Carlow History, India History, Laois History

Edge family of Clonbrock House, Laois

Edge family of Clonbrock House, Laois

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Clonbrock House near Crettyard, Co. Laois, later known as Geneva House, was for many generations home of the Edge family. Crettyard is in County Laois about 9 miles west of Carlow. Because Carlow was so near Edward Walford inserted Clonbrock and the Edge family within the ranks of the Carlow gentry when in fact they were part of Laois society for generations.[1]

The Edge family come to Ireland

The Edge family were part owners of the manor of Edge in the parish of Malpas, Cheshire until the close of the fifteenth century. In 1338 Adam de Edge received a grant of lands at Horton in Staffordshire and from him descends the Edge family of Clonbrock. The first of the family of Edge to come to Ireland was John Edge in the time of Charles II.

John Edge of Dublin

In the Irish Parliament of James II John Edge, gent of Dublin was among those included in the act of Attainder. His fortunes were restored with the victory of William III and John Edge went on to have six sons and five daughters. On 2nd November 1714 John Edge died and was buried at Rathdrum.[2]

The sixth son of John Edge of Dublin was David Edge who was born in 1692. He married Margaret (died 1797), widow of John Gough and daughter of Thomas Wybrants. They had four sons and two daughters. On 28th May 1773 David Edge died and was buried at Rathdrum.[3]

John Edge of Clonbrock

The eldest son of David and Margaret Edge was John Edge of Dublin. He was born in 1732 and married Sarah daughter of George Ougan and had six sons and seven daughters. John Edge died in November 1790 and his wife died in 1825 aged eighty-four years.[4] On 29th July 1767 John Edge was born as the fourth son of John Edge of Dublin. John Edge became a Civil Engineer to the River Shannon Navigation and to the River Barrow Navigation.[5]

On 31st August 1800 John Edge, esq., of Clonbrock House married Letitia, daughter of Charles Dallas, esq., of Killashee, Co. Longford by Jane, daughter of Mr. Hamilton of Cavan by his wife, Rhoda, daughter of Mr. Little. Letitia Edge died on 3rd February 1847 having had two sons and two daughters.[6]

In the early 1800s the Grand Canal Company took out a lease on coal collieries at Doonane near the border between Laois and Kilkenny. The Company also took out a lease on the neighbouring Clonbrock farm of 500 acres. The collieries were a bad investment as they mostly cost money each year and delivered few profits. In the 1820s John Edge became the manager of the colliery but the financial position remained bleak. In May 1831, the Grand Canal Company surrendered its lease of both its colliery and “a large tract of ground” around Crettyard to Maria Lecky and Martha Bowen, daughters of the late Robert Hartpole (colliery owner since before 1794). Following the surrendered a new lease was taken out by the former manager, John Edge, who attempted to collect arrears of rent due from various under-tenants. The rent was £500 per year but only half the colliery formed part of the lease.[7] To help make the venture pay its costs John Edge sacked 600 out of 800 colliers.[8]

John Dallas Edge

The eldest son of John and Letitia Edge was John Dallas Edge. He was born on 7th January 1806. He was first educated by Rev. A. Stone before entering Trinity College, Dublin in October 1823. John Dallas Edge qualified as a barrister-at-law and in 1834 was called to the Irish Bar.[9] On 17th September 1835 he married Anne, daughter of Thomas Maunsell of Dublin. This Thomas Maunsell could be the same Thomas Ridgate Maunsell of Dublin who had a daughter called Anne.[10]

On 11th August 1842 John Dallas Edge died accidently while helping a friend who had fallen into the water from a boat at Mill Pond in Dublin.[11] The only surviving child of John Dallas Edge was John Henry Edge of Farnans, Co. Laois. He was born on 11th June 1841 and attended Trinity College Dublin where he got a BA and a MA. In 1866 he qualified as a Barrister-at-Law at the King’s Inn, Dublin.[12]

Edge property in County Carlow

Apart from their business and farming interests in County Laois the Edge family held a number of properties in County Carlow in the 1850s according to Griffith’s Valuation. John Edge held 18 acres of land (worth £9 10s) at Clogrenan in the parish of Cloydagh, Co. Carlow from Horace Rochford in Griffith’s Valuation. In the townland of Raheendoran, Cloydagh parish, John Edge held from Horace Rochford a herd’s house, offices (worth £13) and 75 acres of land (£65).

In the townland of Ballycook, parish of Kineagh, Co. Carlow, John Edge held a house, offices (worth £3) and 71 acres of land (worth £52) from Henry Bruen. At Ballyhacket Upper in the same parish of Kineagh, John Edge held 29 acres of land (worth £23) from Henry Bruen. In 1876 John Edge held 362 acres 2 roots and 30 perches in County Carlow which was valued at £312 10s.[13]

John Henry Edge

John Henry Edge succeeded his grandfather, in 1856, to Clonbrock House but his uncle, Benjamin Booker Edge took over Clonbrock.[14] On 23rd June 1870 John Henry Edge married Georgina, only daughter of William Monk Gibbon of Templeshelin, Co. Wexford by his wife Margaret, the eldest daughter of Strangeman Davis-Goff of Horetown, Co. Wexford. The Gibbon family came from Sedgley in Staffordshire and settled in Ireland in the early eighteenth century. Like the Edge family the Gibbon family was also connected to the law. William Gibbon’s elder brother, John George Gibbon, and his father, William Monk Gibbon, both served as Barristers-at-Law while John George Gibbon’s eldest daughter married in 1890 William Cotter Stubbs, another Barrister-at-Law and Crown Prosecutor for County Monaghan.[15] In 1876 John Henry Edge held 1,576 acres 2 roots and 10 perches, worth £826 15s, in County Laois.[16]

John Henry Edge served as a barrister, lawyer and Land Commission agent. He wrote a number of books on land law, historical writing, biography and fiction. In 1901 and 1911 John Henry Edge lived at Mount Street Upper in Dublin. On 21st September 1916 John Henry Edge died in Dublin and was buried at Mount Jerome Cemetery.[17]

 

Clonbrock House Irish waterways history com

Clonbrock house: photo by BJG

Benjamin Booker Edge

Benjamin Booker Edge was the second son of John Edge and Letitia Dallas and was born on 12th April 1810.[18] The son took his name from Benjamin Booker, a pay clerk and land agent of the Grand Canal Company for some forty years.[19] Benjamin Booker Edge was a magistrate for Queen’s County (Laois).[20] On 10th March 1840 he married Esther Anne, only child of Thomas Allen of the Park, Co. Wicklow by Elizabeth Dowzard, his first wife.[21]

In 1874 the rent on the Grand Canal colliery was renewed in favour of Benjamin Booker Edge. The rent was £250 per year (half of the previous lease) with a royalty of 7d per ton on coal sold. But Benjamin Edge was not a successful businessman and in 1883 gave up the lease while retaining the lease on Clonbrock farm.[22] In 1876 Benjamin Booker Edge held 1,575 acres 2 roots 10 perches, worth £851 10s, in County Laois (then known as Queen’s County).[23] Esther Anne Edge died on 3rd March 1879 and Benjamin Booker Edge died on 21st April 1887 leaving one child, a son called John Edge, a gold medallist in Ethics, Logics and Metaphysics.[24]

John Edge of Clonbrock

John Edge of Clonbrock was born on 28th July 1841. He got a BA and a LLB at Trinity College Dublin in 1861 and a Hon LLD at Allahabad University in 1894. On 18th September 1867 John Edge married Laura, youngest daughter of Thomas Loughborough of Selwood Lodge in Surrey. From 1886 to 1898 John Edge served as Chief Justice of the North-West Province in India.[25]

John Edge in India

The North-West Province was a great political division of British India and contained the six subordinate divisions of Delhi, Meerut, Rohilcund, Agra, Benares and Allahabad. Each of these subordinate divisions was further divided into five districts with the exception of Benares which had six districts. The total area of the North-West Province was 116,000 square miles and in 1870 had a population of thirty million.[26]

Between 1887 and 1893 John Edge was Vice-Chancellor of Allahabad University.[27] The University of Allahabad grew out of Muir College (founded 1873) and was established as a separate university in September 1887. Before that it was part of the University of Calcutta.[28] The city of Allahabad, meaning “City of God” was the capital of the Allahabad province (the most populous and productive provinces in the Indian Empire) and since 1862 was the seat of the Presidency of the North-West Province. The population of the city in 1869 was just over 64,000. Allahabad was a favoured residence of Emperor Akbar in the sixteenth century.[29] For Hindus the city is one of the holiest cities in India due to its situation at the confluence of the Ganges and Jumna rivers which are considered sacred rivers. Millions of Hindus make the pilgrimage to Allahabad every year as they did in the time of John Edge.

In 1893 the second daughter of John Edge, Laura, married Stuart George Knox of the Indian Staff Corps (as his second wife), eldest son of Justice George Edward Knox of the North-West Province.[30] The Knox family descend from Alexander Knox of Eden Hall, Co. Down in the eighteenth century.[31] The family were associated with India for many generations. Stuart Knox’s grandfather, George Knox, served as a chaplain in the East India Company.[32] Stuart George Knox was educated at Repton, and served for many years in the Indian Army. He transferred into the Indian Political Service and served in the Persian Gulf, Basra and Kuwait. When not away on business Stuart Knox lived at Hyderabad. Stuart Knox (died 1956) and Laura Edge (died 27th January 1934) had two sons, Inman and John (Sean).[33]

In 1896 John Edge became head of the famine relief committee set up in response to the 1896 famine in India. In January 1899, after his retirement from the courts, John Edge became a judicial member of the Council of India and retained that position until 1908. It was at this time that he was also elected to the bench of the Middle Temple, of which he served as treasurer in 1919. In 1902, he also served on a Royal Commission that investigated the Boer War and in 1905 was involved in an inquiry that ultimately had a part in the creation of the Court of Criminal Appeal.[34]

In January 1909 John Edge became a privy counsellor. As a privy counsellor he heard many legal appeals from India between 1916 and May 1926, when he retired completely, just short of his 85th birthday. On 30th July 1926 John Edge died suddenly at his home, 123 Oakwood Court in Kensington, London.[35]

With the death of John Edge in 1926 we take our leave of the Edge family from medieval Cheshire to Laois miners and Carlow property owners to administrators in British India.

 

Bibliography

Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899

Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976

Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001)

Delany, R., The Grand Canal of Ireland (Newton Abbot, 1973)

Fitzgerald, S.V., ‘Edge, Sir John (1841-1926)’, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)

The National Encyclopaedia (William Mackenzie, London, 1870), Vol. IX

Walford, E., The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, 1860)

 

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[1] Walford, E., The County Families of the United Kingdom (London, 1860), pp. 201, 812

[2] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 129

[3] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[4] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[5] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[6] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[7] Delany, R., The Grand Canal of Ireland (Newton Abbot, 1973), pp. 143, 145, 150, 151

[8] http://irishwaterwayshistory.com/abandoned-or-little-used-irish-waterways/the-grand-canal/south-of-moscow-north-of-geneva/ accessed on 11 August 2015

[9] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 258

[10] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 803

[11] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130; http://gw.geneanet.org/gbarnier2?lang=en&pz=claude&nz=barnier&ocz=0&p=john+dallas&n=edge accessed on 25th September 2017

[12] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[13] www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194438# accessed 25th September 2017

[14] Edward Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom, p. 201

[15] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 167

[16] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194510 accessed 25th September 2017

[17] http://gw.geneanet.org/gbarnier2?lang=en&pz=claude&nz=barnier&ocz=0&p=john+henry&n=edge accessed on 25th September 2017

[18] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[19] Delany, R., The Grand Canal of Ireland (Newton Abbot, 1973), p. 152

[20] Walford, The County Families of the United Kingdom, p. 201

[21] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 130

[22] Delany, The Grand Canal of Ireland, pp. 151, 152

[23] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/16252/page/194510 accessed on 25th September 2017

[24] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, pp. 129, 130

[25] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 129

[26] The National Encyclopaedia (William Mackenzie, London, 1870), Vol. IX, p. 594

[27] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 129

[28] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allahabad_University

[29] The National Encyclopaedia, Vol. 1, p. 490

[30] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 129

[31] http://www.geni.com/people/George-Knox/6000000013036478026

[32] http://www.geni.com/people/George-Knox/6000000013037503559

[33] http://www.geni.com/people/Stuart-Knox/6000000013036462988

[34] Fitzgerald, S.V., ‘Edge, Sir John (1841-1926)’, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)

[35] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Edge

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Cork history, Waterford history

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Perry family, landlords of Kilwatermoy

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the nineteenth century the Perry family were the landlords of about 1,000 acres at Kilwatermoy in west Co. Waterford, including the village of Kilwatermoy. It is not known when the family first acquired an interest in Kilwatermoy. What follows therefore is a life story of the family from the earliest times to the turn of the twentieth century when like so many other landlords, they sold their estates to the occupying tenants and the end of an era occurred.

John Perry

The earliest ancestor of the family was John Perry of Woodrooff, Co. Tipperary who had two sons by his wife Anne, second daughter of John Neville of Newrath, Co. Wicklow.

Samuel Perry

The younger son of John Perry was Samuel Perry, who in turn had two sons and two daughters by his wife Phoebe, daughter of William Norcott. The eldest son, William Perry, inherited Woodrooff and was the ancestor of the Perry family of that place.

Richard Perry

The younger son of Samuel Perry, Richard Perry, moved to Cork City where he established a merchant business. Richard Perry got married three times. His first wife was Ellen, daughter of Alderman Lavitt who gave his name to Lavitt’s Quay in the city, in 1763. They had a son, Samuel who got married and had children.[1] We will return to Samuel Perry later.

Richard Perry secondly got married on 7th March 1769 to Mary, daughter of Adam Newman of Dromore. They had four sons and one daughter.[2] The eldest son, Adam Perry got married in 1804 to Mary Anne Sarsfield. They had at least two sons. The elder, Richard Newman Perry, was born in late 1805 or early in 1806 and entered Trinity College, Dublin in 1824.[3]

The younger son, Adam Newman Perry got married on 17th September 1848 at St. Nicholas church, Cork to Catherine, third daughter of John Drew of Rockfield, Co. Kerry by his wife, Helen, eldest daughter of John Elmore of Hollyhill, Cork.[4] Adam Newman Perry had an address in Cork City and at South Tourine, Co. Waterford in 1848.[5]

Samuel Perry

Returning to Samuel Perry of Cork we find that he was born in 1764. Samuel Perry took his first schooling under Rev. Reid before he entered Trinity College, Dublin in November 1780 as a pensioner. At that time, his father, Richard Perry, was described as an esquire rather than a merchant. Samuel Perry graduated with a B.A. in 1784.[6]

On 23 April 1790 Samuel Richard Perry, eldest son of Richard Perry, was admitted to the freedom at large of Cork City with about thirty other people.[7]

Richard Lavitt Perry

At some time later Samuel Perry got married Elizabeth Clewlow and had a son Richard Lavitt Perry. In 1819 Richard Lavitt Perry married Jane Deane.[8] It appears that Richard Lavitt Perry held an army career as he was listed as a soldier in 1843.[9]

Richard Lavitt Perry was a member of the 44th Regiment of Foot. On 20th December 1810 he was a cornet in the Regiment and on 3rd September 1812 Richard was made a Lieutenant. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars there were less soldiers need and so on 25th March 1817 Richard Lavitt Perry was put on half pay.[10]

Robert Deane Perry

One of the children of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Robert Deane Perry who was born about 1828 in Cork. Robert first began school under Dr. O’Brien which school was possibly in the Cork area. On 13th October 1843 he entered Trinity College, Dublin as a pensioner which usually equates to a middle class background. In the spring of 1848 Robert Perry got a B.A.[11]

Thomas Deane Perry

Another son of Richard Lavitt Perry and Jane Deane was Thomas Deane Perry. On 6th May 1842 Thomas Perry became an ensign in the 81st Regiment of Foot and on 30th July 1844 was made a Lieutenant. In 1846 the Regiment was serving in Canada.[12]

 

DSC05000

View east from Kilwatermoy medieval church across the Perry estate

The 1851 estate of Robert Deane Perry

In 1851 the estate of Robert Deane Perry at Kilwatermoy was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation for the purposes of setting a Poor Law rate to support the local Lismore Poor Law Union. Thus we find that Robert Perry held Ballymoat Upper (165acres 2roots 21perches), Churchquarter (128ac 2r 4p), Close (115ac 3r 8p), Kilwatermoy (202ac 3r 20p), Kilwatermoy Mountain (206ac 3r 24p), Lyrenacarriga (275ac 2r 6p), and Shanapollagh (62ac 2r 30p).[13]

Also holding land in Kilwatermoy in 1851 was Richard Lavitt Perry (Robert’s father) at Ballymoat Lower (169ac 0r 22p) and Mrs. Robert Perry at Ballymoat Lower (15ac 1r 16p).[14]

For more on other landlords surrounding the Perry estate in 1851 see = https://niallbrn.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/kilwatermoy-landlords-in-1851/

Death of Richard Lavitt Perry

In 1875 Captain Richard Lavitt Perry was living at 3 Belgrave Place, Cork.[15] Richard Lavitt Perry died on 17th December 1878 at his home at Belgrave Place, Cork. His will was proved at Cork on 13th February 1879 by the oath of Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House. Richard Perry left effects to the value of under £1,000.[16] Clyda house and townland just 2.5km south west of Mallow was the home of Robert Deane Perry since 1861 as a tenant of the Webb family of Quarterstown house.[17]

Robert Deane Perry after 1879

On 11th September 1889 Robert Deane Perry of Clyda House and Rupert Deering attended court in Cork as executors to the will of Anne Perry, spinster, of Albert Place, Cork. Anne Perry died on 17th March 1889. The proving of her will noted the value of her effects at £2,235 10s 10d.[18]

A few months later, on 23rd August, Robert’s cousin, Richard John Perry of Rocklodge, Monkstown, County Cork, died.[19] Robert Deane Perry was a colonel in the North Cork Militia.[20]

Death of Robert Deane Perry

Robert Deane Perry died on 22nd May 1897 in County Cork leaving Eliza Matilda Perry as a widow and that his effects were valued at £2,600 9s 2d. The probate of his will was granted at Cork on 11th November 1897.[21] Eliza Matilda Perry was born in Somersetshire about 1840.[22] It is not known when Robert Deane Perry married Eliza Matilda but by 1858 they had a daughter named Helena Perry while living in Cork. Around 1872 they had another daughter who they named Eliza and she was born at Mallow.[23] A third daughter Jane married Charles William Bagge of Summerville house.[24]

Within two years Robert’s only son, Robert Deane Perry, junior, had died on 14th March 1899. The administration of his will was granted to his mother on 29th June. The effects of Robert junior were valued at £1,561 1s 9d.[25]

The Perry house in 1901 census

In the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was living at Clyda House with her two unmarried daughters, Helena and Eliza. They had two servants, Hannah and Ellen Mansfield. Of all the household only Ellen Mansfield could speak Irish and English. The fact that she was born in County Waterford, a good Irish speaking area at the end of the nineteenth century, possibly aided her ability. Eliza Matilda Perry said her occupation was living off dividends. The two daughters gave their occupation as “land and houses”.[26]

The census returns record that there were fourteen rooms in Clyda House that were used by the family. Around the house there were sixteen outbuildings. These included 3 stables, a coach house and a harness room. There was also a cow house, calf house, dairy house and 4 piggeries with 1 foul house. There were a further 3 sheds to service the house and farm.[27]

At the 1901 census Eliza Matilda Perry was not just owner of Clyda House but also had three other houses in the townland. The full townland contained just over 62 acres.[28] One of these houses was occupied by Thomas Mansfield.[29] Thomas Mansfield was born in County Waterford and possibly on the Perry estate at Kilwatermoy. Like his daughter Ellen in the “big house” Thomas could speak Irish and English. Thomas Mansfield was 48 years old and worked as the head gardener at Clyda House. His wife, Anne (born in County Cork), was the cook while their eldest son Maurice was the groom. The couple had another son James and two daughters, Elli and Lizzie.[30]

The third house at Clyda was occupied by County Cork born John Condon who was the coachman. John Condon was only 25 years old like his wife Ellen. They had a baby daughter called Eliza Mary.[31] Outside the house the Condons had a piggery and a foul house.[32]

The fourth house on the estate was occupied by 45 year old Thomas Flanagan who worked as an agricultural labourer. With that job he had to support his 29 year old wife, Mary, along with their son and three daughters. Their eldest child was just 7 years old. Like the Condons, the Flanagans had a baby daughter which gave each other mutual support.[33]

Perry family after 1901

In 1906 Eliza Perry would need support for her own comfort as two of her cousins died within two months of each other. Richard T. Perry of Albert Place, Cork died on 12th June with administration granted to James Perry, gent, of the same place. But, on 20th August 1906, James Perry died. With no immediate heirs his estate was entrusted to Graham Gould, solicitor.[34]

Perry in 1911 census

By 1911 Montague Mandeville, county engineer for the Great Southern and Western Railway was living in Clyda House.[35] By the time of the 1911 census it is not known where the Perry family were living. Helena and Eliza, two of the daughters of Robert Deane Perry, were recorded as visitors of the house of James Sugrue at Sidney Place in Cork city. They were both unmarried.[36]

By 1911 it would appear that most of the Perry estate in Kilwatermoy and the adjoining townlands had been sold to the occupying tenants under the various Land Acts.

 

Bibliography

Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004)

Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899

Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976

Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001)

Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964)

Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6

Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002)

Hart, H.G., Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846)

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[1] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948; Casey, A.E. & Dowling, T. (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), Vol. 4, p. 257

[2] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976 (reprinted 2007), p. 948

[3] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses (3 vols. Thoemmes Press, Bristol, 2001), Vol. 2, p. 664

[4] Burke’s Irish Landed Gentry, 1899, p. 123

[5] Baxter, C., Drew family tree (published online, 2004), p. 7

[6] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[7] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 7, p. 2122

[8] Casey & Dowling (eds.), O’Kief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater, Vol. 4, p. 257

[9] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[10] Hart, Annual Army List, Militia List and Indian Civil Servant List, 1846 (London, 1846), p. 380

[11] Burtchaell & Sadleir (ed.), Alumni Dublinenses, Vol. 2, p. 664

[12] Hart, Annual Army List, 1846, p. 233

[13] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[14] Griffith’s Valuation, Kilwatermoy parish, Coshmore and Coshbride barony, Co. Waterford

[15] Guy’s Cork Almanac 1875-6, p, 721

[16] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014894/005014894_00718.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[17] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North (Whitegate, 2002), p. 123

[18] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[19] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014903/005014903_00312.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[20] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014910/005014910_00206.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[21] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/search/cwa/details.jsp?id=1639337193 accessed on 25 August 2013

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[24] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[25] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014911/005014911_00215.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[26] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550874/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[27] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[28] http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,553643,597499,7,7 accessed on 23 August 2013

[29] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550872/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[30] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550875/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[31] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550876/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[32] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550873/ accessed on 23 August 2013

[33] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000550877/ accessed on 23rd August 2013

[34] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014914/005014914_00504.pdf accessed on 25 August 2013

[35] Hajba, A.M., Houses of Cork, Vol. 1 – North, p. 123

[36] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001856949/ accessed on 24th September 2017

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Antrim History, Cork history

Mount Cashell estate in Antrim

Mount Cashell estate in Antrim

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

In the 1830s Stephen Moore, 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell (the title is variously spelt as one word – Mountcashell or as two separate words), was the owner of 5,961 acres in Co. Cork (with his chief residence at Moore Park near Kilworth), 6,383 acres in Co. Tipperary and over 21,000 acres in Upper Canada, with smaller properties in Counties Waterford, Limerick, Dublin and Kildare, but the vast bulk of his estate, amounting to 48,629 acres, was in Co. Antrim.[1]

Finding the Antrim estate

With an estate of over 48,000 acres it surely will not be difficult to find records relating to same but that is where the adventurer would be wrong. Finding records on this vast estate is actually quite difficult, even to the extent of locating the estate on the ground. A number of accidents of history contribute to this absence. The last Earl of Mount Cashell died in 1915. Moore Park house was sold to the government in the late 1890s and was destroyed by fire in 1908 (the land around the house site is still owned by the Irish government and is a major centre for dairy farming research).

A further contributing factor was that much of the Antrim estates were sold in the 1850s just before the Griffith’s Valuation survey was made. This survey of tenants and immediate landlords in the 1850s and 1860s was made to help establish a Poor Law rate to fund the various workhouses and poor relief. Griffith’s Valuation is often used in many parts of the country as the foundation document for estate research in the nineteenth century.

But much more significantly to all the above to the absence of records was the actions of Alfred Cleverly who was appointed land agent for the Antrim estates in 1847. Within three years Alfred Cleverly had embezzled £24,000, sold the Earl’s gold snuff boxes, made away with his yacht and destroyed the account books to cover his tracks.[2]

Some information on locating the Antrim estate can be found among the records of the Encumbered Estates Court. Printed particulars of the Mount Cashell property in the vicinity of Ballymena, in 1850, can be found in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland among the sales catalogue.[3] Much of the estate centred around Galgorm, Kells and Cullybackey.[4] Elsewhere, a rental of turf bogs belonging to the Earl of Mount Cashell from 1834 gives us more locations for determining the bounds of the estate. Thus the Earl had bogs at Ballygalley, Buckna, and Ballywatermoy, Cargin and Carnstroan, Crankill, Carnlea, Dunnygarran, Elginny, Fenagh, Galgorm Parks, Kildowney, Lisnacrogher, and Moss-side, Mackadoo, Rokeel, Rooghan, Rasherry, Tannybrannon, Teeshan, Tullygrawley, and Tullaghgarley, Co. Antrim, along with Carnaboy, Claggan and Cromkill, Co. Londonderry.[5]

 

Galgorm castle

Galgorm castle

The Moore family in Ireland

The Moore family came to Ireland in the time of King James the first and settled in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary where Richard Moore established a successful merchant business. His son, Stephen Moore, purchased some 40,000 acres in the 1680s across Counties Cork (including Kilworth and the later Moore Park), Waterford and Tipperary. Included in the latter county was the famous Rock of Cashel from which Stephen’s grandson, also called Stephen Moore, took to form his peerage title of Viscount Mount Cashell in 1766. It was the Viscount’s son, another Stephen Moore who in 1781 became the first Earl of Mount Cashell.[6]

Acquiring the Antrim estate

In the 1720 Stephen Moore (later 1st Viscount), grandson of the man who purchased Kilworth, married Alicia, sister and heiress of Robert Colville and daughter of Hugh Colville. Stephen and Alicia had a number of children, Richard (1725-1761), Stephen (1st earl of Mount Cashell), William (of Moore Hill, Co. Waterford and ancestor of the Perceval Maxwell connection), Robert (left female heirs), Sarah (married Henry Sandford), Mary (married 4th Earl of Inchiquin), Elizabeth (Hon. Ponsonby Moore) and Catherine (married 1st Baron Hartland).[7] Thus the large Antrim estate came via the Colville family to the Moore family of County Cork – one end of the country to the other.

History of the Antrim estate

In May 1607, King James I granted the Ballymena Estate with Galgorm castle to Rory Og MacQuillan, grandson of the Elizabethan owner, Edward MacQuillan. In 1618 Sir Faithful Fortescue, a nephew Arthur Chichester, tricked Rory McQuillan out of the estate or purchased it legitimately depending on your view point.[8] It is suggested that it was Sir Faithful Fortescue that started to build Galgorm Castle. In the English Civil War between King and Parliament Sir Faithless Fortescue fought at first in the battle of Edghhill on the side of Parliament before he changed his mind and went over to the Royalists. Unfortunately he forgot to instruct his men and seventeen of them were slain by the Royalist as the enemy.

Some years before the war, in 1630, Sir Faithful Fortescue sold the Ballymena estate to the infamous Dr. Alexander Colville. Legend has it that Alexander Colville as an alchemist sold his soul to the devil for the knowledge of turning base metal into gold.[9] Alexander Colville was Professor of Divinity at St. Andrew’s (yet others say he was only educated there and was instead professor of Hebrew at Sedan University in Fance), and came to Ireland in 1630 to succeed to his new estate and got a number of rectory positions from his cousin Bishop Echlin.[10]

Alexander Colville died in 1679 and was succeeded at Galgorm by his son Captain Robert Colville. Captain Robert purchased additional estates in Counties Antrim and Down.

The Mount Cashell Antrim agent

As the various Viscounts and Earls of Mount Cashell lived mainly in County Cork a local land agent was needed to manage the affairs of the Antrim estate. In the late eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century three generations of the Joy family fulfilled that role, sometimes on their own. George Joy, agent from 1809 to 1847, managed the 48,000 acres and 800 tenants with the help of just one clerk.[11]

This was typical of the Mount Cashell estate in Ireland and Canada where only local agents were employed but no chief agent to oversee the entire operation. Lord Mount Cashell tried to act as chief agent himself but was too involved in political matters (in 1826 he was elected a life peer at the Westminster Parliament).[12] The Earl was in addition a poor judge of character and employed ineffective agents who turned upon the Earl after they were fired and caused him problems both in and out of employment.

In addition to this work George Joy had his own estates in Counties Antrim and Wicklow to manage through his own agent, John Jones (who was agent for a number of Wicklow estates). In Wicklow the Joy family had 1,541 acres in 1838 survey.[13] George Joy lived at Galgorm Castle (now a upmarket hotel) and at Rathfarnham in Co. Dublin. Fortunately the Public Records Office Northern Ireland has a number of records of the agent correspondence with Lord Mount Cashell in the years from January 1835 to November 1848 (T1248 & T1289/19) which helps fill in the gaps made by the lost material.[14]

Balancing income and expenditure

A landed estate was a means of generating income which income was then spent reinvesting in the estate or building a big house or financing fine living. The income from the estate was insufficient to meet all the running expenses of an eighteenth century or nineteenth century landlord family, and so borrowing money on the securing of the estate was common. Often the estate income just covered the loan interest with little of the principle being repaid. This was fine in the good times but the depression after the Napoleonic Wars and the collapse of the tenant economy during the Great Famine bankrupted many an estate including that of the Earl of Mount Cashell. During the famine the Earl was so burdened with mortgages, debts and other charges that he could barely offer the smallest level of support to his starving tenants.[15]

Some eighteenth century letters in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland show loan interest payments coming out of the Antrim estates. On 31st December 1796 Thomas Black of Dublin, wrote to Dr. Joseph Black of Edinburgh, informing him that Mr. Joy had remitted the balance of the half year’s interest due by the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell (£11 16s 8d), to Sir Robert Herries & Company of London. But Thomas Black added that the economy was not well and money was hard to come by with the result that future interest payments could be difficult.[16]

Rental income

The main source of income on a landed estate of the eighteen and nineteenth century was in collecting rents. Rental income was mainly got from leasing out farms but also came from other sources like turf rights from bogs. On the Antrim estate rents were set by a professional surveyor rather than by public auction. Amongst the leases granted in 1846 the rents charged varied from 6s to £3 4s 9d per acre according to the location, type of soil and buildings on the property.[17] Many tenants had other income like from the linen industry to help them pay for the rent.

Estate leases

Most leases on the Antrim estate were for three lives in contrast to the Cork estates where many rentals were just on a yearly basis. The majority Protestant population allowed this difference of management as Catholics were not allowed to have long term leases on land. Long leases allowed a landlord to get a higher income upfront but also locked in his land so that he would not be able to take advantage of a rising economy. In about 1850 a survey of the estate, prepared for the Encumbered Estates Court showed that of leases signed between 1724 and 1822 there were still 224 leases for three lives still in operation, 14 leases in perpetuity, 8 leases for three lives renewable forever, 1 lease for three lives plus 31 years and 1 deed of fee farm.[18]

One of these eighteenth century leases was renewed on 3rd October 1818 between the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell and William Rea and Enoch Craig, both of Ballykennedy, Co. Antrim. The original lease was made on 2nd October 1724 between Robert Colville, Newtown, Co. Down, and Robert Cook, Galgorm, Co. Antrim, respecting lands in the parish of Ahoghill, Co. Antrim for 3 lives renewable forever.[19]

On 8th May 1812 the 2nd Earl of Mount Cashell renewed another eighteenth century lease to James Owens of Taldarg, for property in Racavan alias Tulloge, Ballygally and Cloggnenerriny alias Cloughinarny.[20] On 5th November 1827 3rd Earl of Mount Cashell renewed the lease to James Owens of Holestone, for the land in Racavan, Ballygally and Cloggnenerriny.[21]

 

800px-Stephen_Moore,_Vanity_Fair,_1883-09-08

3rd Earl of Mount Cashell in Vanity Fair

Nineteenth century leases

In the nineteenth century the 3rd Earl of Mount Cashel continued to offer long leases to his Antrim tenants at a time when other landlords were going for shorter rental agreements. Up to 1847 the number of long leases increased on the Antrim estate but also a substantial number of tenants preferred tenancies at will.[22]

In rental agreements made after 1822 there were 18 for one life, 474 for 29 years, 60 yearly tenancies, 8 at will and 11 other types. In the 1840s, as the tenants could see the Earl descending into greater debt, many asked for longer leases to protect them from a new landlord if the Earl died or more if the estate was sold. as Mr. Brown, a tenant of 15 acres at Kildrum remarked ‘If Mr. Joy and Lord Mount Cashell were to live, and I was to live, I should not care to have a lease; but Lord Mount Cashell may be gathered to his fathers and Mr. Joy may die, and another Pharaoh may arise, who knew not Joseph, and we may be put under other circumstances.[23]

1820 Antrim election

The possession of a great landed estate was more than just a source of income. It was also a means to gaining political power. In a time when voting rights went with how much property you had rather just your age, it was important to manage an estate to maximise your voting strength and even gain election to public office.

The Moore family control of Clonmel in Tipperary facilitated the election of ten members of the family to the Irish Parliament in Dublin during the eighteenth century.[24] Much of the political management in Antrim was done by the local estate agent, George Joy, as the Earl of Mount Cashell lived mostly in Cork.[25] Yet even while on holidays in Europe the second Earl was not beyond thinking of Antrim politics.

On 10th March 1820 Lord Hertford wrote to Mount Cashell, who was holidaying in Paris that Lord Belfast and Mr. Ker had started for Antrim to drum up support for their own candidates in the upcoming general election. At the same time Lord Belfast wrote directly to Mount Cashell seeking the Earl’s support. On 16th March 1820 Lord Mount Cashell to Lord Hertford from Paris saying that he told Lord Belfast clearly that his support was ‘already engaged’. On the same day (20th March) Lord Mount Cashell wrote to George Joy ‘requesting him to use every exertion amongst my tenantry to induce them to come forward and vote for Colonel [Hugh] Seymour’. Lord Mount Cashell added that he would feel ‘greatly disappointed if any of my freeholders hold back and do not render every assistance … to Colonel Seymour’.

Yet even before Lord Hertford told Mount Cashell of the new candidates entering Antrim, the Earl had written to George Joy about the 13th March that, ‘in the event of any new candidate starting for Antrim, he should apprise my tenantry that I had given my interest to Colonel Seymour and Colonel [John Bruce] O’Neill’.[26] In the event Lord Belfast and Mr. Ker withdrew from the race and Seymour and O’Neill took the two seats for the Westminster Parliament unopposed.[27] The influence of Mount Cashell and the number of voters he could muster for Seymour and O’Neill may have frighten off the other candidates.

The Antrim estates in the Great Famine

The exceptional demands made on the economy and society by the Great Famine (1845-51) placed great pressure on even the largest of estates like that of Mount Cashell in Antrim. In late 1846 George Joy, the agent, wrote to Mount Cashell that he was only able to collect rents after threats of eviction and carrots on inducement. In 1847 George Joy hoped to get sufficient income to cover loan interest and the tithe rent charge but things only got worst. Although the people had enough money to avoid starvation they didn’t have enough to pay the rent. But Lord Mount Cashell was desperate for money and in 1847 fired George Joy for failing to press the tenants for arrears.[28] As it turned out the Earl had fired a good man to be replaced by a scoundrel who robbed Mount Cashell of more money than all of the arrears.

Selling the Antrim estate

By the end of the 1840s many landed estates in Ireland were bankrupt and beyond recovery. In 1848 the English Parliament passed the Encumbered Estates Act with a revised Act in 1849 to help facilitate the sale of these estates. Lord Mount Cashell was outraged and said ‘a more arbitrary Act never passed through the House’.[29] But Mount Cashell’s enormous debts made it impossible for him to stop the end from happening.

The large Antrim estate was one of the biggest sales conducted by the Encumbered Estates Court. The estate of 48,000 acres was offered in four smaller lots: the Kells estate of 3,556 acres, the Galgorm estate of 8,700 acres, the Glenwhirry estate of 11,401 acres and the big Baird estate of 24,975 acres.[30] The first sale on the 8th November 1850 was unsuccessful with only six out of thirty-one lots sold. The sale of so much land around the country all at once had depressed the market.

The estate was reoffered for sale in December 1850 and January 1851 with much better success. It is said that Lord Mount Cashell planted relatives in the auction room to push up the price. The total sale realised about £65,000 which was equivalent to 17 to 25 years of rental income.[31]

 

Galgorm

Galgorm castle

Sale of Galgorm castle

In 1850 Galgorm castle was offered for sale by the Commissioners for the Sale of Encumbered Estates in Ireland on behalf of the Earl of Mount Cashell or more particularly his creditors.[32] William Young of Ballymena put in an offer for part of the estate. On 30th October 1850 P. Scott, of 15 Merchants Quay, Dublin, wrote to William Young saying that ‘Lord Mount Cashell has a decided objection to any partition of the lots as arranged in the rentals’. But then Scott went on to say, that if the lot was not sold by the 8th November, then Young’s offer would be considered.[33]

William Young already had an interest in part of the Mount Cashell estate as on 15th November 1847 a fee farm grant was made by the Earl of Mount Cashell to Dr. William Young of the townland of Fenaghy, in the parish of Ahoghill, in consideration of an annual rent of £72 10s.[34]

In 1851 Galgorm Castle and the surrounding estate was sold to Dr. William Young of Ballymena by the Encumbered Estates Court.[35] On 28th May 1851 the sheriff of Co. Antrim was instructed to hand over possession of lands at Galgorm, including the castle and demesne containing 191 acres 8 perches, to Dr William Young.[36]

After the Antrim sale

The sale of the Antrim estates went some way to relief the Earl of Mount Cashell of his debt troubles but the sale also reduced his sources of income. During the 1850s the Earl descended into more debt. Even the financial help of his cousin, Robert Perceval Maxwell, could not save him. Even the furniture of Moore Park was taken by the sheriff to pay debts. When the third Earl died on 10th October 1883 in London he had only £30 to his name.[37]

 

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End of post

 

==================

[1] Wilson, C.A., A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada (Montreal, 1994), pp. 15, 16

[2] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 27

[3] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/5

[4] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 16

[5] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/3/3

[6] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 13, 15; Debrett’s Peerage, 1901, p. 582

[7] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 819, 820

[8] Dickson, J.M., ‘The Colville family in Ulster’, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Second Series, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1899), pp. 139-45, at pp. 143-44

[9] http://www.galgormcastle.com/the-castle/ accessed on 4th September 2017

[10] Dickson, J.M., ‘The Colville family in Ulster’, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Second Series, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1899), pp. 139-45, at pp. 139-40; https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Colville,_Alexander_(1620-1676)_(DNB00) accessed on 4th September 2017

[11] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[12] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[13] Nolan, W., ‘Land and Landscape in County Wicklow c.1840’, Hannigan, K. & Nolan, W. (eds.), Wicklow History and Society (Dublin, ), pp. 649-691, at p. 658, 669

[14] http://www.from-ireland.net/irish-estate-records-antrim/ accessed on 2 November 2016; P.R.O.N.I. T1289/19

[15] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 83

[16] P.R.O.N.I. D1950/32

[17] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 31

[18] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 83

[19] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/8

[20] P.R.O.N.I. D1824/B/1/1/7/9

[21] P.R.O.N.I. D1824/B/1/1/7/10

[22] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 28

[23] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 29

[24] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clonmel_(Parliament_of_Ireland_constituency) accessed on 4th September 2017

[25] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 25

[26] P.R.O.N.I. T3076/2/77

[27] Walker, B.M. (ed.), Parliamentary Election results in Ireland, 1801-1922 (Dublin, 1978), p. 30

[28] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 26, 82

[29] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 86

[30] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 87

[31] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, p. 87

[32] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/3/4

[33] P.R.O.N.I. D1364/B/9

[34] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/12

[35] P.R.O.N.I. D3027

[36] P.R.O.N.I. D3027/1/14

[37] Wilson, A new lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants & Immigrants in Ireland and Canada, pp. 90, 91, 95

Standard
Cork history

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Carey family of Careysville, Co. Cork

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Careysville lies on the south bank of the River Blackwater a few miles to the east of Fermoy in County Cork. In medieval times and up until the early eighteenth century the place was known as Ballymacpatrick. The name of Careysville came from the Carey family who had acquired the property in the 1650s. In the early eighteenth century people liked to place the word ‘ville’ behind a place-name like at nearby Bettyville and Abbeyville in north Co. Dublin in keeping with the fashion of all things French even if the British were busy fighting King Louis XIV of France.

There is no fully published history of the Carey family and they seem to have stayed out of the usual genealogical publications like Burke’s Landed Gentry. They family also left their own challenges for any researcher in that so many members of the family are called Peter or John and it is sometimes difficult to distinguish one Peter Carey from another Peter Carey. It could be worst of course. The neighbouring Campion family of Leitrim near Kilworth had six generations of people all called Thomas Campion.

 

Careysville

Careysville

Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick

Peter Carey was the first of his family to come to Ballymacpatrick in the mid seventeenth century. Within a generation the family would change the name of the place from Ballymacpatrick to Careysville by which name the place is known today. The Carey family came from Devon and early spelling of the name was Cary/Carew.[1] The name is said to be derived from the manor of Cary and this is possibly true.[2]

Peter Carey was born about 1625 in Devon. At the start of the rebellion in Ireland Peter Carey went there as part of the Royalist army.[3] In 1645, at Cork, he married Sarah Graham of Dromore, Co. Cork.[4] In the Confederate War (1641-53) Peter Carey served as a major in the Royalist army in Ireland under the Marquess of Ormonde. At Cork on 23rd October 1649 Major Peter Carey submitted to the English Parliament and Cromwell. Also there on that day was Captain Samuel Pomeroy who was a later friend of Peter Carey.[5]

During the period of the Cromwellian regime Captain Peter Carey acquired part of the confiscated estate of the Condons of Kilworth as part of his war wages. In 1660 Captain Petr Carey and his son, Peter Carey junior, were living at Ballymacpatrick. In 1660 Peter Carey (written as Carew) was appointed with many others in County Cork to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1660 and was also appointed to implement the Poll-Money Ordinance of 1661.[6]

Following the restoration of King Charles II it was feared that much of the property acquired by the soldiers and adventurers, as part of their payment by Parliament, would be returned to the former owners. Some property was returned to the former owners but most of the confiscated land was kept by the new settlers. On 27th July 1666 Captain Peter Carey received certifications from the Court of Claims to retain the land he was given. This property formed the core of the Careysville estate.

In Macrony parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 55 acres 2 roots 16 perches at Curraheen Atmurry (also written as Curaghnalmory), 10ac 1r 12p at the Two Balleraths (held in 1640 by Richard Crofton) and 196ac at Crognalane (held in 1640 by David Sarsfield).[7] In Clondulane parish on 27th July 1666 Peter Carey got 166ac 2r 16p at Ballymacpatrick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon), 236ac 1r 16p at Curraballymurraboe (also written as Curraghballymorogh), and 173ac at Carrigtotane (Carrigturtane). In the same parish a person called Roger Carey got land at Lishnesillagh and Carrimoe in April 1663 but this land was later taken over by the Lord Chancellor.[8]

In Killgullane parish on 24th July 1666 Peter Carey got 100acres at Ballyshanbegg while on 27th July 1666 he got 105ac 3r 16p at Ballyadick (held in 1640 by Richard Condon) in the prebendary of Kealane.[9]

It would seem that Captain Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Burnell. In the 1664 will of Richard Burnell it was said that Elizabeth Carey should receive a grey mare while Peter Carey should get a grey horse and his son, Michael Carey, should get a colt. Richard Burnell also said that if all of Richard’s daughters should die, then Captain Peter Carey and Lieutenant Samuel Pomeroy should receive half his estate while the other half went to Henry Tanner. Peter Carey and Samuel Pomeroy were made the two executors. Richard Burnell’s sister was Elizabeth Campion, possibly of the Campion of Leitrim near Kilworth.[10] In 1676 Sarah, one of the daughters and co-heirs of Colonel Richard Burnell, married Edward Hoare. This Edward Hoare established Hoare bank with his brother Joseph Hoare before 1680, possibly using the inheritance of Sarah Burnell. The other daughter, Mary married Captain Thomas Lane.[11]

Captain Peter Carey died in 1670 and on 16th November 1670 his son, Peter Carey, took out administration of the estate.[12]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick was a cousin of Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, and was mentioned in the will of Thomas Campion in 1699 as the overseer of the will with Thomas Wight of Cork. Thomas Campion was a Quaker and it seems that Peter Carey was also.[13] In about 1679 Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick wrote his will in which he mentioned his wife Elizabeth, along with his sons, Peter and Thomas and two daughters, Sarah and Elizabeth. Peter Carey also mentioned his deceased son, Michael Carey.[14]

In 1712 Peter Carey junior was mentioned as one of the executors of the will of Henry Pyne of Waterpark, Co. Cork, with William Maynard.[15] Peter Carey was married to Elizabeth Greene (died after March 1694) and died in 1714.[16] Records say that Peter Carey had at least two sons, Peter Carey and John Carey.[17]

Michael Carey

Michael Carey, who lived about 1657, was the second son of Captain Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick, yet other records say that Michael was the grandson of Captain Carey.[18] Michael Carey was mentioned in the 1657 will of Richard Fisher of Fermoy (proved in 1661). Initially Richard Fisher left his estate to his wife, Dame Ann Boyle but after her death the estate would pass to Michel Carey. The estate of Richard Fisher in Mayo was gifted to his nephew, Andrew Fisher, son of Sir Edward Fisher.[19]

Michael Carey was alive in 1664 as he was mentioned in the will of Richard Burnell from whom he was to receive a colt but was dead before 1679 as his father mentioned his deceased son, Michael, in his own will.[20]

It is not clear if this was the Michael Carey of Ballymackee, Co. Waterford, who only daughter and heiress, Mary, married Rodolphus Greene (High Sheriff of Co. Waterford 1717), fourth son of Captain Godfrey Greene, a 49th officer.[21]

Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville

Sources say that that Peter Carey, son of Captain Carey, had a son called Peter Carey who in 1677 married Elizabeth Langer, daughter of John Langer of Youghal and was the father of eight children. These children were Peter (died 1773), John, Roger, Thomas, George, Catherine, Elizabeth and Ann.[22]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1683. In April 1699 John Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in the spring of 1703 with a B.A.[23]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey of Careysville was the son of Peter Carey of Ballymacpatrick/Careysville. He was born about 1681 and was educated by Mr. St. Clare of Cork. In July 1698 Peter Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1711 he was called to the Irish Bar.[24]

On 21st May 1736 Peter Carey of Careysville made his will. In it he mentioned his two sisters, Catherine and Anna and his brother George. Also mentioned were his other brothers John and Thomas and another sister called Mrs. Power. Peter Carey also remembered his cousins John Dillon of Quarterstown, Co. Cork and Thomas Campion of Leitrim, near Kilworth, Co. Cork. Peter’s three brothers were the executors for the will. The witnesses of the will, which was proved on 10th October 1737, were John Kerby, James Fling and William Condon.[25]

Penelope Carey

About 1728 Penelope Carey of Careysville married Nicholas Power of Careysville, eldest son of Pierce Power of Ballyhane, Co. Waterford. Nicholas Power lived for a time at Careysville and in January 1728 converted from Roman Catholicism to the Protestant Church of Ireland. Nicholas and Penelope Power had one son, Pierce Power, of Affane and Mogeehy, who was the ancestor of the Protestant Power families of Affane House, Mount Rivers and Belleville Park, all in Co. Waterford. Rev. John Power of Tallow was another convert and a younger son of Pierce Power.[26]

John Carey of Careysville

John Carey of Careysville was the brother of Peter Carey (1736) of Careysville. In 1737 John Carey married Ann, daughter of John Causidice Maunsell, merchant of Cork and High Sheriff in 1719, by his wife Elizabeth Campion and had children. In 1767 Anne’s sister Elizabeth married John Carey of Carey’s Lodge.[27] In 1753 John Carey died and his will was proved by his widow on 2nd August 1753. He was succeeded by his eldest son Peter.[28]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was the third son of John Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Rev. Sullivan and entered Trinity College, Dublin, in May 1760. Langer Carey was a scholar there in 1763 and in the spring of 1765 graduated with a B.A. In 1664 he joined the Middle Temple. In 1770 Langer Carey was called to the Irish Bar.[29] He died unmarried on 16th June 1773 at his apartments in Trinity College.[30]

John Carey of Carey’s Lodge

In 1767 John Carey of Carey’s Lodge near Fermoy, married Elizabeth Maunsell, fourth daughter of John Causidice Maunsell of Cork and younger sister of Anne Maunsell who married John Carey of Careysville. John and Elizabeth left issue. Carey’s Lodge is located in the townland of Billeragh West which came to Peter Carey in the 1650s. In 1798 Carey’s Lodge was the scene of the notorious murder of Jasper Uniacke (the resident land agent), his wife and Colonel Richard Mansergh who were hacked to death by a gang of United Irishmen.[31]

In 1760 John Carey was a witness to the will of Thomas Campion of Cork city along with Peter Carey.[32]

John Carey

John Carey was the son of John Carey of Carey’s Lodge. He was educated in Fermoy and entered King’s Inns in Easter 1845 on the affidavit of his father as he was under 18 years old.[33]

Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge

On 21st September 1825, the wife of Roger Carey of Carey’s Lodge, died.[34]

Peter Carey, armiger

In May 1747 Peter Carey married Penelope Minchin (as her second husband), eldest daughter of John Minchin of Anngh, Co. Tipperary and later Castle Inch, by his second wife, Penelope, daughter of Joseph Cuffe of Castle Inch, Co. Kilkenny. John Minchin’s first wife Frances, was the widow of Major Valentine Power of Clashmore, Co. Waterford.[35]

On 22nd September 1748 Humphrey Minchin of Inchmore, Co. Kilkenny mentioned his sister Penelope in his will and his brother-in-law, Peter Carey who was named as executor. Humphrey also mentioned William Minchin, son of Penelope by her first husband, Thomas Minchin along with other nephews. At the bottom of the will Peter Carey affixed his seal and the will was proved on 7th November 1748.[36]

Peter Carey was described as an armiger in 1779 and came from Cork. In 1779 his son, Peter Carey, entered Trinity College, Dublin.[37]

Peter Carey, son of the armiger

Peter Carey was born in about 1763 as the son of Peter Carey, armiger of Cork. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1779 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[38] In March 1783 Peter Carey, eldest son of Peter Carey, was made a freeman of Cork city with five other people.[39] On 13th September 1792 at Bloomfield, David Foley married the daughter of Peter Carey of Cork city.[40]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was born in 1738 and died in 1817.[41] On 23rd August 1759, at St. Paul’s church in Cork city, Peter Carey married Ann, daughter of Hugh Lawton merchant of Castle Jane, Co. Cork. Ann came with a dowry of £3,000, a not inconsiderable sum.[42]

 

peterofcareysville

Peter Carey

Jane Carey, the eldest daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville, married William Collis (died April 1839) of Richmond, Co. Waterford and Mountford Lodge, near Fermoy, Co. Cork. William Collis was the second son of Rev. William Collis of Co. Kerry and a descendent of the Cooke family of Castle Cooke near Kilworth, Co. Cork. William Collis and Jane Carey had five sons and one daughter. The second son, Peter Collis married in 1843 to Elizabeth, daughter of John Carey of South Cregg, near Fermoy.[43]

On 26th July 1792 Ann, the second daughter of Peter Carey married Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane.[44] Careysville was located in the parish of Clondulane.

Richard Carey, merchant

Richard Carey, merchant, was the father of John Carey who in 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[45]

John Carey

John Carey was born about 1757 as the son of Richard Carey, merchant. John Carey was educated by Mr. West and In June 1778 entered Trinity College, Dublin.[46]

John Carey of Straw Hall

On 19th August 1793 James Connell of Castlelyons married Mary, the second daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall.[47] In 1767-1771 David Crotty held Straw Hall from where he sold mature oak trees and young trees for planting.[48]

Charlotte, the youngest daughter of John Carey of Straw Hall, near Fermoy, married John Mansergh as his second wife. John Mansergh was the eldest son of Nicholas Mansergh of Grenane, Co. Tipperary by his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John Carden of Templemore. Charlotte and John had one son, Robert Mansergh, who died without issue in May 1871[49]

Langer Carey

Langer Carey was a son of Peter Carey, gent of Cork and was born in 1799. He was educated by Mr. Hincks and in January 1818 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin. In 1821 he graduated with a B.A. and in the summer of 1824 he got a M.A. and a M.B.[50] After graduation Langer Carey became a physician and surgeon, operating at Newport in Co. Tipperary. In 1828 he married Margaret Hunter of Dublin.[51] Langer Carey died on 16th August 1866 at Newport, Tipperary.[52] His will (valued under £4,000) was proved on 7th September 1866 by his wife Margaret Carey of Churchfield, Newport.[53]

On 7th July 1864 his daughter, Margaret Anna (born 1835) married Francis George Fosbery of Blennerville, Co. Kerry. Francis Fosbery died 1897 and Margaret Anna died 30th December 1917 leaving issue, a daughter and a son. In 1897 the son, George Francis Fosbery married Vivian de Burgh Lewis and was the father of four sons who in turn left living descendants.[54]

Langer Carey of Garrynoe

In December 1846 Langer Carey got £45 for drainage works on 9 acres at Ballyrice so as to provide work relief for the starving people in the Great Famine.[55] In about 1850 Langer Carey (or Langworth Carey as he is recorded in Griffith’s Valuation) owned Garrynoe townland (169 acres) in Clondulane parish. Langer Carey died on 31st March 1876 at Garrynoe leaving a will valued under £600 and which was proved 27th June 1876 by his wife Mary Anne Carey and Richard Carey, farmer of Garrynoe.[56]

Rev. Richard Carey

Rev. Richard Carey was the son of John Carey of Careysville. He was born about 1740 and was a prebendary of Donoughmore and Kiltegan in the diocese of Lismore. In 1787 Rev. Richard Carey was involved in the Clonmel Free School.[57] His appointment was made by the Earl of Mountcashell (a neighbour of the Careys at Careysville and the mayor of Clonmel). In 1809 a report said that the school was in a poor state of repair and that there were no boarders and that the attending students went to another school in the town to received their actual education.[58] In 1820 Rev. Richard Carey was still master of the Lismore Diocesan School. Rev. Richard Carey also acted as an assistant curate for Rev. Daniel Sullivan at Rathronan parish.[59]

In April 1791 Rev. Richard Carey was made a freeman of Cork city with about fifteen other people.[60] In June 1810 Rev. Richard Carey was elected bailiff of Clonmel town by the Corporation along with John Howell under the new mayor, John Croker.[61] He died in 1821 and was buried in Kiltegan graveyard. Rev. Richard Carey married Jane, daughter of Robert Bell, surgeon of Cork city and had at least three sons two of whom entered the church, Rev. Langer Carey and Rev. Robert Carey.[62] Rev. Richard Carey had at least two daughters, Ann married (1769) Humphrey Croly and Elizabeth married (1763) John Peddar.[63]

Rev. Richard Carey had at least one daughter, Martha (died 1876), who in 1836 married Francis Boxwel of Butlerstown, Co. Wexford, son of John Boxwell of same place. Francis and Martha Boxwell had three sons and three daughters.[64]

Rev. Langer Carey

Rev. Langer Carey was born near Clonmel as the eldest son of Rev. Richard Carey. In March 1806 Langer Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, and in the spring of 1810 graduated with a B.A.[65] In 1820 Rev. Langer Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Garret Wall in the parish of Dromkeen in the Diocese of Emly.[66] Rev. Langer Carey got married and had at least one son, Richard Garret Carey. Rev. Langer Carey died in 1830 and was buried in Marlfield church near Clonmel.[67]

Richard Garret Carey

Richard Garret Carey was the son of Rev. Langer Carey. Richard Carey was born about 1814 and in October 1830 entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1835 he graduated with a B.A.[68] In about 1850 Richard Garret Carey lived at Glen Abbey on the south side of the River Suir, near Clonmel. The property of 83 acres was known locally as ‘Carey’s Castle’.[69]

Rev. Robert Carey

Rev. Robert Carey was born about 1794 as a younger son of Rev. Richard Carey. In January 1811 Robert Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin, where in the spring of 1815 he graduated with a B.A.[70] In 1818 he was made a priest at Cork.[71] In 1820 Rev. Robert Carey acted as assistant curate for Rev. Thomas Crawford in the parish of Derrygarth.[72] In about 1850 Rev. Robert Carey was rector of Kiltegan parish near Clonmel and held a number of properties in Clonmel and also at Donoughmore.[73]

John Peter Carey

John Peter Carey was the fourth son of Rev. Richard Carey and Anne Bell. He was born on 17th March 1809.[74] He was educated by Mr. Bell and entered Trinity College Dublin in July 1824 where in spring 1829 he graduated with a B.A.[75] In 1831 he entered the Middle Temple.[76]

Peter Carey of Careysville

Peter Carey was the eldest son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. In 1793 he married Elizabeth Keily (died 1801) by whom he had children and married secondly to Sarah Moore who died in 1839 without issue. Peter Carey was living at Careysville in 1814 and died in 1823.[77]

 

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Careysville by the River Blackwater – home to good fishing

Peter Carey

Peter Carey was born about 1793 as the son of Peter Carey of Careysville. He was educated by Mr. Carey and in January 1814 Peter Carey junior entered Trinity College, Dublin.[78] In 1831 he married Anne Clarke.[79] Peter Carey was originally living in Clondulane House in 1844 and 1856 but later moved into Fermoy. He died on 25th August 1863 and his will (valued under £800) was proved on 8th October 1863 by his son, Peter Wellington Carey of Fermoy.[80]

Rev. Richard Carey

Richard Carey was another son of Peter and Anne Carey of Careysville. He took holy orders and was made a deacon in 1818 and a priest at Cloyne in 1819.[81] He later served as was a vicar in Skibbereen. About 1835 he married Elizabeth, daughter of John Labarte and was the father of Richard Carey.[82] Many years before, on 1st June 1789 John Labarte of Cork city had married Miss Crowley of Cork city at Careysville, the home of Peter Carey, esq.[83]

Richard Carey

Richard Carey son of Rev. Richard Carey was born in 1838 and was educated at Fermoy College. He became manager of the Munster and Leinster Bank at Skibbereen. In 1866 Ricard Carey married Kathleen Hill, daughter of William Hill. Richard Carey was the father of six sons Langer, William, Henry, Sidney, Arthur, and Edward.[84] Richard Carey was also the father of two daughters, Kathleen and Ethel (or Elizabeth and Sarah as another source has it).[85]

William Carey of Ballymacmoy

On 11th September 1819 William Carey of Ballymacmoy got a gaming licence for the year 1819 along with other local landowners from north-east Cork. On 17th September 1827, Margaret Theresa, eldest daughter of William Carey of Ballymacmoy died.[86] It is not clear this William Carey was one of the sons of Richard Carey of Skibbereen or a different person unconnected to the family.

 

f9d926d87c83ab2717fdd5aab7782275

Careysville

Edward Keily Carey of Careysville

Edward Keily Carey was the son of Peter Carey of Careysville and was born about 1801, the year of his mother’s death. In January 1818 Edward Carey entered Trinity College, Dublin where in Easter 1821 he graduated with a B.A.[87]

On 1st September 1821 Edward Keily Carey married Elizabeth Margaret (died 13th September 1881), eldest daughter of William Cooke-Collis of Castle Cooke, by his wife Elizabeth de Courcy, daughter of Maurice Uniacke Atkin of Leadington, Co. Cork. Elizabeth’s sister, Jane married her cousin Rev. Jasper Grant, rector of Castlehyde and member of the Grant family of Kilmurry.[88] Rev. Jasper Grant was the son of Rev. Alexander Grant, vicar of Clondulane, third son of Thomas Grant of Kilmurry by his wife Elizabeth Campion. In 1792 Rev. Alexander Grant had married Ann, second daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[89] William Cooke-Collis was the eldest son of Rev. Zachery Cooke-Collis and nephew of that William Collis who married Jane, daughter of Peter Carey of Careysville.[90]

In 1823 Edward Keily Carey inherited Careysville according to his father’s will.[91] It seems that in the 1820’s or early 1830’s Edward Keily Carey remodelled Careysville house as Samuel Lewis in 1837 described it as a ‘handsome modern mansion’ lately built by Edward.[92]

In about 1850 the estate of Edward Keily Carey was recorded in Griffith’s Valuation. In Clondulane parish (barony of Condons and Clangibbon) he had Ballinveelig (147ac 0r 22p), Bawnnaclogh (81ac 2r 16p), Careysville (291ac 0r 19p), Carrigatoortane (170ac held jointly with Stephen Moore and George Lukey), Clondulane South (1ac 0r 3p), Curragh Lower (120ac 3r 11p), and Curragh Upper (312ac 3r 18p). In Macroney parish Edward Carey held Billeragh West (810ac 1r 10p) while Billeragh East (held in 1666 by Peter Carey) was owned by the Earl of Kingston, Crinnaghtane (236ac 3r 33p), and Curraghanolomer (367ac 3r 35p). Thus in about 1850 the total estate amounted to about 2,430 acres.

In June 1859 Edward Keily Carey sold 388 acres in the Estates court. By the 1870s the estate of Edward Keily Carey amounted to 1,670 acres.[93]

The big event in the middle years of Edward’s life was the Great Famine which killed many people and bankrupted many an estate. On 15th October 1845 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law Union meeting to discuss the growing problem with potato blight. Captain Carey said that the potato crop in the parish of Macroney was seriously affected and beyond remedy.[94] On 22nd October 1845 the Guardians of the Poor Law meet for their weekly meeting at which it was reported that a few people had already died in the workhouse and the Union was under financial pressure to cope.[95]

As the situation developed it was difficult to maintain the social and property barriers of previous times. On 7th November 1845 Edward Keily Carey summoned Mick Leahy, kiln labourer at Clondulane Mills, for the audacity to enter his field and quench his thirst in a spring. At the Fermoy petty sessions, Leahy was fined one shilling and one shilling 2 pence in costs.[96]

On 13th April 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended the Fermoy Presentment session where a number of local road works were approved. At the Poor Law meeting of 13th May 1846, attended by Edward Carey, the members discussed building a new fever hospital to cope with the increasing famine which was further discussed on 17th June 1846.[97] In late June 1846 Edward Carey gave £5 to the Glanworth relief fund.[98]

The labouring class were particularly affected by the famine as they relied on the produce of their small gardens attached to their poor cottages. On 20th August 1846 Edward Carey was the chairman of the Fermoy petty sessions before which a good number of labourers were charged with not providing work service in lieu of rent payments under the Parliament Act of 43 George 3, C86. The labourers wanted cash for their work so they could buy food as their potato crops had failed. Chairman Carey agreed with four of the seven magistrates to dismiss the cases and not send the labourers to prison due to the exceptional nature of the times.[99]

To help provide work for the starving people a number of work schemes were organised. In December 1846 Edward Carey got £221 for drainage works on 45 acres at Curragh and Careysville.[100] On 18th August 1847 Edward Carey attended the Fermoy Poor Law meeting where a big discussion occurred over the striking of a rate upon property owners to fund the Union’s famine relief works. A minority, led by the Earl of Mountcashell, were for asking the government to fund the Union rather than local taxation. Edward Carey supported the majority who were for setting a rate and asking the government for reimbursement afterwards.  The Union was under pressure to do so or the government would take over the Union and charge the local landlords an additional £800 to £1,000 to administrate the Union.[101] In the event the Union struck as a rate and continued in business under stressful times. In 1850 Edward Keily Carey was an ex-officio member of the Fermoy Poor Law Union with other local landlords.[102] By then the worst of the Great Famine had passed and life was beginning to return to normal but the undercurrent of society had changed utterly and the days of the landlord were on the countdown to termination.

Today (2017) the Careysville estate is well known as an important fishery location on the River Blackwater with visitors coming there from near and far, the famous and the not so famous. Back in the 1840s, during the height of the Great Famine, Careysville was still an important fishery location. On 2nd July 1846 Edward Keily Carey attended a meeting in Fermoy to ask parliament to extend the angling fishery season by one month and to ask for restrictions on net fishing as the salmon were not getting upriver in the same numbers as previously.[103]

In 1867 Edward Keily Carey was asked to judge on the attack by a mob on the daughter of the Bridewell jail in Fermoy. A local man, John McCarthy, had been arrested for involvement in the Fenian movement and was detained in the Bridewell, now known as Kneller Villas. When the warden came to take McCarthy out for exercise, he was locked in the cell and McCarthy attempted to make good his escape. But the warden’s daughter raised the alarm and McCarthy in panic dropped the jail keys and returned to his cell. For her troubles a mob attacked the girl the following Sunday. Ten days later Magistrate Carey and other local landlords had the mob up before the Fermoy petty sessions but decided to leave them off with a caution.[104]

On 4th February 1874 Margaret Anna, the second daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey, married her near neighbour, Thomas St. John Grant (born September 1852) of Kilmurry, eldest son of Thomas St. John Grant by his wife Eliza, youngest daughter of Rev. Thomas Hoare by his wife Mary, daughter of Henry Lloyd of Lloydsboro, Co. Tipperary. Thomas and Jane Grant had two sons.[105]

Edward Keily Carey died on 18th December 1876 and his wife Margaret died in 1881. Later a memorial tablet was erected to their memory in Christ Church, Fermoy, by their daughter, Elizabeth Montgomery.[106] The will of Edward Keily Carey (valued under £3,000) was proved on 6th March 1877 by Rev. Maurice Cooke Collis and Rev. Jasper Alexander Grant.[107]

George Montgomery of Killee and Careysville

In 1866 George Montgomery of Killee House, near Mitchelstown, married Elizabeth Jane, eldest daughter and co-heir of Edward Keily Carey of Careysville. George Montgomery (born 12th July 1843 – died 4th September 1910) was the eldest son of Rev. William Quin Montgomery of Killee and Alice, daughter of Rev. P. Sleeman of Devon, and grandson of George Montgomery of Killee and Mary Quin of Loloher, Cahir, Co. Tipperary. George’s grandfather, Hugh Montgomery, fought under William III in Ireland and Hugh was the grandson of Rev. James Montgomery from Scotland who first settled in Co. Down in the early seventeenth century.[108]

Killee was first granted in 1699 to Colonel Francis De la Rue and his wife Elizabeth Howard and inherited by their son, Wriothesley De la Rue. In the early eighteenth century Wriothesley devised all his Irish estate to his half-brother, George Montgomery (son of Hugh Montgomery and Elizabeth Howard by her second marriage). This George died in 1778 and his third son, George Montgomery inherited Killee and married Mary Quin, as above.[109]

George and Elizabeth Montgomery had four sons and two daughters. The eldest son, William Montgomery inherited Killee while the second son, Edward Hugh Montgomery inherited Careysville.[110]

Edward Hugh Montgomery of Careysville

Edward Hugh Montgomery was born on 10th November 1871 and attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he qualified as a medical doctor. On 12th July 1894 he married Lilla, daughter of W. Perrott and in March 1896 they had a son, Edward Henry Montgomery.[111]

After the Second World War Careysville was sold to the Duke of Devonshire whose descendants still own the property ending nearly three hundred years of Carey association.

 

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[5] Caulfield, R., The Council Book of the Corporation of Youghal: From 1610 to 1659, from 1666 to 1687, and From 1690 to 1800 (Guildford, 1878), p. lvi

[6] Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), pp. 235, 623, 642

[7] Casey, A.E. & O’Dowling, T. (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter and Upper Blackwater (15 vols. Wisconsin, 1964), vol. 11, p. 932; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 236

[8] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 933; Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661(Dublin, 2002), p. 235

[9] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 11, p. 934

[10] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[11] White, Col. J.G., Historical and Topographical notes, Etc. on Buttevant, Castletownroche, Doneraile, Mallow and Places in their Vicinity (Cork, 1905), vol. 1, pp. 36, 40

[12] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[13] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 746, 747

[14] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[15] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 721

[16] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[17] Burtchaell, G.D. & Sadleir, T.U. (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses: A Register of the Students, Graduates, Professors and Provosts of Trinity College in the University of Dublin, 1593-1860 (Bristol, 2001), vol. 1, p. 133

[18] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[19] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 627

[20] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 643

[21] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 493

[22] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[23] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[24] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 75

[25] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 14, p. 633

[26] O’Byrne, E. (ed.), The Convert Rolls (Dublin, 2005), no. 998; Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 174

[27] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804

[28] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[29] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133; Keane, E., Phair, P. Beryl & Sadlier, T.U. (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 (Dublin, 1982), p. 74

[30] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[31] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 804; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 96

[32] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 747

[33] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[34] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1607

[35] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 824, 826

[36] Eustace, P. Beryl (ed.), Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Abstracts of wills, Vol. II, 1746-1785 (Dublin, 1954), no. 42

[37] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[38] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[39] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2111

[40] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1437

[41] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[42] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 15, p. 2523

[43] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 259

[44] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[45] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[46] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[47] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 143

[48] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1359, 1383

[49] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 782, 783, 784

[50] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[51] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[52] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[53] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014887/005014887_00035.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[54] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[55] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[56] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014892/005014892_00056.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[57] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[58] Reports from the commissioners of the board of education in Ireland, 1813-14, pp. 279, 280

[59] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register: Containing the Names of the Prelates, Dignitaries and Parochial Clergy in Ireland (Dublin, 1820), pp. 90, 93

[60] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 2124

[61] http://nickreddan.net/newspaper/np_abst13.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[62] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017; http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[63] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[64] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 159

[65] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[66] Erck, J.C., The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 78

[67] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[68] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[69] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[70] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[71] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[72] Erck, The Ecclesiastical Register in Ireland, p. 93

[73] http://www.careyroots.com/careyirish.html accessed on 3rd September 2017

[74] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867, p. 74

[75] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[76] Keane, Phair, & Sadlier (eds.), King’s Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867 , p. 74

[77] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[78] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

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[80] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014885/005014885_00249.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017; Hajba, Houses of Cork, Vol. 1: North, p. 119

[81] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 910

[82] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[83] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, p. 1422

[84] Pike, W.T., ‘Contemporary Biographies’, in Hodges, R.J. (ed.), Cork and Cork County in the Twentieth Century (Brighton, 1911), p. 176

[85] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[86] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 7, pp. 1583, 1610

[87] Burtchaell & Sadleir (eds.), Alumni Dublinenses, vol. 1, p. 133

[88] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[89] Casey & O’Dowling (eds.), OKief, Coshe Many, Slieve Loughter, vol. 6, p. 819

[90] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 260

[91] http://fosbery.tripod.com/CareyFamily.htm accessed on 3rd September 2017

[92] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[93] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/estate-show.jsp?id=2922 accessed on 3rd September 2017

[94] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 7’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[95] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 8’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[96] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 11’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[97] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 33 and 37, and 42’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[98] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 43’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[99] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 51’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[100] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 68’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[101] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 103’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[102] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 106

[103] Barry, T.A., ‘The Famine, part 44’, a weekly series published in The Avondhu newspaper

[104] Power, B., Fermoy on the Blackwater (Mitchelstown, 2009), p. 210

[105] Burke’s Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1899, p. 176

[106] http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/cork/photos/tombstones/1headstones/fermoy-mem.txt accessed on 3rd September 2017

[107] http://www.willcalendars.nationalarchives.ie/reels/cwa/005014893/005014893_00061.pdf accessed on 4th September 2017

[108] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, pp. 485, 486

[109] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 485

[110] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

[111] Burke’s Landed Gentry, Ireland, 1912, p. 486

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Gloucester History, Oxford History

William Tyndale: a brief account

William Tyndale: a brief account

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

Introduction

In the first half of the sixteenth century the Protestant version of Christianity was born on continental Europe and spread across the northern countries in particular. The spread of the Protestant faith across England was aided by many in and out of government and by the conversion of the gentlemen of the shires with their tenants following their master. But in all these efforts the work of William Tyndale in translating the Bible into English made the growth of Protestantism possible in England. Without Tyndale it is very possible that only a small number of people in England would have become Protestant.

Although the spread of Protestantism across Northern Europe reached the shores of Ireland, very few people converted from Roman Catholicism. It was only the later arrival of English and Scottish settlers between 1560 and 1660 that increased the Protestant population in Ireland.

William Tyndale

William Tyndale was born about 1484-1496 in Melksham Court, Stinchcombe, a village near Dursley, Gloucestershire. The Tyndale family had migrated to Gloucestershire at some point in the 15th century and sometimes went by the name of Hychyns (Hitchins), and it was as William Hychyns that Tyndale was enrolled at Magdalen College School, Oxford.[1] In 1522 Thomas Tyndale lived at Stinchcombe while William Tyndale was recorded as clerk of Breadstone near Stinchcombe, where he had lands worth £10 and goods worth £16.[2]

In about 1521 William Tyndale came to Sodbury, in Gloucestershire, to provide religious instruction and education for the children of Sir John Walsh.

Sodbury, Gloucestershire, about 1500

The three places of Sodbury, i.e., Chipping Sodbury, Old Sodbury and Little Sodbury lie about the summit of a hill called Old Sodbury. Upon this hill is an old Roman fort from which the area takes its name. The name of Chipping Sodbury translates as ‘market place of Sodbury’ and the market was here established in the time of Henry III. Sodbury lies some four miles east of Yate which latter place is ten miles north-east of Bristol.[3]

At the start of the reign of Henry VII the manor of Little Sodbury was in the possession of Robert Foster and the Foster family.[4]

Sodbury comes to Sir John Walsh

Elizabeth Foster, heir to Little Sodbury, married Sir John Walsh of Olveston in the first year of Henry VII (1485-6) and thus the manor of Little Sodbury passed to Sir John Walsh.[5]

John and Elizabeth Walsh were succeeded by their son, Sir John Walsh in 1504. Little is known of this gentleman. It would appear that he was a champion of Henry VIII and in fulfilment of the office was given a knighthood. Sir John Walsh had previously married Ann Poyntz of Iron Acton, daughter of Anthony, Earl Rivers.[6] In the military survey of Gloucestershire in 1522 Sir John Walsh was lord of Little Sodbury with lands worth £12 and goods worth £100.[7]

The house of Sir John Walsh at Sodbury was frequented by his neighbouring gentry along with abbots and priors from the surrounding religious houses. Listening to their conversation and often joining in to it was a chaplain of the Walsh household, William Tyndale. Although much of the later manor house at Sodbury was built early in the reign of Henry VIII, the older portions of the house as much as Tyndale would have known it if the later partition walls were removed. It is said that in the great hall of Little Sodbury William Tyndale first resolved to translate the Scriptures into English.[8]

 

William_Tyndale

William Tyndale

Tyndale dreams to translate the Bible into English

William Tyndale’s views on theology, such as denouncing the practice of praying to the saints for intercessions, and the need to translate the Scriptures into English must have caused some unsettling in the household. It was William Tyndale’s wish that “If God spared his life; he would cause a boy that driveth the plough to know more of the Scripture than a priest”.[9]

In 1522 William Tyndale was brought before the chancellor of the Diocese of Worcester, John Bell, but the charges against him were dropped. Yet if Lady Walsh and the many visiting abbots and priors were against the views of Tyndale, the countryside around Sodbury was somewhat prepared ground to hear what he had to say. In 1375 Richard II had appointed a person called John Wycliffe to be rector of Aust which belonged to the College of Westbury-on-Trim. As a prebendary in the College, John Wycliffe would have often met John Trevisa. Though, not a great follower of the proto-Reformer, John Trevisa was of the same mind as Wycliffe. Trevisa had previously translated a sermon preached at Oxford in 1337 by FitzRalph, Archbishop of Armagh, for which translation he was denounced.[10]

But if the plough boys of Gloucestershire were pleased and favourable to Tyndale the authorities of church and state were not. The attempts by Wycliffe and Tyndale to translate the Bible were the latest in a long series of attempts since the seventh century. But whereas in Europe a number of different translations were successfully made into various vernacular languages, in England there was no success. The violent attack upon Wycliffe and his followers was a strong signal to others that the English church wished to keep all Scripture knowledge to itself via the Latin language. The Church feared that if the people knew what was written in the Bible, the people would demand more freedom and even question why people needed any church authority when the people could directly speak to Jesus through their own copy of the Bible.

Opposition to Tyndale and the move to Europe

In 1523 William Tyndale went to London to seek permission to translate the Bible which was refused. Even though he did not get permission, even to ask for same placed Tyndale’s life in serious circumstances. In this climate of control William Tyndale was forced to leave Little Sodbury and indeed to leave England. In 1525 William Tyndale completed the translation of the New Testament at Wittenberg and this, in 1526, was printed at Worms. Copies of the book began to pour into England and Scotland where the church authorities burn copies and intimidated booksellers into not selling the banned book. In 1529 William Tyndale was declared a heretic.[11]

In 1530 William Tyndale did not help his cause when he declared opposition to the planned divorce by Henry VIII of Catherine of Aragon in favour of Ann Boleyn on the grounds that it was against Scripture. Henry VIII was furious and ordered the arrest of Tyndale but Emperor Charles V refused extradition on lack of evidence.

Capture and death of Tyndale

In 1535 Tyndale was betrayed and taken prisoner to the castle of Vilvoorde, near Brussels. In that same summer of 1535 Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn visited Little Sodbury on their royal progress. Sir John Walsh welcomed his royal master but both knew that William Tyndale was once in that great hall where the king feasted.[12] In 1536 William Tyndale was charged for heresy and burnt at the stake about September 1536. How satisfied Henry VIII was that his main enemy was out of the way.

Within four years Henry VIII reversed his policy of opposition and had four English translations of the Bible made, including his own official Great Bible version. All four versions were principally based on the translation from the Greek and Hebrew done by Tyndale.[13] The later King James Bible, so called Authorised Version, which book did so much to spread the Protestant version of Christianity and the spread of the English language, was based heavily upon the translations of William Tyndale.

 

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[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tyndale accessed on 26 December 2014

[2] R.W. Hoyle (ed.), The military survey of Gloucestershire, 1522, p. 146

[3] W. St. Clair Baddeley, Place-names of Gloucestershire (John Bellows, Gloucester, 1913), pp. 42, 143, 169;  John Taylor, ‘William Tyndale and Little Sodbury manor house’, in the Bristol Times and Mirror, 11th August 1883

[4] http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~walsh/sodbury.html accessed on 20th August 2017

[5] http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~walsh/sodbury.html accessed on 20th August 2017

[6] John Taylor, ‘William Tyndale and Little Sodbury manor house’, in the Bristol Times and Mirror, 11th August 1883

[7] R.W. Hoyle (ed.), The military survey of Gloucestershire, 1522 (Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, Vol. 6, 1993), p. 4

[8] John Taylor, ‘William Tyndale and Little Sodbury manor house’, in the Bristol Times and Mirror, 11th August 1883

[9] John Taylor, ‘William Tyndale and Little Sodbury manor house’, in the Bristol Times and Mirror, 11th August 1883

[10] John Taylor, ‘William Tyndale and Little Sodbury manor house’, in the Bristol Times and Mirror, 11th August 1883

[11] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tyndale accessed on 26 December 2014

[12] http://onthetudortrail.com/Blog/anne-boleyn-places/palaces-and-houses/little-sodbury-manor/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[13] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tyndale accessed on 26 December 2014

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India History, Military History, Waterford history

George Sheaffe Montizambert: From Canada to Lismore and Pakistan

George Sheaffe Montizambert:

From Canada to Lismore and Pakistan

 

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

 

On 4th July 1846 George Sheaffe Montizambert, a major in the army, married Jane Vaughan Cotton, daughter of Rev. Henry Cotton, dean of Lismore Cathedral.[1] Two years later Major Montizambert was killed in the assault of the city of Multan, in modern-day Pakistan and a memorial was erected in Lismore cathedral to his memory. This article follows the long journey of this British soldier from the heights of Quebec to India, Afghanistan, Ireland and Pakistan.

 

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Montizambert memorial in Lismore Cathedral

Birth and family

George Sheaffe Montizambert was born on 7th December 1812 in Quebec City in Lower Canada.[2] He was the son of Louis Montizambert (born 8th October 1775 at Chambly, Quebec and died 18th August 1834 at Quebec) and Sarah Minot Taylor Montizambert (1777 – 1862).[3] Louis Montizambert was Acting Clerk of His Majesty’s Executive Council.[4]

George Sheaffe Montizambert had two older brothers, Charles Nathaniel Montizambert (1810 – 1885) and Edward Lewis Montizambert (1811 – 1882).[5] Charles Montizambert married Helen Bell and was the father of two daughters and five sons.[6] Edward Montizambert married Lucy Bowen and was the father of one daughter and four sons.[7]

In was interesting times in 1812 for a French Canadian to be born. Canada was then part of the British Empire which in 1812 was fighting a long war against the France of Napoleon Bonaparte. The British were at the same time fighting a war with the new United States of America in what is known as the War of 1812. This war saw a number of battles in Canada.

After growing up in Quebec, George Sheaffe Montizambert moved to Montreal.[8]

Army career in the 1830s

At the age of nineteen George Sheaffe Montizambert left civilian life and joined the British army. On 11th April 1831 George Sheaffe Montizambert joined the 41st (Welsh) Regiment of Foot as an ensign. The 41st Regiment was the only British regiment in Canada at the start of the War of 1812. A good number of members of the Regiment retired to Canada after the War and their stories may have influence young George Montizambert to join that particular regiment.[9] At the start of the 1830s the 41st Regiment was based in India and it was in that country of a thousand languages that George Sheaffe Montizambert spent the most eventful years of his military career. On 11th January 1833 he was promoted to Lieutenant. In 1840 Lt. George Sheaffe Montizambert was serving with the 41st (Welsh) Regiment of Foot, under the command of Colonel Sir Ralph Darling, in the East Indies with nine years of full pay service completed.[10]

Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42

In 1839 the British invaded Afghanistan to prevent Russian expansion into central Asia. The action generated a violent reaction from Afghan tribes and began the First Anglo-Afghan War. The British had early victories and on 7th August 1839 Sir John Keane of Cappoquin led the successful capture of Cabul (in 1840 created Baron Keane of Ghuznee and Cappoquin). The popular leader of Afghanistan (Dost Mohammad) was removed and a rival (Shah Shuja) put in his place. In 1840 and 1841 the country was still unsettled with engagements by both sides. In November 1841 the Afghans launch a series of major attacks on the scattered British positions across the country in support of Dost Mohammad.[11] By January 1842 the situation in Cabul was untenable and a force of 26,000 soldiers, camp-followers, women and children left Cabul for India. Along the way they were incessantly attacked with the end result of a total defeat of a British army in the Khyber Pass and the death of men, women and children.[12] To reclaim military honour and not to be seen to be bettered by native soldiers, in March 1842 the British launched a large scale invasion of Afghanistan. The five companies of the 41st Regiment of Foot was part of this force.

Invasion of Afghanistan 1842

Early in the advance, about the 28th March 1842, Lieutenant George Sheaffe Montizambert saw action the village of Hykulzye beyond the Bolan Pass when the British were suddenly attacked and had to retreat with Captain May of the 41st among the dead. The British halted their retreat at Quettah where on 26th April Brigadier England (Lt. Colonel of the 41st) went on the attack and reached Kandahar by 10th May. But at that stage Lord Ellenborough, the Governor-General, fearful of another slaughter like on the retreat from Cabul, ordered a retreat.[13]

 

khyber-pass1

The Khyber Pass

By early July Lord Ellenborough had changed his mind again and now ordered an advance into Afghanistan under General Nott. At the start of August Brigadier Edwards of the 41st was sent forward with five regiments and twelve cannon to secure the Bolan Pass. Lieutenant Montizambert was with this force. By 30th August the army was at Ghoaine where General Nott gave battle. The confident Afghans were defeated and their leader, Shumshoodeen fled to Ghuznee. On 5th September Lt. Montizambert and General Nott were before Ghuznee. As engineers of the 16th Bengal Infantry reconnoitred the fortress the Afghans attacked but were eventually driven back inside Ghuznee. During nightfall the Afghans fired shot into the British camp. On the morning of 6th September as the British prepared to attack Ghuznee, it was found that during the night the Afghans had left. Lt. Montizambert and others occupied the famous fortress which was destroyed after removing the gate of Somnauth.[14]

On 7th September General Nott left Ghuznee to advance on Cabul which was taken on 15th September 1842. Lt. Montizambert was part of the advance and was involved in the occupation and destruction of that fortress. But the war was not over, as the Afghans regrouped in Kohistan. A force under General McCaskill was sent towards Kohistan with Lt. Montizambert. The fortress of Istaliff was home to the treasure and families of the Afghan forces. On 29th September the British stormed the fortress which was later destroyed.[15] On that same day of 29th September Lt. George Sheaffe Montizambert was made a Captain.[16] The promotion was possibly because of George’s abilities or the death of other officers in the attack – bit of both reasons maybe.

With the taking of Istaliff and Charikur the Afghans surrendered and the war was over apart from a few minor engagements between the Bolan Pass and the Khyber Pass in which Captain George Sheaffe Montizambert was involved.[17] A puppet king was installed in Cabul and the British withdrew back across the Indus River to India.

41st Regiment back in Britain

After the slaughter and killings of the Afghan War the 41st Regiment took leave of India and returned to England in 1843. In 1844 the Regiment was stationed in Canterbury. Yet the battle honours of Kandahar Ghuznee and Cahool were added to the Regimental battle flag.[18] By the start of 1845 the 41st Regiment had returned to Wales and was stationed in Brecon.[19] On 23rd September 1845 he was promoted to the rank of Major in the 41st Regiment of Foot.

41st Regiment in Ireland and marriage

In 1846 the 41st Regiment was stationed in Dublin with Colonel Sir Ralph Darling in command.[20] It was while in Ireland that George Sheaffe Montizambert met Jane Vaughan Cotton, daughter of Rev. Henry Cotton, dean of Lismore Cathedral. On 4th July 1846 George Sheaffe Montizambert got married to Jane Cotton.[21] Rev. Henry Cotton came from Buckinghamshire and was a noted cleric in the Church of Ireland and wrote a number of books on the church and religion. He was sub-librarian at the Bodleian from 1814 to 1822. Rev. Cotton died in 1879 and was buried at Lismore. His book collection now forms the core of the Cotton library in Lismore Cathedral.[22]

 

DSC05869

Lismore cathedral

Change of regiment and return to India

Yet the beauty of Jane Cotton and the River Blackwater about Lismore, so famed by poets and artists had no lasting attraction upon Major Montizambert. Instead the lure of the magic of India drew him back. By the start of 1847 Major George Sheaffe Montizambert left the 41st Regiment and had joined the 62nd (Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot as it journeyed to India. The 62nd Regiment was under the command of Colonel Sir John Foster Fitzgerald and was based in Bengal.[23]

At the beginning of 1848 Major George Sheaffe Montizambert had changed regiments again and was serving with the 10th (North Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot at Lahore under Colonel Sir Thomas McMahon. By then he had served seventeen years in the army on full pay.[24]

The Multan revolt and the Second Sikh War

By 1848 the city of Multan, in modern-day Pakistan, was part of the Sikh kingdom, for nearly thirty years was governed by a Hindu viceroy, Dewan Moolraj, who operated a very independent administration. The First Sikh War had taken much territory from the Sikh kingdom and led to the imposition of taxes by the British. When Dewan Moolraj was required by the British in Lahore to pay an increased tax assessment and along with revenues that were in arrears, Moolraj offered his son, so as to keep control over Multan. This was rejected and the British imposed a Sikh governor, Sardar Kahan Singh, with a British Political Agent called Lieutenant Patrick Vans Agnew.

On 18th April 1848, Vans Agnew arrived at Multan with another officer, Lieutenant William Anderson, and a small escort. At first Moolraj appeared to be cooperative by handing over the keys of the fortress, but Vans Agnew’s party was set upon by a mob and both officers were wounded, and were rescued by Sardar Kahan Singh. While they were recovering in a mosque outside the city, they were again set upon by a mob on 19th and both were murdered.

Moolraj presented Vans Agnew’s head to Sardar Kahan Singh, and told him to take it back to Lahore. The news of the killings spread over the Punjab, and large numbers of Sikh soldiers deserted the regiments and joined the rebels under of Moolraj.

Lieutenant Herbert Edwards possessed the only British force in the area and responded to the revolt at Multan even though the Commander-in-Chief of the British East India Company, Lord Gough, wanted to wait until the cold season when the ground was dry to transport the artillery and the hot summer weather was gone. In May and June Lt. Edwards achieved victories and defeats before settling in camp some distance from Multan.

 

Multan

Multan – city of the saints

The British attack on Multan and the death of Montizambert

On 24th July Major-General Whish started for Multan with over 8,000 troops, 32 cannon and 12 horse artillery guns. The Major George Sheaffe Montizambert and members of the 10th Regiment of Foot were amongst these troops. On 4th September 1848 General Whish came before Multan and ordered its surrender. But instead he was greeted by a single cannon shot. The siege of Multan began on the 7th September with firing a 1,000 yards. On the night of the 9th a British advance on the trenches before the city met with defeat. For the next two days both sides strengthen their defences. On 12th September General Whish launched an attack with two columns of British troops in the centre and native soldiers on the left flank. The attack was met with strong resistance. By the end of the day the British had advanced to within 800 yards of the city walls at a cost of 500 dead including Major George Sheaffe Montizambert.[25]

General Whish now had his artillery within range and expected a quick victory but on 14th September Shere Sing threw off his neutral approach and joined the Multan garrison. General Whish was now heavily outnumbered and lifted the siege. The siege was not renewed until 17th December 1848 with reinforcements under Brigadier Henry Dundas. On 30th December a chance shot blew up the garrison’s magazine but still the siege when on. The British targeted key areas of the city and on 2nd January 1849 breached the city walls. The British advanced into the city against fierce resistance but by 4th January had encircled the main Sikh forces of Dewan Moolraj in the citadel. On 12th January the Sikhs made a furious sortie but the encirclement remained. On the 8th and 21st sappers blew mines under the citadel walls and preparations were in place for a general assault but Dewan Moolraj saw the end result and surrendered and was banished overseas.[26] But by the time of the surrender of Multan the entire Sikh kingdom has risen up against the British. Fierce battles raged across the Punjab before the British colours were raised over Lahore on 29th March 1849 and the Punjab was annexed into the territory of the East India Company.[27]

The widow of Montizambert

It is not known if Jane Vaughan Cotton was with her husband in India at the time of his death. Certainly the brief marriage was cut short after just two years in a very foreign land to the greenery of the Blackwater valley. After six years of widowhood Jane Vaughan Cotton got married again in November 1854 to John William Gaisford of Dolly’s Grove, Co. Meath. John Gaisford was the second son of Rev. Thomas Gaisford, dean of Christ Church, Oxford, by Helen, second daughter of Rev. Robert Douglas, rector of Salwarpe, Worcestershire. Rev. Thomas Gaisford was Regius Professor of Greek at Oxford. The Gaisford family came from Bulkington in Wiltshire.[28] The clerical connections of her father, Rev. Henry Cotton, possibly arranged the marriage or the meeting of Jane and John.

Rev. Thomas Gaisford married secondly in 1832 to Jane Katherine Jenkyns and their first son was Thomas Gaisford married in 1859, as his second wife, Lady Emily St. Lawrence, eldest daughter of the 3rd Earl of Howth. In 1909 the eldest son of Thomas and Emily Gaisford, Julian Charles Gaisford, inherited Howth Castle on the death of the 4th and last Earl of Howth.[29]

The children of Jane Cotton

Meanwhile John William Gaisford died in 1889 while Jane Vaughan Cotton spent nearly fourteen years in her second widowhood before dying on 18th October 1903.[30] John Gaisford and Jane Cotton had five children of whom the eldest was Cecil Henry Gaisford. He joined the army and was 2nd Lieutenant in the 72nd Highlanders Regiment. In 1870 he got killed in another Afghanistan War.

Jane’s second son, Douglas John Gaisford, also joined the army and was a Captain in the South Wales Borders before became a Lt-Col in the Essex Imperial Yeomanry. In June 1892, Douglas married Elizabeth Glencairn (d 27 April 1926), daughter of General Sir Archibald Alison. Douglas Gaisford died in June 1940, leaving three children one of whom, John William Gaisford fought at Gallipoli in World War One where he was wounded.[31]

Jane Cotton’s third son, Algernon Richard Gaisford, also joined the army becoming a Lieutenant in Seaforth Highlanders and died in 1953.

Jane Cotton had two daughters by John Gaisford. The eldest, Helen Gaisford, married in 1882, to Robert Groves Sandeman who was the second son of Major-Gen Robert TurnbulI Sandeman of the Bengal Army. It was common for the second or subsequent children in Victorian England to join the army but for four of Jane’s five children to join the army or marry army people may be inspired by her brief marriage to George Sheaffe Montizambert whose life was the army.

 

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[1] Lismore Cathedral Registers marriages 1838-1869’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 248; Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1008

[2] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=120546233 accessed on 6 November 2016

[3] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=120546233 accessed on 6 November 2016

[4] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=112114787 accessed on 6 November 2016

[5] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=120546233 accessed on 6 November 2016

[6] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=119197641 accessed on 6 November 2016

[7] http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=112114787 accessed on 6 November 2016

[8] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1008

[9] http://www.fortyfirst.org/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[10] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1840, p. 192

[11] Trevelyan, G.M., British History in the 19th Century and After, 1782-1919 (London, 1946), p. 317

[12] Anon, ‘Afghanistan’, in The National Encyclopaedia (London, 1870), Vol. 1, p. 246

[13] Grant, J., Cassell’s Illustrated History of India (London, 1880), vol. II, pp. 124, 125

[14] Grant, Cassell’s Illustrated History of India, vol. II, pp. 128, 129

[15] Grant, Cassell’s Illustrated History of India, vol. II, pp. 130, 131, 34

[16] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1848, p. 161

[17] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1848, p. 161

[18] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1844, p. 192

[19] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1845, p. 192

[20] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1846, pp. 108, 192

[21] Lismore Cathedral Registers marriages 1838-1869’, in The Irish Genealogist, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 248

[22] https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Cotton,_Henry_(DNB00) accessed on 20th August 2017

[23] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1847, pp. 102, 214

[24] Hart’s Annual Army List, 1848, pp. 102, 161

[25] Grant, Cassell’s Illustrated History of India, vol. II, pp. 166, 167, 168

[26] Grant, Cassell’s Illustrated History of India, vol. II, pp. 170, 171

[27] Grant, Cassell’s Illustrated History of India, vol. II, pp. 172, 173, 178179

[28] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1008

[29] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1009

[30] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1008

[31] Burke’s Irish Family Records, 1976, p. 1008

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Waterford history

Mocollop at the turn of the Twentieth century

Mocollop at the turn of the Twentieth century

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

The townland of Mocollop is situated on the north bank of the River Blackwater in the civil parish of Lismore and Mocollop. The townland contains the ruins of a medieval castle, a nineteenth century Church of Ireland church (in ruins since 1960s) and Mocollop house, long the residence of the Drew family for near 200 years. In 1901 there were five inhabited houses in the townland, one uninhabited house and a school house.[1] In 1911 there were still five inhabited houses, one empty, a school house and the church was mentioned.[2] All the dwelling houses were owned by Henry William Drew.

DSC05253

 

view over Mocollop 

Mocollop House (house number one in 1901 & 1911)

In 1901 and 1911 Mocollop House was the residence of the Drew family, the local landlords for over 200 years. The family descended from an officer in the Irish army of Queen Elizabeth at the close of the sixteenth century. At the turn of the twentieth century Henry William Drew was the head of the family. Henry William Drew was born on 14th March 1848 at the height of the Great Famine. He was the only son of Henry Drew of Wynberg, South Africa, and his wife, Gertrude, daughter of a Mr. Albertyn and widow of a Mr. Williams.[3]

Henry Drew of Wynberg was the youngest and sixth son of Henry Drew of Mocollop and Amy, daughter of Higatt Boyd of Rosslare, Co. Wexford.[4] The eldest son of Henry and Amy Drew was called Francis (a popular name in the Drew family) and he succeeded to Mocollop Castle on the death of his father. Francis Drew married Anna Maria Ross and had a son and a daughter. The son, Francis, died unmarried in 1839 and thus his sister, Olivia Maria succeeded to Mocollop. Olivia Maria Drew married twice; first in 1841 to James Barry and following his death in 1881 she married George Edward Hillier. When Olivia Maria Drew died in 1884 she left no children by her two husbands.[5]

The succession to the Mocollop estate then reverted to the second son of Henry and Amy Drew, Tankerville Chamberlain Drew. Tankerville Drew had died on 15th June 1843, aged 48 years.[6] By his wife Jane, daughter of John Elmore, Tankerville Drew left two children; Francis and Helen.[7] The life of Francis Drew is not recorded and we don’t know when he died.

After the death of Francis and Helen the succession to Mocollop reverted to the third son of Henry and Amy Drew, John Drew and then to the fourth son, Samuel Drew and then to the fifth son, James Drew. By 1895 all these heirs had died without children and the succession passed to the sixth son, Henry Drew of Wynberg. But Henry Drew had died long before then in 1866 and thus Mocollop passed to his son, Henry William Drew.[8]

Henry William Drew was born in the Cape Colony according to the 1901 census. After some education in South Africa, Henry William Drew went to England where he qualified as a medical doctor in England. Henry William Drew then went to India where he served with the Indian Army. On 15th April 1873 he married Cherry Geraldine (also born in the Cape Colony), only daughter of Bolton S. Honeylorne. When the 1904 edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry was published the couple had six children.

These children were: Henry William Drew junior (born 26th January 1874), Francis Charles Drew (born 1st April 1875), Cecil Bolton Drew (born 12th September 1879), Desmond Drew (born 16th August 1886), Kathleen Maud Drew and Violet Mary Drew.[9] The 1911 census said that Henry William Drew and Cherry Geraldine had ten children of which five were still living. Elsewhere we learn that Cecil Bolton Drew died on 4th February 1905 at Beaufort West, South Africa. Cecil Drew must have returned to South Africa after his father inherited Mocollop. The other four deceased children possibly died early in South Africa. In the 1901 and 1911 census returns only the two daughters (Kathleen and Violet, both born in Cape Colony) of Henry William Drew and Cherry Geraldine were living with their parents at Mocollop.[10]

Servants at Mocollop House

When Henry William Drew came from South Africa in 1895 he brought with him three Zulu servants. In the 1901 census only two such servants are listed as living at Mocollop. These were Autie Drew, a female servant aged 15 and born in the Cape Colony, and Beu Bonoyd, a male servant aged 15 and born in Maleteland. Both servants were members of the Church of Ireland as were all members of the Drew family. In 1901 census also tells us that both servants could read and write. By the 1911 census this had changed and Autie Drew was listed as couldn’t read. Beu Bonoyd was not living at Mocollop in 1911 and his fate is as yet unknown.[11]

Two other servants were living in Mocollop House in 1901; Hannah Parsley and Mary Ann Sullivan, both Roman Catholics. Hannah Parsley was the cook and was aged 45 years. She was born in County Cork and could both read and write along with being able to speak Irish and English (the only member of the household to speak two languages). Hannah Parsley was also previously married but by 1901 was a widow. In 1911 Hannah Parsley was no longer at Mocollop and her job as cook was then performed by Autie Drew.

The other Irish servant of 1901 was Mary Ann Sullivan, a native of County Waterford and not married. Mary Ann Sullivan was listed as a general servant who could read and write. By 1911 Mary Ann Sullivan had left Mocollop.

In 1911 there were five servants living in Mocollop House. These were; Autie Drew, Bridget Flynn (domestic servant), Mary Latty (dairywoman), William Brown (domestic servant and house boy) and Patrick Healy (coachman).[12] In 1901 John O’Connor was the coachman but he had retired by 1911.

 

Mocollop_Castle__House__Ballyduff_Upper

Mocollop House c.1900

Structure of Mocollop House 1901 & 1911

In 1901 Mocollop House had five windows at the front of the house with twenty-four rooms within. Outside there were sixteen outbuildings.[13] By 1911 Mocollop House had fourteen windows at the front of the house and fourteen rooms within with fifteen outbuildings.[14] The 1901 return giving the purpose of each outbuilding has not survived but in 1911 these outbuildings were two stables, one coach house (inside the round tower of the medieval castle), one harness house, one dairy, two fowl houses, one boiling house and two barns along with one turf house, one laundry and three sheds.[15]

House number two in 1901 and 1911

In the 1901 and 1911 census returns there were four other dwelling houses in the townland of Mocollop. House number two in 1901 was occupied by the Bourke family with Johanna Bourke as head of the household. Johanna Bourke was aged 60 years and was a widow. She couldn’t read. Johanna Bourke listed her occupation as a housekeeper, possibly for her own house and also at Mocollop House. In 1901 she had not only to care for her own family but entertained two boarders.

These boarders were John Smith (married and aged 52) and John Davidson (unmarried and aged 27). Both were from Scotland and were temporary employed on the Mocollop estate was rabbit trappers.

The 1901 census records two sons and one daughter as living with Johanna Bourke, all three were unmarried. These children were George Bourke (aged 24), Johanna Bourke (aged 22) and Thomas Bourke (aged 20). Johanna Bourke had at least another daughter as the 1901 census records Johanna Daly, granddaughter, as in the house on census night.

In 1901 the Bourke house was described as having one window in the front elevation and three rooms within. By 1911 this had changed to two windows in front and only two rooms within. The number of outbuildings remained unchanged at two in both census returns.

House number three in 1901 and house number five in 1911

In 1901 and 1911 this house (with 2 windows in front and 3 rooms within) was occupied by John O’Connor with no outbuildings. In 1901, John O’Connor (aged 57, born Co. Cork) was the coachman for Mocollop House. He was married to Mary (aged 56, born Co. Waterford), a domestic servant. With them in the house in 1901 was their daughter Johanna (aged 24, born Co. Waterford).[16] Sadly in just over two years Johanna died (14th August 1903) and was buried in the nearby Mocollop graveyard. By 1911 John O’Connor was 74 years old and a retired coachman. Also by 1911 John was a widower and was living alone.[17] The big increase in his age was experience by many people between 1901 and 1911 as they tried to be old enough to qualify for the Old Age pension which was introduced in 1910.

House number four in 1901 and house number three in 1911

In 1901 this house (with 2 windows in front and 2 rooms within) was occupied by Patrick Enright. The Enright family had four outbuildings in 1901 and six outbuildings in 1911. These 1911 outbuildings were one each of a stable, piggery, fowl house, potato house, shed and the all-important forge.[18] In 1850 Patrick Keane operated a forge on the site and there was possibly a forge there for many decades before that.[19]

In 1901 Patrick Enright (aged 55, born Co. Cork) worked as a blacksmith along with his son, James Enright (aged 32, born Co. Cork) who was also a blacksmith. The third person in the 1901 household was Patrick’s wife, Mary Enright (aged 65, born Co. Cork) who could not read whereas her husband and son could both read and write.[20]

By 1911 James Enright was head of the household and was married seven year to Bridget Enright (aged 31, born Co. Waterford). They had five children, Richard, Daniel, James and Ellen. There was one child missing on the census night. One person who was not missing was Patrick Enright. By 1911 he was still working as a blacksmith and now 72 years old, another person like John O’Connor who had aged rapidly in the previous decade – must be something in the Mocollop air.[21]

It is also of note that the wider Enright family had the occupation of a blacksmith or engineer in their blood. In the 1911 census for Co. Cork there was Michael and Danial Enright as blacksmiths at Ringaskiddy with Thomas Enright as a boiler maker, while another Thomas and James Enright were blacksmiths at Shanbally, with a third Thomas Enright as a railway engine fitter in Cork city. Also in County Cork were Danial and Patrick Enright who were both blacksmiths at Ardra while John Enright was a fitter in a Cork city foundary.

House number five in 1901 and house number four in 1911

In 1901 this house was occupied by William O’Brien (aged 59, born Co. Cork), land steward, with his wife, Mary (aged 49, born Co. Clare) and their daughter, Mary (aged 23, born Co. Waterford).[22] In 1901 the house had three windows on the front elevation with four rooms within and two outbuildings outside.

By 1911 William O’Brien was a widower while still working as a land steward. His daughter Mary O’Brien was still living in the house.[23] The O’Brien house in 1911 still had three windows at the front and four rooms within but now had only one outbuilding, a piggery.[24]

End of one era and beginning of another

On 16th October 1918 Cherry Geraldine Drew died. On 7th June 1925 Henry William Drew died. It is said that he was buried with his gun and his dog. By that time the world around Mocollop House was changing fast. The southern counties of Ireland had broken away from the United Kingdom to form the Irish Free State. Closer to home the ancient landed estate of the Drew family was gradually passing into the ownership of the tenant farmers.[25] Over the next few decades of the twentieth century the Drew family left Mocollop, the Enright forge closed down, the nearby church went into ruins but a new Mocollop house stands at the dawn of a new century to continue the story of a rural townland forever changing.

 

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[1] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226478/ accessed 11th November 2014

[2] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488428/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[3] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[4] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[5] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[6] Grave stone inscription, Mocollop graveyard

[7] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[8] Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 24, p. 6; Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[9] Burke’s Landed Gentry, 1904, p. 159

[10] Census of Ireland, 1901 and 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[11] Census of Ireland, 1901 and 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[12] Census of Ireland 1911, Drew, Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[13] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226478/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[14] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488428/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[15] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[16] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226481/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[17] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488440/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[18] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[19] Griffith’s Valuation, Mocollop, parish of Lismore & Mocollop, Co. Waterford

[20] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226482/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[21] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488436/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[22] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001226483/ accessed on 11th November 2014

[23] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488438/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[24] http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003488430/ accessed on 20th August 2017

[25] http://www.dippam.ac.uk/eppi/documents/22658/page/638873 accessed on 20th August 2017

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