed the Augustinian nunnery of St. Mary at Kilculliheen as Baron of Overk.[5]   

The last Baron of Overk, Roger Fitz Milo le Graunte, sold the lordship of Overk to Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, in 1319. Edmund Butler’s son, James Butler, became the first Earl of Ormond in 1328.[6] The adjoining fee of Logeran was lost by Sir William le Graunte in 1345 after the Desmond rebellion. By that time some members of the le Graunte family had moved out from South Kilkenny into South Tipperary and northwards into Connacht while others moved south into County Waterford. Some le Graunte families stayed in South Kilkenny until the Commonwealth confiscations (1653-1660).[7]

Grant family in Waterford City

By around 1500 members of the Grant families had moved into Waterford city where they became successful merchants involved with trade to Spain and the Continent. Thomas Grant was a bailiff of the city in 1542 and 1546.[8] James Grant was city bailiff in 1549, 1557 and 1560.[9] In the seventeenth century Matthew Grant was bailiff of Waterford City in 1626, sheriff in 1634 and mayor of Waterford in 1640.[10] During the Civil War of 1641-1653 members of the Grant families fought on different sides with those around Waterford City on the Royalist side and those from Wexford and Tipperary fighting for the Confederate army.[11] Following the victory of the Parliamentary side over the Royalists and Confederates the property of many Grant families were seized and their former owners transplanted to Connacht. Even Grants who stayed loyal and were innocent of any rebellion were not spared.

John Fitz Jasper Grant

But before all that, the first appearance of the Grant family of Kilmurry in documents is seen. A person called Jasper Grant was admitted as a freeman of Waterford City in 1632 and paid 4 shillings for that entry.[12] The Christian name of Jasper is not that common yet it features very much in the Grant family of Kilmurry. Among other people with the name of Jasper include Jasper Archer, a Waterford freeman in 1570 and three people called Jasper Lombard lived in Waterford in 1596-1626 and Jasper White, a freeman in 1558. There were also three people of the Woodlock family called Jasper between 1552 and 1614.[13] 

Yet long before 1632 another person had Jasper as his first name. This Jasper Grant lived in the first half of the sixteenth century. In 1567 his son, John Fitz Jasper Grant, was admitted as a freeman of Waterford City in return for 2 half barge loads of stones to help build the Corporation quay.[14] Little else is known about Jasper Grant or his son but it is very possible that they were ancestors of Jasper Grant I of Kilmurry and later generations.

Jasper Grant I

 As said, Jasper Grant was admitted a freeman of Waterford in 1632. It is said that he was born around 1595 and that his family held Grantstown in the parish of Ballinakill.[15] It is suggested that his son was Jasper Grant II but positive proof has yet to be found.

Jasper Grant II

After the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 many people who had lost their property, including many Grants, petitioned for the return of their property. Few were successful. The one notable exception was Jasper Grant of Waterford, ancestor of the Grant family of Kilmurry. During the Commonwealth Jasper Grant made good use of his time in exile by prospering as a merchant on the Continent.[16]

Initially Jasper Grant was not more successful than others who lost their property. His first petition to the Duke of Ormond in November 1660 was unsuccessful. But Jasper Grant did not give up. In 1664 he wrote again, with six other people, to the Duke of Ormond from St. Malo to plead their case as banished merchants of Waterford.[17] 

Sometime between 1664 and 1666 Jasper Grant returned to Ireland. Not willing to wait for the long process of government decision-making Jasper Grant used his acquired wealth to make his own way in the world In 1667 Jasper Grant obtained as assignment of a mortgage of the lands of Grantstown or Ballygraunt outside Waterford City.[18]

Grantstown was owned by Peter Dobbyn in 1640 and held by his wife, Beale Dobbyn, after his death. The land was restored to William Dobbyn in 1666.[19] In 1668 William Dobbyn conveyed these lands to Jasper Grant in fee.[20] To receive land in fee would suggest that by 1668 Jasper Grant had become a Protestant but this is far from certain.

Jasper Grant continued to work his way into acceptance by the new government. During the wars against the Dutch Republic Jasper Grant joined the Royal Navy as a privateer.[21] Sailing around the English Channel and the Irish Sea Jasper Grant attacked Dutch merchant vessels, disrupting trade and making money in the process.[22]

Captain Jasper Grant also operated in the regular Royal Navy. In the summer of 1666 he was captain of H.M.S. Sapphire. Captain Jasper Grant operated out of the County Cork ports on convey protection duties between Ireland and England. In late May 1666 Captain Jasper Grant was at Kinsale with three other warships.[23] He was also involved in merchant convoy protection beyond the waters of Ireland and England. On 7th June 1666 the Duke of Ormond wrote to Captain Jasper Grant of H.M.S. Sapphire that he was to sail to the Caribbean Islands as escort for a fleet of merchant vessels loaded at Kinsale. The vessels were laden with beef and other merchandise by a French merchant.[24] It would seem that there was a delay in the French convoy leaving Kinsale.

On 19th June 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and his squadron were about seventy leagues to the south-west of the Cape. They were waiting for an incoming merchant fleet convoy to give it protection on the way into England. Major John Love recommended that the pleasure boat of the Duke of Ormond should stay in England because Captain Grant was not available to offer protection. The Duke had intended sending arms and ammunition to Ireland on his boat.[25]

By 26th June 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and the Sapphire had returned to Kinsale. On that later date the Sapphire and the Swift were directed to sail round from the south coast to Dublin and await further orders.[26] Some date later, Captain Grant had returned to Kinsale for new orders. By 6th July 1666 Captain Jasper Grant and his squadron were sailing along the west coast of Ireland. They were searching for a merchant fleet inbound from the East Indies.[27] There were no radios or radar to help them find the inbound fleet and so it was no easy task. Of course it was not easy for the Dutch warships to find the merchant fleet and the weather can always upset things for everyone, friend and foe alike.

Around 20th July 1666 Sir George Lane sent a letter to Captain Grant but the port commander at Kinsale, Major Love, said Captain Grant and six other warships were gone to England on convoy protection duties. The content of the letter to Captain Jasper Grant is unknown. Major Love told Sir George Lane that he would deliver the letter on Grant’s return to Ireland.[28]

The Sapphire was a 38-gun fourth-rate frigate, originally built for the Commonwealth navy in 1651. In 1666 it is recorded that the gun stock of the Sapphire was reduced to 36 guns (in wartime conditions) and 30 guns (in peacetime). She was 100 feet long and 28 foot 10 inches wide at the beam. In 1666 she had a wartime crew of 160 men and boys. In March 1670 her then captain, John Pearce, ran the Sapphire aground of Sicily to escape what he believed to be four Algerian ships and the ship was lost. A Royal Navy court judged his actions, and those of his lieutenant, to be cowardice and both were executed in August 1670.[29] Reminds one of those soldiers shot at dawn in the Great War for cowardice. History changes at a slow pace sometimes.   

In is said that Captain Jasper Grant fought at the battle of Lowestoft in June 1672. He was then in command of the frigate Mermaid (28 guns).[30]

Sometime around 1667 Jasper Grant, R.N. of Grantstown got married. His wife was Gillian Hely of Kinsale, sister of Francis Hely of Kinsale and later of Cork City.[31] They had at least two sons, Thomas Grant (died 1706 without issue) and Jasper Grant III along with two daughters, Margaret Butler and Mary Phillips.[32]

Sometime before Trinity term 1687 Jasper Grant, late of Waterford, had travelled to England. While there he was charged with an indictment of trespass. Jasper Grant was to appear before the King’s Bench relating to this but failed to appear. His goods were declared forfeited to the value of £2,000. In January 1690 the Attorney General was asked to report on the bail forfeiture of Jasper Grant. Unfortunately this report has not survived. In February 1690 this bill of £2,000 was granted to William, Bishop of St. Asaph.[33] But things didn’t turn out well for the Bishop of St. Asaph. The Barons of the Exchequer claimed first call for the £2,000 and declared the grant to the Bishop of St. Asaph as defective. The Bishop complained to the Treasury about the impasse. The Treasury directed the Attorney General to draw up a fresh grant to the money to the Bishop.[34] It is not known if the Bishop ever got the money. It is presumed that Jasper Grant was eventually clear of forfeiture.   

In 1697-8 Jasper Grant II made his will and gave his address as Grantstown.[35]

Jasper Grant III

Jasper Grant III was born around 1655. He is accredited by some as the person who purchased Kilmurry, Co. Cork, which became the family home until sold around 1930.[36]

Kilmurry was once the property of Robert Walsh junior and contained 500 acres. In 1640 Mary Walsh, widow and wife of the late Robert Walsh, held Kilmurry. Although George Norton claimed part of Kilmurry, on 27th July 1663 the whole townland was granted to Mary’s son Sir Robert Walsh. It was from the latter gentleman that Jasper Grant purchased Kilmurry.[37]

The Walsh family were possibly from Waterford City and could have been known to Jasper Grant from previous times. Next door neighbours to the Walsh family in the 1640s were John and Patrick Sherlock. The Sherlock family were a long established family in Waterford City.

In 1681 Jasper Grant III married Annabella Fitzgerald of unknown pedigree. The couple had two sons, Jasper Grant IV and Thomas Grant I.[38]

During the war between King James and King William Jasper Grant was a captain in Carrol’s dragoons in the army of King James.[39] Jasper Grant of Kilmurry was indicted for high treason committed between 1st June 1689 and 12th November 1691 with numerous others. He thus became a forfeited proprietor and lost his lands.[40]

On 14th March 1694 the lands of Kilmurry were granted to Manus O’Brien by the Lords of the Treasury at a moderate rent. During the siege of Limerick, Manus O’Brien had told the Williamite army of the planned attack by Patrick Sarsfield on the siege cannon travelling to Limerick. The 500 acres at Kilmurry were valued at £60 per annum.[41]

On 1st May 1695 a royal warrant was issued to the Lords Justice of Ireland to allow Manus O’Brien to have Kilmurry for three years. The rent for the land was to be set by the Lords Justice while allowing Manus O’Brien to have £50 per year for his own use after the rent charge was paid.[42] But Manus O’Brien died before he could get full possession of Kilmurry. Therefore on 2nd May 1696 the Treasury Lords wrote to the Lord Deputy of Ireland that the King in Council had ordered a new royal warrant for Kilmurry to be issued to Daniel O’Brien, son of Manus O’Brien. The Lord Deputy was to fill a report on the suitability of Daniel O’Brien to have Kilmurry.[43]

It is not known when Kilmurry was restored to the Grant family. The record of Jasper Grant II may have helped. Jasper Grant III is said to have died around 1694.

Jasper Grant IV

Jasper Grant IV succeeded to his father’s lands at Kilmurry and Grantstown around 1700. This would suggest that the family were Protestants by 1700 as in Catholic families the property would have to be shared equally between all the sons. Protestant heirs could inherit the full property of their father.

A further reflection of his Protestant faith was that Jasper Grant was a cavalry officer in the army of George II.

Jasper Grant IV is accredited with building the present Kilmurry House in 1734.[44] Jasper Grant IV married Jane Vaughan, daughter of James Vaughan of Golden Grove, but left no children. Following the death of Jasper Grant IV in 1715 his brother Thomas Grant I succeeded to Kilmurry and Grantstown.

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Early chief members of the Grant family

Thomas Grant I

Despite their principal residence being at Kilmurry, just inside County Cork and west of the county boundary with Waterford the family did not neglect Grantstown and East Waterford. The Grant marriage of 1719 showed the family keeping in with East Waterford society. On 29th July 1719 Thomas Grant I married Anne, daughter of Beverly Ussher of Ballytaylor, near Waterford City.[45] The couple had at least one child, Thomas Grant II.

Thomas Grant II

Thomas Grant II was born around 1721. His early education was in the school operated by Dr. St. Leger Chinnery at Bandon. On 16th November 1738 Thomas Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin.[46]

If his father kept in with East Waterford society, Thomas Grant II took more than an interest in North-East Cork society. On 11th October 1748 he married his next door neighbour, Elizabeth Campion, daughter of Thomas Campion III of Leitrim House.[47] The couple had at least four sons and two daughters. One son, William Alexander Grant, was born in 1771 (the same year in which his father died). His early education was under Mr. Kerr before he entered Trinity College, Dublin on 30th October 1788. William Grant got a B.A. in 1792 but was deceased by the end of 1794.[48]

By his will of 30th May 1794 William Grant left his estates in Counties Cork and Limerick along with property in Cork city to his haft sister, Sarah Clinch and his two aunts; Frances Robinett nee Fenwick and Catherine Fenwick. This will was proved in December 1794.[49]

In July 1777 their daughter Mary married William Conner while in 1790 their other daughter, Eliza married H. Campion.[50]

Jasper Grant VI

The second son of Thomas Grant II and Elizabeth Campion was called Jasper Grant IV. He was born in 1762. After schooling Jasper Grant joined the army. He began his military career with the 4th Regiment of Foot as an ensign in 1781. By the end of 1793, Jasper Grant had attained the rank of Captain and transferred to the 41st Regiment with which he remained to the end of his career. He was promoted to the rank of Major in 1798,

In 1799, Jasper Grant married Isabella Odell. Shortly after their marriage the couple moved to Canada with the posting of the 41st Regiment. Jasper Grant would serve out the remainder of his army carer in Canada until his death in 1812. It was in Canada that three of the four children of Jasper and Isabella Grant were born. These children were: Isabella (b. 1801), Thomas (b. 1803) and Susannah. In later life Susannah Grant married J.F.W. Des Barres, grandson of J.F.W. Des Barres, Lieutenant Governor of Cape Breton.[51]

A kinswoman of J.F.W. Des Barres and Susannah Grant, Isabella Des Barres married Richard Maxwell Gumbleton of Castleview, near Mogeely, Co. Cork in 1858. Isabella’s brother, Joseph F.W. Des Barres lived at Mogeely House, beside Mogeely Castle in the 1880s.[52]

The eldest daughter, Isabella Grant got married on 2nd February 1836 to Richard Kiely Ussher of Cappagh House, Co. Waterford. Richard Kiely Ussher was a retired army man having served against the French in the West Indies. Richard Kiely Ussher was a brother of Arthur Ussher of Camphire. Richard and Isabella Ussher (died 20th July 1881) had one child, Richard John Ussher.[53] Richard John Ussher was a noted ornithologist. In 1906 he was principal author of Birds of Ireland which remains an important reference book.[54]

The eldest son of Jasper and Isabella Grant was Jasper St. James Grant who was born in London in 1800. Young Jasper Grant went to school under Mr. Gwynne and afterwards entered Trinity College, Dublin on 2nd November 1818. He got a B.A. in the spring of 1825.[55]

Meanwhile Jasper Grant continued to rise up through the ranks. In 1803 he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1803 and was made Colonel in 1811. While still a major, Jasper Grant was the Commanding Officer at Fort George, Upper Canada, and later, Commanding Officer at Amherstburg.[56] It is written that Colonel Jasper Grant was at some time Governor of Upper Canada (now Ontario).[57] Yet the published lists of governors do not have Jasper Grant as governor (actually known as Lieutenant Governor).[58]

During the War of 1812 the 41st Regiment fought with distinction and gained more battle honours than any other British army unit.[59] Jasper Grant missed out on the fighting as he died on 3rd March 1812 and was buried at the Grant family cemetery north-east of Kilmurry House. The National Library of Ireland holds copies of fifteen letters between Jasper Grant in Canada and his family at Kilmurry (Mss 31,820).[60]

The table slab grave at Kilmurry records that Jasper Grant was Lieutenant Colonel in the 41st Regiment of Foot. The grave memorial also records that Jasper Grant served for a time as Lieutenant Governor of Carlisle.[61] This was possibly New Carlisle in modern Quebec which was founded in 1784 as a settlement for discharged British soldiers and people from the American colonies who wished to stay loyal to Britain after American independence, known as the “United Empire Loyalists”.[62]

Rev. John Alexander Grant

The third son of Thomas Grant II was born in 1765 and named, John Alexander Grant. On 26th July 1792 John Alexander Grant continued the interest in local North-East Cork society when he married Ann Carey, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville (on the south bank of the River Blackwater from Kilmurry). The couple were married in St. Nicholas Church, Cork.[63] They had at least two sons and two daughters (who both married their Grant cousins).

On 5th October 1794 John Alexander Grant was made a deacon at Cork and on the same day became curate of Mogeely parish on the River Bride.[64] Sometime later Rev. John Alexander Grant became vicar of Clondulane by the banks of the River Blackwater. While holding that position Rev. Grant attended a great meeting in the King’s Arms Inn of Fermoy on Wednesday, 19th June 1816. They came from far and wide to attend the meeting of creditors of that famed entrepreneur, John Anderson. This Scottish gentleman came to Ireland many years before to make his money in trade. Such was his success that he could buy the Fermoy estate.

Fermoy in the 1790s was just a poor hamlet by an old bridge across the Blackwater. Within twenty years John Anderson had transformed it into the town we see today. In 1762 the Fermoy rental was £800 per year. After the work of John Anderson this climbed to £5,250 per year. But it was the purchase of the Barrymore estate and the economic depression at the end of the Napoleonic Wars which was his undoing. John Anderson was declared bankrupt.[65] The town of Fermoy was sold to a Scottish absentee landlord and life went on. 

Meanwhile in 1812 a dispensary was established in Fermoy. A subscriber’s list survives from 1822. In it Rev. John Alexander Grant contributed £1 2 shillings 9 pence.[66] 

On 15th December 1818 Rev. John Alexander Grant became rector of Clondulane parish (in which parish is Careysville). Rev. John Grant remained as rector of Clondulane until his death on 23rd October 1833. He was buried at Kilworth.[67]

Meanwhile the eldest son of Thomas Grant II succeeded to Kilmurry as Thomas Grant III.

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Later chief members of the Grant family

Thomas Grant III

Thomas Grant III was born in 1762. He attended the school operated by Mr. Crawford before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 14th July 1778. He got a B.A. in 1782.[68]

Thomas Grant III continued the family tradition of marriages with local families along the River Blackwater when on 28th November 1792 he married Sarah Musgrave, daughter of Christopher Musgrave of Tourin, Co. Waterford.[69] The Musgrave family were important people in the social and political life of West Waterford. Sarah’s brother was Sir Richard Musgrave, baronet, the author of a history of the 1798 rebellion. It was this political involvement which possibly helped Thomas Grant III to become High Sheriff of County Waterford in 1797.[70]

During the time of Thomas Grant, a farm labourer on the Grant estate would gain national reputation and his name was Willie Brennan, otherwise known as Brennan on the Moor. Willie Brennan was born on the estate in the later eighteenth century. He was working near the big house one day when an army officer came to visit the Grant family, possibly a friend of Colonel Jasper Grant. Some other servants challenged Willie Brennan to steal the officer’s watch and chain which he did.

For this crime Willie Brennan went on the run and made his home in the Kilworth Mountains. There he took up the occupation as a highwayman. At that time the Cork to Dublin road crossed over the Kilworth Mountains. The road surface was not good and traffic travelled slowly making easy targets for robbery. By 1809 Brennan had moved from highwayman to robbing houses including some around Clonmel within sight of the military barracks.

The authorities and military stepped up their efforts to capture Brennan but were unsuccessful. Instead they forced him by 1812 to move to the remoter areas of west Cork and South Kerry. Yet his days were soon number. As he was robbing a solicitor on a remote road the solicitor wounded Brennan with a concealed pistol. Willie Brennan was able to crawl away but died the following day. Willie Brennan’s body was returned to his native home and buried at Kilcrumper cemetery, between Kilworth and Fermoy. Willie Brennan’s fame as a highwayman was spread far and wide in ballads and song.[71]   

Thomas St. John Grant I

Thomas Grant III was succeeded at Kilmurry by his son; Thomas St. John Grant I. Thomas St. John Grant was born about 1794. He attended the school in Fermoy operated by Rev. Dr. William Adair. On 20th December 1811 Thomas St. John Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin. He received a B.A. in the summer of 1815.[72]

In September 1821 Thomas St. John Grant I married his cousin, Anna Esther, daughter of Rev. John Alexander Grant. The couple had three daughters (Sarah married Samuel Morton Tuckey of Killindonnell, Co. Cork; Anna; and Susan Mary married Monsieur Francois Jules Turquet, judge of the Imperial Court at Angers, France) and a son and heir, Thomas St. John Grant II.[73]

Thomas St. John Grant was involved in local affairs and in the affairs of his extended family. In 1822 Thomas St. John Grant was a subscriber to the dispensary in Fermoy. His cousin, Rev. John Alexander Grant was also a subscriber.[74] Elsewhere Thomas St. John Grant was a trustee to the marriage of his cousin Roland Campion and his wife, Anne Campion.[75]

Thomas St. John Grant I died on 17th January 1832 and was succeeded at Kilmurry by his son, Thomas St. John Grant II.[76]

Thomas St. John Grant II

Thomas St. John Grant II was born on 20th September 1822.[77] His early education was at Eton followed by a time at Exeter College, Oxford where he got a B.A. in 1843.[78]

Shortly after graduation the Great Famine began. Thomas St. John Grant was an ex-offico member of Fermoy Poor Law Union.[79] He attended a number of meetings in 1847, at the height of the Famine.[80] In the summer of 1847 Thomas St. John Grant organised a summer festival at Kilmurry to relieve the air of doom and gloom.[81] Of course famine relief would be achieved by more than just having a party. Thus in the same year of 1847 Thomas St. John Grant gave financial support to the Kilworth Relief Fund.[82] 

On 15th August 1849 Tomas St. John Grant married Eliza Anna Louisa (born 1829), youngest daughter of Rev. Thomas Hoare of Glenamore by Mary Anne, daughter of Henry Jesse Lloyd of Lloydsboro, Co. Tipperary. The bride was granddaughter of Sir Edward Hoare, baronet, of Annabella, Mallow. The couple had two sons, Thomas St. John Grant III and Edward Hoare Grant.[83]

Edward Hoare Grant was born on 4th May 1859. In June 1888 he married Lena Colliachoune and they had one daughter, Lena Clotilda (born June 1889).[84]

In the absence of any estate papers it is difficult to get information on the Grant family apart from the usual biographical details. The Primary Valuation of Tenements, known popularly as Griffith’s Valuation, is therefore an important source. In 1850, around Kilmurry House, Thomas St. John Grant held the following estate in the parish of Leitrim, County Cork.

Kilmurry North (567 acres) 18 tenants and 3 under tenants – total value £152-4-0

Kilmurry South (521 acres) 16 tenants and 4 under tenants – total value £394-3-0

In that part of Leitrim parish located in County Waterford Thomas St. John Grant held the following lands.

Cahergal (210 acres) 1 tenant – total value £13-10-0

Countygate (154 acres) 7 tenants and 1 under tenant – total value £56-8-0

Inchinleamy East (161 acres) 4 tenants and 2 under tenants – total value £106-2-0

Inchinleamy West (332 acres) 9 tenants and 4 under tenants – total value £288-13-0

Knockaunroe (108 acres) 4 tenants – total value £22

In east County Waterford Thomas St. John Grant held a number of properties in the parish of Ballynakill which included:

Farranshoneen (174 acres) 2 tenants and 6 under tenants – total value £466-1-0

Grantstown (106 acres) 2 tenants and 5 under tenants and 1 sub tenant – total value £296

The full extent of Grantstown was 276 acres at a total valuation of £705. It would seem that this additional land was owned by other people and quite possibly had not formed part of the Grant estate for many decades. It is of interest to note that the highest valued house on the Grant estate was not Kilmurry House (£37) but Grantstown House at £74.

In total the estate of Thomas St. John Grant was about 2,333 acres at a valuation of £1,795. Yet the quality of the land varied considerably between east Waterford and that in Leitrim parish. In Grantstown much of the land was worth £2 per acre which is very good. The mostly hilly land in Leitrim parish gave a much lower valuation. At Countygate for example the land was 50 pence per acre. In flat inch land beside the River Blackwater did manage to get near £1 per acre in Inchinleamy but this land was and still is subject to flooding.

An interesting feature of the Grant estate was that most tenants rented their land directly from the Grant family. Where under tenants were present, they were mostly farm labourer cottages. Only in the outlaying estate at Grantstown was there a sub tenant, but only one. Source documents from the Land Commission courts around 1907 give the average rents on the Grant estate as about £1 per acre.[85]

During the 1850s Thomas St. John Grant achieved new heights in social standing for the family. In 1852 he was High Sheriff of County Waterford and in 1858 he was High Sheriff of County Cork.[86] Thomas St. John Grant also became a Justice of the Peace and more importantly Deputy Lieutenant of County Cork.[87]

On a more local level Thomas St. John Grant advanced education for his tenants and the wider community. Around the year 1800 there were two hedge schools in the area at Leddy’s Boreen and at Raspberry Hill. By 1826 these were replaced by more public schools in a building. A thatched cabin in Leitrim served as a school under Master Clancy while another thatched cabin at Knockaskehane served as a school under Master Moore.

In 1861 Thomas St. John Grant replaced these schools with a purposely built school in the townland of Kilmurry North. The one building had two separate rooms – one for boys – the other for girls. From 1887 the school became a mixed school and in 1909 a doorway was made connecting the two former schoolrooms. The first master was a Mr. Barrett and there were over a hundred pupils in 1862. The school closed in 1967.[88]

Thomas St. John Grant II died on 18th September 1868 and was succeeded by his son, Thomas St. John Grant III.

Thomas St. John Grant III

Thomas St. John Grant III was born on 25th September 1852.[89]

In his search for a bride Thomas St. John Grant kept things local and in his marriage renewed his connection with two local families. On 4th February 1874 Thomas St. John Grant II married Margaret Anna, second daughter and co-heir of Edward Kiely Carey of Careysville by his wife, Margaret, eldest daughter of Captain Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke.[90] The couple had two sons, Thomas St. John Grant IV and Edward Kiely Grant.[91]

In the 1870s the Grant family owned a landed estate of about 1,000 acres in County Cork and 1,217 acres in County Waterford.[92] In the grand scheme of things this was a modest estate. Yet the era of the landlord estate was passing. During the 1890s the Grant family estate around Kilmurry House was sold off to the tenants. Thus by 1901 of the seventeen houses in the townland of Kilmurry South tenant proprietors owned nine of the seventeen houses.[93] In Kilmurry North all nine houses were owner occupied.[94]

The mother-in-law of Thomas St. John Grant, Margaret Carey, died on 13th September 1881. Administration of her will, valued at £399 was granted in October 1881 to her daughter, Margaret Ann Grant.[95] This family loss was added to a year later when Margaret Ann’s aunt, Sarah Carey, died on 14th December 1882 at the asylum of Dr. Osborne at Lindville near Cork. Sarah Carey never married and left a will worth £981 7 shillings. Margaret Ann Grant was given administration of this will.[96]

The asylum at Lindville in the present Cork suburb of Blackrock was established in 1828 by Thomas Carey Osborne as a private lunatic asylum on fourteen acres of private grounds, far from the madding crowds of other asylums. Dr. John Osborne succeeded his father as proprietor and was succeeded in turn by his son, Cecil A. Osborne in 1897. A government inspection report in 1892 found 12 ladies and 7 gents as patients in the asylum. The report found they were well treated by the staff. One concern was the inadequate fire escape provision for patients.[97]

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Grant coat of arms on the main staircase 

Meanwhile back at Kilmurry, the days of landlord may have been coming to a close but Kilmurry House was, for a brief time, the centre of Irish society. In March 1890 the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Lawrence Dundas, 3rd Earl of Zetland, was on a fishing holiday along the River Blackwater. During his holidays the Lord Lieutenant stayed at Kilmurry House.[98] Having the Lord Lieutenant in your house was the next best thing to having Queen Victoria for tea.

On the 7th July 1899, Thomas St. John Grant III died at the age of forty-eight.[99] He was buried in the family cemetery near Kilmurry House. On 20th April 1899 administration of his will was granted, at Dublin, to his widow, Margaret Ann. The value of the will was £1,175 19 shillings.[100]

In the 1901 census Margaret Ann Grant (born 1855) was head of the household at Kilmurry House. With her in the house was her mother-in-law, Eliza Grant, widow of Thomas St. John Grant II and her son, Edward Kiely Grant. They were served by two servants; Mary Rainey (63 years), a cook who could not read and Julia Regan (23 years), a house parlour maid who could both read and write.[101]

The second son of Thomas St. John Grant III was Edward Kiely Grant as previously mentioned. He was born on 29th August 1877.[102] In 1901 he was living with his mother and grandmother at Kilmurry House where he described himself as a gentleman farmer.[103] Yet the sale of much of the family estate to the former tenants must have taken its toll on Edward Grant. Thus we find him at Kilmurry in 1911 listing his occupation as retired farmer. He was by then head of the household.[104]

In 1911 Edward Kiely Grant was at Kilmurry with his mother and two domestic servants. These servants were; Sarah Godson (29 years), cook-domestic servant and Mary Flynn (29 years), house parlour maid-domestic servant.[105]

Thomas St. John Grant IV

Thomas St. John Grant IV was born on 1st December 1874.[106] On 25th January 1905 he married Katherine Sophia, daughter of Colonel W. Cooke-Collis, D.L., of Castle Cooke, near Kilworth, Co. Cork.[107] Shortly after his marriage Thomas St. John Grant IV left Ireland for service in the British Colonial Office. He became a District Magistrate in the Orange River Colony.[108]

Thomas St. John Grant IV died on 22nd April 1943 leaving two sons, Thomas St. John Grant V and Maurice William Grant.[109]

Maurice William Grant was born on 23rd January 1910. He was educated at St. John’s College in Johannesburg. After school he returned to Southern Rhodesia where he took up a job at the Standard Bank of South Africa in Salisbury. Maurice Grant rose through the ranks to become chief teller. When World War II broke out Maurice Grant left for the army. He became a lieutenant colonel in the Gold Coast Regiment. Maurice William Grant died unmarried on 4th April 1954.[110] 

Thomas St. John Grant V

The eldest son of Thomas St. John Grant IV was Thomas St. John Grant V. He was born on 6th December 1907.[111] The love of southern Africa captured his heart in a way that the south facing slopes of Kilmurry could not. But of course Thomas did not see much of Ireland to be enchanted by the misty isle. Thomas St. John Grant went to school at St. John’s College, Johannesburg after which he went to work in Southern Rhodesia. There he became Register of Deeds, Companies, Patents and Trade Marks.[112]

On 12th December 1936 Thomas St. John Grant V married Irene Ethel, daughter of W.E. Bouette of Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe). The couple had one son, Thomas St. John Grant VI, and one daughter, Katherine Diana (born 28th May 1940). In 1958 the couple were still living in Salisbury.[113]

Thomas St. John Grant VI

Thomas St. John Grant VI was born on 16th December 1942.[114] Sadly little else is known to this author about Thomas St. John Grant V.

Other branches of the Grant family

Jasper St. James Grant

This Jasper Grant was a son of Colonel Jasper Grant V. He was born in Canada around 1800/1801. In 1848 he married Thomasine Grant, daughter of Rev. Alexander Grant of Clondulane. Jasper St. James Grant lived for a time in Lismore before moving to Cork where he lived at Mount Verdon Terrace in Cork City and died there on 28th September 1859. Jasper Grant’s will was valued under £500 and Thomasine was left a widow and one of the executors.[115] They had two sons, Jasper and Thomas.[116]

Children of Rev. John Alexander Grant

As noted earlier Rev. John Alexander Grant was the second son of Thomas Grant II of Kilmurry. Rev. Grant had two sons and two daughters by his wife Ann, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville. The eldest daughter Ann Esther Grant married her cousin, Thomas John Grant of Kilmurry while the second daughter, Thomasine Croker Grant married her cousin, Jasper St. James Grant of Cork.[117]

Joseph Grant

The eldest son of Rev. John Alexander Grant was Joseph Grant.[118] Joseph Grant was born in Waterford, possibly at Grantstown. He was born about 1804 and had his early education under his father. On 6th December 1819 Joseph Grant entered Trinity College, Dublin.[119]

Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant

The second son of Rev. John Alexander Grant following his father into the church and his name was Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant.

Rev. Richard Jasper Grant was born at Tallow, Co. Waterford in 1804. He graduated from Trinity College, Dublin with a B.A. in 1825. In 1829 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant was made a deacon in the Cloyne diocese and given his first job as curate at Clondulane, his father’s parish. In 1836 he was ordained a priest at Cork and moved over the River Blackwater in 1839 to become curate at Kilworth parish. In that same year of 1839 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant married a local girl, Jane Leslie Collis, daughter of William Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke in the parish of Kilworth. The couple had nine children. To help support this large family Rev. Richard Jasper Grant received promotion in January 1848 when he became rector-vicar of Litter parish. Little is otherwise known as Castle Hyde and is located just west of Fermoy on the road to Mallow.[120]

Like his cousin, Thomas St. John Grant I, we know much about Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant in the 1840s from published newspaper reports. On 16th October 1845 the full impact of the Great Famine was still in the future. Instead locals of all backgrounds were interested in the newest form of transport, the railways. A meeting was called in Fermoy, attended by Rev. Grant, to discuss different railway routes between Fermoy and Cork via Rathcormac and Watergrasshill.[121] The railway would continue north from Fermoy towards Cashel where a proposed railway to Dublin was to terminate. With so many options nothing was decided and the railway between Cork and Dublin went by Mallow instead of Fermoy. It would be 1860 before a branch line from Mallow brought the railway to Fermoy.   

As 1846 began, the Great Famine started to take its toll on people and society. Local relief committees were establish in each area to distribute food and help the needy. In May 1846 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant gave £10 to the Kilworth Relief fund.[122]

By July 1846 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant Alexander was secretary of the Kilworth Relief Committee. In that month he wrote to the Relief Commission in Dublin asking the Office of Public Works to transfer control of local road works from the Mitchelstown Committee to the Kilworth Committee. This control would help to provide relief work in exchange for food in a way to serve best the local needs.[123] The reply from Dublin is unknown but if no further requests for change were written it is possible that the Kilworth Committee was successful. The attendance of Rev. Grant at the presentments session of the Condons and Clangibbon in December 1846 to decide of future road works possibly reflects the involvement of the Kilworth Committee in road work provision.[124]

In the dark days of ‘Black ‘47’ Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant continued to give financial support to the Kilworth Committee.[125] Yet in the mist of death new life was born. In April 1847 Mrs. Grant returned to her home at Castle Cooke to give birth to a daughter.[126] This happy occasion may have gone someway to lessen the loss the family suffered in 1842 when their daughter, Sarah, died young.[127]  

In January 1848 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant became rector-vicar at Litter parish. He would remain in this parish until his retirement in 1875 as rector-vicar.[128] After the retirement of Rev. Grant the parish of Litter was joined with that of Clondulane and Fermoy to form the Union of Fermoy. The local Church of Ireland community had so declined in number that the church at Castle Hyde was empty more times than full. After many attempts to permanently close the church final deconsecration was not until November 1965. Since then the church has fallen very much into ruins.[129]

In 1870 Rev. Richard Jasper Alexander Grant owned 181 acres in County Cork, valued at £94. He would enjoy this property and the company of his family for another fourteen years. On 14th December 1884 Rev. Richard Jasper Grant died and was buried at Castle Hyde beside his old parish church. His wife, Jane Leslie Grant died on 30th November 1892, aged seventy-nine years.

Alexander Grant

The third son of Rev. John Alexander Grant was called Alexander Grant. He married in 1830 to Margaret Crossley and died in 1848 having had four sons; William Grant (went to India), Alexander Grant (died young), Jasper VI Grant and Charles Grant (JP of Fermoy).[130]

Thomas William Grant

Thomas William Grant lived in Cork and was the father of Alexander George William Grant.

Alexander George William Grant

Alexander George William Grant was born about 1868. He married Margaret Florence Grant (she moved to Carmel-by-Sea, California after her husband’s death). At the outbreak of World War One Alexander Grant was serving with the West African Regiment. He initially operated in the West African front before moving to France. There he joined the newly formed 8th Battalion Devonshire Regiment and attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. On 25th September 1915 Alexander Grant was killed while commanding his troops in action. He is remembered at the Loos cemetery memorial in Northern France.[131] There is also a memorial to his memory in the Church of Ireland church, Fermoy where other people with North-East Cork connections are remembered.[132] It may be of interest to note that the Devonshire Regiment was formed in 1685 and saw its first military action at the Battle of the Boyne on the side of King William.[133]

The battle in which Alexander Grant was killed began on 12th September 1915 when the French army launched a major offensive in the Loos-Artois area of the Western Front. The French attack continued until 25th September when the British took over the offensive. The British used gas for the first time as an offensive weapon in this battle. In the first day of fighting, in which Alexander Grant was killed, the British scored a victory with the capture of the town of Loos. But the Germans recovered their situation after the disorientation of the gas attack and launched a counter-attack. Over the following three days the British suffered heavy causalities as the Germans came on good and hard. When the battle ended on 28th September both sides were nearly back where they started from – such was the repeated story of the Western Front.[134]

Kilmurry after the Grant family

In the 1930s Kilmurry House and gardens were sold to the Rosminian Order, who ran it as a seminary. During the 1940s the blunderbuss once owned by Willie Brennan, the highwayman, disappeared from Kilmurry House. The house suffered a partial fire in the 1950s when the large ballroom at the rear of the house was destroyed. It seemed the ghosts of the past were leaving one by one.

In the 1970s the house was sold to the Unification Church after whom the house returned briefly to private ownership. There were plans to convert the house into a nursing home but this was refused by the planning authorities.

The cost of up-keeping the house in the absence of a stable income was too much for the owners and the house was abandoned and became derelict. In the 1990s numerous members of the so called “new age travellers” community learnt of this abandoned house and moved in. The roof along with the fixtures and fittings were removed for ready cash leaving just the four walls.[135]

 

==========

End of post

 

==========

 

[1] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, July-December 1972, p. 74

[2] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua (author, 2001), p. 63

[3] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 63; Kathleen Laffan, History of Kilmacow (author, 1998), p. 34

[4] Kathleen Laffan, History of Kilmacow, p. 252

[5] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 67

[6] Jim Walsh, Sliabh Rua, p. 67

[7] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, pp. 66, 74

[8] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford (Waterford County Council), p. 66

[9] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford, pp. 66, 67

[10] Joseph Hansard (edited by Donal Brady), History of Waterford, p. 68

[11] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 66

[12] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford: Liber Antiquissimus Civitatis Waterfordiae (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2007), p. 228

[13] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford, pp. 122, 134, 155, 183, 206, 210, 220, 224

[14] Niall Byrne (ed.), The Great Parchment Book of Waterford, p. 151

[15] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed 20 March 2014

[16] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[17] J.S. Carroll, ‘Land ownerships in East Waterford, 1640-1703’, in Decies, No. XI, p. 36

[18] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[19] J.S. Carroll, ‘Land ownerships in East Waterford, 1640-1703’, in Decies, No. XI, p. 38

[20] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[21] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[22] A.P. Grant, ‘The Grant Families of County Tipperary’, in the J.C.H.A.S., Vol. LXXVII, No. 226, 1972, p. 67

[23] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond at Kilkenny Castle, new series, vol. III (Historic Manuscripts Commission & Stationery Office, London, 1904), p. 223

[24] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 144, folio 76, Duke of Ormond to Captain Jasper Grant, commander of H.M.S. Sapphire, 7 June 1666

[25] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 231

[26] Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS. Carte 144, folio 76v, Duke of Ormond to Captain Richard Rooth, 26 June 1666

[27] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 233

[28] C. Litton Falkiner (ed.), Calendar of the manuscripts of the Marquess of Ormond, new series, vol. III, p. 239

[29] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Sapphire_(1651) accessed on 17 March 2014

[30] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 24 March 2014

[31] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[32] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[33] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 9, 1689-1692 (Institute of Historical Research, 1931), pp. 456, 497

[34] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 9, 1689-1692, p. 746

[35] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[36] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[37] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 932

[38] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[39] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[40] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 11, p. 930

[41] Joseph Redington (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Papers, Vol. 1, 1556-1696 (Institute of Historical Research, 1868), p. 430

[42] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 10, 1693-1696 (Institute of Historical Research, 1935), pp. 1026, 1027

[43] William A. Shaw (ed.), Calendar of Treasury Books, Vol. 11, 1696-1697 (Institute of Historical Research, 1933), p. 133

[44] Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of County Cork, Vol. 1 (Ballinakella Press, Whitegate, 2002), p. 227

[45] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274; Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1952, p. 274 – The 1912 edition has the father-in-law as James Ussher of Taylorstown. 

[46] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, 2001), vol. 2, p. 340

[47] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[48] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[49] Eilish Ellis and P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, vol. 3, 1782-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 156

[50] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 24 March 2014

[51] http://www.archivescanada.ca/english/search/Jasper_Grant accessed on 16 March 2014

[52] Anon, Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 291, 297

[53] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (2007 facsimile edition), p. 1157

[54] T.N. Frewer, Waterford People: A Biographical Dictionary (Ballylough Books, Waterford, 1998), p. 151

[55] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 339

[56] http://www.archivescanada.ca/english/search/Jasper_Grant accessed on 16 March 2014

[57] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (2007 facsimile edition), p. 1157

[58] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lieutenant_governors_of_Ontario accessed on 17 March 2014

[59] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/41st_(Welch)_Regiment_of_Foot accessed on 17 March 2014

[60] http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000018906 accessed on 17 March 2014

[61] Grave memorial inscription recorded by the author

[62] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Carlisle,_Quebec accessed 17 March 2014

[63] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[64] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[65] Niall Brunicardi, John Anderson, pp. 102-107

[66] Niall Brunicardi, Fermoy, a history, p. 137

[67] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[68] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[69] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[70] P. M. Egan, History of Waterford City and County (author, 1895), p. 301

[71] Stephen Dunford, The Irish Highwayman (Merlin Publications, Dublin, 2000), pp. 229-245

[72] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[73] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, pp. 274-5

[74] Niall Brunicardi, Fermoy, a history, p. 137

[75] Author’s history notebooks, book 9 (1), p. 2243

[76] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[77] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[78] Edward Walford, The county families of the United Kingdom (Robert Hardwick, London, 1860), p. 265

[79] Edward Garner, To die by inches (), p. 136

[80] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 98’, and, ‘The Famine, part 103’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[81] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 104’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[82] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 87’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[83] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[84] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[85] Court of the Land Commission, List of Appeals, April 1907, Kilkenny and Waterford, f. 8, authors copy

[86] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[87] Edward Walford, The county families of the United Kingdom, p. 265

[88] Mary Crowley, ‘Education in the Kilmurry Area’, in The High School: Kilmurry National School, Kilworth, Co. Cork, 1861-1967, edited by Tony O’Brien (Kilmurry Reunion Committee, no date), pp. 6, 7

[89] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[90] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[91] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[92] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2930 accessed on 16 March 2014

[93] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000576047/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[94] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000576035/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[95] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 1054

[96] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 1141

[97] http://eppi.dippam.ac.uk/documents/18900/eppi_pages/508096 accessed on 17 March 2014

[98] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 355

[99] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[100] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 14, p. 2198

[101] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/1146023/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[102] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 275

[103] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/1146023/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[104] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/414514/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[105] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Leitrim/Kilmurry_South/414514/ accessed on 16 March 2014

[106] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[107] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[108] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1912, p. 274

[109] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[110] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[111] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[112] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[113] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[114] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1958, p. 170

[115] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 11, p. 1432

[116] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 20 March 2014

[117] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 819

[118] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 5 April 2014

[119] George D. Burtchaell & Thomas Ulick Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 2, p. 340

[120] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 6, p. 855

[121] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 7’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[122] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 39’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[123] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 47’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[124] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 67’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[125] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 87’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[126] T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine, part 86’, in The Avondhu newspaper

[127] Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, vol. 7, p. 2220

[128] Christ Church, Fermoy: a brief guide, p. 3

[129] Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater, p. 132

[130] http://www.grantonline.com/grant-family-genealogy/Kilmurry/37_Jasper.htm accessed on 5 April 2014

[131] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice: Cork servicemen who died in the Great War (Echo Publications, Cork, 2010), p. 276

[132] http://www.tripadvisor.ie/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g212987-d4975253-i89016725-Christ_Church_Church_of_Ireland_Fermoy_County_Cork-Fermoy_County_Cork.html#89016730 accessed on 16 March 2014

[133] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devonshire_Regiment accessed on 16 March 2014

[134] Gerry White & Brendan O’Shea (eds.), A Great Sacrifice, pp. 603-4

[135] Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of County Cork, Vol. 1, pp. 227, 228

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