Carlow History

Ballintrane (Carlow) land purchases 1918 and 1919

Ballintrane (Carlow) land purchases 1918 and 1919

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In February 1918 the world was still fighting another year of the Great War. Civil War was raging in Finland between Russian Communists and Finnish independence fighters.[1] In Ireland the Irish Parliamentary Party and the Sein Fein Party went head-to-head in the South Armagh by-election (the I.P.P. won by 2,324 votes to 1,305). The result temporarily halted the rise of Sinn Fein after four by-election victories.[2]

Also in the news was a meeting in Dublin of the Town Tenant’s League. This meeting was of interest to people in County Carlow as a landlord in Bagenalstown attempted to evict a shopkeeper.[3] If the land war was still ongoing among urban tenants, out in the countryside the tenant farmers were becoming owners of their own land such as two people in Ballintrane on the road between Carlow town and Ballon.

Ballintrane land purchases 1918

On 26th February 1918 Thomas Nolan of Ballintrane, Co. Carlow, purchased his farm under the 1903 Land Act from the estate of Robert A. French Brewster. The property consisted of two parcels of 10 acres 3 roots and 19 perches each. The purchase price was £254 for parcel one and £271 for parcel two or £25 in total. The government advanced the full purchase price repayable on annuities of 3¼ per cent.[4]

In 1911 Thomas Nolan (aged 37, farmer) lived with his wife Mary (aged 36) at house 8 in Ballintrane (Ballintrain). They were married in 1909 and both could read and write.[5] The dwelling house had four windows in the front façade and three rooms within used by the family.[6] There were five outhouses consisting of one stable, one cow house, one calf house, one piggery and one fowl house.[7]

It seems that Thomas Nolan was living in Ballybrommell in 1901 as an agricultural labourer and son of Michael Nolan (agricultural labourer, aged 66) and his wife Sarah Nolan, nee James (born Co. Kilkenny).[8] The land purchase acts did not only benefit tenant farmers to become the owners of their own land but help farm labourers to achieve some economic standing. In 1911 Thomas Nolan described himself as a farmer.[9]

Ballintrane land purchases 1919

One year later, in May 1919, further land purchases were made at Ballintrane. By that time the Great War was over but the Irish War of Independence had begun. Other parts of the British Empire were also at war with unrest in India and Egypt. Labour unrest across Ireland was adding to the climate of uncertainty. Yet there was also time for entertainment with a five day Feis Ceoil at the Dublin Mansion House.[10]

Meanwhile in County Carlow Mr. E. Dowling of Bagenalstown paid £75 for a two year old bullock at Carlow fair while another part of the Brewster estate at Ballintrane was sold to the occupying tenant.[11] On 16th May 1919 William O’Brien purchased a parcel of 11 acres and 3 roots from the estate of Robert A. French Brewster at Ballintrane for which the government advanced £194 as the full purchased price under the 1903 Land Act. The repayable annuities were at 3¼ per cen. On 23rd November 1911 this property was consolidated with land from the trustees of L. Walker.[12] In 1911 there was no person called William O’Brien living in Ballintrane. Across County Carlow there were five people called William O’Brien in the 1911 census but it is uncertain which person, if any, was the William O’Brien who purchased his holding in May 1919.

Also on 16th May 1919 Thomas Doyle purchased a parcel of 16 acres 3 roots and 10 perches from the estate of Robert Brewster at Coole (Rathvilly parish) with a purchase price of £315 fully advanced by the government. This holding was consolidated on 23rd November 1911 with land from the trustees of L. Walker.[13] In about 1850 Coole townland was owned by Philip Newton.[14]

Ballintrane in about 1850

In about 1850 Pilsworth Whelan of Rathglass owned 290 acres of Ballintrane while Thomas Singleton owned 2 acres. The remaindered of the 547 acres of the townland was owned by William Garrett of Janeville house. William Garrett was a cousin of Robert A.F. Brewster as noted below.

 

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Carlow countryside

Brewster family in County Carlow

The Brewster family had settled in County Carlow in the time of Charles II and acquired a number of properties over the years and married into the local gentry families.[15] Samuel Brewster married Elizabeth Garrett, second daughter of Thomas Garrett (born 1711) of Kilgaran, otherwise Janeville, and his wife Anne, daughter of John Cole.[16]

In 1789 Anne (died 1851), daughter of Samuel Brewster, married Samuel Watson (died 1830) of Lumclone, second son of Samuel Watson of Ballydarton, Co. Carlow by his wife Mary, daughter of Jonathan Beale of Mountmellick, Co. Laois by his wife Rebecca Lecky and left one son, Thomas Henry Watson of Lunclone, Co. Carlow.[17]

Brewster in Griffith’s Valuation for Carlow

In the time of Griffith’s Valuation (c.1850) the Brewster family held the following property in County Carlow. At Rathnapish townland in the parish of Carlow Abraham Brewster was joint landlord with the Rev. Thomas Durdin of just over 36 acres of lands with a house and outbuildings (rented by James Nolan). In the parish of Haroldstown, Abraham Brewster was landlord of a number of properties in the townland of Ballykilduff Upper amounting to about 119 acres. In the townland of Haroldstown (parish of Haroldstown) Abraham Brewster rented 338 acres from Sir Ralph Howard and was landlord of three vacant houses and two occupied houses. In the parish of Tullowphelim and in the townland of that name Abraham Brewster was landlord of over 20 acres and 4 houses. In the town of Tullow Abraham Brewster was landlord of three houses.

This Abraham Brewster was son of William Bagenal Brewster of Ballinulta, Wicklow, by his wife Mary, daughter of Thomas Bates. Abraham Brewster was called to the Irish bar in 1819. In 1846 he became Solicitor-General for Ireland and in 1853 was made Attorney-General.[18] In 1866 he became Lord-Chancellor of Ireland. On 26th July 1874 Abraham Brewster died at his residence, 26 Merrion Square South, Dublin, and was buried at Tullow, co. Carlow, on 30 July. By his marriage in 1819 with Mary Ann, daughter of Robert Gray of Upton House, co. Carlow, who died in Dublin on 24th November 1862, he had issue one son, Colonel William Bagenal Brewster, and one daughter, Elizabeth Mary, wife of Mr. Henry French, both of whom died in the lifetime of their father.[19]

Other Brewster land owners 1850

Other members of the Brewster family held land in County Carlow about 1850. In Fennagh parish Edward Brewster was landlord of 59 acres in the townland of Mountmelican with Henry Bruen as landlord for the remaining two acres of that townland. In the townland of Kilknock (parish of Kellistown) Sarah Brewster was landlord of about 450 acres. In the townland of Commons (parish of Ballon) William Brewster was landlord of 39 acres. Michael Brewster rented land in Dunleahny and a house in Tullowphelim.[20]

Brewster family in 1876

In 1876 the only property owned by the Brewster family in County Carlow was the 59 acres 2 roots and 17 perches held by Edward Brewster at Mountmelican.[21]

Robert A.F. Brewster as landlord

By 1889 the Brewster family had expended their holdings in the county. In that year Robert A. Brewster French-Brewster was landlord of Bennekerry. In about 1850 the townland was held by Walter and Philip Newton (Philip also owned Coole in Rathvilly, another Brewster property).[22] In 1889 John Gorman got a judicial reduction in his rent from £18 to £13 for a holding of 15 acres and 37 perches that he rented from Robert Brewster.[23]

Robert A.F. Brewster as MP

Robert Abraham Brewster French-Brewster elected Conservative M.P. for Portarlington in 1883 with 70 votes against Thomas Mayne, Liberal, with 57 votes.[24] He served as M.P. until the general election of 1885 when the constituency was abolished.

Robert A.F. Brewster in the army

After his short lived Parliamentary career Robert A. Brewster joined the army. By 19th July 1899 he was a second lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers and was a lieutenant by 27th June 1900. In 1899-1900 he served with the Fusiliers in the South African War. He was engaged at the battle of Colenso, and was also the at Pieter’s Hill, Hussar Hill, and Hlangwani, and went to the relief of Ladysmith. Robert Brewster also took part in operations in Transvaal, including engagement at Rooidam and the operations in the Western Transvaal under Sir Archibald Hunter.

He then changed to the Irish Guards and by 10th July 1901 was a second lieutenant. On 22nd January 1902 Robert Brewster was made a lieutenant.[25] Later Robert Brewster became a major in the Irish Guards.[26]

Death of Robert A.F. Brewster

On 17th February 1917 Robert A.B. French-Brewster died at 10 Hanover Square, Middlesex in England. In his will he left effects totalling £15,380 19s 8d. Probate was granted in London on 3rd May 1917 to Houston French and Philip Martineau.[27] The death of Robert Brewster in 1917 possibly released any impediments to the sale of his County Carlow estate to the occupying tenants. The land purchases at Ballintrane in 1918 and 1919 noted above formed part of that change of ownership which was repeated across Ireland since the 1870s and continued into the 1960s.

 

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[1] Evening Telegraph (Dublin), 2nd February 1918, front page

[2] O’Connor, S., (ed.), The Revolution Papers, 1916-1923, number 13 (Dublin, 2016)

[3] Evening Telegraph (Dublin), 2nd February 1918, page four

[4] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/22658/page/638831# accessed on 12th March 2017

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001675863/ accessed 12th March 2017

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001675849/ accessed on 12th March 2017

[7] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001675851/ accessed 12th March 2017

[8] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000420566/ accessed on 12th March 2017

[9] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001675863/ accessed on 12th March 2017

[10] Freeman’s Journal, Wednesday 14th May 1919, page two, five

[11] Freeman’s Journal, Wednesday 14th May 1919, page two

[12] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/22658/page/638926# accessed on 12th March 2017

[13] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/22658/page/638926# accessed on 12th March 2017

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Coole, Rathvilly parish, Barony of Rathvilly

[15] Walford, E., The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, 1860), p. 73

[16] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 162

[17] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1191

[18] Walford, E., The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, 1860), p. 73

[19] Dictionary of National Biography at https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Brewster,_Abraham_(DNB00)

[20] Griffith’s Valuation for County Carlow – various locations

[21] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194437# accessed on 12th March 2017

[22] Griffith’s Valuation, Bennekerry, Ballinacarrig parish, Barony of Carlow

[23] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/18337/page/486333 accessed on 12th March 2017

[24] Walker, B.M. (ed.), Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801-1922 (Dublin, 1978), p. 308

[25] Hart’s Annual Army List, Militia List and Imperial Yeomanry List, 1908 (London, 1908), pp. 224, 224a

[26] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014920/005014920_00038.pdf accessed on 17th March 2017

[27] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014920/005014920_00038.pdf accessed on 17th March 2017

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Biography, Cork history

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Peard family of North East Cork and district

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

The Peard family were substantial landlords in the area of north-east County Cork for near 300 years. There were numerous branches of the family who lived in a number of great houses. Yet today none remain and some of their former homes are in ruins or totally destroyed. The family does not appear in any genealogical publication of note and so this article is an attempt to reconstruct their lives from the pages of the past.

This article is in no way the final finished product but a working document in progress with changes expected as new information comes to hand.

Peard surname in Devon

The ancient records of Devonshire give reference to a number of people with the Peard surname. In 1332 Richard Peard of the parish of Hatherleigh paid 2s in the lay subsidy tax of that year. [Audrey M. Erskine (ed.), The Devonshire Lay Subsidy of 1332 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 14, 1969), p. 66]

Later records in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries make reference to people with the Peard surname. In 1701 Henry Peard, merchant and apprentice of Malachi Pyne, was made a freeman of Exeter. In 1722 another Henry Peard, hotpressman and apprentice of Samuel Wardell, was made a freeman. In 1754 Thomas Peard, fuller and apprentice of Henry Peard, was made a freeman. In 1757 Henry Peard, tailor, became a freeman in succession of his father, Henry Peard. In 1767 Abraham Peard, fuller and apprentice of Joseph Stephens, was made a freeman of Exeter. [Margery M. Rowe & Andrew M. Jackson (eds.), Exeter Freemen 1266-1967 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, Extra Series, No. 1, 1973), pp. 206, 232, 281, 282, 293]

In 1733 when Oliver Peard of Tiverton was a clothier and merchant with insured property worth £1,900 (this increased to £6,100 by 1744). [Stanley D. Chapman (ed.), The Devon cloth industry in the Eighteenth Century (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 23, 1978), pp. 122, 138]

In about 1693 to 1707 Oliver Peard of Barnstaple was co-pastor of the United Brethren Assembly with John Hanmer. In 1698 and later years William Peard was a member of the United Brethren Assembly at Exeter. He was the son of Oliver Peard of Barnstaple and succeeded John Hanmer as moderator in 1707 at Barnstaple where he was not the most favoured of ministers. William Peard died in 1716. [Allan Brockett (ed.), The Exeter Assembly: The minutes of the Assemblies of the United Brethren of Devon and Cornwall, 1691-1717 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol. 6, 1963), pp. 14, 39, 60, 61, 140, 144]

Early Peard family of Cork in Devon

[101] George Peard (b. 1505, d. 1578)

He was the great grand father of Richard Peard [104] (the first of the family to come to Ireland). [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[102] John Peard (b. 1525, d. 1574)

He was Chamberlain of Barnstaple in Devon and father of John Peard [103] of Upcott, Devon. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[103] John Peard (b. 1559, d. 1632)

John was the father of Richard Peard [104] who came to Ireland. He has a monument in Burnum Church. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 2]

[104] Richard Peard (b. 1595; d. 1683)

Listed for Coole as a husbandman in the 1641 depositions – married a miss Cole and had three sons; Richard [105], Henry [106] and William [107].

Richard Peard is listed as one of 7 tituladoes for Castlelyons town [Seamus Pender (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin), p. 237].

In this tomb, erected at the charges of William [107] and Henry [106] Peard, it says here lieth the body of Ensign Richard Peard of Castlelyons, who departed this life February the 28 day anno Dom 1683 aged 88 years and (who) came from Upcott in the parish of Welcombe in Devonshire in England. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription]

It is interesting to note that in the parish register for Welcombe there is no person by the name of Peard at that time but there were a good number of people with the surname of Beard. The two surnames are very near each other – only a slip of the pen in the difference.

peard-tomb

Peard tomb at Kill-St-Anne

[105] Richard Peard (b. 1620, d. 1684)

Here lieth, also, the body of Richard Peard of Coole, gent, eldest son of Ensign Richard [104] Peard, who departed this life November the sixth 1684 aged 54 years. [Kill-St-Anne tombstone inscription] His will was proved in 1689 and from Coole. [Guide to Genealogical Office, p. 241] He married and had one son, William [129] and three daughters. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[107] William Peard

He could be the William Peard of Castlelyons who married Miss Wrixon of Cork in October 1762 at Glinfield, the home of Henry Wrixon. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2544] William wrote a series of letters to Francis Price in Wales from 1739 to 1750 about various aspects of life in Castlelyons and across Cork. These are now in the Puleston Papers at the National Library of Wales MS 3577C and MS 3579D. [There are copies on Microfilm at the National Library of Ireland Mic. P. 3,262 and P. 3,263] William Peard is mentioned as a cousin of Redmond Barry of Rathcormac in the latter’s will which was proved on 22 November 1750. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 642]

William Peard had three sons; Henry [133], Richard [134] and Thomas [135].

[106] Henry Cole Peard of Coole (b. 1661; d. 1731)

Henry Cole Peard was a former army captain and in 1698 he lately held the abbey lands of Castlelyons with the impropriator of its rector. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore Papers, MS 6146]

Henry is mentioned as trustee and overseer to the will of his brother-in-law of Christopher Vowell of Ballyorane in 1724. John Harrison of Castlelyons is also mentioned for the same job and is also referred to as brother-in-law of Christopher. Both gentlemen were also to be executors of his will if his wife, Elizabeth, remarried. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 678]

His will was proved in 1738 and he is a gent from Coole. [Guide to genealogical office, p. 241] The will was made on 6 August 1729 with his wife and two sons as executors. He asked to be buried in Castlelyons. The will also mentions his two daughters; Dorcas and Priscilla along with his nephew, Thomas Peard. The guardians appointed by him were; his brothers-in-law, John and Henry Harrison of Castlelyons, Samuel Harrison of Carrigabrick, his cousin Daniel Keeffe of Ballinglinhane and his friend Andrew Crotty. The latter was for many years the Irish land agent for the earl of Cork and lived for sometime at Modeligo House. E. William Troke, Richard Thorne and John Bryan were witnesses to the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 677]

He married Priscilla Harrison in 1701 and had two sons; John [108] and Richard [109] along with a daughter Priscilla [110].

[108] John Peard (d. November 1780)

He lived at Ballyclogh House and his will is dated 1785. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] John was trustee with Rev. William Vowell to the lands of Shanakill and that part of Glenatore called Carrow Towreen by will of his brother in 1772. John was trustee, with Richard Moore (heir-at-law of Rev. Vowell), of the marriage of his nephew, John and Margaret Mitchell. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81] He died in 1780 without any issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[110] Priscilla Peard

She was a daughter of Henry Cole Peard [106] of Coole.

[109] Richard Peard (d. 1773)

He married Elizabeth, sister of Rev. William Vowell, vicar of Aghern in 1731. He had issue by her of; Henry [111], Christopher [112] John [113] and Peard Harrison [114] and another eight children. [Conna in History and Tradition, p.194; J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179 for order of sons] He lived at Carrigeen. [Vicars’ index, p. 370] His will was dated 10 May 1772 with his wife and his brother, John, as executors. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179]

In 1771, his daughter Ellen married Henry Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork and their daughter and co-heiress Mary Broderick married in June 1795 Grice Smyth of Ballinatray. She married secondly Captain John Irvine, the 7th son of Col William Irvine of Castle Irvine Co. Fermanagh (see Burke 1912). [Burke’s Irish Family records p. 1040] His other daughters were: Elizabeth married William Spread, Ballycannon in the liberties of Cork, at Mogeely church in May 1763 with a dowry of £2,000; [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2550] Dorcas, wife of Westropp Watkins, late of Old Court, Co. Cork and Priscilla who married Charles Widenham, esq., and attorney-at-law on 20 April 1776 at Carrigeen. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29] see also [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[111] Henry Peard of Coole (d. 1797)

Henry was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Mary Gumbleton in 1764 at Lismore. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2559 and Faulkner’s Dublin Journal 15/9/1764]

He built Coole Abbey with David Duckert around 1765 – he planted 10,000 trees at Coole in 1794. Henry died before 1773. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He left six children including; Richard [115] and John [116] [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

Henry had a daughter, Charlotte, who in 1807 married Rev. John Lord. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 919]

[115] Richard Peard of Coole Abbey (d. 1830)

Richard Peard is mentioned with reminder to Carrigeen and part of Glenatore from his grandfather in a legal petition of his aunt-in-law in 1791. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 179] He attended the John Anderson creditors meeting on 19 June 1816. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 51] In 1801 he married Elizabeth Hart and had a son; Henry Hawke Peard [117] and a daughter, Henrietta Maria Peard [118]. Richard had two other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[118] Henrietta Maria Peard

She married on 2 September 1837, Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park as his second wife. They had five sons and two daughters. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

[117] Henry Hawke Peard (b. 1804; d. 1858)

He married Elizabeth Cathrow in 1826 and had a son; Richard [119]. Henry Peard had eleven other children included Francis [120]. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

dsc03300

Coole Abbey

In 1836 Henry H. Peard reported to the Poor Law enquiry that no more than a dozen labourers left the Coole area for the U.S.A. he went on to say that ‘fifty-nine labourers [who] reside in this parish (Coole), all in constant work, besides many more from adjoining parishes’. Henry Peard said that the ordinary diet of the people was ‘potatoes with milk in summer, which is very cheap and in winter those that can afford it, the addition of bacon, salt fish etc., while the article of clothing is beyond belief improved’. Henry Peard further said that since 1815 the ‘condition of the poor is much improved in clothing particularly, you now never see a person without shoes and stockings, which used to be the case, clothing is much cheaper, they are also improved in cleanliness of the house, diet perhaps also improved. The population is about the same’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), pp. 66, 68, 71]

As for the wages of the labouring class in Coole, Henry Peard said that ‘including the sale of a couple of fat pigs, fowl, etc., together with constant work, a man can earn about £15 per year’. But the devoutness of many Catholic labourers prevents them from earning more money as they observe too many church holidays and ‘attending stations to confess, [which] take a good deal from what a labourer could earn, there are 11 holidays kept’. Henry Peard estimated that the cost of living ‘as the labourer does, he can procure a full supply of potatoes and milk for about £7 per year, many live on £5’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 69]

Henry Peard went on to tell the Poor Law enquiry that “the number employed on roads is very difficult to determine, they being almost in every case, belonging to other parishes, the resident labourers, as I before stated, having constant work. I know they are paid in money”. [Conna in History and Tradition, pp. 82 – 83]

On the houses of the Coole labourers Henry Hawke Peard said that those who owned cabins ‘with the exception of a few tradesmen such as carpenters, blacksmiths etc., they are the labourers of the different farmers in the parish’. The usual rent was ‘with a small patch of garden … from £1 10s to £2’. The conditions of the cabins were better than those at Aghern and were mostly ‘composed of mud walls, thatched [and] in almost all you will find good bed and bedding’. [Conna in History and Tradition (Conna Community Council, 1998), p. 71]

in 1837 Henry Hawke Peard was a subscriber to the large folio volumes of Samuel Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland.

In September 1845 Henry Hawke Peard backed a proposal for a railway between Cork and Fermoy at a meeting in Fermoy courthouse which was attended by many of the great and the good of the district. The proposed Cork and Fermoy Direct Railway Company was to have a share capital of £250,000 in 12,500 shares of £20 each. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 3]

On 16th March 1846 Henry Peard attended a meeting at Fermoy Courthouse, under the chairman of the Earl of Mountcashell, to appoint a relief committee for the Fermoy Poor Law Union. The potato blight which started in 1845 to rot the crops was now causing much distress in the area.

Henry Peard proposed that an estimate of the funds needed until 10th August be made and that the landlords would pay a rational proportion according to the value of their estates. Michael Mackey of Ballyroberts seconded the motion but the Earl of Mountcashel would not put it to a vote. Father Fitzpatrick then proposed a motion of a levy of one shilling in the pound according to the Poor Law Valuation (Griffith’s Valuation) of each rate payer and the money be deducted from the rent.

Both motions caused division, uproar and laughter and the Earl of Mountcashell stood down as chair with Hon. Gen Annesley of Annesgrove taking it. Subsequently both motions were denied a vote. Instead the meeting divided the area into 11 relief districts and left the issue of funding undecided. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 29]

At relief committee was established in Castlelyons at the end of March 1846 but no names of those attending were published. On 1st April 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the weekly meeting of the Fermoy Board of Guardian. There were 739 people in the workhouse and the Board had £705 5s 7d in the bank. The Board unanimously resolved to assist everyone within the Poor Law Union. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

On 28th August 1846 Henry Hawke Peard attended the presentment session for the Barony of Barrymore at Watergrasshill. The meeting resolved to employ labourers on the proposed Cork to Waterford railway which would pass through two parts of the Barony. They would further employ people on road maintenance and improvement after a new Government Act was passed to allow for such employment. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 52]

On 26th December 1846 R.G. Campion of Bushy Park attended the Kinnatalloon presentment session at Aghern schoolhouse as agent for Henry Hawke Peard. Mr. Campion reported that the tenants at Coole had their land at a fair rent from Henry Peard and there were no small tenants. Eugene Byrne contradicted this claim by saying that when Henry Peard was at home up to 40 people were employed but when he was away there was much unemployment and that the rent was too dear.

Mr. Campion said the rent was cheap while Byrne replied that the tenants were leaving fast. Campion responded with denial and the meeting fell into confusion and disorder. After order was restored Mr. Campion got £180 to drain 35 acres at Coole. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 69]

On 27th March 1851 Henry’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth married Francis Drew Campion, second son of Robert (or Richard) Gifford Campion of Bushy Park, Co. Cork, at Castlelyons. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

In 1850 Henry Hawke Peard rented Coole Upper and Coole Lower from James H. Smith Barry. Henry farmed 157 acres directly in Coole Lower of a total of 606 acres and rented out the remained. At Coole Upper, where Coole Abbey was situated (total buildings worth £36) Henry farmed directly 449 acres of a total of 545 acres. [Griffith’s Valuation, Coole, parish Coole, barony of Barrymore]

[119] Richard McCulloch Peard (b. 1829; d. 22 March 1880)

He lived at Coole Abbey. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 135] He married Ann Corban in 1858 and had a son Henry William [121] [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 78] There was also another unnamed child. Richard died in 1880 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

It is unclear if this was the Richard Peard who was in 1850 landlord of the townland of Kilmagner (637 acres of 765 acres – remained held by Michael Cagney in perpetuity).  [Griffith’s Valuation, Kilmagner, parish Castlelyons, barony of Condons and Clangibbon]

[121] Henry William Peard (b. 1860 – d. 1936)

He lived in Buenos Aires and married Flora Agusta Sewell in 1893 and she died in 1960 aged 86. Henry was a physician and surgeon. Before 1901 he sold Coole Abbey to Orr McCausland. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), pp. 78, 126]

[120] Francis Peard (d. 31 January 1864)

This Francis Peard died in 1864 at 84 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[116] John Peard (b. 1775, d. 1847)

John Peard lived at Towermore. He married Bridget Woodley in 1810 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and had two sons; Henry [122] and John [123] and one daughter Elizabeth [124].

In 1863 John’s widow, Bridget Peard otherwise Woodley late of Rathcormac died. Letters of administration of her estate (valued under £100) were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, widow and the administratrix of the son of the deceased [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 897]

towermore-house

Towermore house as seen from gate lodge

This John Peard of Towermore was possibly the same John Peard of Castlelyons who in 1847 was a member of the Fermoy Board of Guardians. In that year John complained to the rector about the cost of graves at 18d each at Beechfield. Plans were then in place for a new cemetery beside the workhouse. John Peard proposed an extra story to the fever hospital then under construction to accommodate 30 more patients and this was accepted. [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 101] John Peard died in 1847 and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

In 1850 Maria Oliver was the immediate landlord of the two townlands of Towermore Upper (Frederick C. Hayes was chief tenant) and Towermore Lower (John Fouhy was chief tenant). [Griffith’s Valuation, Towermore, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

In 1911 associates of John Peard lived at Knocknahorgan in Rathcooney, Co. Cork. They were John Richard Peard (28, bank official) and his brother Francis Woodley Peard (24, bank official) and their two sisters, Ethel Woodley Peard (34 years) and Maud Josephine Peard (29 years) – all unmarried. [http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001913770/]

[122] Henry Harrison Peard (b. 1810; d. 1918)

He lived at Towermore and died in 1918. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[123] John Peard (d. 1876)

It is unclear if this John Peard was the John Peard of Coole mentioned in 1850 as a member of the Board of Guardians of the Fermoy Poor Law Union [Bill Power, Fermoy on the Blackwater (Brigown Press, Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 105], or is there confusion with John Peard [116] above.

In 1850 John Peard was the immediate landlord of Ballyrobert (169 acres), parish of Castlelyons with Michael Mackey as sole tenant. [Griffith’s Valuation, Ballyrobert, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

John Peard left a will under £3,000 at his death on 11th January 1876. On 21st March 1876 letters of administration per estate of John Peard, late of Brideville, Rathcormac, esq., deceased, was granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard also of Brideville, the widow of the said deceased. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 898]

[124] Elizabeth Peard (d. 1867)

Elizabeth Peard died on 23rd June 1867, late of Rathcormac, spinster leaving an estate valued at under £300. On 1st May 1867 letters of administration of per estate were granted at Principal registry to Annie Peard of Brideville, Rathcormac, widow and the administratrix  of John Peard, brother of the deceased [Upper Blackwater, vol 14, p. 897]

[111] Christopher Peard (d. 1775)

Christopher was appointed a Peace Commissioner for County Cork sometime after 1750. [Charles Smith, ‘The Ancient and Present state of the County and City of Cork’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 1 (1892), p. 35]

He married Ann Cooke of Tallow and lived at Glantore where his house is marked on the Taylor and Skinner map and where he was a J.P. Christopher died intestate in 1775. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He had two sons and one daughter; William [125], Richard [126] and Mary [127].

Anne Peard filed two draft briefs in 1791 concerning her right to a legacy on various lands at Barranstown, Tallow and Curryglass. [Cork Archive Institute, U290; see J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 179-81 for info on this petition]

[125] William Peard

He lived at Peardmount and is listed in the 1804 tithe books. Mary Boles of Killbree married William Peard of Peardmount. She was the daughter of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles, who was son of Thomas Boles of Ballinacurra and the latter was born in 1646 [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland 1899, p. 44 Bowles of Aghern]

He was possibly the William Peard, who transmitted a letter from Jane ____ to Mrs Henrietta Smyth in November 1827 from Dublin to Ballinatray. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 1, folder (7), 1827-8, Bill Fitzgerald to Mrs Henrietta Smyth, 21 November 1827]

On 7th August 1809 Walter Croker Poole of Ballyanchor, Co. Waterford made his will and it was witnessed by William Peard and Richard Peard. A cordicil made on 4th January 1810 was witnessed by Ann Peard and William Peard. It is unclear if the William Peard of the Poole will was the William Peard of Peardmount. [Eilish Ellis & P. Beryl Eustace (eds.), Registry of Deeds Dublin, Abstract of Wills, Vol. III, 1785-1832 (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1984), no. 502]

In 1814 William Peard was still living at Peardmount, Co. Cork with Tallow, Co. Waterford as the postal town. [Ambrose Leet, Directory of market towns, villages and gentleman’s seats (Dublin, 1814), p. 318] In 1815 Peardmount was mentioned as a seat of the Peard family in the Barony of Kinnatalloon along with Carrigeen and Coole. [Horace Towsend, Statistical survey of County Cork (1815), p. 73]

[126] Richard Peard

It is unclear if this is the Richard Peard of Peardmount mention about 1799 as one of the many commissioners for building a road between Cork city and the bounds of County Tipperary north of Kilworth. [Anon, Statutes passed in the Parlaiments held in Ireland 1799-1800 (Dublin, 1801), p. 46]

[127] Mary Peard

[113] John Peard (d. June 1784)

John Peard married Margaret Mitchell in July 1776 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] and lived at Peardmount. Margaret was the daughter and only child of Henry Mitchell and Mary Shears of Mitchellsfort. She remarried in September 1784 to Odell Spread. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29; J.C.H.A.S. vol 52 (1947), p. 180; Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] By deed made on 10 July 1776, previous to her marriage with John Peard, Margaret became entitled to the charge of £1,500 on Barranstown and other lands of her father. By the will of his father, Richard Peard, John vested a charge of £80 on Glenatore and Shanakill as a jointure for Margaret.

John was obliged, by his father’s will, to pay his brother, Christopher £200 but though he possessed property valued at £300, John was in a poor financial state and despite repeated promises, never paid the amount. John died intestate in 1784 leaving his widow Margaret and very little else as P.H. Peard sold his effects for £130. Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180]

[114] Peard Harrison Peard (d. 1798)

In 23 October 1784, he married Arabella Drew, daughter of Francis Drew of Mocollop by his wife, Arabella Godfrey of Kilcolman Abbey, Co. Kerry. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 159] In the same year, his brother, John died and Peard Harrison Peard entered into possession of Glenatore, Shanakill, a leasehold interest in Tallow and the leasehold of Curriglass because John left no male heirs. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), p. 180] He was the Captain Commandant of the Curryglass Volunteers infantry unit in April 1779. His lieutenant was Stephen Rollston with James Graham as secretary. [Robert Day, ‘Reprint of the Munster Volunteer Registry, 1782’, in Journal Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. III (1894), p. 326] Vicar’s index of wills gives his death for 1799 and an esq. from Carrigeen. [Vicar’s index, p. 370] He had two sons; Henry [128] and Richard Frederick [129] and two daughters along with two other unnamed children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[128] Henry Peard (b. 1791; d. 1832)

He lived at Carrigeen Hall and married Charity Jane Greene (she died 26 March 1841 at 41 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann), and had a son; Henry [130] along with three other children. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), pp. 3, 4]

carrigeen-hall

Entrance to Carrigeen Hall – old house no longer standing

In a court case at Carlow, Henry Peard was “disguised beyond redemption by his exposure of his attempts to deprive his poor dependent younger brother of the ___ of renewal of a small farm”. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

Henry Peard died in September of 1832 and letters of administration were written on 28 March 1833 at under £300. His wife as executrix of his will should have received the letter but she didn’t. Instead his son Henry got the letter of administration. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

[130] Henry Peard (d. pre 1854)

Henry Peard was living at George Street in Cork city in 1833/34. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 939] He lived at Carrigeen and farm 147 acres there in 1850

In December 1845 Henry Peard gave notice that his farm at Carrigeen Hall was for lease from 1st May 1846. The house, offices and land of 180 acres had a coach house, stables, and walled gardens and was well stocked. The gate keeper at the lower lodge was available to allow people see the property. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 17]

In February 1847 Henry Peard of Carrigeen was named as one of the local landed gentry who did not contribute money to the Kinnatalloon relief fund. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 78]

Henry Peard is said to have married in 1849 to Jane Roch of Woodbine Hill, Waterford, and daughter of George Butler Roch. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 392] Yet as daughter was said to marry in 1854 there may have been an earlier marriage or confusion between the different Henry Peards. His second daughter, Arabella, married at Kinsalebeg in 1854, Rev Mellanus Spread Campion, the second son of Rev Thomas Spread Campion of Knockmourne. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

In 1850 Henry Peard was landlord in fee of Carrigeen East (320 acres) and of 30 acres at Carrigeen Hill where he rented out the remaining 320 acres. Henry Peard was also landlord of Castleview where Richard Gumbleton was the chief tenant. Henry Peard was also landlord of Glantore Lower (139 acres) and Glantore Upper (173 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Carrigeen, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Henry Peard was landlord of Shanakill Lower (244 acres) and Shanakill Upper (244 acres). [Griffith’s Valuation, Shanakill, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

For more on Shankill townland see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2016/02/08/shanakill-townland-in-the-barony-of-kinnatalloon-county-cork-2/

[129] Richard Frederick Peard

Richard Frederick Peard lived at Belvedere House and died in the 1840s. He planted 31,640 trees between 1815 and 1817. In various land deeds, Richard is mentioned as an attorney and solicitor, while one of the deeds was registered by a Francis Peard. [See appendix I, no. (I), (III) and (IV) for land deeds involving Richard Peard in 1828, 1833 and 1842] Richard Peard handled the Heathcote land sale of 1826 with his first cousin, Charles Maunsell, solicitor of Dublin. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth papers, PC 904, box 2, folder (6), 1826, letters to Richard Smyth]

belverdere-house-from-mogeely-bridge

Belverdere house from Mogeely Bridge

In 1831, he went to court in Carlow because his brother Henry Peard would not renew a lease on a small farm and Richard Peard was dependent on Henry for his livelihood. [National Library of Ireland, Holroyd Smyth Papers, PC 904, box 2, folder 8, (1), 1831, letters to Rd Smyth, Charles Maunsell to Rd Smyth, 14 November 1831]

He married Maria Maunsell, the daughter of Charles Maunsell of Roseville, Tallow by Grace, daughter of John Green. Charles was great, great, great, grandson of Thomas Maunsell of Berkshire and later of Derryville, Co. Cork, who’s first son was Colonel Thomas Maunsell of Mocollop, who defended it against Cromwell’s forces in 1649. [Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 800-801, 803] The couple were married before 1822 and had two children, a son; John Maunsell [130] and a daughter; Grace. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork (Ballinakella Press, 2002), p. 78]

In 1850 Mrs. Maria Peard held Belvidere (171 acres) from Henry Peard of Carrigeen. She farmed 74 acres where the buildings were worth £15 12s and rented out the remainder. Maria Peard also had 5 acres at Castleview which was rented by Richard Gumbleton. At Glantore Lower Maria Peard rented the townland from Henry Peard and in turn rented the land out to other tenants. At Glantore Upper Maria Peard rented 19 acres from Richard Gumbleton and rented the remaining land (154 acres) from Henry Peard. This land she in turn rented out to others. [Griffith’s Valuation, Belvidere, Castleview, Glantore, parish Knockmourne, barony of Kinnatalloon]

Also in 1850 Maria Peard was the immediate landlord of Blackpool townland (38 acres) where the representatives of Lord Lisle appear to be the senior landlord. Maris Peard was also landlord of about 15 houses in Rosybower and a garden which she rented from the representatives of Lord Lisle. [Griffith’s Valuation, Blackpool, Rosybower, parish Mogeely, barony of Kinnatalloon]

See appendix one below for some lands deeds involving Richard Frederick Peard.

[130] John Maunsell Peard

He lived at Belvedere House. He occupied Vinepark House near Curriglass in 1855. [Anna-Maria Hajba, Houses of Cork, vol. 1 – North Cork, p. 356] On 27 November 1855 his wife had a son at Vinepark. [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29 – Faulkner’s Journal] But the child didn’t live to adulthood as John Peard died without issue. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[132] William Peard

He was the son of Richard Peard [105] and did not marry. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 3]

[133] Henry Peard (d. 19 July 1797)

He was the son of William Peard of Castlelyons and is mentioned as one of the three lives in a lease deed of 1750 between James, earl of Barrymore and John Nason of Newtown for property about Castlelyons. Henry Peard was still alive in 1777, but in poor health by 1791 and died 19 July 1797. [J.C.H.A.S. vol. 52 (1947), pp. 183-4]

[134] Richard Peard (d. pre 1729)

He was the son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons. In the will of his uncle, Henry Peard [106] of Coole, dated 1729, it is mentioned that Richard was deceased. He may be that Richard Peard who made land deeds with a Mr. Croker between 1709 and 1729. [Registry of deeds = 0522803 2 320 481]

Richard Peard married Diana Mitchell in 1709. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101] There is a will dated 1716 for a Richard Peard of Castlelyons and this could be the same person. [Guide to Genealogical office, p. 241; Vicar’s index, p. 370]

[135] Thomas Peard

He was the second son of William Peard [107] of Castlelyons and was mentioned in the will of his uncle, Henry Peard of Coole in 1729.

Twenty-first century Peard members

Darrell W. Peard

He restored the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann in September-December 2002 at a cost of €9,000. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 5]

Delphine Adele Peard

She died on 5 July 1909 at 75 years and is buried in the Peard mausoleum at Kill-St-Ann.

[Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

029

Peard mausoleum

Eric W.E. Peard

Eric Peard and his brother-in-law Eric Balt entered the Peard mausoleum in 1985 following damaged by a falling tree. There they saw about 15 to 20 broken coffins with of the name plates having rusted away. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Francis Peard

He lived in South Africa where his daughter Gitta Brill passed on the family coat-of-arms to Noel Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

Frank W. Peard

He wrote a short history on the Peard family in Ireland entitled Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003).

Noel P. Peard

Noel inherited a plaque with the Peard coat-of-arms from Gitta Brill, daughter of Francis Peard. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003), p. 4]

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Apart from the Peard family of north-east Cork outlined above, there were other people by the name of Peard living in north Cork in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. These people maybe cousins of the Peard family above but no clear line of connection has been made yet. Information on these, as yet, unconnected Peard people is recorded below.

Peard of Allworth

John Peard of Allworth

John Peard was married to Ellen and they had a son, William Peard who was baptised 4 December 1836. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Joseph Peard of Allworth

On 16th February 1839 Joseph Peard and his wife Ellen had a son, Matthew Peard baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 306]

Thomas Peard of Allworth

Denis son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, baptised 28 July 1812 and died on 12th November 1812. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 319]

On 24th April 1813 —– Peard daughter of Thomas Peard of Allworth, died and on 4th October 1813 Henry Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 29th November 1818 Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised while on 15th April 1821 their son Matthew Peard was baptised. On 21st January 1827 Richard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. On 4th April 1828 —- Peard, son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 319, 298, 299, 300, 303, 319, 322]

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Peard family of Glountane

[PG110] Henry Peard of Glountane

On 11th October 1838 Thomas Peard [PG111], son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane was baptised. On 12th April 1842 Thomas Peard, son of Henry and Elizabeth Peard of Glountane died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 306, 325]

On 17th February 1840 Robert Peard [PG112], son of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 307]

On 1st April 1842 Frances Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 26th July 1846 Elizabeth Peard, the daughter of Henry and Catherine Peard of Glountane was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 309]

On 5th April 1846 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

On 11th March 1848 Henry Peard was witness to the marriage of Elizabeth O’Connor (nee Peard), to George Dormer in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

John Peard of Glountane

On 7th August 1845 John Peard lived at Glountane and married Mary Phillpott of Newmarket by licence. John Peard was 25 years old and a farmer. He was son of Thomas Peard who was also a farmer. Mary was 28 in 1845 and daughter of Robert Philpot of Glantane (farmer). The witnesses were Thomas Peard and Robert Philpot with M. Becker as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, pp. 20, 340]

Thomas Peard of Glantane

On 4th November 1832 Robert Peard, son of Thomas and Frances of Glountane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304]

John Peard, the son of Thomas Peard, got married on 7 August 1845. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20 and see above under John of Glantane]

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Peard family of Knockanesweeny

[PK108] Thomas Peard of Knockanesweeny

He married Katherine Callaghan and they had a daughter Katherine baptised on 28 November 1761. Thomas Peard died on 27 August 1786. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1728; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 316]

[PK110] Henry Peard of Knockanesweeny

He and his wife Catherine had a daughter Jane baptised on 27 December 1789. On 4th December 1791 they had a son Thomas Peard [AK111] baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1736]

Henry Peard died on 6 September 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 317]

Richard Peard of Knockanesweeny

On 23rd October 1810 Richard Peard and his wife Mary had a daughter baptised. On 27th December 1812 their son, Denis Peard was baptised and in December 1815 another son called Thomas Peard was baptised. On 12th April 1818 a third son, Richard Peard was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 297, 298, 299]

Matthew Peard

He lived at Knockanesweeny and died 13 January 1839 at 68 years. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 324]

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Peard family of Knocknemony

[AKP110] Henry Peard of Knocknemony

He and his wife Katherine had a daughter Elizabeth baptised on 22 June 1794. They had a son John Peard [AKP111] baptised on 2 April 1797. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1737, 1738]

[AKP111] John Peard of Knocknamoney

His wife Ellen had a daughter Elizabeth Peard who was baptised on 6 March 1835. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 305]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamony

On 25th October 1778 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter, Jane, baptised and on 8th October 1779 they had a son Thomas Peard baptised on 8 October 1779. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1732, 1733]

Thomas Peard of Knocknamoney

Thomas was a shoemaker in Knocknamonee. His daughter, Elizabeth (spinster) was a servant and married in Kilshannig parish on 14 February 1854 to Isaac Jones (servant) of Rockforest and son of Thomas Jones (steward). Thomas Peard and Thomas Peard junior were the two witnesses and H. Swanson was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 25]

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Peard family of Lombardstown

Catherine Peard of Lombardstown

She lived at Lombardstown and died a widow on 21 October 1836 [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 323]

[PL110] John Peard of Lombardstown

On 2nd November 1825 John Peard and his wife Ellen had a daughter, Catherine Peard baptised. On 6th April 1828 they had a son, Henry Peard [PL111] baptised. On 7th September 1830 they had a daughter, Ellen baptised and on 29th July 1832 another daughter, Jane, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 302, 303, 304]

John Peard was a yeoman and his son Denis Peard [PL112] got married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

[PL112] Denis Peard of Lombardstown

Denis Peard was the son of John Peard of Lombardstown. He was a wood-ranger and married on 16 November 1850 in Kilshannig parish to Bridget Boyle (spinster) of Duclayne and daughter of James Boyle (yeoman). The witnesses were James Berry and Richard Berry with H. Swanson as celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 23]

Denis Peard and his wife Bridget had a son called Henry Peard baptised 28 September 1851. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 310]

Thomas Peard of Lombardstown

In February 1820 Thomas Peard and his wife, Elizabeth had a son, Henry Peard baptised. On 11th January 1822 they had a daughter, Catherine baptised in Kilshannig church. On 14th May 1826 Thomas and Elizabeth Peard had a son, Denis Peard baptised and on 23rd November 1828 another son, Thomas Peard was baptised. On 23rd October 1831 their daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 300, 302, 303, 304]

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Peard family of Scarragh

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a son John baptised on 20 November 1763 (he died on 18th December 1763) and a daughter Mary was baptised on 25th August 1773. They had a daughter Mary baptised on 25 August 1773. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1728, 1731; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 314]

Thomas Peard of Scarragh

On 19th August 1824 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a daughter, Celia baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Upper Blackwater, vol. 14, p. 301]

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Unassigned Peards

In additional to the above a number of people with the Peard surname have appeared for which it is as yet not possible to connect them with any of the Peard families above.

Alice Peard

She married Hercules Jones in 1814. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anna Maria Peard

She married Joseph Busteed in 1820. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Anne Peard

She married Thomas Williamson in 1811. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Annie Peard

Mrs Annie Peard lived at 4 College View Terrace, Western Road, Cork in 1881. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78] She was a widow in 1897 and got letters of administration to the estate of her sister, Sarah Land who died 19 December 1897. Both lived at Woodview, Glanmire. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2105]

Catherine Peard

She lived in Fermoy and married, in 1832, Rev. Robert Spread Nash. Rev. Nash was a grandson of Rev. William Nash and died in November 1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 6, p. 922]

Diana Peard

Diana Peard married John Mowbay in 1717. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Elinor Jane Peard

She married 24 October 1854 her second cousin, Richard Gifford Campion son of Richard Gifford Campion of Bushy Park by his wife, Lucinda Catherine Drew. [Carol Baxter, Drew Family Tree, p. 13]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard was a witness to a marriage in Kilshannig parish on 7 July 1796 and also a witness to another marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Thomas Peard. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 334, 335]

Elizabeth Peard

Elizabeth Peard married Thomas O’Grady of Aghamarta castle and had four sons and one daughter – Louise who in 1891 married George Foott of Carrigacunna castle, Co. Cork. [Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904, p. 345]

Frances Peard

She left a will under £1,500 after her death on 31 January 1864 at Fermoy, Co. Cork. She died a spinster and John Thomas Sherlock, solicitor, Fermoy proved the will. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1517]

Francis Peard

See under Richard Frederick Peard – also Ellen Peard, full age spinster from Curryglass, daughter of Francis Peard, married 9 December 1847, James Wynne, full age bachelor of Curryglass and land steward (son of Richard Wynne, steward) in Mogeely Church by Rev. M.S. Campion. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 2669]

Henry Peard (d. 1773)

From near Castlelyons [Nick Reddan newspapers, no. 29]

Henry Pearde

He married Hannah Dickenson in 1837. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257] She died on 16 October 1868 at Dunkerreen, Bandon, Co. Cork. Letters of administration were granted to her husband and only next of kin. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1626]

Henry Peard of Kilshannig

His daughter Mary died 22 January 1847. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 326]

Henry Peard

He lived a Millview, Fermoy Co. Cork and was party to a number of deeds with the Nash family around 1843 to 1853 and with Catherine Peard, a possible daughter who was wife of Robert Spread Nash of Fermoy, Co. Cork. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2179]

Henry Peard

He was a witness to the will of Jonathan Tanner of Bandon, which was proved on 17 May 1776. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 703]

Henry Peard of Mountpleasant

His will is dated 1805 at Mountpleasant. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Jane Peard

She married William Berry in 1834. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard

She married James Crothers in 1807. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Jane Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 11th October 1814 Jane Peard married John Farmer of Kilshannig parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 14, p. 335]

Jane Peard of Youghal

She lived at number 14 Knockaverry, Youghal in the 1901 census with Margaret O’Reilly. [Youghal family roots, p. 7]

John Peard

In 1698, John Peard along with Henry Ellin lately held Coole with its two ploughlands. He shared a fine of £2,000 with Ellin from Charles, earl of Burlington in consideration of their interest there on 4 August 1698 because Charles wished to sell the property to financiers. [National Library of Ireland, Lismore papers, MS 6146]

John Peard

John married Mary Seward in 1732. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

John Holmer Harrison Peard

He lived on Western Road, Cork in 1881 and had a veterinary practice at 28½ Princess Street. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p. 78]

On 25th June 1922 Henry Holmer Peard, son of John Holmer Harrison Peard of Ashtown House, Castleknock, Co. Dublin, married Fanny McClintock (born 8th May 1902), third daughter of Frederick Foster McClintock of Termonfeckin, Co. Louth. Henry Holmer Peard died on 12th September 1950. [Burke’s Irish Family Record, 1976, p. 753]

John Peard of St. Finbarry

He left a will dated 1782 with an address in St. Finbarry. [‘Index testamentorum olim in Registro Corcagle’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 390]

Mary Peard

In 1774 Mary Peard married John Bennet. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Mary Peard

In 1787 Mary Peard married William Dobbyn. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

He married Catherine Ring in 1810. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Matthew Peard

Witness the marriage of Elizabeth Peard of Brittas to Laurence O’Connor of Brittas at Kilshannig in April 1846. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

Nicholas Peard

He was a witness to the will of John Williams of Cork which was proved on 22 January 1662. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1452]

Rebecca Peard

Rebecca married Thomas Connaway in 1704. [‘Index to the marriage licence bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland’, in J.C.H.A.S., vol. III (1897), p. 101]

Richard Peard of Kilshannig

On 25th February 1810 Richard Peard married Mary Lynch. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 335]

Richard Peard of Mallow

His son Richard Peard died 30th July 1820 and on 19th June 1828 his son Matthew Peard died. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 321, 322]

Richard Peard (living c.1846)

In March 1846 Richard Peard reported on the state of the poor and the condition of the potato crop in the area of Ballyclough, Kilmagner and Knockdromaclough to the Fermoy Relief Committee. [T.A. Barry, ‘The Famine: Chronicle of Famine Times’ in The Avondhu newspaper, part 31]

Richard William Peard

He lived at Butlerstown, barony of Barrymore, Co. Cork and Elizabeth Phair was his wife. He was party to a Phair family deed of 13/8/1857. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2170]

Robert Peard of Roscommon

His will is dated 1794 at the Cottage, Roscommon and a gent. [Vicars’ index, p. 370]

Rosanna Peard

In 1772 Rosanna Peard married George Ward. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Sarah Peard

In 1764 Sarah Peard married George Pearse. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 4, p. 257]

Thomas Peard of Brittas

In April 1846 Thomas Peard of Brittas, farmer, saw his daughter Elizabeth marry at Kilshannig to Laurence O’Connor, a smither of Brittas. Elizabeth was twenty five years old at the time. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 20]

In 1848 Thomas Peard was a farmer and his daughter Elizabeth O’Connor (a widow) married in Kilshannig parish on 11 March 1848 to George Dormer (constable), the son of Richard Dormer (weaver). Henry Peard and John Vanston were the witnesses and F. Brady was celebrant. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 2, p. 21]

Thomas Peard of Dromore

William Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Dromore was baptised on 6 March 1831.

Later in 1835 Thomas Peard was witness to Murphy/Buckley land deed of 16/3/1835 in the barony of Duhallow. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 304; Ibid, vol. 15, p. 2202]

Thomas Peard of Keal

On 21st January 1765 Thomas Peard and his wife Jane had a daughter Elizabeth baptised. They had a son Henry Peard baptised on 28 June 1767. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, pp. 1729, 1730]

Thomas Peard of Kilshannig parish

On 24th August 1783 Thomas Peard and his wife June had a son Richard Peard baptised. He was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish on 10 May 1804 with Elizabeth Peard and also on 14 November 1804. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 1734; Ibid, vol. 14, p. 335]

On 20th February 1810 Thomas Peard married Frances Lynch of Kilshannig parish by licence. On 23rd November 1810 Thomas Peard son of Thomas and Frances Peard of Allworth, was baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, pp. 296, 335]

On 1st September 1815 Thomas Peard of Kilshannig married Elizabeth Lynch of same parish by banns. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

On 7th January 1823 Thomas Peard was witness to marriage in Kilshannig parish. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 336]

In April 1850 Thomas Peard was a witness to a marriage at Mourne Abbey church. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 15, p. 2495]

Robert Henry Peard was baptised on 2 September 1855 to Thomas and Elizabeth Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 311]

Thomas Peard of Newberry

On 22nd September 1816 Thomas Peard and his wife Frances had a son, John Peard, baptised. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 299]

William Peard

He was brother-in-law of John Mitchell of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork who died 16th March 1755 and had his will proved on 2nd April 1755 and executor to the will. Among the witnesses were Thomas Browne, John Barry and Henry Peard [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 729]

William Harrison Peard (b. 9 May 1822)

He was born at St. Helier in Jersey and married in 1875 Maude Anna King Palmer. She was born about 1851 and died in 1891. [Frank Peard, Records of the Early Peards in Ireland and Their Houses near Fermoy, Co. Cork (2003)]

The will of Maude Palmer Peard was proved on 27th October 1892 with an address of Riverstown, Co. Cork. The registrar of the will stated that she died 19 September 1891 at the same place. Letters of administration for her will was granted at Cork to William Harrison Peard of same place, gent, and described as farmer and the husband. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1797]

William Love Peard

Major William L. Peard of Rathbarry sent 29 letters, via his solicitor, G.W. Shannon, to Henry Dennehy, agent of Villiers Stuart, about the lease of a field near Youghal in 1844-48. A legal case resulted which was entitled Peard v Lord Stuart. [P.R.O.N.I. Villiers Stuart papers, T. 3131/G/16/1-29]

Major William Love Peard was chief tenant of Rathbarry (47 acres) which he rented from Rev. R. Gumbleton. [Griffith’s Valuation, Rathbarry, parish Castlelyons, barony of Barrymore]

W. Peard

In 1881 W. Peard lived at Richmond Lodge, Riverstown. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

W. Peard

He wrote a book entitled “A Year of Liberty-Salmon Angling in Ireland, 1867”. [Hamilton Osbourne King, House sale at Ileclash House, Fermoy, Co. Cork, 26 May 1998, lot 389]

William Peard

In 1881 William Peard lived at Skahabeg on the Old Douglas Road. [Slater’s Postal Directory of Munster, 1881, p.78]

William Peard

His will was proved in Cork by John Harris, solicitor, Sullivan’s Quay as one of his executors. William died 14 August 1885 at Duhallow, gent. [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1568]

William Pearde

Ellen Pearde … effects £2,340 … July 7 … letters of admin … will annexed … per est … late of Kilbrogan Hill, Bandon and wife of William Pearde, died 9 October 1889 at same place and left unadmin by Frances Anne Beamish, sole executor, were granted at Cork to Ellen W. Beamish of Neelin House, Bandon, spinster, attorney of one of the resident legatees [Albert Eugene Casey & Thomas O’Dowling, O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater in Ireland (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 14, p. 1844]

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Appendix I

Some land deeds involving members of the Peard family

(I)        CROKER/HANNA (869/432/578432); barony of east Muskerry; 7/3/1828; indented deed – Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork, Francis Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, merchant;

Walter Croker made over to Francis Hanna the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; Witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard and John O’Brien, writing clerk; sworn 19/5/1828; registered by Francis Peard. [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 1752]

(II)       PEARD/WESTROPP (866/56/576556) Barony west Muskerry 27/5/1830 – indented deed – Richard Peard. Coole, Co. Cork (eldest son & exec, of last will and testament of Henry Peard), Edward Morgan, Birdstown, co. Cork, Maria Morgan (nee Spread) his wife, Eliza Albina Spread, Ballincollig Co. Cork (spinster – exec of last will & testament of Rev Thomas Westropp, Richard Spread, Ballincollig, Co. Cork, Mountiford Westropp, Westmount, Co. Cork.

In consideration of the marriage of Wm Spread & Elizabeth Peard; Richard Peard, Ed Morgan, Maria his wife & Eliza A. Spread made over to Mountiford Westropp, in trust for Richard Spread, the lands at Ballycannon & Kilbeg – Barony Barretts – Upper and Lower Coolnageragh – Barony Muskerry lands of Behina, Knockaroghery, Lansvaghy, and Carrigatow & £142/17 part of a trust of £1,000. Witnesses; John Lysaght, Richard Pope Hackett (gent); sworn 24/11/1830; reg. Richard Foot [Upper Blackwater, vol 15, p. 2160]

(III)     HANNA/CROKER (1833/15/1911); barony of east Muskerry – 28/5/1833 – indented deed of reassignment by William Hanna, Tallow, Co. Waterford, (?) and Elizabeth O’Hea (widow), Co. Waterford (both administrators and executors of the will of Francis Hanna, deceased merchant) to Walter Croker, Lisnabrin House, Co. Cork

William Hanna and Elizabeth O’Hea reassigned and made over to Walter Croker the lands of Upper Rovamore in the barony of East Muskerry; witnesses; Richard Frederick Peard (attorney) and John O’Brien (writing clerk); sworn; 8/10/1833 and registered by Francis Peard

(IV)     BOWLES/WOODLEY (1842/21/282); barony of East Muskerry – 7/10/1842 – indenture of removal; Catherine Jones Bowles, Mount Prospect, Co. Cork, widow and administrator of George Bowles; Ellen Harman Woodley, Tallow, Co. Waterford, widow and devises of Joseph Woodley and Francis George Woodley, Leads, Co. Cork. Catherine Bowles and Ellen Woodley demised and let unto Francis Woodley, in his actual possession, the lands of Leads East (401 acres), Leads West (354 acres) and Ballyvougane (877 acres) in the barony of Muskerry for life at yearly rent of £110 0s 5d together with 11d per (hereceives) fees, also 1 fat hog at Christmas. Witnessed by William Woodley and Richard Frederick Peard, solicitor; sworn 12/10/1842 and registered by John Cranitch

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Carlow History

Adelaide Memorial Church, Myshall, Co. Carlow

Adelaide Memorial Church, Myshall, Co. Carlow

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Introduction

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the Church of Ireland engaged itself in erecting new parish churches that were almost uniform in their architectural form. These churches of simple lines were mostly financed by the Board of First Fruits, the official body responsible for building churches for the Church of Ireland.

In contrast to these simple churches, the parish church at Myshall, Co. Carlow is a riot of ornate style, pinnacles and colour.[1] The beauty of the Adelaide Memorial Church of Christ the Redeemer is as breath-taking as it is unexpected. And the tragic love story behind its construction is as compelling as its craftsmanship.

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The legend of the Adelaide Memorial Church at Myshall, Co. Carlow was that it was raised by John Duguid of Dover, England, in memory of his wife Adelaide and his daughter Constance who were killed in a riding accident while visiting friends in Myshall area.[2]

After the burial of his wife and daughter at Myshall John Duguid erected a memorial statue of ‘Innocence’ carved by Thomas Farrell from Sicilian marble over the grave. But the harsh Irish weather caused the marble to deteriorate rapidly. This prompted John Duguid to build the Adelaide church as a protective structure around the sculpture.

The church is described as an architectural gem and is a miniature of Salisbury Cathedral in England. It is constructed in limestone over a granite base. The limestone came from Stradbally, in Co Laois, and was transported by steam engine to Myshall, 15 tons at a time. The finest of materials were used and no part of the building was left unadorned. Delicate carving can be found everywhere and especially on the Bath stone which lines the interior.[3]

Inside the church are ten rows of carved-oak pews flanking the single aisle leading up the step, into the choir stalls. Polished Peterhead granite, quarried close to the Duguid ancestral home in Aberdeen, was used for the columns of the archway into the chancel, where the eye is drawn to the colourful mosaic behind the altar. Mother-of-pearl and gold leaf are used in this depiction of the Last Supper, in the style of Leonardo da Vinci

The interior has some fine stained glass including some by Evie Hone.[4] At the consecration the local bishop described the church as “one of the finest and most finished specimens of ecclesiastical art in Ireland”.[5]

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The church was consecrated in September 1913 and continues, under the official name of The Church of Christ the Redeemer, to provide a beautiful place of worship for the local Church of Ireland community.[6]

Within the church was built a mausoleum where John, Adelaide and Constance Duguid are buried. Sculptured panels on the mausoleum show the English rose and Scottish thistle (Mr. Duguid was of Scotch descent, his wife was English).[7] Much of the information about the construction and opening of Adelaide Memorial Church comes from a book written by Canon Pettipiece’s wife Kate for the occasion of the church’s consecration in 1913.

Constance Duguid

The story of the Church began in 1887 with an accident involving Constance Duguid. Constance was the daughter of John and Adelaide Duguid. Constance Duguid first came to Myshall on holiday to visit her sister, Madeline who married to a cleric and was living in the local rectory. While there she met Inglis Cornwall-Brady of Myshall Lodge. The couple began to see each other more often as they both enjoyed the fun of horse riding and their own company. The relationship blossom and they got engaged to be married.

But it was while out fox hunting that plans for the wedding came to a crashing end. It was in the field adjacent to the Adelaide Church that then 25-year-old Constance Duguid was seriously injured when she fell from a horse. A cross in the field marks the beginning of a chain of events that led, many years later, to the consecration of the new Church of Ireland place of worship in Myshall.

One, possibly fanciful version of the incident, was that a jealous former girlfriend of her fiancé spooked Duguid’s horse. The marriage of Constance’s intended to another woman within months of the accident seems to support some foul play. Constance Duguid lived for some time after the accident and knowing that she would not recover, Constance wished to be buried at Myshall.

Inglis Cornwall-Brady

The intended husband of Constance Duguid was Inglis Cornwall-Brady of Myshall Lodge. Myshall Lodge was built by Robert Cornwall on land acquired in the late eighteenth century. Robert Cornwall came from Co. Tyrone and was a nephew of Sam Faulkner of Dublin. As a barrister he was able to pick up some properties that were in trouble on the cheap such as that of Richard Whaley in Carlow. Robert Cornwall was very active in 1798 suppressing the Rebellion in County Carlow.

Major John Cornwall inherited Myshall Lodge and in 1810 married Jane Brady, daughter of Henry Brady of Limerick. They had no children and Myshall was inherited by Jane’s cousin, John Beauchamp Brady who added the name of Cornwall to his own. John Beauchamp Cornwall-Brady was High Sheriff of Carlow in 1853 and had three sons and one daughter by his wife Jane Harriet George. The eldest of these sons was John Cornwall-Brady, father of Inglis Cornwall-Brady, the intended husband of Constance Duguid.[8]

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If the tragic accident of 1887 played on the mind of Inglis Cornwall-Brady he didn’t show it in public. Instead on 14th February 1888 (St. Valentine’s Day) he married Mary Louisa Watson of Ballydarton. They had one daughter called Mona. Inglis Cornwall-Brady died in 1896 aged 37 years. Three years later, in 1899, his widow married Hon. Ralph Bowyer Norton.[9]

Inglis Brady left two sisters; Florence (died 1898) and Georgiana who married (1882) Edmond Hartstonge-Weld of Rahinbawn, Co. Carlow and inherited Myshall Lodge. Georgiana and Edmond left the house in 1915 and it was burnt by the I.R.A. in 1922.[10]

Adelaide Duguid

The mother of Constance Duguid was Adelaide Duguid, an English woman. It is Adelaide’s name that was given to the new Myshall church. In the 1891 census Adelaide Duguid was living in Dover, Kent. She was born in about 1842 in Sussex.[11] Adelaide Duguid never forgot her daughter’s grave at Myshall and when she died on 30th March 1903 she was buried beside her at Myshall.[12] It was after this double loss that John Duguid decided to build a new church at Myshall as a memorial to his wife and daughter.

John Duguid

The English census of 1911 records that John Duguid was 83 years old and was born in 1828 in Argentina. The occupation of John Duguid was given a private means.[13] These private means was a wine importer.[14] By all accounts John Duguid was a well-travelled, formidable man, standing more than six feet tall. He was the son of a Scottish father and English mother, and was raised in the manner of Spanish nobility.

In his early life John Duguid lived many adventures included riding coast to coast across bandit-country Mexico. Into adulthood he decided to settled down and in time he took over his father’s successful wine business, based himself in Dover and made it a success.

Earlier in 1889 John Duguid appeared among the Register of Electors in the parish of St. John the Apostle in the Borough of Dover in Kent.[15] In 1891 John Duguid was also on the same Register of Electors.[16]

After the death of his wife John Duguid further put to grief. When she was laid to rest at Myshall John Duguid struck up a close friendship with the then rector, Canon Pettipiece.

An offer by Duguid to fund the reroofing of Pettipiece’s church, as well as the need to erect a protective case around the weather-beaten statue of Innocence, developed into a far more ambitious plan for a new church on the site, incorporating his loved ones’ tombs.

“For him it was to stand as an exemplary mark of permanence, when everything in life can be swept away,” said today’s rector in Myshall, the Rev. Lester Scott.

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John Duguid died, aged 87, just months before the church was consecrated, on September 29th, 1913, so he was there only in spirit to hear the opening service. John Duguid did get to see the church and, in fact, there is a photograph in existence of him outside the church. John’s ashes were buried in Adelaide Memorial Church, alongside his wife and daughter. On consecration day the Duguid family was represented by his nephew Basil Duguid and his wife.[17]

Architect of the Adelaide Church

The Adelaide Memorial Church stands in beautifully maintained grounds and was designed by George Coppinger Ashlin, one of the foremost architects in the country in the early twentieth century.[18]

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George Coppinger Ashlin was born about 1837 at Carrigrenane House, Little Island in Co. Cork. He was the third son of John Mason Ashlin (who died when George was an infant) and Dorinda Coppinger of Midleton. George Coppinger Ashlin was educated in Liege (Belguim), at Oscott College and at the Royal Academy in London. Between 1856 and 1860 he studied architecture under Edward Welby Pugin, son of Augustus Welby Pugin.[19]

George Coppinger Ashlin returned to Ireland and worked on various commissions with Edward Welby Pugin. These included SS Peter and Paul’s, Cork, (1859), Convent of Mercy, Clonakilty, County Cork (1867), Convent and Orphanage, William Street North, Dublin (1867) and the SS. Augustine and John, Thomas Street, Dublin (1860).

In 1867 George Coppinger Ashlin married Mary Ashlin (aged 66) who was born about 1845 in England. Mary Ashlin was formerly Mary Pugin, Edward’s sister. They had one child. In 1911 George Ashlin was lived on Killiney Hill Road.[20]

Among the works of George Coppinger Ashlin, apart from the Adelaide Memorial Church, included about fifty other churches, Clery’s Department Store in Dublin, St. Colman’s Cathedral in Cobh and SS. Peter and Paul’s Church in Cork. On 10th December 1921 George Coppinger Ashlin died at his residence.[21]

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Conclusion

“It cost £50,000 to build the church, which is literally, millions in today’s money. At the time, it would have bought up most of Carlow,” explained Rev. Lester Scott. In conclusion to the story of the Adelaide Memorial Church we leave with the words of Rev. Scott when he said “The church is a memorial to love and that love comes from God, so really this church is a testament to God’s love.”[22]

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[1] Anon, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Carlow (Government of Ireland, 2002), p. 36

[2] http://trails.carlowtourism.com/adelaide-memorial-church.html accessed on 16 September 2015

[3] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say! (Carlow, 1993), p. 36

[4] http://archiseek.com/2013/adelaide-memorial-church-myshall-co-carlow-built-1903/ accessed on 18 September 2015

[5] http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/memorial-to-a-parent-s-love-1.1526667 accessed on 16 September 2015

[6] http://trails.carlowtourism.com/adelaide-memorial-church.html accessed on 16 September 2015

[7] http://trails.carlowtourism.com/adelaide-memorial-church.html accessed on 16 September 2015

[8] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 40

[9][9] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 38

[10] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 38

[11] http://search.ancestry.co.uk for Adelaide Duguid in English census 1891 accessed on 16 September 2015

[12] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 35

[13] http://www.ukcensusonline.com for John Duguid in English census 1911 accessed on 16 September 2015

[14] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 34

[15] https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJ8K-D5H3 accessed on 16 September 2015

[16] https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJ8K-64JX accessed on 16 September 2015

[17] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 36

[18] http://trails.carlowtourism.com/adelaide-memorial-church.html accessed on 16 September 2015

[19] Tim Cadogan & Jeremiah Falvey, A Biographical Dictionary of Cork (Four Courts Press, Dublin, 2006), p. 8

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Dublin/Killiney/Killiney_Hill_Road__Part_of/97866/ accessed on 18 September 2015

[21] Tim Cadogan & Jeremiah Falvey, A Biographical Dictionary of Cork, p. 8

[22] http://www.carlow-nationalist.ie/2013/09/30/church-love-built/ accessed on 16 September 2015

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Carlow History

Huntington castle, Clonegal, Co. Carlow

Huntington castle, Clonegal, Co. Carlow

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

Huntington castle lies on the edge of the village of Clonegal in County Carlow. The castle is a private house, yet it is open to the public for guided tours throughout June, July, August and September. It was the setting for Stanley Kubrick’s film Barry Lyndon.[1]

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Front facade of Huntington castle

The original tower house was built in the 15th century as a stronghold for the Cavanagh family.[2] In 1607, Richard Netterville, Corballies, Co. Dublin, owned part of Clonegal. In that year he entrusted all his Irish lands, including Clonegal, to Christopher Fleming and others for the use of Richard Netterville. On 4th September 1607 Richard Netterville died and was succeeded by his nephew Nicholas Netterville.[3]

In October 1641 the manor of Clonegal was held by Lawrence Esmond, Lord Esmond and his wife, Dame Ellis.[4] Lawrence Esmond was the second son of Walter Esmond of Johnstown, Co. Wexford, by his wife Margaret, daughter of Michael Furlong of Horetown. Lawrence Esmond was sheriff of Co. Waterford in 1607 and was constable of Duncannon fort, Co. Wexford from 1606 until his death in 1644 or May 1645; the year is different in various sources.[5]

In 1622 Lawrence Esmond was created Lord Esmond, Baron of Limerick. In 1628 he married Ellis, widow of successively John Sherlock and Sir Edward Gough, daughter of Walter Butler, 4th son of James Butler, Earl of Ormond. Although Lawrence Esmond at one time was Major General of all Royal forces in Ireland, Lord Esmond joined the Parliament cause in 1644 and defended Duncannon fort during a long siege by Confederate forces. The fort surrendered in March 1645. After his death with no children, his titles became extinct and administration of his estate was granted to his nephew, Richard Esmond.[6]

Clonegal passed in 1645 to Katherine Gough, wife of the late Patrick Esmond, for use during her life. Revenue from half the manor was assigned to the daughters of Patrick Esmond.[7] Due to the strategic importance of the village of Clonegal on the road between Dublin and Wexford, the castle was captured by Oliver Cromwell as he marched on Kilkenny in 1649.[8]

The Esmonde family laid out most of the gardens in the 17th century. In 1663, Lawrence Esmonde of Ballignestragh, Co. Wexford, filed a claim for various properties in Counties Wexford Tipperary, and Carlow including the manor of Clonegal. This Lawrence Esmond called the place Huntington castle after the ancestral home place in Lincolnshire and was the son of Sir Thomas Esmond, baronet.[9] Thomas Esmond was the son of Lawrence Esmond, Baron of Limerick, by his first wife Ailish O’Flaherty, a granddaughter of Grace O’Malley. Lawrence Esmond was an ardent Protestant while his wife was a devout Catholic and they disagreed on what religion their son Thomas should follow. One night Ailish left with the child and returned to Connacht and Lawrence Esmond subsequently married Ellis Butler. Thomas Esmond was declared illegitimate and excluded from inheriting the Barony of Limerick.[10]

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The Huntington castle gardens

The gardens at Huntington castle include the French limes on the avenue, the lawns to the side of the house, the fish ponds on either side of the centre walk through the wilderness and the majority of yew trees which comprise the Yew Walk.[11]

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In the second half of the seventeenth century, Huntington castle passed from the Esmond family on the marriage to John Durdin, a prosperous merchant from Essex who moved to Ireland in the 1630s. John Durdin enjoyed the good Carlow air and lived to the remarkable age of 108.[12]

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century further extensions were made around the original tower house at Huntington. Yet the house does not figure highly in the recorded social life of the Carlow gentry. In Edward Walford’s book of 1860 recorded the gentry families of the United Kingdom and Ireland, Huntington castle is excluded from the thirty-three gentry houses mentioned.[13] The house also escapes mention in the work of the Carlow gentry by Jimmy O’Toole.[14]

In 1875 Alexander Durdin of Huntington castle held 296 acres in County Carlow which was valued at £269. Rev. Alexander Durdin of Lower Mount Street in Dublin held 1,121 aces in County Carlow.[15]

Alexander Durdin made further improvements to the gardens at Huntington. A lake at the bottom of the wilderness garden at Huntington was built for ornamental purposes and next to it was constructed one of the earliest water turbine houses in Ireland, providing the castle with its own electricity as early as 1888.[16]

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In 1880, Melian Durdin married a Robertson. The Durdin-Robertson family have kept Huntington castle since that time.[17] In 1901 Helen Durdin-Robertson was living in the castle with her mother-in-law, Melian Durdin. Also there was Helen’s son, Magnus Robertson and her daughter, Helen Robertson with nine servants.[18] In 1901 there were 40 windows in the front façade and 22 rooms within along with 31 outbuildings.[19] In 1911 Arthur M. Haines rented Huntington castle from Herbert Robertson. The house then had 38 windows in the front façade and 25 rooms within with 30 outbuildings.[20] The castle today (2016) is still a private house, yet it is open to the public for guided tours throughout June, July, August and September.

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[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Castle,_Clonegal accessed on 17 December 2016

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Castle,_Clonegal accessed on 17 December 2016

[3] Margaret C. Griffith (ed.), Calendar of Inquisitions formerly in the Office of the Chief Remembrancer of the Exchequer prepared from the MSS of the Irish Record Commission (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 1991), No. J1 54/35

[4] Geraldine Tallon (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2006), no. 415

[5] G.E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage (Alan Sutton, Gloucester, 1987), Vol. V, p. 112; Geraldine Tallon (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663, no. 415

[6] G.E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. V, p. 112

[7] Geraldine Tallon (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663, no. 415

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Castle,_Clonegal accessed on 17 December 2016

[9] Geraldine Tallon (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663, no. 415

[10] http://www.turtlebunbury.com/history/history_houses/hist_hse_huntington.html accessed on 17 December 2016

[11] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Castle,_Clonegal accessed on 17 December 2016

[12] http://www.turtlebunbury.com/history/history_houses/hist_hse_huntington.html accessed on 17 December 2016

[13] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, 1860), p. 812

[14] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow Gentry: What will the neighbours say! (Carlow, 1993)

[15] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194438# accessed on 17 December 2016

[16] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Castle,_Clonegal accessed on 17 December 2016

[17] http://www.turtlebunbury.com/history/history_houses/hist_hse_huntington.html accessed on 17 December 2016

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000419807/ accessed on 17 December 2016

[19] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000419805/ accessed on 17 December 2016

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001679594/ accessed on 17 December 2016

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Biography

Charles McNeill: editor of manuscripts

Charles McNeill: editor of manuscripts

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

An important aid for historians is access to published original documents or knowing where to find unpublished manuscripts. The people who tirelessly work away reading old handwriting in dusty old documents to provide this source material for historians are the unsung heroes of history writing. One of these men who devoted his life to gathering and publishing original documents was Charles McNeill.

Birth and family

Charles McNeill was born on 26th April 1862 at Glenarm in County Antrim.[1] He was one of a large family born to Archibald McNeill, a Roman Catholic working class “baker, sailor and merchant”, and his wife, Rosetta (née McAuley) McNeill.[2] His younger brother, John MacNeill (he later used the first name of Eoin) was a founding member of the Gaelic League, President of the Irish Volunteers, Professor of Early and Medieval history at University College, Dublin, Minister of Education and first Chairman of the Irish Manuscripts Commission. Another brother, James McNeill was second Governor-General of the Irish Free State. The wife of James McNeill, Josephine Ahearne, was a first cousin of my grandfather.

Education

The McNeill family had aspirations for Charles McNeill beyond a life in the Glens of Antrim. Thus he was sent south and was educated at Belvedere College before moving on to becoming a scholar at the Catholic University of Ireland in 1880 shortly before it was renamed the University College, Dublin. At University he was educated by Father William Delany and Father Edmund Hogan among others. When Father Hogan produced his Onomasticon Goidelicum in 1910 Charles McNeill was mentioned for thanks among a small group of former students.[3]

Employment

On 20th December 1880 Charles McNeill entered the Irish Civil Service for a very brief career – he was still at University at the time. He got a job as a clerk in the Collector General of Rates for Dublin City. But Charles McNeill had no desire to be a pin pusher all his life – he had another mission. When the office was dissolved in 1893, Charles McNeill quickly acquired a right to the first of two Civil Service pensions. With this slender source of income Charles McNeill gave up recognised employment and devoted his life to the study and transcription of unpublished Irish manuscripts, particularly those relating to medieval history.[4]

1901 census

In 1901 Charles McNeill was living at Hazelbrook in Malahide with his mother, Rosetta; his aunt Marianne Spenser; and younger brother John MacNeill, then secretary of the Gaelic League and his wife Agnes MacNeill. In the return Charles gives his occupation as “Pensioner Collector General Office”.[5] In the census return the family spelt their name as McNeill but John would later use the surname of MacNeill. In the house and building return Charles McNeill was listed as head of the household while in the household return his mother Rosetta was head of the household. The house was rented from Mary Gaffney.[6] It was the McNeill home from 1893 to 1908.[7]

Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Two institutions formed an important part of Charles McNeill’s life, the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland and the Irish Manuscripts Commission. In 1890 Charles McNeill became a member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. The Society was founded in Kilkenny in 1854 as the Kilkenny Archaeological Society. Over the following years it changed its name a few times before moving to Dublin in 1890 and calling itself the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland.

On 27th January 1914 Charles McNeill attended the Annual General Meeting of the Royal Society of Antiquaries at the Society’s rooms at number 6 St. Stephen’s Green. Also attending as a fellow of the Society was R.A.S. Macalister, later member of the Irish Manuscripts Commission and editor of a number of works. Macalister was President of the Society from 1925 to 1928 and President of the Royal Irish Academy from 1925 to 1931. During the A.G.M. Charles McNeill, then of 19 Warrington Place, Dublin, was elected a fellow of the Society along with eight others. Charles McNeill was proposed by Robert Cochrane, a past President of the Society. Charles McNeill was in 1914 a member of the Council of the Society and attended five of the eleven meetings held that year.[8]

On 31st March 1914 Charles McNeill attended the Council meeting of the Society in St. Stephen’s Green. He was due to present his paper on ‘The Secular Jurisdiction of the Early Archbishops of Dublin’ but due to the lateness of the hour it was postponed the following meeting.[9] The paper was later published in the Society’s Journal in 1915 (Series 6, Vol. V, pp. 81-108, 1915).

During 1914 Charles McNeill became one of the two honorary general secretaries of the Society.[10] He would hold the position until 1920 and again for a short period in 1937 to meet a special emergency.[11]

By 1920 Charles McNeill was one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society representing the Ulster province. During 1920 Charles McNeill attended just three Council meetings out of fifteen held. This was not as bad as it seems as some other Vice-Presidents only attended one meeting. During that time Charles McNeill had been reducing his work load in the Society as he had stepped down as Honorary General Secretary. His successor, H.J. Leask, found the position too much and resigned in July 1920 to be replaced by W.G. Strickland. Charles McNeill was busy at that time processing the work he had done in Malta.

In 1921 Charles McNeill was able to give more time to the Society and attended a number of meetings. On 27th January 1921 Charles McNeill was one of the attendees the A.G.M. of the Society at 63 Merrion Square. On 5th July 1921 and on 13th December 1921 Charles McNeill was one of the attendees at the Quarterly General Meeting of the Society and took the chair for the Quarterly General Meeting held on 20th September 1921.[12]

Over the following years Charles McNeill continued to give time to the Royal Society of Antiquaries through publishing papers and attending meetings. Even when he was overseas Charles McNeill found time for the Society on his return. In 1931 he attended four out of ten meetings of the Council. This was the time when he was doing his major work at the Bodleian Library in Oxford. At that time Charles McNeill was still one of the Vice-Presidents of the Society – representing Leinster.[13] In 1951 the Society elected Charles McNeill as an Honorary Life Fellow for his service over sixty years and he in turn was ‘singularly gratified’ when the Society published his Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register.[14]

Early work on editing manuscripts

In the years between 1893 and 1914 Charles McNeill visited many libraries and archives in which he studied and transcribed some manuscripts. In this regard he was a self-taught scholar with no scientific and technical training but with a natural talent for the game he went on to search for the sources of Irish history. One of the manuscripts that he found was the Black Book of Dublin, more commonly known as Archbishop Alen’s Register. But his very elaborate calendar lay unpublished for nearly fifty years until in 1950 when the Royal Society of Antiquaries published the work as a public gratitude for all the help Charles McNeill gave the Society over the years.[15]

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For Charles McNeill it was a delight to see the work finally published but also a time of sadness because others who helped so much with it didn’t life to see the day. When Charles McNeill first applied to Most Reverend Dr. Peacock, then Archbishop of Dublin, to edit the manuscript the archbishop was delighted and readily gave permission. Charles McNeill regretted that the Archbishop didn’t live to receive a copy of the finished work. The death of the Diocesan Registrar, W.H. Robinson, was also one of regret to Charles for all the help he gave.[16]

During World War One Charles McNeill found time to publish his article on the secular authority of the medieval Archbishops of Dublin. In 1930 Herbert Wood described this article as a ‘valuable paper’ on the subject when Herbert edited the Court Book of the liberty of St. Sepulchre.[17] Charles McNeill also found time to help others with their work as in 1917 when he was consulted about the book on Howth castle and its owners, written by Elrington Ball.[18]

In January 1916 Charles McNeill also showed that his life was not just all about dusty old manuscripts when he read a paper on the New Gate of Dublin to the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (this was published in 1921 in the Society Journal, Sixth Series, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 152-165). The article had its origins in 1915 when Dublin Corporation knocked down an old house that extended over a narrow laneway between Corn Market and Thomas Street. The removed house exposed a circular tower which was part of the medieval New Gate and the later New Gate prison.[19] For many people the removal of an old house by the local authority would not make much difference in their lives but Charles McNeill it inspired him to explored the exposed ruins and search for its history.

Shortly after the end of World War One, Charles McNeill went to Malta. There he spent some weeks transcribing the many references to Irish houses among the records of the Knights of Malta (Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem). On returning to Ireland the work lay unpublished. Later Charles McNeill had the transcripts bound in a volume of fine leather and was one of his treasured possessions. After many years Irish Manuscripts Commission purchased the volume with the intention of having it published but it never happened. Instead the volume was deposited in the National Library where it is available for consultation.[20] In July 1958, after the death of Charles McNeill, the Irish Manuscripts Commission presented a typed copy of McNeill’s notes and abstracts from the Malta archive to the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. This was typed by Rev. Brendan Jennings and runs to over three hundred pages.[21]

The work of editing manuscripts

The job of editing a manuscript is a long and sometimes lonely endeavour that few see. The final published work is enjoyed by historians and acclaimed as a job well done by a few of these. But if an editor was less than perfect in transcribing or translating or relied too much on later copies of the manuscript for the text, a great host of people will pass a negative comment or two. Charles McNeill was very conscious of accessing the original manuscript or the earliest available copy if the original was no longer in existence.

Sometimes a copyist of a manuscript can be too quickly condemned as inaccurate, especially if the scribe says he worked from the original when in fact he merely transcribed from an early copy. The Trinity College copy of Archbishop Alen’s Register (referred to by the letter T and numbered MS 554 in the Library catalogue), was judged to be valueless by commentators like Rev. J.H. Bernard and Dr. H.J. Lawlor. But a later, seemingly valueless copy can be of use in suppling material for missing folios in the original. Charles McNeill found the scribe of the Trinity College MS (T) copy to be honest and had some merits.

In his own editing of the Archbishop Alen’s Register, Charles McNeill acknowledged the comments of earlier writers and commentators on the manuscript and its later copies. But he went back to the original manuscript, known as A1 and said that ‘allowing for its mutilations, we have all the original register, as well as additions by Alen’.[22]

Yet even Charles McNeill was liable to make errors and emissions. The difficulty of reading old handwriting where two words like numinum and immunium can only be distinguished from one another by the number of stokes makes errors unavoidable. In his work on the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis there were a number of such failings. In the 1960s, in preparation for her English translation of the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis, A.J. Otway-Ruthven made a list of these corrections and additions and had them published in Analecta Hibernica, Number 26 (1970), pages 73-87.

Work for the Irish Manuscripts Commission

The second great institution of Charles McNeill’s life was the Irish Manuscripts Commission. In the 1920s Charles McNeill’s brother, Eoin McNeill, campaigned for the establishment of the Irish Manuscripts Commission to promote public and institutional awareness of the need to preserve primary records and where possible, publish these records so that they would be available as the indispensable resource for historians. In November 1928 the Commission was founded and held its first meeting in January 1929.

In the early days of the Irish Manuscripts Commission, members of the Commission and others were invited to submit ideas on where the Commission could find Irish related manuscripts for publication. Richard Best was one of the founding members of the Irish Manuscripts Commission. While some of his colleagues favoured edited Irish language manuscripts or simply publishing pure texts, Richard Best had his eye on manuscripts relating to Ireland at the Bodleian library at Oxford. Edward Gwynn, another founding member of the Commission, also suggested a survey of Bodleian material. Charles McNeill was appointed by the Commission to examine these manuscripts.[23] In May 1930, Charles McNeill was living at Oxenford Hall, Oxford.[24] His work at Oxford produced a number of reports which appeared in a number of issues of Analecta Hibernica. The work at the Bodleian in Oxford was by far the greatest and most detailed inspection of manuscripts undertaken by the Irish Manuscripts Commission in its early years.[25]

Charles’s brother, James McNeill, was of the opinion that the work at Oxford, and also at Lambeth Palace, was too much for Charles to undertake alone and that he needed the help of a younger man who Charles could train in the work of inspection. Richard Best, on behalf of the Commission, said that an assisted, with a degree, could be got later on. James McNeill was unsatisfied with this and in 1929 enclosed £100 of his own income to help Charles McNeill to do the work at Oxford and London. As James asked Charles to take the money “in the interest of Ireland”.[26]

bodleian-librarys

Bodleian Library

In May 1929 Charles McNeill set off for Oxford with a letter of introduction to the Bodleian, a copy of the Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research dealing with editing documents and first class travelling expenses with a subsistence allowance for a first class civil servant and £30 a month remuneration. The initial stay was for two months with a later visit to Cambridge but instead the Oxford visit was extended into a three year labour of vast proportions and Cambridge never happened.[27]

The instructions given to Charles McNeill were without too many restrictions. He was given ‘considerable latitude’ and could ‘excise an independent judgement in dealing with the Manuscript collections’. He was allowed to include in his report anything new in the way of historical facts or items of unusual interest or peculiarities of spelling. It was up to the Commission to make a judgement on which documents should be printed in full or just noted in the report. For the most part the reports furnished by Charles McNeill were to in no way be regarded as ‘superseding the use of the documents themselves or as a substitute for publication at a later time’.[28] Of course as Robert Frost would say in his poem ‘Two roads diverged in a yellow wood … Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back’.[29] Charles McNeill did have the honour of seeing part of the collection mentioned in his reports making it to full publication such as the Registrum de Kilmainham (this was approved even before the first issue of Analecta Hibernica) but for the most part the reports of Charles McNeill formed the end of publishing for majority of the documents at the Bodleian.

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Charles McNeill began by examining the Rawlinson collection of manuscripts at the Bodleian before moving on to the Carte collection and the Fitzwilliam papers within the Carte collection. In this work Charles McNeill received some assistance from Miss Parker of Oxford with the Gerrard Papers within the Rawlinson collection. From May to October 1930 Charles McNeill examined the Fitzwilliam papers. These collections held numerous documents relating to Irish history and the reports on same filled many of the pages in the first three issues of Analecta Hibernica.[30] After the Fitzwilliam papers Charles McNeill examined other collections in the Bodleian such as the Chichester Papers, Nairne Papers and the Letter-Book of Sir John Perrot.[31]

Although Charles McNeill was kept busy with manuscripts at Oxford he could still see a world beyond the colleges and spires. Charles McNeill had ideas about examining Irish related documents on the Continent. In February 1931 he wrote to the Irish Manuscripts Commission about a survey of documents in the Vatican Archives.[32] Such a survey didn’t happen under his watch but one was later done by Leonard Boyle. The secretary of the Irish Manuscripts Commission was unimpressed with such ideas and in January 1931 pressed Charles McNeill to return his proof for publication ‘as soon as possible as Mr. Blythe (Finance minister) has got worried about our slackness in issuing publication’.[33]

Meanwhile Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 was issued containing more survey material by Charles McNeill in Oxford. The issue was well received. Charles wrote to his brother John MacNeill, Chairman of the Irish Manuscripts Commission, that the issue ‘comes out very well and has made a good impression here (England). I have heard it approved beyond the English Historical Commission’s work for its general appearance, type and paper’.[34]

Shortly afterwards the Irish Manuscripts Commission was invited by G. Wentworth Fitzwilliam to examining the Fitzwilliam Papers at Milton. Charles McNeill had seen the Fitzwilliam papers which form part of the Carte Manuscripts at the Bodleian and reported that there ‘importance for Elizabethan policy in the period leading up to Hugh O’Neill’s war becomes daily more evident’.[35] Charles McNeill was dispatched to report of the collection from 10th to 13th October 1931 and a report was published in 1932.[36] Charles McNeill continued work on the Fitzwilliam collection after 1931 and in 1936 it was questioned by the Department of Finance why he was being paid a fee by the Irish Manuscripts Commission for the work.[37]

By 1932 Charles McNeill desired to return to Ireland and in that year he examined and reported on a collection of seventeenth century documents deposited in the library of the King’s Inns, Dublin, by J.P. Prendergast. In about September 1932 Charles McNeill found time to run across town and examine the Harris Collection in the National Library, Dublin.[38] A report of the Harris Collection was published in 1934.

Editor of books published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission

In 1931 the Irish Manuscripts Commission published the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis under the editorship of Charles McNeill. Louis P. Roche collated the text and compiled the index. The Liber Primus is the most ancient record held by Kilkenny Corporation and was deposited at the Irish Manuscripts Commission office while McNeill worked on it.[39] In 1961 A.J. Otway-Ruthven edited an English translation of the Liber Primus that was based on the edited produced by Charles McNeill with some corrections and additions.[40]

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In 1932 the Irish Manuscripts Commission published another volume of work by Charles McNeill. This was the Registrum de Kilmainham and it was a product of his work in Oxford. The main source for the text was taken from the Rawlinson manuscripts at the Bodleian Library.[41] Other manuscripts that Charles McNeill saw among the Rawlinson Manuscripts at the Bodleian formed the work of later publications. These included Raw. Ms. B.498 (The Register of St. John’s without the New Gate, Dublin, edited by Eric St. John Brooks, I.M.C. 1936), Raw. Ms. B.504 (Register of Tristernagh, edited by Maud Clarke, I.M.C. 1943), and Raw. Ms. B.499 (Copinger’s Transcript of 1526, unpublished). Charles McNeill also saw material relating to Ireland from the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries within the collection known as the ‘Miscellany of Chancery’.[42]

While all this examination and publication of manuscripts was going on, Charles McNeill found time to help others. In 1932 Canon Patrick Power produced an edition of Crichad an Chaoilli with an introduction, translation and notes. In the introduction Canon Power acknowledge the help he had received from Charles McNeill among others.[43]

In 1935 and 1936, Charles McNeill was living at number 7 Pembroke Road, Dublin.[44] In early 1936 Charles McNeill was appointed to a committee consisting of Liam Price, Richard Best and Dr. Con Curran to report on the Public Record Office of Ireland. At the end of 1936 the committee reported that the government should look beyond the destruction of 1922 and see that the modern state records were properly preserved. They recommended the transfer of public documents from all Government departments to the P.R.O.I. on the basis that it was an ‘essential idea of any Public Record Office that it should be a repository of all official documents’. They recommended two departments – one to keep current documents and another for archive material of a historical nature. But the report was just filed away and nothing happened for another five decades.[45]

In the mid-1930s the Irish Manuscripts Commission looked to Spain as a possibly area for surveying and editing of Irish related material. Charles McNeill was the recommended person to go to Spain and was due to leave after the summer of 1936. But in July 1936 the Spanish civil war began and the project was scrapped. In 1939 the project was revisited and Joseph Healy, a lecturer in Spanish at U.C.C., was sent to Spain and made a short report.[46]

In the last years of the 1930s Charles McNeill was at work with a number of different projects including an edition of A Light to the Blind. This manuscript was recently acquired by the National Library from the Earl of Fingall. Sir John Gilbert had published a part of the manuscript in 1892 but the McNeill edition didn’t make it to the printing press.[47]

World War Two and receiving honours

Before 1940, Charles McNeill was at work editing the Tanner Letters along with the Dowdall/Peppard manuscripts. The advent of World War Two placed many restrictions on editors and publishers. Yet despite the restrictions of wartime the Irish Manuscripts Commission continued to publish many works including seven issues of Analecta Hibernica and twenty-one volumes of other works which included the Tanner Letters in 1943 at the height of World War Two.[48] James Hogan described the Tanner Letters as containing ‘many documents of capital importance, belonging to the reigns of Elizabeth and James 1’.[49]

The Dowdall/Peppard collection, housed at the National Library of Ireland, represented an important archive giving a history of land in Co. Louth from the thirteenth century to modern times. The War stopped this work as for safety most of the Dublin libraries and archives deposited their important collections in various places in the countryside – the memory of the Four Courts fire of 1922 was too fresh for comfort. After the War, A.J. Otway-Ruthven and Rev. Aubrey Gwynn completed the editing process of the Dowdall papers. In 1960 the Dowdall Deeds were eventually published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission.[50]

In 1946 Charles McNeill received an honorary doctorate from the National University of Ireland along with R.C. Simington, a member of the Irish Manuscripts Commission and chief editor of the Civil Survey project. The reason for giving the doctorate was for his lifelong devotion to ‘painstaking and most fruitful research in Irish history’. It was said that the I.M.C. was ‘singularly fortunate in having at its service his exceptional equipment in all branches of MSS material’.[51]

Death and legacy

On 25th January 1958 Charles McNeill died when he was nearly ninety-six years old. His legacy in over seventy years of service for Irish historians was to produce much material that would otherwise by difficult to access. An obituary for Charles McNeill was written by Aubrey Gwynn in the publications of the two organisations that had been so apart of his life, namely the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland for that Society and in Analecta Hibernica for the Irish Manuscripts Commission.[52] As for the man, this is what Aubrey Gwynn had to say about his friend – ‘Today we salute his name and his achievement, with many pleasant and grateful memories of that dry sense of humour and those half-cynical, half-serious comments which made conversation with Charles McNeill a stimulating experience even in his last years’.[53]

The Published Writings of Charles McNeill

In the obituary for Charles McNeill, written by Audrey Gwynn, a full listing of his published works was left out and just the main items were mentioned. The list below is an attempt to record the writings of Charles McNeill. It is most likely that not everything he wrote is mentioned below but ‘Rome wasn’t built in a day’ as they say.

 

1912

The affinities of Irish Romanesque architecture in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. II, pp. 140-147, 1912

1915

The secular jurisdiction of the early Archbishops of Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland , Ser. 6, Vol. V, pp. 81-108, 1915

1919

The chalices of the West Convent, Galway in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. IX, pp. 187-188, 1919

1920

Remarks on the walls and church of Athenry in Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, Vol. XI, pp. 132-141, 1920-21

1921

New Gate, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XI, pp. 152-165, 1921

1922

Monaincha, Co. Tipperary: historical notes. With architectural notes on the church by Harold G. Leask and some remarks by H. S. Crawford in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. X, pp. 19-35, 1920; Vol. XII, p. 81, 1922

Accounts of sums realised by sales of chattels of some suppressed Irish monasteries in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XII, pp. 11-37, 1922

1923

The Suppression Commission of 1539 and religious houses in Co. Louth, 1539 in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), pp. 161-165

The De Verdons and the Draycots in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), pp. 166-172

Butler’s Journal (scholia to J. Deane’s article in last year’s Journal), in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 3 (1923), p. 227

1924

The Hospitallers at Kilmainham and their guests in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XIV, pp. 15-30, 1924

Professor Curtis on Mediaeval Ireland: being a review of Edmund Curtis’ “Mediaeval Ireland from 1110 to 1513” in The Irish Monthly, Vol. LII, pp. 249-259, May, 1924

Some early documents relating to English Uriel and towns of Drogheda and Dundalk 1, the Draycott family; II, The grants to the Hospital of St. John, Thomas Street, Dublin, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume V number 4 (1924), pp. 270-277

1925

The Lumbard inscription in Christ Church, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XV, pp. 1-5, 1925

Hospital of St. John Without the New Gate, Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XV, pp. 58-64, 1925 [Republished in H.B. Clarke (ed.), Medieval Dublin: the living city (Blackrock, 1990), pp. 77-82]

Castletown and Roche, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume VI number 1 (1925), pp. 1-2

History of the Irish State to 1014 by Alice Stopford Green, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 55, pp. 502-505, September 1925

Vicissitudes of an Anglo-Irish family 1530-1800 by Philip H. Bagenal, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 55, pp. 505-508, September 1925

Cleanings from Irish history by William F. T. Butler reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XIV, No. 56, pp. 679-681, December, 1925

1926

Dolmen in Glenasmole, Co. Dublin in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XVI, pp. 122-123, 1926

The monastery of St. Mochaoi of Nendrum by H. C. Lawlor, foreword by R. A. S. Macalister; reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XV, No. 58, pp. 335-338, June, 1926

1927

Notes on the Liber Primus Kilkenniensis in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 6, Vol. XVII, pp. 21-38, pp. 138-149, 1927

The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921 by F. Elrington Ball, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XVI, pp. 346-347, June, 1927

A short bibliography of Irish archaeology, in the Journal of the Bibliographical Society of Ireland, Vol. 3, Issue 10, 16 pages

1928

Some Drogheda gilds and properties, in County Louth Archaeological and Historical Journal, volume VI number 4 (1928), pp. 239-246

1930

Publications of Irish interest published by Irish Authors on the Continent of Europe prior to the Eighteenth century, in the Journal of the Bibliographical Society of Ireland, Vol. 4 (1930), pp. 3-41

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: recent acquisitions, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 1-11

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 12-117

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class B), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), pp. 118-178

1931

Liber primus Kilkenniensis, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1931)

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class C), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 1-43

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class D), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 44-92

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Lord Chancellor Gerrard’s Notes of his Report on Ireland, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 93-291

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 3 (1931), pp. 151-21

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class D), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), pp. 219-224

1932

Registrum de Kilmainham: register of chapter acts of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem in Ireland, 1326-50, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1932)

Report on Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford: Rawlinson Manuscripts (Class A), in Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. 1-9

Fitzwilliam Manuscripts at Milton, England, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. 287-326

1933

“La Sculpture Irlandaise pendant les douze premiers siècles de l’Ère Chrétienne” par Françoise Henry, reviewed by Charles McNeill in Studies: an Irish quarterly review, Vol. XXII, pp. 499-503, September, 1933

1934

Harris: Collectanea de Rebus Hibernicis, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 6 (1934), pp. 248-450

1935

Sepulchral slab, Kilcorban Church, Co. Galway in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 7, Vol. V, p. 325, p. 327, 1935

1938

Copies of Down Survey Maps in private keeping, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 8 (1938), pp. 419-427

1940

Notes on Dublin Castle in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Ser. 7, Vol. X, pp. 194-199, 1940

1943

The Tanner Letters, edited by Charles McNeill (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1943)

‘The Perrot papers’, Analecta Hibernica, 12 (1943), pp. 3-65

1950

Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534, edited by Charles McNeill (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1950)

1960

Dowdall Deeds, edited by Charles McNeill and A.J. Otway-Ruthven (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1960)

 

Manuscripts of unpublished material

Extracts made by Dr. C. McNeill in the 1930s from the Prendergast Papers in Kings Inns dealing with the Cromwellian, Restoration and Revolution Eras, = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Extracts and notes from the archives of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem at Valetta (Malta) concerning Irish and British members of, and connections with the Order, = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Letter of Charles McNeill to Lord Walter FitzGerald enclosing extracts re the Earl of Kildare from The Lismore Papers ed. by Alexander Grosart, also notes on Coillach, Co. = Archive: Dublin: National Library of Ireland

Research notes of Charles McNeill relating to history and archaeology = Archive: Dublin: University College Dublin: Archives Department

Correspondence, notebooks and miscellaneous papers of Charles McNeill, M.R.I.A., including transcripts of manuscripts in the Bodleian Library = Archive: Maynooth: St. Patricks College Library

 

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to acknowledge the obituary of Charles McNeill that was written by Aubrey Gwynn as a framework for this article.

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eoin_MacNeill accessed on 1 October 2016

[3] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[4] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, pp. 185, 186

[5] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003669802/ accessed on 1 October 2016

[6] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003669800/ accessed on 1 October 2016

[7] http://digital.ucd.ie/view-media/ivrla:35427/multi#e297ee7e-c72d-4cb7-92da-161e41164ce8 accessed on 1 October 2016

[8] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, pp. 84, 86; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the Irish Manuscripts Commission (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2009), p. 170

[9] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, p. 98

[10] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. IV, 1914, p. 100

[11] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[12] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 85, 89, 90, 100, 189, 191

[13] Proceedings in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 7, Vol. II, 1932, pp. 127, 135

[14] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

[15] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 186

[16] Charles McNeill (ed.), Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534 (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1950), p. xii

[17] Herbert Wood (ed.), Court Book of the Liberty of St. Sepulchre within the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Dublin (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Dublin, 1930), p. viii, note 2

[18] http://rsai.soutron.net/Library/Catalogues/Results.aspx?RetName=2 accessed on 1 October 2016

[19] Charles McNeill, ‘New Gate, Dublin’, in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, Series 6, Vol. X, 1921, pp. 152, 153

[20] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 186

[21] http://rsai.soutron.net/Library/Catalogues/Results.aspx?RetName=2 accessed on 1 October 2016

[22] Charles McNeill (ed.), Calendar of Archbishop Alen’s Register, c. 1172-1534, p. x

[23] Analecta Hibernica, No. 23 (1966), p. xv; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 24

[24] https://www.ria.ie/sites/default/files/upton-catalogue-sp-list-a008.pdf accessed on 1 October 2016

[25] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 39

[26] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 40

[27] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 40

[28] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 1 (1930), p. vi

[29] http://www.bartleby.com/119/1.html accessed on 1 October 2016

[30] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 2 (1931), p. vi

[31] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 3 (1931), p. v

[32] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 22

[33] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 51

[34] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 50

[35] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[36] Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), pp. v, 287

[37] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 70

[38] Analecta Hibernica, No. 4 (1932), p. v; Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[39] Charles McNeill (ed.), Liber Primus Kilkenniensis (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1931), pp. iv, viii

[40] A.J. Otway-Ruthven (ed.), Liber Primus Kilkenniensis (Kilkenny, 1961), p. 4

[41] Charles McNeill (ed.), Register de Kilmainham (Stationery Office, Dublin, 1932), pp. title page, xvi

[42] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 41

[43] Canon Patrick Power (ed.), Crichad an Chaoilli (Cork University Press, 1932), p. viii

[44] https://www.ria.ie/sites/default/files/upton-catalogue-sp-list-a008.pdf accessed on 1 October 2016

[45] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 75

[46] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 76

[47] Eoin MacNeill & James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, Analecta Hibernica, No. 8 (1938), p. iv

[48] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., p. 85

[49] James Hogan, The Irish Manuscripts Commission (Cork University Press, 1954), p. 19

[50] James Hogan, ‘Introduction’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 18 (1951), p. vii; James Lydon (ed.), England and Ireland in the Later Middle Ages: Essays in honour of Jocelyn Otway-Ruthven (Irish Academic Press, Blackrock, 1981), p. 258

[51] Michael Kennedy & Deirdre McMahon, Reconstructing Ireland’s past: A history of the I.M.C., pp. 102, 103

[52] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185-187; Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 22, 1960, pp. xv-xvi

[53] Aubrey Gwynn, ‘Obituary for Dr. Charles McNeill’, in The J.R.S.A.I., Vol. 88, Part II, 1958, p. 185

Standard
Offaly History

Lloyd family of Gloster House, Co. Offaly

Lloyd family of Gloster House, Co. Offaly

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Gloster House and estate lies on the east side of the road between Roscrea, Co. Tipperary and Birr, Co. Offaly. It is situated in the civil parish of Ettagh which contains about 6,500 acres. The name of Gloster is said to be a deviation of Glasderrymore which means big green oak wood. In the time of King James 1st the Medhop family were granted the estate by royal patent.[1]

Medhop family of Gloster House

The earliest mention of Edmond Medhop (also spelt Midhop) is from January 1615 when King James wrote to the Lord Deputy of Ireland, Chichester, that Edmund Medhop should have a lease of unspecified Irish crown lands for 60 years. In November 1615 Edmond Medhop was appointed clerk of the Irish House of Commons.[2] Over the following years Edmond Medhop acquired other government jobs in Ireland such as clerk of the pleas at the Exchequer. He continued to acquire leases of crown property or as a grantee of concealed lands. Edmond Medhop also managed lands grants for his brother-in-law Sir Francis Annesley, Lord Mountnorris and the Villiers family.[3]

In October 1622 Edmond Medhop was recorded as paying £50 as a fine to the government for land in Ely O’Carroll as part of the plantation of that region. The region of Ely O’Carroll covers the area of south Offaly and north Tipperary. In 1619 Edmund Medhop acquired 500 acres with 135 acres of waste land in Ely O’Carroll as part of the plantation and was to pay £6 10s 7½d in rent to the government. As part of the plantation conditions undertakers of land less than 500 acres were to build a good house of stone or brick with lime. Edmund Medhop began building the stone house but died before completion and his widow finished the job.[4] This could have been the early building of Gloster House.

gloster-house-early-photo

A 19th century photo of Gloster House

Elsewhere in Ely O’Carroll Edmund Medhop held the towns of Tromragh and Moynrath by letters patent in 1621 but only briefly as by 1622 Samuel Downing had purchased the towns. Edmund Medhop got the towns from Richard Cosby who acquired same in 1608. It seems that Edmund Medhop died in 1622 as his widow was recorded as holding his property in Ely O’Carroll. She was recorded as one of only two resident undertakers – the rest lived away from their new estates.[5]

Elsewhere, in Ireland, Edmund Medhop had acquired other property. Under the Wexford plantation begun in 1617 Edmund Medhop was recorded as an undertaker of 1,000 acres paying a rent to the government of £5 6s 8d per year.[6]

By 1639 Francis Medhop of Gloster and Tonagh, King’s County (Offaly) had a daughter as his sole heir, Margaret Rose Medhop.[7] In 1639 Trevor Lloyd married Margaret Rose Medhop, heiress of the estate, and thus began an association which lasted until 1958.[8] Francis Medhop was still alive in 1640 and 1641 when he made a bond with Lady Anne Parsons of Birr Castle.[9] In 1641 Francis Medhop held the townlands of Ballkeelinbeg and Ballykeelinmore in the parish of Shinrone along with the townlands of Lisnabrony and Balleculline in Kilmurry parish. Francis Medhop continued to hold these lands into the 1670s.[10]

Trevor Lloyd, 1st of his family at Gloster

Trevor Lloyd was the third son of Evan Lloyd of Bodidris, Co. Denbighshire, by Mary, the daughter and co-heir of Sir Richard Trevor of Allington, Denbighshire. Evan Lloyd was a captain-general in the army of Charles 1st in Ireland. The Lloyd family had an estate at Bodidris for many generations. Evan’s grandfather was Sir Evan Lloyd, husband of Elizabeth Mostyn. Sir Evan Lloyd’s great grandfather was David Lloyd of Bodidris, son of Tudor ap Ienen, 3rd son of Ievan ap Llwellyn. The family claimed descent from Cadrod Hard, a prince of Anglesey in the tenth century.[11]

Trevor Lloyd served as a captain in the army of Charles 1st but this did not cause him much discomfort in the Civil War and subsequent Republican government. During the Cromwellian period (1649-1660), Trevor Lloyd acquired additional property. After the Restoration of Charles II, Trevor Lloyd received further lands.[12] In the 1660s he acquired 142 acres of the land formerly belonging to Donagh McGillefoyle in Kilmurry parish.[13] In 1672 he was included with many people inside and outside King’s County (Offaly) to act in a general commission of the peace in the county.[14]

Like many people after 1660 Trevor Lloyd was involved in the army. In July 1662 Trevor Lloyd was listed as a cornet in the troop of horse under the command of Mark Trevor.[15] In November 1664 Trevor Lloyd was cornet in the horse troop of Viscount Dungannon. By March 1675 Trevor Lloyd was a Lieutenant in the horse troop of Captain Edward Brabazon. In August 1677 Captain Henry Boyle was captain of the horse troop which was based at Tallow, Co. Waterford. By June 1682 Trevor Lloyd was a Captain and in charge of his own foot company of 76 soldiers.[16]

In 1685 the late Major Trevor Lloyd was listed as in a foot company. In company with the changes in the military command in Ireland after the accession of King James II, Trevor Lloyd was replaced by Major William Dorrington.[17]

Medhop Lloyd

In 1685 Trevor Lloyd died and was succeed at Gloster house by his son Medhop Lloyd. A second son, Trevor Lloyd, faded out of the history books.[18] In 1696 Medhop Lloyd married Hannah Lovett, a daughter of Christopher Lovett, a former Lord Mayor of Dublin. The couple had fourteen children but only one; Trevor Lloyd lived to leave any descendants.[19]

Trevor Lloyd and building Gloster House

By the marriage the Lloyd family became connected with one of the leading architects of early eighteenth century Ireland, Sir Edward Lovett-Pearce (c. 1690-1733). Sir Edward’s mother was Frances Lovett, daughter of Christopher Lovett. In the 1720s Trevor Lloyd, only surviving son of Medhop Lloyd, decided to enlarge and embellish the old Gloster House. Sir Edward Lovett-Pearce was employed to do the job and in so doing created one of the finest country houses of its day. Some writers have suggested that Sir Edward Lovett-Pearce may have drawn up the plans for the house but that local builders actually did the work. This maybe so but as a cousin of Trevor Lloyd it is possible that Sir Edward paid one or two visits to Gloster to see his cousins and the works. The land in Ettagh parish is a rich loam and good for tillage which made the Gloster estate a wealthy place to afford a fine house.[20]

gloster-house

Gloster House from the south lawn 

If Gloster House was the work of Sir Edward Lovett-Pearce, the situation of the house is more like what Sir John Vanbrugh would do. Usually a grand house has a long avenue to build up the excitement of visiting a large house. But Gloster House is approach by a short avenue from the west. The impression given by the short avenue with trees on each side and with a moderate house seen at the end is of a small estate. But then you come out of the trees and round the corner and bang! – Gloster House hits you with the unexpected majesty of its construction – that is so typical Vanbrugh. Keep the visitors guessing as to what they are going to see and then surprise them is a hallmark of Vanbrugh’s work. This arrangement at Gloster House is not surprising as the grandmother of Sir Edward Lovett-Pearce was Mary Carleton and her sister, Elizabeth, married Giles Vanbrugh, the father of the great architect, Sir John Vanbrugh. It is said that Edward Lovett-Pearce worked for a time under Sir John Vanbrugh before setting out on his own career.[21]

On Tuesday, 13th June 1749 John Wesley preached in the new house. John Wesley wrote of visit that “We rode over to Gloster, a beautiful seat, built by an English gentleman who had scarce finished his house and had laid his gardens, when he was called to his everlasting home. Sir Laurence Parsons and his lady dined with us. About five, I preached in the stately saloon to a little company of plain serious people. The fine ones looked on, and some of them seemed to be a little affected”. It seems that John Wesley was also not so affected by Gloster’s charms as he failed to visit the place in 1750 when he was in Birr and Roscrea. The local Methodist community established more securely by other preachers remained small compared to the Church of Ireland community.[22]

Trevor Lloyd of Gloster House married Henrietta, daughter of James Waller, of Castletown, Co. Limerick. James Waller was a descendant of Sir Hardress Waller, Governor of Limerick during the Commonwealth, and thus the name Hardress came into the Lloyd family. Trevor and Henrietta Lloyd had three sons and one daughter, namely: John, Hardress, and Waller Lloyd who married Lovat Ashe of Ashgrove, Co. Tipperary. The only daughter, Rose, married Alexander Saunderson, of Castle Saunderson, Co. Cavan. Trevor Lloyd made his will in January 1733 and this was proved in January 1747. He was succeeded at Gloster House by his eldest son, John Lloyd.[23]

John Lloyd

John Lloyd of Gloster served as M.P. for King’s County (Offaly) from 1768 until 1790, and subsequently for the borough of Inistiogue in Co. Kilkenny. It seems that John Lloyd was left to his own judgement in the Dublin Parliament. In September 1780 the Grand Jury of King’s County wrote to the two county M.P.s that they were free to vote without any instructions from their constituents. In 1782 (against Grattan’s Parliament) and in 1798 John Lloyd supported the government and the Earl of Rosse. But in 1787 he was placed among the doubtful M.P.s and under the patronage of Lord Lansdowne. By 1799 John Lloyd had moved into the opposition benches as he was against the Act of Union.[24]

At a local level John Lloyd had to deal with the troubled times of the 1790s with armed factions travelling the countryside and the 1798 rebellion. On Ash Wednesday 1797 a man called Thomas Doolan was shot in his own home by the Ribbon Society. On 23rd October 1798 John Lloyd, as the local magistrate, heard the evidence of the murder. Later two or three people were hanged for the crime. Attempts to organise a rebellion in 1798 in the Shinrone area came to nothing because of a heavy clamp down by the Shinrone and Dunkerrin Yeomenry.[25]

In 1777 John Lloyd married Jane, youngest daughter and co-heir (with her sisters, Anne, wife of Rev. Abraham Symes, D.D., and Alice, wife of Samuel Hayes, of Avondale) of Thomas Le Hunt, 5th son of George le Hunt of Artramont, Co. Wexford.[26]

John and Jane Lloyd had five sons and two daughters, namely; Hardress, Trevor (died 1796), Thomas (died unmarried in 1813), Evan (died unmarried), and John Lloyd. The latter in May 1822 married Martha, daughter of William Peisley Vaughan, of Golden Grove, King’s County (Offaly) and in the same parish of Ettagh as Gloster House. Martha was the sister and heir of William Peisley Vaughan. They had an only daughter and an heir, Mary Vaughan Lloyd who married Samuel Dawson Hutchinson, of Mount Heaton. Samuel Hutchinson subsequently assumed the surname of Lloyd-Vaughan and died in 1845, leaving an only son, William Peisley Hutchinson Lloyd-Vaughan of Golden Grove, who in 1899 was heir-general and representative of the Lloyd family of Gloster House.[27]

The two daughters of John and Jane Lloyd of Gloster were Alice and Harriet. The latter married Rev. King of Ballylin. On 5th April 1797 John Lloyd’s daughter, Alice, married Lawrence Parsons, 2nd Earl of Rosse, of Birr Castle. The marriage between Alice and Lawrence formalized the friendly link which had existed between the two families for the previous century. Alice Lloyd was the mother of the 3rd Earl, the famous scientist/mathematician and designer who built a telescope in Birr. This telescope remained the largest in the world until the end of the nineteenth century.[28] As part of the marriage settlement the Parsons family and Lloyd family managed a jointed estate in the Shinrone area including the village.[29]

Hardress Lloyd

John Lloyd of Gloster House was succeeded by his eldest son Hardress Lloyd who was born in the 1780s. In 1807 Hardress Lloyd was elected as the junior M.P. for King’s County (Offaly). The senior M.P. was Thomas Bernard who was first elected in 1802 and served until his defeat in 1832. In the uncontested 1807 election Hardress Lloyd received endorsement from Sir Arthur Wellesley, then Chief Secretary of Ireland, towards his election.[30] Hardress Lloyd only served as M.P. until 1818 when he was succeeded by John Parsons.[31]

upper-gallery-at-gloster-house

Upper gallery at Gloster House

It is possible that Hardress Lloyd would have stayed on longer as an M.P. but for the pressure from the Parson family. As early as March 1809 the Parson family were upset at Lloyd’s voting record. On 17th March 1809 Hardress Lloyd had voted against the Duke of York and followed the opposition in two separate divisions. In December 1816 the rumour mills were circulating a story that Hardress Lloyd would no contest the next election. John Lloyd said it was for his son to decide if he should continue as M.P. By February 1817 the Parson family were putting pressure on Hardress Lloyd to vacate the seat for John Parsons.[32]

Later Hardress Lloyd became a magistrate and Deputy Lieutenant for King’s County (Offaly). He was also a magistrate for County Tipperary.[33] Hardress Lloyd was a Lieutenant- Colonel in the South Down Regiment of Militia and was known as Colonel Hardress Lloyd.[34]

Hardress Lloyd would need all his military skills in September 1828 as a large crowd of Greenboys and Greengirls converged upon Shinrone village. At that time Shinrone had a large Protestant population and a very active Orange Lodge. It was feared that a great bloodbath would occur if the march proceeded. Two Catholic priests travelled at breakneck speed throughout the surrounding district and stopped the vast majority of the marchers. Meanwhile Lord Oxmantown had brought police and soldiers to Shinrone to resist the march and aid the local Orangemen. Colonel Lloyd arrived upon the village and succeeded in reducing the desire for a battle among the Orangemen and soldiers. The march that never happened persuaded the Duke of Wellington that Catholic Emancipation could no longer be blocked and it passed the following year.[35]

In the years 1845-50 the Great Famine struck Ireland. The Famine was worst along the western seaboard counties but the area around Gloster House did not go untouched. Between 1841 and 1861 the population of the area fell by half. The blight first struck in 1845 but really started to impact on people’s lives in 1846 when most of the potato crop failed. Relief committees were established to help the worst affected people. In May 1846 a relief committee was established at Shinrone under the chairmanship of Colonel Hardress Lloyd of Gloster House and a relief fund was opened.[36]

In King’s County (Offaly) many landlords were non-resident absentees and the level of landlord commitment towards local improvement varied highly.[37] The majority of the local landlords around Shinrone and the district were humane and gave generously. Among the foremost of these “good” landlords was Colonel Hardress Lloyd of Gloster House. He not only assisted the poor on his own estate but helped in the greater district. Colonel Lloyd was also against the continued export of corn out of Ireland while the people were dying by the thousand. Unless the corn trade was stopped an even greater famine would ensue. But the cattle and the corn continued to be exported and the people went on dying. For many people the workhouse offered the only hope of survival. The chief local workhouse was at Roscrea where a building intended for 700 people had over 2,000 people at the peak. Colonel Hardress Lloyd was often elected chairman of the Roscrea Poor Law Union which managed and funded the workhouse.[38]

With the normal conditions of life breaking down due to the effects of the Great Famine, the number of crimes against property and people went on the increase. As a local magistrate Colonel Hardress Lloyd oversaw the law as it took on the criminals. Some people did get imprisonment for crimes committed while at other times they were released. A man named Clennens was release after he was caught with suspected stolen property from a forge at Shinrone. Colonel Lloyd gave the character references for his release.[39]

The mystery Hardress Lloyd

Within the Rosse archive at Birr Castle and also among the Earl of Rosse papers at the National Library (MS.13885) there are documents relating to the financial affairs of Captain Hardress Lloyd. In 1823-5 Captain Hardress Lloyd is described as deceased. It is not clear how this Hardress Lloyd is related to the Lloyd family of Gloster but his forename would suggest some certain relationship.[40]

John Lloyd

Colonel Hardress Lloyd died unmarried in 1860 and was succeeded at Gloster House by his natural son, John Lloyd.[41] In 1863 John Lloyd was in discussions with the 3rd Earl of Rosse on the partition of an estate near Shinrone. This estate was part of the marriage settlement of Alicia (Alice) Lloyd to Lawrence Parsons in 1797.[42] In 1866 John Lloyd of Gloster House was made High Sheriff of King’s County (Offaly). John Lloyd was also a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant of King’s County.[43] In 1867 John Lloyd became a member of the First Drainage Board for a Parliament approved drainage scheme around Parsonstown (Birr).[44]

By 1876 the large estate around Gloster House was estimated at 4,536 acres and worth £1.474.[45] John Lloyd owned another 92 acres over the border in Co. Tipperary.[46] In County Offaly the three big landlords, with over 20,000 acres were the Parsons of Birr, the Charlevilles of Tullamore and the Digbys of Geashill. Two other landlords, the Bernards of Castletown and the Marquis of Downshire estate around Edenderry had over 10,000 acres each. The Lloyds of Gloster were included among the about 40 landlords with over 2,000 acres.[47] A substantial part of the Gloster estate was farmed directly by the Lloyd family which caused later resentment by the Land League and the United Irish League who campaigned for a fairer distribution of the land.[48]

On 14th November 1872, John Lloyd married Susannah Frances Julia (died 1886), 2nd daughter of John Thomas Rosborough Colclough, of Tintern Abbey, Co. Wexford. They had three sons and four daughters before John’s death on 26th January 1883 at the age of fifty. The children were: John Hardress (born 14th August 1874), Evan Colclough (b. 4th January 1877), Llewellyn Wilfrid Medhop (b. 27th July 1879), Mary Louisa Arthurina Gwendoline Colclough (b. 28th August 1873), Susan Frederica Lillian May (b. 4th September 1875), Alice Maude Josephine (b. 14th April 1878) and Myrtle Susan Lloyd (b. 9th August 1883).[49] As can be seen Myrtle Lloyd was born after the death of her father. It is also interesting to note that most of the children were born in August or shortly before and after that month – John and Susannah Lloyd enjoyed the December festivities.

Evan Colclough Lloyd served in the army and attained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Irish Regiment. He fought in the Boer War (1899-1902) and in World War One when he was three times mentioned in dispatches. In March 1916, he married Mary (d. 27th October 1968), 2nd daughter of Sir Heffernan Considine of Pallasgreen, co Limerick, and died 28th February 1945, leaving one son, Evan Trevor Lloyd.[50]

Llewellyn Medhop Lloyd also served in the Boer War and in World War One (in the Royal Navy Reserve and the Royal Air Force). He was a major in the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. On 28th September 1915, he married Linda (d. 17th June 1963), daughter of John Craig, of London, and dies in March 1957 leaving a son, Hardress Llewellyn Lloyd who served for many years in the Royal Navy. Hardress Lloyd married Suzanna Turnpenny and had two sons (John and Andrew) and one daughter (Kathryn).[51]

John Hardress Lloyd

In January 1883 John Hardress Lloyd succeeded his father to Gloster House. He would become the last Lloyd of direct descent to hold Gloster House. It would that the estate was in good condition in the early 1880s. In 1882 a total of 209 Offaly landlords applied for government financial support to offset accumulated rent arrears. The Gloster House estate claimed no problem with rent arrears at that time and didn’t apply for government support.[52] As John Hardress Lloyd was a minor when he succeeded his father the estate was managed by his cousin William Peisley Hutchinson Lloyd-Vaughan of Golden Grove.[53]

1901 census

In the 1901 census John’s sisters were in charge of Gloster House as he was overseas, fighting in the Boer War. Gwendeline Lloyd (aged 27) was the head of the household. She was joined in the house by her sisters, Lilian Lloyd Cotegrave (aged 25 and married), Alys Lloyd (aged 22), Myrtle Lloyd (aged 17), and by her niece, Perriwinkle Cotegrave (aged one). They were all members of the Church of Ireland as was their visitor, Thomas Cradock (aged 50), an agent.

front-hall-gloster-house

Main entrance hall at Gloster House

There were five servants in Gloster House of whom four were Roman Catholics. They were Maria Nolan (aged 40, cook, born Co. Wexford), Sarah Cahill (aged 27, housemaid, born King’s County), Ellen Fogarty (aged 21, kitchen maid, born Co. Tipperary), and Patrick O’Brien (aged 19, domestic servant, born Co. Waterford). The Church of Ireland servant was Jenie Dawn (aged 37, nurse, born in England).[54] Away from the big house there were other servants living in houses rented from the Lloyd family. Timothy Delany junior was a gardener while his two brothers were agricultural labourers working at Gloster House. Richard Cole lived in another house and was the estate steward. He came from County Carlow. Other people living in Glasderry More townland, in which Gloster House was situated, also possibly worked on the estate.

In 1901 Gloster House was described as twenty-one windows in the front of the house and forty rooms within. Outside there were thirty-one outbuildings.[55] These outbuildings included 4 stables, 2 coach houses and one harness house. There were 4 cow houses, one calf house, one dairy, 2 piggeries, and one fowl house, barn and boiling house. Also there were 2 turf houses, one potato house, one workshop, 6 sheds and on each of a forge, laundry and store house.[56]

John Hardress Lloyd

In 1903 John Hardress Lloyd married Adeline Wilson, an Australian heiress. Her inheritance injected substantial financial resources into the estate which resulted in internal remodelling of the house and major enhancements to the gardens.[57] John Hardress Lloyd joined the army, serving with the 21st Lancers. He fought in the North-West Frontier of India (1897), the Boer War and World War One, eventually became a Brigadier-General. During World War One he was noted as a distinguished general.[58] In 1917 Lieutenant Colonel Hardress Lloyd was involved with the Tank Corps.[59]

1911 census

In the 1911 census John Hardress Lloyd was head of the household at Gloster House and lived there with his wife, Adeline, and a house full of servants. By 1911 the number of servants in the house had increased to nine and their place of origin had expanded beyond the shores of Ireland. The servants were Annie Hawkins (aged 28, cook/domestic servant, born Co. Galway, Church of Ireland), Effie Ball (aged 19, kitchen maid/domestic servant, born Gloucestershire, Church of England), Susan Whitford (aged 18, fuelley maid/domestic servant, born King’s Co., Church of Ireland), Rachel Fotherby (aged 28, housemaid/domestic servant, born Yorkshire, Church of England), Hannah Quillane (aged 37, housemaid/domestic servant, born Co. Cork, Roman Catholic), Gabrielle Labre (aged 40, lady’s maid/domestic servant, born in Paris, France, Church of England), William Elliott (aged 21, footman/domestic servant, born Lincolnshire, Church of England), Frank Kenna (aged 20, odd boy/domestic servant, born King’s Co., Roman Catholic), and Annie Rose Goodman (aged 30, nurse maid/domestic servant, born Suffolk, Church of England).[60] A recent study of the origin of servants for a gentry’s house in Co. Cork (estate of about 1,800 acres) found that most of the servants came from within the estate and those from outside came from within a six mile radius of the house – see article = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2016/09/10/modeligo-house-county-cork-and-its-servants/

By 1911 changed was also to be seen in and around Gloster House. The number of windows in front of the house had increased to twenty-three while the number of rooms within had decreased to twenty-five. Outside the number of outbuildings had decreased to twenty-five.[61] These outbuildings consisted of 5 stables, 2 coach houses and one harness house along with 4 cow houses and one each of a calf house, dairy, piggery, fowl house and barn. There were also 2 turf houses, 2 workshops, 3 sheds and one forge.[62]

Gloster House after 1911

After World War One and the Irish War of Independence life in, and around, Gloster House changed considerably. The large estate was reduced to the few hundred acres around the house and the number of servants declined. Adeline Wilson Lloyd died in 1933 and John Hardress Lloyd lived on until 1952. The couple had no children and so the Gloster house estate was inherited by their nephew Major Evan T. Trevor Lloyd. The Major held the estate for only a few years when in 1958 he sold it to an order of nuns.[63] Major Evan Lloyd died in January 1964 leaving an adopted daughter, Sarah.[64]

In 1990 the religious order ended their activities at Gloster and in 1992 the estate was sold to the Macra ne Feirme organization. The organisation intended to operate the estate as a national rural training centre much like the successful An Grianan estate (in Co. Louth) operated by the Irish Countrywomen’s Association. But the project proved to be a financial mishap for the organisation and is still referred to as ‘the Gloster House affair’.[65] After a few years they sold it to a pharmaceutical organisation that held it until 2001 when it was purchased by the present owners. Today the beautifully restored house and 140 acres is used for weddings receptions and other entertainments.

 

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[1] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[2] Rev. Charles Russell & John Prendergast (eds.), Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland of the reign of James 1, vol. 5, 1615-1625 (Kraus reprint, 1974), pp. 3, 95

[3] Victor Treadwell, Buckingham and Ireland 1616-1628: A Study in Anglo-Irish Politics (Four Courts Press, Dublin, 1998), pp. 130, 131, 346, n. 93, 347, n. 98

[4] Victor Treadwell (ed.), The Irish Commission of 1622: an investigation of the Irish Administration 1615-22 and its Consequences 1623-24 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2006), pp. 651, 652, 653, 701; A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), p. 200

[5] Victor Treadwell (ed.), The Irish Commission of 1622: an investigation of the Irish Administration 1615-22 and its Consequences 1623-24 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2006), pp. 475, 701

[6] Victor Treadwell (ed.), The Irish Commission of 1622, pp. 644

[7] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[8] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[9] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), p. 521

[10] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History (Kilcommon Press, Shinrone 1998), pp. 46, 47

[11] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[12] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[13] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, p. 47

[14] John Ainsworth (ed.), ‘Dunne Papers’, in Analecta Hibernica, No. 25, 1967, Survey of Documents in Private Keeping, no. 417

[15] The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, vol. 1 (H.M.C. 1895), p. 241

[16] The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, vol. II (H.M.C. 1899), pp. 189, 202, 206, 231

[17] The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, vol. 1 (H.M.C. 1895), p. 411

[18] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[19] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[20] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016; Maurice Craig, The Architecture of Ireland: From the earliest times to 1880 (Lambay Books, Portrane, 1997), p. 189

[21] Edward McParland, Public Architecture in Ireland, 1680-1760 (Yale University Press, New Haven, 2001), p. 177, , 179

[22] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, p. 149

[23] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[24] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), nos. B/8, D/5/6, E/31/4, E/32/29; Eighteenth Century Irish Official Papers in Great Britain, Private Collections: volume one (H.M.S.O. Belfast, 1973), p. 247

[25] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 73, 75

[26] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[27] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 458

[28] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[29] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, p. 98

[30] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), nos. E/33/34, E/33/46, E/34/14

[31] B.M. Walker (ed.), Parliamentary election results in Ireland, 1801-1922 (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, 1978), pp. 222, 223, 288

[32] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), no. D/14/2

[33] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United kingdom (London, 1860), p. 775

[34] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 468

[35] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 102-107

[36] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 115, 118

[37] Arnold Horner, Mapping Offaly in the early nineteenth century with an atlas of William Larkin’s map of King’s County, 1809 (Wordwell, Bray, 2006), p. 8

[38] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 121, 122, 124, 125

[39] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 128, 129

[40] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), no. E/35

[41] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 730

[42] A.P.W. Malcomson (ed.), Calendar of the Rosse Papers (Irish Manuscripts Commission, Dublin, 2008), nos. E/38, O/47

[43] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 265

[44] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/15188/page/393567 accessed on 23 September 2016

[45] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194482 accessed on 23 September 2016

[46] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194599 accessed on 23 September 2016

[47] Arnold Horner, Mapping Offaly in the early nineteenth century, p. 8

[48] Noel Mac Mahon, In the Shadow of the Fairy Hill: Shinrone and Ballingarry – A History, pp. 134, 135

[49] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 265

[50] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 730

[51] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 730

[52] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/17658/page/470811 accessed on 23 September 2016

[53] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/19128/eppi_pages/514204 accessed on 23 September 2016

[54] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000950221/ accessed 23 September 2016

[55] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000950212/ accessed on 23 September 2016

[56] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000950213/ accessed on 23 September 2016

[57] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[58] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 730

[59] http://www.stablebelts.co.uk/nzarmouredcorps.html accessed 23 September 2016

[60] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002662931/ accessed 23 September 2016

[61] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002662923/ accessed on 23 September 2016

[62] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002662925/ accessed on 23 September 2016

[63] http://www.glosterhouse.ie/about-gloster-house/history/ 23 September 2016

[64] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 730

[65] http://hazelheritage.com/2015/05/23/gloster-house-and-damer-house/ 23 September 2016

Standard
Carlow History

Duckett’s Grove: a mansion house that’s upside down

Duckett’s Grove: a mansion house that’s upside down

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Duckett’s Grove is a ruined mansion near the northern boundary of Co. Carlow. Its name is taken from the Duckett family who held the area for about two hundred and fifty years. At its height many visitors came to Duckett’s Grove to enjoy the place and their company. After the departure of the Duckett family and the fire of 1933 the visitors still come. Today visitors come with curiosity to understand the place which is home only to the birds. Yet Duckett’s Grove is no straight forward gentry’s mansion. It is rather a mansion house that’s upside down in many respects.

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The front door and side of Duckett’s Grove

Duckett’s Grove in the wrong townland

The present ruined mansion and associated buildings lie just inside the eastern boundary line of townland of Rainestown. Yet when Thomas Duckett, ancestor of the Ducketts of Duckett’s Grove, came to the area in 1695 he purchased the townland of Kneestown which adjoins Rainestown on the east.[1] In 1852 John D. Duckett owned the entire 201 acres of Kneestown where he had some farm buildings and land and no residents. The entire area of the townland of Rainestown (620 acres) was in 1852 owned by William Burton of Burton Hall. John Duckett only had a long term lease on 179 acres around Duckett’s Grove from William Burton thus the Duckett family didn’t really own the land their house was built on.[2] This long term lease was taken out sometime in the eighteen century as Jonas Duckett (1720-1797) was the first to address himself as of Duckett’s Grove.[3]

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The area around Duckett’s Grove c.1840 and c.1900

John Duckett also didn’t own the grand entrance gateway at Russellstown Cross Road which was owned by his brother, William Duckett of Russellstown Park.[4] The grand house at Russellstown Park was demolished in the 1950s by the Land Commission but in the early 1900s the Ordnance Survey had already removed the house and outbuildings from their maps.[5]

Russellstown Cross Roads gateway

The grand entrance gateway at Russellstown Cross Roads is the wrong way round and in the wrong place. There are in fact two gateways in one structure at the Cross Roads. The smaller gateway opens to along avenue the heads north-east across Russellstown townland and towards the two grand houses of Rainestown House to the left and Duckett’s Grove to the right. This long avenue is used by present day visitors to Duckett’s Grove. The grander gateway at the Cross Roads is not in use today but in the past lead eastwards at first before curving round to the north-east and heading straight for Duckett’s Grove. This abandoned avenue can still be seen today as visitors leave the mansion house and take the right hand turn towards Rainestown House. The abandoned avenue was joined by another abandoned avenue that came from a gate way further east along the Russellstown road at a ninety degree turn. Thus the Russellstown gate way takes visitors in the wrong direction.

dsc05004

Russellstown gateway – the usual entrance is on the left

The Russellstown gateway is also in the wrong place because before 1840 the straight avenue from the Russellstown Cross Road was just an ordinary public road. The original entrance to Duckett’s Grove was via a gate way and gate lodge located half way down the straight avenue on the right. The third gateway into Duckett’s Grove is located straight past the house and out onto the R418 Castledermot to Killerrig road. The accompanying map shows the road patterns around Duckett’s Grove in the 1840s and around 1900.

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The grand entrance at Russellstown cross road which once led to Duckett’s Grove

Duckett’s Grove built of brick

Another oddity about Duckett’s Grove is the materials used in its construction and the manner of its eventual destruction. The vast majority of Duckett’s Grove is built of brick. Often when you build with brick, one thinks of fire brick. If the builders of Duckett’s Grove had ideas that the extensive use of brick would protect the house from fire they were to be sadly mistaken. In April 1933 locals notice smoke coming from the empty house and took swift action to prevent disaster. But on 20th April 1933 a second fire took hold of the building and consumed it in its entirety. Nobody knows if the two fires were started accidentally or otherwise but the red bricks did little to stop it.[6]

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Remains of spiral stairway from basement to ground floor

The unseen servants made visible

The fire of 1933 destroyed the mansion of Duckett’s Grove yet exposed the underground cellars where the servants who kept the house in running order worked away unseen when the house was standing.

But even long before the fire the servant quarters were empty. In 1911 Duckett’s Grove was described as a house with 24 windows in front and 40 rooms within and 27 outbuildings.[7] The census records show no servants were living in the house. Instead, at that time William Mackey lived in the house with his sister and acted as land agent for Maria Duckett.

This is in contrast with the early years of the house when the servant quarters were a hive of activity. In the 1841 census 17 people lived in Rainestown in two houses and by 1851 there were 32 people in the townland living in three houses.[8]Although we can’t say for certain how many of these people lived at Duckett’s Grove it would seem to be the case that the number of servants at the house increased in those years.

At one time there were eleven men employed full-time maintaining the lawns, gardens and driveways. Along these driveways for nearly eighty years visitors in great numbers came to picnic on the well maintained grounds. As many as 150 sat down for lunch on the same day. The great kitchens under Duckett’s Grove were hot with cooking at those times. The ice house out by the back avenue would help to keep thing cool. But by 1900 the family had turned cold against this open policy as visitors damaged flowers entered the enclosed yards, looking in the windows and laughing loudly.[9]

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The main kitchens 

Catholic servants not approved but still employed

Maria Duckett, wife of William Duckett (last male owner of Duckett’s Grove), was said to have a hatred of Catholics and the Catholic Church. It was said that she would not employ Catholics. She was reported as saying that “people are in league with the Catholics to poison and kill me”.[10] Yet the census returns for 1901 and 1911 show at that time that she was not so against Catholic servants as later commentators may have suggested.

In 1901 the census returns account for six servants at Duckett’s Grove of whom five were Roman Catholics or as William Duckett called them “Church of Rome”.[11] William Duckett died in 1908 and his widow left the house for Raglan Road in Dublin. There in 1911 Maria Duckett had five servants two of whom were Roman Catholics or as it is written “Church of Rome”.[12] If Maria Duckett was totally against Catholics among her employees it must have occurred later in life.

The 1926 census, which is the next after 1911, is not due for publication until 2026 and thus we must wait ten years to see the religious affiliations of her servants at that time. Maybe Maria’s dislike of Catholics could be from a discovery that the Duckett family were not all Protestant. Back in the days of religious Reformation and Counter Reformation in England many members of the Duckett family in Lancashire and Westmoreland stayed Catholic while a prosperous Protestant branch settled in Wiltshire. The Catholic branches produced two Catholic martyrs in the form of James and John Duckett. Another member, John Duckett, was priest in 1660 to Colonel Mervyn Touchet, later Earl of Castlehaven.[13]

Servants well cared for

Even if the Ducketts kept their servants unseen in the basement or even may have disliked their religion, the family did have a reputation of caring for their servants. New suits of clothes, boots and a cash bonus was given to the men servants at Christmas while their wives got new bed clothes and cash with gifts for the children. Such was the respect for the family by the locals that when the I.R.A. occupied the house they left it intact and did not burn it or loot it like they did at other houses like Mitchelstown Castle in Co. Cork.

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Servant’s quarters

Of course in any relationship there will be ups and downs. In 1893 William Duckett of Duckett’s Grove brought an action against his former coachman and groom, John Sweeney, for theft. John Sweeny countered with an action of slander and claimed damages of £500. The case was settled with Sweeney getting £65 in damages.[14] In 1901 John Sweeney was living at Strawhall near Carlow town and employed as a coachman – though not for the Ducketts.[15]

The walled gardens at the far end

Another curiosity at Duckett’s Grove is the situation of the two walled gardens. The two walled gardens are separated from the mansion house by the enclosed farm yard and servant buildings. Because today’s visitors enter the mansion complex via the farm yard entrance with the walled gardens to the left and the mansion far to the right you get a strange sense of situation. It would seem that visitors to the house of the nineteenth century would have to walk through the farm yard seeing servants and heaps of horse dung to get to the gardens from the house.

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It is only when you go to the far end of the gardens that you find a sculptured doorway through which visitors of the past entered the gardens. This doorway is on the south side of the gardens.

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Yet still the gardens seem to be place in an odd place. Visitors of the nineteenth century would have to exit the mansion by a side door or the front door and walk around the outside of the walled farm yard to get to the gardens. It would seem better if the walled gardens were at the side of Duckett’s Grove rather than at the further rear of the house.

Of course if the original Duckett’s Grove was in Kneestown townland then the walled gardens would be right beside the house and not far away from it. The townland boundary between Kneestown and Rainestown passes just outside the eastern wall of the walled gardens.

Duckett’s Grove entry by the back door

Owing to the 1933 fire present-day visitors don’t enter the mansion house by the front door or the door frame of the front door. This is because the front door is barred with an iron gate which is mostly locked. Instead modern visitors enter the enclosed farm yard, pass through the servant’s area and enter the mansion house via the back door. This line of approach allows visitors to see the workings behind the big house and get an appreciation that these large gentry’ houses may have been built by a landlord family but could only operate with all the servants and their associated buildings in the back.

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The front door – or should say gate – into the mansion house

Duckett’s Grove in conclusion

There are possibly other curiosities at Duckett’s Grove waiting to be discovered such as the oval window on the south side of the main reception room that was changed into a square window with semi-circular top. Every visit brings new discoveries and new wonders. It is a wonderland of exploration and discovery – an Alice in Wonderland place – even if it is a mansion house that’s upside down.

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The north facade with gateway to enclosed farm yard in middle picture & house to right

 

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End of post

 

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[1] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say! (Carlow, 1993), p. 101

[2] Griffith’s Valuation, Rainestown townland, Killerig parish, Carlow barony, Co. Carlow

[3] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland (London, 1899), p. 125

[4] Griffith’s Valuation, Russellstown townland, Killerig parish, Carlow barony, Co. Carlow

[5] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 107; http://map.geohive.ie/mapviewer.html historic 25 inch maps 1888-1913

[6] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 104

[7] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001664569/ accessed on 15 September 2016

[8] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/13270/page/340863 accessed on 15 September 2016

[9] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 102

[10] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say!, pp. 97, 98

[11] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000417551/ accessed on 15 September 2016

[12] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000126649/ accessed on 15 September 2016

[13] J. Anthony Williams, Catholic recusancy in Wiltshire 1660-1791 (Catholic Record Society, 1968), p. 100

[14] Jimmy O’Toole, The Carlow gentry: What will the neighbours say!, p. 103

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000418986/ accessed 23 September 2016

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